ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Tell All Book: “Side Effects: Death”: by Former Lilly Exec

Paragraphs two & three read:  “Many of the
horrific school, workplace and mass shootings that have plagued parts of the
world over the years
may not have occurred if the pharmaceutical
industry had been completely honest about the side effects of psychotropic
medication, according to the new book Side Effects: Death – Confessions of a
Pharma Insider
by former executive director of the Swedish Branch of Eli

Lilly & Company John Virapen.”

“Virapen claims that
anti-depressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors
(SSRIs
) were known to have suicidal and homicidal side effects, even during
clinical trials.
Thanks to spin marketing and paid, positive articles in
scientific journals, he points out, the adverse reactions were often ignored or
given little thought by prescribing physicians and patients.”

http://www.prlog.org/10514103-what-big-pharma-knows-sideeffectsdeath.html

What Big Pharma Knows – “Side Effects: Death

Former pharmaceutical executive director reveals industry
secrets

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
PR Log (Press
Release)
Feb 01, 2010 – P.O. Box 9949, College Station, TX.
77842 • Phone/Fax: 877-376-4955
http://www.virtualbookworm.cominfo@virtualbookworm.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Virtualbookworm.com Publishing Inc.

877-376-4955
reviews@virtualbookworm.com

What Big Pharma
Knows – “Side Effects: Death

Many of the horrific school, workplace and
mass shootings that have plagued parts of the world over the years may not have
occurred if the pharmaceutical industry had been completely honest about the
side effects of psychotropic medication, according to the new book Side Effects:

Death – Confessions of a Pharma Insider by former executive director of the
Swedish Branch of Eli Lilly & Company John Virapen.

Virapen claims
that anti-depressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were
known to have suicidal and homicidal side effects, even during clinical trials.
Thanks to spin marketing and paid, positive articles in scientific journals, he
points out, the adverse reactions were often ignored or given little thought by

prescribing physicians and patients.

Virapen also asserts the
pharmaceutical industry has engaged in bribery and other major forms of
corruption to gain approval for and in the marketing of many drugs used to treat
such conditions as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD),
schizophrenia, arthritis, pain, diabetes and many others. The industry also
“makes up” illnesses to enhance sales and market shares, he says.

To
boost sales, Virapen writes, large pharmaceutical corporations spend about
$35,000–$40,000 per year and per practicing doctor to persuade them to prescribe
their products. In addition to covering or “massaging” the negative effects of
drugs, many of the companies engage in “off-label marketing,” which encourages
physicians to prescribe the medicines for conditions for which they haven’t been
approved, Virapen reveals.

Born in British Guyana, John Virapen went
from a door-to-door conman to a pop star, to a pharmaceutical representative to
executive director of one of the largest drug companies in the world. He admits
to participating in bribery, false information and deception to help launch and
market some of the most popularly prescribed (and most dangerous) drugs. In an
effort to exorcise his demons and expose the tactics and dangers of the
pharmaceutical industry, he wrote this expose.

The book has been
published in four languages around the world and is a best-seller in Europe.

Side Effects: Death – Confessions of a Pharma Insider is available in
softcover (ISBN 978-1-60264-516-5) and e-book (ISBN 978-1-60264-517-2) hardcover
from Virtualbookworm.com, Amazon.com, and Barnesandnoble.com. This book can also
be ordered from most bookstores around the United States and United Kingdom.
More information can be found at the book’s official website, www.sideeffectsdeath.com.



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ANTIDEPRESSANT: 14 Year Old Girl Kills 3 Year Old: Canada

Paragraph 15 reads:  “But fetal alcohol syndrome,
attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, disruptive, hostile and threatening
behaviour ­ behaviour that escalated before her period and required
anti-depressant and anti-anxiety medication to quell ­
and functioning at the level of a child half the girl‘s age didn’t faze
Hamilton.”

http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/ArticleDisplay.aspx?e=2367695

Inquest opens into boy’s killing

Posted By TIFFANY MAYER Standard Staff

The three-yearold boy signed the word across the dinner table to the daughter of
his Welland foster mom.

He did it to show he understood the young
woman’s message to him ­ also said with sign language to quiet the talkative
tot ­ that the 14yearold girl joining them at the table, who arrived that
mid-December day in 2005 to stay with them, was a friend.

The next
morning, foster mom Margaret Hamilton found the gregarious boy lying on his
bedroom floor, cold and grey.

He had been smothered by his friend, a
Crown ward in the care of Family and Children’s Services Niagara, who confessed
her crime in a note left near the boy’s body and calmly brushed her freshly
washed hair in her bedroom as Hamilton and her daughter frantically called for
help.

The girl, who cannot be identified, was given a seven-year

sentence in November 2007 for second-degree murder.

On Monday, during
the first day of a coroner’s inquest that will examine the events surrounding
the tragedy, Hamilton relived the events leading to the Dec. 15, 2005 death of
the boy, who was in the care of the Haldimand-Norfolk Children’s Aid Society.

Due to a publication ban, the boy can’t be named.

The inquest,
presided over by Dr. James Edwards, is being held at the Quality Hotel Parkway
Convention Centre on Ontario Street. It is expected to take three weeks.

A five-person jury will hear from about 30 witnesses, including police,
a forensic pathologist, social workers, educators who worked with the girl,
foster families and, possibly, the perpetrator herself.

At the end of
the proceedings, the jury can choose to make recommendations that can be used to
prevent similar deaths in the future.

The circumstances surrounding the death “cry out for some kind of
examination,” coroner counsel Eric Siebenmorgen said.

As she answered
Siebenmorgen’s questions, Hamilton talked about the notes she took when she got
the call that FACS Niagara would like to make use of a bed in her Welland home.
It was a bed that she decided to reserve for the agency after moving to Niagara
from neighbouring Haldimand County a year earlier.

She had been a foster
parent with Haldimand-Norfolk CAS for more than four years when the 14yearold

girl, who had recently been raped and was arrested for stealing a van, would be
coming to stay with her.

The list of issues plaguing the teen was long
and troublesome to anyone unfamiliar with caring for foster children,
Siebenmorgen noted.

But fetal alcohol syndrome, attention deficit
hyperactivity disorder, disruptive, hostile and threatening behaviour ­
behaviour that escalated before her period and required anti-depressant and
anti-anxiety medication to quell ­ and functioning at the level of a child
half the girl‘s age didn’t faze Hamilton.

“I fostered a lot of teenage
girls, a lot of runners, and almost always seemed to have good rapport with
them,” she said.

What she did question, though, was how the girl was
with young children, Hamilton told the inquest.

The boy, who had
recently been returned to Hamilton’s home after time with his biological mother,
had been roughed up by an eight-yearold girl who had stayed briefly with
Hamilton a couple weeks earlier.

“I wanted him to get settled and feel
comfortable,” Hamilton said. “I didn’t want anything upsetting him …. The
response to that was, ‘No, she likes little kids.’ ”

But looking back,
as Siebenmorgen asked her to do, Hamilton said she felt the half-hour that the

girl‘s caseworker spent at her home when dropping off the teen seemed short and
rushed.

That evening, as dinner was eaten, TV was watched and everyone
called it a night, nothing seemed out of the ordinary, until she went to rouse
the boy the next morning and get him ready for a pre-school Christmas party.

In hindsight, Hamilton said she would have liked to have seen some of
the notes in the girl‘s file with FACS, written between 2000 and 2003, before
agreeing to accept her. The teen was the first foster child from FACS Niagara
that Hamilton welcomed into her home.

Two incidents in particular
concerned Hamilton: a report of the girl allegedly putting another child’s head
through a window and another accusation of her pushing a child down stairs.

“I believe if I had those notes, I wouldn’t have chosen to have someone
with that background in the home, just because there was a small child in my
home,” Hamilton said.

The inquest continues Tuesday with
cross-examination by counsel for the boy’s biological family.
Article ID#
2367695

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PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
so.
__________________________________
Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
were the answer.
‘They made it seem like my world was falling
apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
take drugs, and
I didn’t want to, but they made me think
I really needed it. So I took them’.”

“She said that after a

few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
into a wall.’
She said that according to her doctor, these were
all symptoms of her depression, but
she thinks it was
the drugs.”

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
in cases of mild or moderate depression.

Depressing truth about antidepressants

by Tina
Amirkiai

Jan 27, 2010

If you are one of the millions of people taking
antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
placebo.

A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
severe acute depressions.”

Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

“The biological or physical
symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
“They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

Researchers used a
severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

Researchers concluded
that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
over placebo is substantial.”

Dobransky and other critics maintain that
the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
antidepressants.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
products to the general public.

Dobransky said a big part of the problem
is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
fixes like that do not exist.

“Each case needs to be set in its proper
place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

She said that
after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
thinks it was the drugs.

“I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

A spokesman for
GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
“the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
results.”

If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
Dashed line

©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
University.  A publication of the Medill
School
.

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LEXAPRO: Murder: Defense of Involuntary Intoxication: Louisiana

First two paragraphs read:  “A Baton Rouge man is not
criminally responsible for the murder of his ex-fiancée and attempted murder of
one of her neighbors in 2008 because he was involuntarily intoxicated at the
time,
one of his attorneys told a jury Wednesday.”

Defense lawyer
Tommy Damico argued in his opening statement that Frederick Dominique Reed
Jr. had a violent reaction to the prescribed anti-depressant

Lexapro, which he began taking in early August
2008.”

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/82864837.html?showAll=y&c=y

Murder trial defense: Intoxication

  • By JOE GYAN JR.
  • Advocate staff writer
  • Published: Jan 28, 2010 – Page: 2B

A Baton Rouge man is not
criminally responsible for the murder of his ex-fiancée and attempted murder of

one of her neighbors in 2008 because he was involuntarily intoxicated at the
time, one of his attorneys told a jury Wednesday.

Defense lawyer Tommy
Damico argued in his opening statement that Frederick Dominique Reed Jr. had a
violent reaction to the prescribed anti-depressant Lexapro, which he began
taking in early August 2008.

But a prosecutor countered that Reed was
“very calculated’’ in hunting down Mia Reid and shooting her at her
Scotlandville apartment while she slept next to her 10-year-old daughter on Aug.
23, 2008.

Assistant District Attorney Melissa Morvant also noted in her
opening statement that Reid’s request for a temporary restraining order against
Reed was denied Aug. 12, 2008, and that a hearing on a permanent protective
order was to be held Aug. 26, 2008.

East Baton Rouge Parish sheriff’s
deputies arrested Reed on a count of domestic abuse battery in March 2008, but
Reid dropped the complaint, her temporary restraining order petition
stated.

At the end of July 2008, Reid and her daughter moved out of an
apartment near Siegen Lane that they shared with Reed to a new apartment in
north Baton Rouge, friends and relatives have said.

Reed, 39, is charged
with second-degree murder in the killing of Reid, 31, and attempted
second-degree murder in the wounding of Richard Kuti.

A second-degree

murder conviction carries a mandatory sentence of life in prison.

State
District Judge Tony Marabella is presiding over the trial, which will resume
today.

Morvant told jurors that Reed first entered apartment 23 at the
Ashley Oak complex on Rosenwald Road and shot Kuti three times while he slept,
then went to apartment 33 and shot Reid.

“While Mia Reid is sleeping on
an air mattress with her 10-year-old daughter, he shoots her twice,’’ Morvant
said.

Later, as authorities closed in on him on Villa Drive, Reed tried
to commit suicide by shooting himself in the chest, she said.

Kuti and
his roommate, Courvasier Jones, testified they did not know Reed or Reid. Jones
said he heard shots and Reed appeared in his room asking for Reid. He said he
told Reed that he did not know Reid or where she was, and Reed
left.

“When I was wrapping up his (Kuti’s) arm with an Ace bandage, I
heard more shots,’’ Jones testified.

Meghan Green, who said Reid was her
best friend, testified she raced to Reid’s apartment complex after Reid’s
daughter called her.

“When (she) jumped into my arms, she had Mia’s
bloody cell phone,’’ Green testified.

Damico asked the jury to “keep an
open mind’’ and not have an “emotional or gut reaction’’ to the tragic events
that he argued were “not the legal fault’’ of his client.

“This is not a
case about who did it or how it was done,’’ he said. “It is about why it
happened and what caused it.’’

Damico added that Reed’s involuntary

intoxication was the “direct cause’’ of the shootings.

“The drug did not
interact with Frederick Reed as it was prescribed to do,’’ he said. “Some people
are affected in very dangerous ways.’’

“But for the involuntary
intoxication, Frederick Reed would not have committed these acts,’’ he
added.

Louisiana law says an offender is exempt from criminal
responsibility if intoxication is involuntary and the circumstances indicate the
condition was the direct cause of the commission of the
crime.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Father Kills Wife, 2 Small Children & Self: UT

Paragraphs 22 and 23 read:  “Natasha Matern said her
father was distraught over the separation. Last week, he checked
himself into LDS Hospital for depression and remained there a few
days,
Natasha Matern said. When he left, the hospital prescribed
an anti-depressant,
she said.”

“Both Natasha Matern and
Merkley said they had never known Justin Matern to be violent.
Natasha Matern said her father had a concealed carry permit because the family
used to live in what they thought was a dangerous neighborhood in Salt Lake
City.”

http://www.sltrib.com/News/ci_14034390

Money problems put stress on couples, and Justin and Melissa Matern were
one of those couples.

Melissa Matern was constantly trying to find rent
and grocery money, one of her former co-workers said Saturday. Justin Matern’s
daughter said he pawned pool cues and his wife asked him to sell more.

Even Justin Matern’s final text message to his surviving family
discussed money.

“My dad’s never been a horrible guy,” said Natasha
Matern. “He just snapped.”

Justin Matern on Thursday shot and killed his
wife, Melissa, then murdered their sons, 6-year-old Gabriel and 4-year-old
Raiden. Matern, 36, then killed himself.

The killings occurred at the
West Jordan apartment Melissa Matern and the boys moved to after leaving her
husband. Justin Matern left a note at work discussing his plans and sent text
messages after the killings.

Natasha Matern, a 16-year-old daughter from
one of Justin Matern’s previous relationships, said her father sent his sister a
text message saying he killed them and he was next. The text also said his
sister could expect a check to pay for the funerals, Natasha Matern said. It was
unclear whether Justin Matern was discussing an insurance policy or something
else.

“Nobody knew what he was going to do,” said Natasha Matern.
“Everybody was shocked. A lot of people even talked to him that day or the day
before and he was laughing.”

Melissa Matern told Jennifer Geneile
Merkley, one of her former co-workers, there were problems in the marriage.
Merkley said Melissa complained her husband was not home often enough to help
with parenting and chores.

Instead, Justin Matern would hang out with
his friends and stay away from home, Merkley said. Meanwhile, Melissa, a
certified nurse’s assistant, worked two jobs and a total of 60 to 70 hours a
week, Merkley said.

Merkley, who worked with Melissa at Woodland Park
Care Center in Salt Lake City, said Melissa would leave the third shift there to
go to work at another nursing home.

“She was constantly trying to put
together rent money or grocery money,” Merkley said.

Justin Matern
“wasn’t the greatest of men,” Merkley said. “He didn’t put his family ahead of
anything else.”

Court records show the state placed a tax lien against
Justin and Melissa Matern in 2004 and again in 2008. In 2006, a judge issued a
$700 judgement against the couple in a debt-collection case. Records show the
family had at least four addresses since 2003.

Natasha Matern said her

father also worked two jobs. He was a tattoo artist at a parlor in Salt Lake
City and also loaded freight for a shipping company. The shipping company
recently laid him off, she said.

Justin Marten was a good pool player
and collected cues, his daughter said. He pawned some of the cues to raise
money, and Natasha Matern wanted her husband to pawn his hunting bow, too, she
said.

“Even though she knew my dad didn’t have that much money, she
still tried to get him to pawn his own things,” she said.

Natasha Matern
lived with her father and stepmother for many years and watched her brothers for
several hours a day, the teenager said. Natasha Matern said she grew tired of
baby-sitting so much.

“I tried to talk to them about it,” she said, “but
they would tell me if I wanted stuff I would have to baby-sit so they could earn
money.”

A few months ago, the teenager moved in with her mother in
Ogden.

Merkley said Melissa Matern threatened to leave her husband
several times, but stayed. Merkley does not know what finally persuaded Melissa
Matern to leave.

Natasha Matern said her father was distraught over the
separation. Last week, he checked himself into LDS Hospital for depression and
remained there a few days, Natasha Matern said. When he left, the hospital
prescribed an anti-depressant, she said.

Both Natasha Matern and Merkley
said they had never known Justin Matern to be violent. Natasha Matern said her

father had a concealed carry permit because the family used to live in what they
thought was a dangerous neighborhood in Salt Lake City.

Merkley said
she’s angry at Justin Matern and her one comfort is her belief that anyone who
commits suicide “burns in Hell.”

“How could you look at your own flesh
and blood and pull the trigger on a 4-year-old?” Merkley said.

Natasha
Matern said she thinks her father decided to kill his wife and himself and
killed the boys because he did not want them to grow up in a foster home. She
does not believe the murders were justified, but understands what he was
thinking.

“I’m mad but there’s also nothing I can do,” she said.

ncarlisle@sltrib.com

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CELEXA: 18 Year Old High School Student Threatens Classmates:

Paragraph four reads:  “Camperlengo said in court that
she believes Crider has adjustment disorder, and that he reacted emotionally
after a stressful event.
Crider had been taking the
antidepressant Celexa on and off, Camperlengo testified, and he reported
side effects such as feeling “speeded up” that may have affected his
behavior.”

Paragraph nine reads:  ” ‘If there is a
misjudgment on the part of his psychiatrist,
there are lives that could be
taken,’ Lowe said in court.”

http://www2.dailyprogress.com/cdp/news/local/crime/article/school_threat_suspect_denied_bail/51435/

School threat suspect denied bail

By The
Daily Progress Staff

Published: January 25, 2010

An 18yearold
Western Albemarle High School student accused of threatening to kill four
students was denied bond this morning in Albemarle County General District
Court.

Patrick Dittmar Crider has been held in Albemarle-Charlottesville
Regional Jail on a charge of threatening to kill or harm someone on school

property in connection with threats made against fellow students on Facebook.
Dr. Vanessa Camperlengo, a psychiatrist specializing in children and
adolescents, testified today that she didn’t believe Crider was a threat to
himself or others.

According to court documents, someone believed to be
Crider had an online conversation Jan. 13 during which threats were made to kill
four specific students the following day. After the shootings, the person
intended to declare his love for a girl and shoot himself in the head, the
records state.

Camperlengo said in court that she believes Crider has
adjustment disorder, and that he reacted emotionally after a stressful event.
Crider had been taking the antidepressant Celexa on and off, Camperlengo
testified, and he reported side effects such as feeling “speeded up” that may
have affected his behavior.

When asked about the Facebook messages,
Camperlengo said Crider was in a specific state of mind.

“I see that as
an stirring excerpt from Patrick at the bottom of an emotional abyss, but that
is not where he lives,” Camperlengo testified.

Darby Lowe, deputy
commonwealth’s attorney, said in court that police had been called previously
when the same victims reported feeling threatened by Crider. That report came
Dec. 11.

Lowe argued that Crider shouldn’t be granted bond.

“If
there is a misjudgment on the part of his psychiatrist, there are lives that
could be taken,” Lowe said in court.

David B. Franzen, Crider’s attorney,
said in court that his client has no criminal record or history of violence.
Franzen argued that his client had a lot of support from family and friends and
could be supervised constantly.

“[He] made an immature judgment,” Franzen
said in court. “Whether or not that in fact was a crime has yet to be
determined.”

Crider is scheduled to have a preliminary hearing Feb.
18.

Read the full story in Tuesday’s Daily
Progress.

923 total views, 2 views today

SARAFEM (PROZAC) & ROBITUSSIN: Brittany Murphy Dies Suddenly: CA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy
(
www.drugawareness.org): Brittany
Murphy died from the use of multiple serotonergic medications – meds that
increase serotonin. She may have had pneumonia, but pneumonia does not kill that
quickly. There were clearly other contributing factors when death is so sudden
and without much warning.

When Heidi Connelly published her information on Fen-Phen and Redux causing
heart valve problems (something Brittany already suffered from) she found that
it was the elevated levels of serotonin produced by the Fen-Phen and Redux that
caused a gummy gooey glossy substance to build up on the heart valves and keep
them from shutting properly. So if Brittany‘s heart valve already did not shut
properly and you raise her serotonin levels with two serotonergic drugs – Prozac(Sarafem) and Robitussin you build the level of gummy gooey glossy substance on
that heart valve and you are in trouble.

But beyond that the increase in serotonin constricts muscle tissue
restricting air into the lungs, blood flow throughout the body, etc. – all the
major organs are constricted by elevated serotonin. When the serotonin level
gets too high (as it does when you mix two meds that increase it) you produce
death via multiple organ failure. This is what killed Daniel, Anna Nicole
Smith’s young son. It is called Serotonin Syndrome.
So, in Brittany‘s case I firmly believe that the elevated serotonin
produced by these drugs put the nail in her coffin.
Paragraph four reads:  “Investigators found prescription
medication for depression, seizures, anxiety and pain. Monjack told Lauer his
late wife used Vicoprofen and Sarafem during her menstrual
cycle. ‘”Most of the medications are mine. I suffer from seizures,’
Monjack declared. The screenwriter began to stutter and added,  ‘I suffer
from, you know, heart… my heart stopped on December 3rd when we landed from
Puerto Rico’.”
SSRI Stories note:  Sarafem is, molecule for
molecule, the same exact drug as Prozac.  It goes by a different name
because it is registered with the FDA for use in PMS.

http://extratv.warnerbros.com/2010/01/brittany_murphys_family_continues_to_deny_drug_rumors.php

Brittany
Murphy‘s Family Continues to Deny Drug Rumors

Posted on January 21, 2010Brittany Murphy‘s
husband and mother sat down with Matt Lauer on the “Today” show to
discuss the actress’ sudden death.

Murphy

died Dec. 20, and the cause of death is still unknown; toxicology
results
are expected in a few weeks.

“Let’s set the record straight
once and for all — Brittany was not taking any medication for her mood, for
anorexia,” Murphy‘s husband Simon Monjack said. “It’s utterly ridiculous
that these rumors have perpetuated.”

Investigators found prescription
medication for depression, seizures, anxiety and pain. Monjack told Lauer his
late wife used Vicoprofen and Sarafem during her menstrual cycle. “Most of the
medications are mine. I suffer from seizures,” Monjack declared. The
screenwriter began to stutter and added, “I suffer from, you know, heart… my
heart stopped on December 3rd when we landed from Puerto Rico.”

See

Brittany‘s life in photos

Murphy‘s mother Sharon began to
shake her head when Lauer asked about Brittany‘s rumored cocaine use. “It’s just
so horrific. She was diagnosed with a heart murmur when she was a young teenager
and she was terrified of anything happening to her. She never did any drugs,
ever.” Sharon replied.

The two also denied Brittany had any type of
eating disorder. “You just need to go to her favorite restaurant, Chateau
Marmont, and speak to any waiter, who would tell you that she would happily
order four plates of food and eat them all,” Monjack stated.

Monjack
also claims Murphy‘s role in “Happy Feet 2” was pulled and it broke her heart.
He explained, “Hollywood is a village and once you upset the villagers they talk
and they gossip and they rumor. They have blood on their hands, and I hope they
wash them with very hot water because of the way they treated Brittany Murphy

while she was alive.”

The grieving husband and mother have established The Brittany Murphy
Foundation
in her memory.

1,335 total views, 1 views today

LEXAPRO: Vehicular Manslaughter: No Alcohol: Idaho

Paragraph three freads:  “The prosecutor’s office
previously alleged Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol,
or was grossly negligent in causing Redfern’s death.
They alleged he had been involved in four crashes on that day, two prior
to the fatal crash and one immediately afterward.”

Paragraphs
seven and eight read:  Stevens failed two sobriety tests, court documents
allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police questioned him. He
reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant.
A
bottle of Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

“However, tests done on blood taken from Stevens after his arrest
came back negative for intoxicants [alcohol], according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.”

http://www.magicvalley.com/news/local/article_82226ad0-3e75-5e78-95fe-27073b884547.html

Stevens pleads guilty to vehicular manslaughter

By
Ariel Hansen – Times-News writer | Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am |
(0)
Comments

HAILEY ­ Nearly a year after Bert Redfern died in a
March 10 car crash on Idaho Highway 75 in Hailey, a Twin Falls man has pleaded
guilty to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter for the fatal crash.

Cody
Stevens, 29, of Twin Falls, had been charged with felony vehicular manslaughter.
On Tuesday, just weeks before his district court trial was set to begin, he
pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor, which carries a penalty of up to a year in
prison and a $2,000 fine.

The prosecutor’s office previously alleged
Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or was grossly
negligent in causing Redfern’s death. They alleged he had been involved in four
crashes on that day, two prior to the fatal crash and one immediately
afterward.

According to court documents, Stevens allegedly left his job
in Jerome after a 12-hour shift at 6 a.m. March 10, and drove north. In Lincoln
County, he was allegedly reported as a reckless driver after he got close enough
to “rub mirrors” with the reporting party at about 7:20 a.m. At about 9:45, he
allegedly hit a tree south of Bellevue, telling police he swerved to avoid a
deer.

After leaving his totaled truck in Bellevue and renting a truck in
Hailey, Stevens returned to a Bellevue body shop. He then headed toward Ketchum
when he allegedly caused the noon-time collision that resulted in Redfern’s
death. He then allegedly flipped his rental truck onto a curb in downtown
Hailey, where police took him into custody.

Stevens failed two sobriety
tests, court documents allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police
questioned him. He reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant. A bottle of
Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

Stevens was taken for blood testing at St. Luke’s Wood River
Regional Medical Center, and he was later taken back to the hospital after
becoming increasingly unresponsive and incoherent during police questioning,
according to court documents.

However, tests done on blood taken from
Stevens after his arrest came back negative for intoxicants, according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.

A civil case for wrongful death is pending against Stevens, filed by
Redfern’s widower, and Stevens’ plea to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter can
be used against him in that case.

The county case has been sent back to
the magistrate court, and a sentencing hearing has not yet been
scheduled.

Ariel Hansen may be reached at ahansen@magicvalley.com or
208-788-3475.

Posted in Local, Crime-and-courts

on Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am Updated: 10:57 pm.
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LEXAPRO: Caused Mania: Man Died After Being Pepper Sprayed 10 TIMES!: FL

Paragraphs 36 through 38 read:  “His doctors had
prescribed Lexapro
for his depression
and Joyce blames the
medication for his high and low mood swings. Patients on
Lexapro report mood
swings
and paranoia among a host of side effects, so it is advised patients
gradually withdraw from the drug.””

His
doctor had planned to take him off the drug,
but she says her husband’s
medical surveillance fell between the cracks when the doctor left to work
somewhere else.”

In the meantime, while in Ohio, Christie was planning to
paint the garage floor and take apart, clean, and re-assemble lawn furniture. He
had become more outgoing and talkative, she said. When he suddenly left
to go to Fort Myers to visit his brother, he went to a mall and opened
a department store account, things he hadn’t done
before.

Paragraphs ten trhough twelve from the end read:

“Christie ended up at a North Fort Myers hotel. He was initially arrested for
disorderly intoxication and causing a disturbance.
The
counter woman at Arby’s gave Nick a free coffee because she thought he had
Alzheimer’s disease.

Joyce says her husband couldn’t
remember her number, or his son’s.
Two days later on March 27, he was
arrested again for trespassing.

This time when officers took her husband
into custody, Joyce says they locked his medications in his truck and never
retrieved them.

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories note:
Amnesia is listed as a frequent side effect to
antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference. Alcohol cravings are also
known to be caused by antidepressants, as is mania and
violence.

http://www.injuryboard.com/national-news/peppersprayedman-dies-in-jail-what-happened-to-nick-christie-.aspx?googleid=277120

Federal Lawsuit
Pending

The widow of an Ohio man who died in police custody in Fort
Myers, Florida last March, will file a federal lawsuit for violating her
husband’s constitutional rights by failing to recognize that he was mentally
ill.

Joyce Christie, of Girard, Ohio, and her son, plan to file the
action against the Lee County Sheriff’s Office and Prison Health Services (PHS),
the private company that oversees medical care for the jail, which had taken
custody of Nicholas Christie for trespassing.

Her attorney, Nick DiCello
(IB member), of the Cleveland firm of Spangenberg, Shibley & Liber LLP, says
his firm has filed the notices required under Florida state law of an intention
to sue.

“Letters of intent to file a civil lawsuit for medical
malpractice, wrongful death, and civil rights violations, negligence, pain and
suffering have been sent,” he tells IB
News.

Christie, 62, was arrested last March after traveling from Ohio
to Fort Myers while suffering, what his widow describes as a mental breakdown
[manic reaction to medication]. Arrested twice for disorderly conduct and
trespassing, Nick Christie was pepper sprayed ten times over the course of his
43-hour custody.

Suffering from emphysema, COPD, back and heart problems,
the jail staff said his medical files were not available or immediately sought
at the time of his arrest. But DiCello says Christie gave his medical history
and list of medications to the jail days earlier during his first encounter with
law enforcement.

His medication list was found in the back pocket of his
pants when Christie’s personal effects were returned to his
widow.

What Happened To Nick
Christie?

Sometime between the time he was arrested on March 27, 2009
around 2:00 p.m., and March 31 at1:23 p.m. when he was pronounced dead, Christie
had been sprayed with ten blasts of pepper spray, also known as OC (Oleo-resin
Capsicum), which is a derivative of cayenne pepper.

The medical examiner
has ruled his death a homicide.

On January 6, the Lee County State
Attorney’s office mimicked a lengthy investigation by the Lee County Sheriff’s
Office, clearing the officers of any wrongdoing in the death.

Assistant
State Attorney Dean Plattner and Chief Investigator Kevin Smith found the
jailers did not break policy guidelines. A separate internal review of policy
was not conducted and the five corrections officers have remained on the
job.

“My blood is boiling,” Joyce Christie, 59, told the News-Press. “I knew it was going to end this way
because the corrections officers were never taken off their jobs during the
investigation.”

A Failure to
Indict

Assistant State Attorney Dean Plattner says in his memo that
in order to prove manslaughter, the office would have to prove someone showed a
“reckless disregard for human life” to the extent that they should have known it
would likely cause death or great bodily injury.

“The facts of the case
do not support this level of proof,” says the office.

Attorney DiCello
says he is shocked that the state attorney didn’t come to the conclusion there
was a crime.

“All he needs to come to a conclusion that there was
probable cause there was a crime. The local community should have been given the
opportunity to indict. They weren’t given that opportunity,” he
says.

DiCello says despite the state attorney’s conclusion, the federal
case has a different standard of review.

“They have to prove beyond a
reasonable doubt there was some type of criminal intent. We have to prove it
fell beneath the standard of care and these officers knew they were violating
this man’s constitutional rights.”

DiCello says strapping an obese,
62-year-old with a heart condition and COPD to a restraining chair, pepper

spraying him and not allowing him water to wash off should qualify.

“Case
law as a matter of law defines that conduct as a violation of constitutional
rights and affords it no protection under the law,” he says.

The standard
of care is established by the county and Prison Health Services, under contract
with Lee County for $9 million annually, one of 160 contracts PHS holds
nationwide.

Lee County, Sgt. David Valez, tells IB News the
company is NCCHC accredited and “they must maintain that high standard.” There
is no independent review by the county.

Under the contract, PHS is
responsible for conducting a medical evaluation of everyone coming into the
system.

Never Saw A Doctor

His jailers
say Nicholas Christie was combative, despite the fact that he was restrained in
a chair so he allegedly wouldn’t spit at his jailers.

But three inmates
who shared Christie’s cell block told the Fort Meyers News-Press that they thought the use
of pepper spray was excessive and that deputies ignored the victim’s pleas for
help.

“While he was sitting in the chair, they sprayed him two more
times,” said Ken Cutler. His whole head was turning purple and almost blue,” he
says, “He was gasping.”

The other inmates say the pepper spray was so
intense they were gagging in the cell block.

“He was constantly telling
them I can’t breathe and I got a heart condition,” he says.

Dr. Robert
Pfalzgraf, deputy chief medical examiner, concluded that stress caused by
restraint and pepper spray were irritants and stressors to his heart. He says
that 99 percent of the time those sprayed do not die. Christie was the 1
percent.

The medical examiner’s report indicates that the death was

caused by “hypoxic encephalopathy following resuscitation for cardiac arrest,
cardiac shock with congestive heart failure, physiologic stress following
restraint and noxious effects of oleoresin capsicum.”

A homicide does not
necessarily mean that the death was a criminal act only that it was caused by a
person or persons.

DiCello says take a look at Pepper Spray on YouTube videos to see it can down
someone for 40 minutes, even if it is washed off.

“You’ll see Marines
crying, now imagine being sprayed ten times, you’re obese, have COPD and having
a manic episode. Ten times and the last time not washed down for a half hour
strapped down so you can’t rub his eyes.”

Mental
Health Issues

Joyce Christie told IB News last June that her
husband had started showing signs of mania. He had recently retired and thought
he was going to go fishing, she said, but diverticulitis shut down his colon,
then he went into a depression after being hospitalized for COPD ( chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Christie had quit smoking years ago, but the former boilermaker worked
around asbestos and nuclear power plants, she says.

His doctors had
prescribed Lexapro for his depression and Joyce blames the
medication for his high and low mood swings. Patients on Lexapro report

mood
swings
and paranoia among a host of side effects, so it is advised patients
gradually withdraw from the drug.

His doctor had planned to take him off
the drug, but she says her husband’s medical surveillance fell between the
cracks when the doctor left to work somewhere else.

In the meantime,
while in Ohio, Christie was planning to paint the garage floor and take apart,
clean, and re-assemble lawn furniture. He had become more outgoing and
talkative, she said. When he suddenly left to go to Fort Myers to visit his
brother, he went to a mall and opened a department store account, things he
hadn’t done before.

Joyce Christie was so concerned she says she
contacted the Lee County Sheriff’s office and issue a welfare BOLO (Be On The
Lookout). Ms. Christie even had the sheriff of her home town contact Lee County
to stress the seriousness of her husband’s condition and the fact that he needed
to take his medication.

“He begged them to take Nick to the hospital.
They said he’s having a good time, he needs a few days away. All they had to do
was say ‘Let us talk to your doctor to confirm.’ They didn’t do it. Captain
Begowski told the officer, ‘If you don’t take him now, I’m going to tell you,
you’re going to be dealing with him in a couple of hours.’”

That forecast
proved true.

Christie ended up at a North Fort Myers hotel. He was
initially arrested for disorderly intoxication and causing a disturbance. The
counter woman at Arby’s gave Nick a free coffee because she thought he had
Alzheimer’s disease.

Joyce says her husband couldn’t remember her number,
or his son’s. Two days later on March 27, he was arrested again for
trespassing.

This time when officers took her husband into custody, Joyce
says they locked his medications in his truck and never retrieved
them.

Joyce frantically flew to Fort Myers March 28, but police would not
let her see Nick. She says they wouldn’t even tell him she was there. Finally,
an officer suggested she could bond him out of police custody.

When she
finally was allowed to see her husband it was too late.

He had been taken
by ambulance to Gulf Coast Hospital where Joyce says Nick’s eyes were taped shut
and he had 40 tubes taped to his body. Doctors told her he had a 10 percent
chance to live. The nurses told her when he was brought in naked that he had so
much pepper spray on him doctors had to change their gloves as they became
saturated with the orange spray.

No one in the sheriff’s office had
contacted her, and until he arrived at the hospital, Nick Christie had never
seen a doctor. Someone in the hospital, shocked by his condition, suggested she
contact an attorney.

“Nick had a life he was somebody my husband, a
father to my son. He’s somebody I miss very much. It shouldn’t have happened. He
should be here. Three weeks later I get his ashes back from Florida in a mail
truck. My husband, he was somebody, he wasn’t just a nobody,” Joyce Christie
says.

Attorney Nick DiCello says the state attorney’s report clearing the
officers will not hurt the federal case. The fact that Christie was sprayed at
least once after being restrained in a chair with a hood over his head violates
any qualified immunity defense the county and Prison Health Services may
claim.

Besides a violation of the law, DiCello is concerned about the
violation of another human being.

“Humanity has failed here. And now they
aren’t going to address the failure. Us as a people, we need to recognize we’ve
all failed and make it right, not ‘Let’s just move on from this failure.’ People
shouldn’t do this to people. Nothing could warrant the treatment and death this
guy experienced.

“A 62-yr-old retiree strapped to a chair and died. I
don’t get it.” #

902 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Father Takes 2 Daughters on Terror Ride: Massachusetts

Paragraph five reads:  “It was not immediately clear what
precipitated Thursday’s terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off
carpenter was taking antidepressants, has been having
medical and family issues, and had banged his head against the truck prior to
the incident.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100109/NEWS/1090332/-1/news

Freetown man held on bail for allegedly crashing truck with young
daughters inside

By Brian
Fraga
bfraga@s-t.com
January 09, 2010 12:00 AM

FALL RIVER ­ A
Freetown man ordered his two young daughters into his pickup truck and took them
on a terrifying ride around his property Thursday afternoon, crashing into
rocks, trees, a camper and a building, while the girls screamed and asked their

father if he was trying to kill them, according to authorities.

The 10-
and 12-year-old girls were cut by flying glass, and one girl’s head slammed
against a window, shattering the glass, authorities said. The ordeal ended when
the truck slammed into the camper and stalled, allowing the girls to escape and
run into their house, where they called 911, according to court
records.

The children were taken to St. Anne’s Hospital in Fall River and
treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

The girls’ father, Mark W.
Haskins, 39, of 24 Locust St., faces numerous criminal charges that include
assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, reckless operation of a motor
vehicle, malicious destruction of property and failing to have the girls wear
seat belts.

It was not immediately clear what precipitated Thursday’s
terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off carpenter was taking
antidepressants, has been having medical and family issues, and had banged his
head against the truck prior to the incident.

“He has little recollection
of what happened here,” said defense lawyer Donald Friar, who described the
episode as “an aberration.”

Haskins was arraigned on the charges Friday
in Fall River District Court and held on $10,000 cash bail. Friar had asked for
$500 bail, but Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Gonzalez cited concerns for
the children’s safety and noted that Haskins had originally fled from
police.

Haskins, who is the son of retired Freetown Fire Chief Wayne
Haskins, turned himself in to local police just before 11 a.m. Friday. On

Thursday, Freetown and Berkley police used dogs to scour the Freetown woods for
more than four hours, while a state police helicopter searched from the
air.

Haskins allegedly ran into the woods after he went inside his house
and apologized to his daughters, telling them he loved them and that it would be
the last time they saw him, court records said.

Police said the girls’
mother was reluctant to cooperate with officers.

When Freetown police
arrived just after 4:30 p.m., Thursday, they were met by Martha Haskins, who
allegedly cursed at the officers when they told her they were investigating the
incident.

Police said she told the officers, “We can smash our own things
if we want,” and, “It’s not a big deal. Nobody got killed.”

Martha
Haskins also reportedly resisted efforts to transport the girls to the
hospital.

Police said she also scolded her daughters for calling 911,
telling them: “I’m going to stay with your father because we’re married and you
two can go live with DSS. I don’t care.”

The Department of Children and
Families, formerly the Department of Social Services, was contacted and is
investigating. According to court records, a DCF case worker told police the
agency dealt with the family years ago when the couple reportedly abandoned a
son who was subsequently taken into DCF custody.

Alison Goodwin, a DCF
spokeswoman, said the girls are currently in the mother’s custody.

A
phone message left Friday at the Haskins’ residence was not
returned.

Freetown police interviewed the girls at the hospital Thursday.
They said their father ordered them into his truck, then began driving into
trees, rocks, a small building and a camper on the Locust Street property, court
records said.

When one girl tried to call for help on her cell phone,
Haskins ordered her to put it away. The girls said he pointed at objects right
before crashing into them. But when one girl asked him he if was trying to kill
them, Haskins said, “No, I’m not going to kill you.”

Police later secured
a search warrant and seized computer equipment connected to a surveillance
system on the property.

Haskins is scheduled to return to court Feb. 3.
Mooney ordered him to stay away from his daughters and to comply with any DCF
instructions.

557 total views, 1 views today