ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sleeping Pills: Death: 32 Year Old Woman Dies from a …

Paragraph two reads:  “Bolton Coroner’s Court heard that
Samantha Andrews, aged 32, of Harpford Close, Breightmet, died after taking drugs including
sleeping tablets, anti-depressants and
anti-hystamines.”

http://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/4776972.Depressed_woman_died_from_cocktail_of_drugs/

Depressed woman died from cocktail of drugs

11:00am
Friday 4th December 2009

A woman who was suffering from depression died
after taking a cocktail of prescription drugs, an inquest heard.

Bolton
Coroner’s Court heard that Samantha Andrews, aged 32, of Harpford Close, Breightmet,
died after taking drugs including sleeping tablets, anti-depressants and
anti-hystamines.

But Assistant Deputy Coroner Peter Watson said there
was insufficient evidence to prove that Miss Andrews committed suicide and
recorded an open verdict.

The inquest heard that Miss Andrews, who had
trained as a nurse, had previously twice taken overdoses but told doctors that
these were a cry for help.

She was found unconscious in her bed by her
partner, Philip Brockbank, on March 2 and taken for treatment at the Royal
Bolton Hospital, before being transferred to a hospital in Wigan where she died
on March 5.

The cause of death was brain death due to lack of oxygen,
caused by the overdose.

Mr Watson said: “She was still a young woman who
clearly had talent but had troubles in her life.”

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ZOLOFT & Geodon: Woman Assaults Another Woman on Golf Course: Drags her …

Paragraph 20 reads:  “Pearce told the psychologist she
had been doing well on a combination of Xanax, (for anxiety) Zoloft
(for depression)
and Geodon (for bipolar disorder and other
problems) but just before the golf cart incident she no longer could get

Geodon , the report states. The medication withdrawal produced agitation,
restlessness and anxiety, as well as depression and social avoidance,
the
report states.”

http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/EastVolusia/evlHEAD04112009.htm

Woman gets probation in golf-cart
attack

By FRANK FERNANDEZ
Staff Writer

BUNNELL — A woman who turned a golf cart into a weapon and
intentionally ran down and dragged another woman for about 15 yards was
sentenced Thursday to three years’ probation.

Pearce
Linda Lee
Pearce, 42, of Daytona Beach entered a plea of no contest to felony battery,
which could have sent her to prison for up to five years.

Circuit Judge
Kim C. Hammond withheld adjudication, meaning the decision won’t appear as a
conviction on Pearce’s record. Hammond also ordered Pearce not to have any
contact with the victim and to pay restitution of $6,299 at $175 per month, said
Chris Kelly, spokesman for the State Attorney’s Office.

The sentence was
part of a negotiated plea made in consultation with the victim, Kelly said.

Pearce, who told a psychologist she had anger problems, declined comment
when reached by phone Thursday.

“I’m not telling you (expletive
deleted),” Pearce said before hanging up.

Pearce was arrested in March
after deputies said she intentionally ran over Verna Boylan, 57, near horseshoe
pits behind the Roadhouse Bar near Flagler Beach, according to a report from the
Flagler County Sheriff’s Office.

Boylan was watching horseshoe games on
St. Patrick’s Day when Pearce, behind the wheel of the golf cart, spotted her.
Pearce told a passenger in the cart, “Oh, there’s the (expletive) . . . I’m
going to run her over, ” according to the report.

Boylan said in a phone
interview Thursday that she heard Pearce.

“I just looked over ’cause I
heard her say that and next thing I know I was already under (the cart),” Boylan
said.

She said she feared her life was over.

“I thought that was
it,” Boylan said. “My head is going under that tire and that’s the end of me.”

She heard people shouting at Pearce.

“I heard everybody
screaming ‘stop, stop, stop,’ but she wouldn’t stop,” Boylan said. “She went
faster.”

After the cart finally stopped, Pearce made her getaway in
another golf cart. Deputies later found Pearce “visibly intoxicated” at her
home, according to the report.

Boylan was left badly bruised and
emotionally battered.

“I couldn’t think,” she said Thursday. “I was
terrified. I still am. But they just told me she can’t come near me.”

Pearce told a psychologist in August she was angry at Boylan because she
had spray-painted Pearce’s girlfriend’s car, according to a psychological
evaluation in the court file.

Boylan denied Thursday, as she has done in
the past, that she had anything to do with spray-painting the car. Boylan said
she has never had a problem with the woman who owns the car and wouldn’t do
anything to her.

Pearce told the psychologist she had been doing well on

a combination of Xanax, (for anxiety) Zoloft (for depression) and Geodon (for
bipolar disorder and other problems) but just before the golf cart incident she
no longer could get Geodon, the report states. The medication withdrawal
produced agitation, restlessness and anxiety, as well as depression and social
avoidance, the report states.

Pearce admitted to having had two or three
beers before the incident, the report states.

frank.fernandez @news-jrnl.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 26 Year Old Man Assaults 16 Year Old Girl: Scotland

Paragraph 18 reads:  “He had attempted suicide by an
overdose and
was taking medication for
depression at the time of the offence.”

Paragraph 16
reads:  ” ‘Jim Stephenson, defending, told the High Court in Edinburgh
Smith wanted to apologise to the victim.  ‘He cannot believe he carried
out these acts,
‘  he said. ‘

http://news.scotsman.com/scotland/Rapist-such-a-risk-that.5886765.jp

Rapist such a risk that he’ll be under watch until he dies

Published Date: 05 December 2009
By JOHN ROBERTSON

A MAN who held a schoolgirl captive for seven hours and then raped her
was given a life sentence yesterday.


Ryan Smith, 26, snatched the teenager off the street and
kept her in his home overnight. She was allowed to leave after giving him a
kiss.

A judge was told that Smith, from Saughton, Edinburgh, had been
assessed as posing a “very high risk” to the public and to women in
particular.

He had earlier admitted abducting, assaulting and raping the
16yearold girl on 8 February.

The girl had never met Smith before, but
they had a mutual friend and she was in a group that was at his flat that night.

The men were drunk and there was a row between Smith and one of the
others in the street. The girl was walking away from the scene when she heard
Smith say: “You’re dead.”

He grabbed her by the neck and pushed her
against a hedge, and then dragged her into his flat.

Neil Beardmore,
prosecuting, said: “She was crying and trying to break free, but was unable to
do so. It was about midnight … there was no-one passing in the
street.”

Smith threw the girl on to a bed, and lay down beside her. He
put his hand over her mouth when someone came to the door, and then indecently
assaulted her.

She repeatedly told him to stop and hit him, but he bit
her on the arm.

“He would alternate between making threats and being
apologetic,” Mr Beardmore said.

“This continued throughout the night and
she considered trying to escape but was afraid of what the accused might do if
he caught her. She was continually in fear of her safety and her
life.”

At about 7am, Smith raped the girl, as she pleaded to go home and
was crying and shaking.

As he allowed her to leave, he told her she
would be “battered” and “killed” if she told the police.

The girl

revealed what had happened to a friend, and the police were contacted.

Mr Beardmore said she had suffered nightmares and now feared sleeping
alone or going out alone.

Jim Stephenson, defending, told the High Court
in Edinburgh Smith wanted to apologise to the victim. “He cannot believe he
carried out these acts,” he said.

The court heard Smith had an alcohol
dependency and had received treatment at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital.

He had attempted suicide by an overdose and was taking medication for
depression at the time of the offence.

His criminal record included
convictions for fireraising, and serious assault against a woman.

The
judge, Lord Brailsford, ordered that Smith must serve a minimum of seven years
before he could apply for parole.

He imposed an order for lifelong
restriction, and said Smith required treatment for underlying psychological
problems.

“An order for lifelong restriction is the only means the court
has of ensuring you will not be released until such time as the risk you pose
has been evaluated as being at an acceptable level,” Lord Brailsford
said.

If and when Smith is released, he will remain on licence for life
and be liable to be recalled to custody.

Page 1 of 1

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Two Children & Self: Ohio

Paragraph 12 reads:  ” ‘Daniel is in counseling and
on antidepressants,
the detective
wrote.”

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/12/05/murder-suicide_westerville_f.ART_ART_12-05-09_A1_3TFT8G8.html?sid=101

Were their deaths preventable?
As details of the Westerville

murdersuicide emerge, there are questions about what was known of the family,
when and by whom
Saturday,  December 5, 2009 3:10 AM
By
Theodore Decker, John Futty and Rita Price
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

CHRIS RUSSELL | Dispatch

A memorial for Nicole and Sarah
Dobson sits outside the home where they were killed by their father. The girls
met with a child-welfare worker, who asked if their dad had hurt them, three
weeks before they died.

Three weeks before their father killed them,
Nicole and Sarah Dobson met with a child-welfare worker who asked whether he had
hurt them.

“The girls denied that they were abused or maltreated,” said
Eric Fenner, executive director of Franklin County Children

Services.

With no physical evidence or statements supporting the
allegations that had been made in a referral, the caseworker saw no grounds to
remove the children from Daniel J. Dobson’s Westerville home, Fenner said
yesterday.

Police say Dobson, divorced this year from the children‘s
mother, Joyce, shot the girls and then himself Thursday in an upstairs bedroom
of the house at 813 Westray Dr., just west of Sunbury Road.

Now the
agency is left to wonder: Were the girls so scared that they lied? And if so,
did investigators, who had been called about the Dobsons twice before, do
everything they could to find the truth?

“A child who is afraid may not
say everything,” said Fenner, who had tears in his eyes as he talked about the
shooting deaths of Nicole, 15, and Sarah, 11. “What worries me is, ‘Did they
reach out to someone? Did they try?’  ”

In early 2008, both girls
reportedly said that, on a scale of 1 to 10, their fear of their father “was
close to 10,” according to the complaint Children Services supplied to
Westerville police.

The report indicated that Mr. Dobson sometimes hurt
the girls by tickling them and bruised them by squeezing them too hard, usually
while he was intoxicated. Sarah reportedly said she “wished she could hurt her

father so he doesn’t kill us.”

But Fenner said those comments came not
from a caseworker but from the person who referred the case to the agency, whose
identity is protected by law. He said those were the type of claims that the
agency was unable to confirm.

Police closed their investigation of the
2008 case as “unfounded” after the mother told them “this whole thing was blown
out of proportion and has been resolved,” a detective’s report
shows.

“Daniel is in counseling and on antidepressants,” the detective
wrote.

Fenner said the agency will investigate and review all its work in
the case. In addition to the recent allegation, he said caseworkers had received
referrals about the treatment of the children in October 2007 and February
2008.

In each case, no abuse was substantiated, although it was clear
that the mother and father had a volatile relationship, Fenner said. “Dad was
drinking; there was some domestic violence.” Franklin County records, however,
show that Dobson had never been charged criminally.

Fenner said the
most-recent complaint, that Dobson had slapped his older daughter on the leg,
came in to the agency on Nov. 2. The caseworker went to the house several times
before finally finding Mr. Dobson at home on Nov. 13.

The caseworker
notified Westerville police about the case, standard practice when a
physical-abuse allegation is made, officials said.

Lt. John Petrozzi said
a detective left a voice mail for Dobson Monday night. Dobson didn’t return the
call.

Petrozzi said information supplied by Children Services indicated
that a therapist alerted the agency about Nicole’s claim that her father slapped
her on the leg “because she wasn’t getting ready for school fast
enough.”

Handwritten notes that Dobson left before killing himself make
no mention of child-abuse allegations. He wrote various notes to his family, his
ex-wife, even his doctor, all on the same notepad. He thanked his family for
their love and support through the years and said there was nothing more they
could have done.

The letters expressed no anger toward his ex-wife, or
anyone else, and said that he had entertained suicidal thoughts for decades and
wanted to spare his daughters pain.

“There will be no more worries for
us,” he wrote.

“I could not stand to see Nicole and Sarah suffering and
could not leave them behind.”

He also left a note at the bottom of the
stairs.

“Joyce, do not come upstairs. Call the police.”

The
Dispatch
reviewed the notes at the Franklin County coroner’s office through
a public-records request.

According to a 911 call from the younger girl’s
principal, which led to the discovery of the bodies, school administrators were
aware of domestic problems.

Kathleen Norris, the principal of St. Paul
Elementary School in Westerville, called 911 Thursday after Sarah failed to show
up for school and her father didn’t report her absence.

In her call,
Norris was asked by a 911 operator whether Daniel Dobson might harm
Sarah.

“Mother feels that, yes, but I have, I have no proof,” Norris
said. “She was worried.”

She described the parents’ relationship as
“adversarial.”

After 10 years of marriage, Mr. Dobson filed for the
divorce in August 2008 and it was granted in May. He kept the house and agreed
to a shared-parenting plan with his ex-wife. Nicole was to live primarily with
her father, and Sarah would move between their homes on a week-to-week basis,
court records show.

Although the girls were not in school on Wednesday,
Petrozzi said detectives think they weren’t killed until sometime Thursday
morning, possibly before dawn.

What the three did during the day on
Wednesday is unclear, though he said he thought the girl’s mother spoke to one
or both girls Wednesday morning, and a neighbor reported seeing Mr. Dobson in
his garage about 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Franklin County Coroner Jan Gorniak
could not pinpoint a time of death but said the girls and their father likely
died Wednesday night or Thursday morning. She said all died of single shotgun
wounds to the head.

Fenner said cases involving domestic violence can be
difficult for child-welfare agencies, partly because fear and threats are more
difficult to substantiate — and to read on children‘s faces — than physical
abuse and neglect.

He said the agency is developing a special unit that
will have more training.

“This is an area we want to strengthen,” he
said. “We want to find out how we can, within the confines of the law, delve
deeper.”

tdecker@dispatch.com

jfutty@dispatch.com

rprice@dispatch.com

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PROZAC: Soldier Stabs to death Two Fellow Soldiers: Iraq/New York

Paragraphs 5 through 8 read:  “Investigators found the
23-year old’s body and along with the body of 20-year old Waide James of Port
St. John in Brevard County in their apartment just outside Ft. Drum in New York.
The two failed to report for duty on base.

Police say the Army Specialists had been stabbed to death.

New York

authorities tracked their other roommate, military police officer Joshua
Hunter,
to Ohio.

“Hunter, 20, was expected to be arraigned on
second-degree murder charges Friday morning, three days after the bodies
of James and Valbuena were found in their apartment just outside Fort Drum,
a
bout 140 miles northwest of Albany. Hunter and the two victims served
in Iraq at the same time in the same battalion.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “‘He was a gunner and he was active,’  says his father, Jim
Hunter.  ‘He said he saw some things he couldn’t get out of his mind. I
know he was seeing a therapist and taking

Prozac.”

http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2009/dec/04/slain-port-st-lucie-soldier-recalled-loving-person/

Slain Port St. Lucie soldier recalled as ‘loving person’ who put others
first

  • BY CAROLYN SCOFIELD WPTV NewsChannel 5
  • Posted December 4, 2009 at 6:18 a.m.

PORT ST. LUCIE ­ Nicole
Aviles will always remember his smile.

Diego Valbuena, a 2006 St. Lucie
West Centennial graduate, had a big grin and knew how to make his younger cousin
laugh.

“He was like the life of the party,” says Nicole Aviles. “He
always had a big grin on his face.”

There’s not a lot of laughter in the
family right now as they prepare for the funeral of the Port St. Lucie
resident.

Investigators found the 23-year old’s body and along with the
body of 20-year old Waide James of Port St. John in Brevard County in their
apartment just outside Ft. Drum in New York. The two failed to report for duty
on base.

Police say the Army Specialists had been stabbed to

death.

New York authorities tracked their other roommate, military police
officer Joshua Hunter, to Ohio.

Hunter, 20, was expected to be arraigned
on second-degree murder charges Friday morning, three days after the bodies of
James and Valbuena were found in their apartment just outside Fort Drum, about
140 miles northwest of Albany. Hunter and the two victims served in Iraq at the
same time in the same battalion.

They all were based at the wind-swept
Army post near the Canadian border, home of the much-deployed 10th Mountain
Division, and shared an off-base apartment.

Investigators have not
released a motive, but Hunter’s family says he served 15 months in Iraq and came
back scarred.

Relatives of Hunter said Thursday that he told them he saw
his best friend “blown to pieces” in Iraq and came back a changed man: abusive,
violent, sleepless, edgy and plagued by flashbacks.

“He was a gunner and
he was active,” says his father, Jim Hunter. “He said he saw some things he
couldn’t get out of his mind. I know he was seeing a therapist and taking

Prozac.”

Hunter’s wife, Emily Hunter, told The Associated Press in a
phone interview that her husband was outgoing before he went to war, but when he
returned stateside, he was an emotional wreck.

“He’d just burst into
tears; spouts of anger or sadness,” she said. “There’d be one emotion but it
would be really deep, just extremely happy or extremely sad. His emotions were
always on the rocks.”

“He’d take his rage out on the wall, or throw
something,” she said.

While he wasn’t violent toward his buddies, he was
toward her, she said, adding that she went to the hospital a couple of times for
treatment of an injured arm and thumb.

She said she moved out two weeks
ago because of his violence and is pursuing a divorce.

Valbuena also
served 15 months in Iraq. His family says he loved his country and excelled in
the Army.

He earned the Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal
and Iraq Campaign Medal among other awards.

More important than the
medals was his love of family.

“A guy like him is like, one in a trillion
basically,” says Aviles. “He was just such a loving person, like he always put
others in front of himself.”

Sergio Valbuena said his brother was a good
man.

“He’s a pretty good boy, a pretty good kid,” he said. “He was loved
by everybody. He was a very good brother, a very good son.

“He was always
a problem-solver. He loved this country. That’s the reason he joined the
military.”

In September, James and Valbuena graduated from Fort Drum’s
Warrior Leaders Course, which teaches skills required to lead, train, fight and
accomplish the mission as noncommissioned officers. The two and Hunter all
listed each other as friends on their MySpace pages.

Valbuena wrote on
his MySpace page that he was born in Bogota, Colombia, and had joined the
military in August 2008.

James and Valbuena served as motor transport
operators with the Headquarters Battalion of the 10th Mountain Division,
according to Fort Drum’s public affairs office.

James arrived at Fort
Drum in July 2007, while Valbuena joined in August 2007 and came to Fort Drum in
January. Both have received awards and decorations including the Army
Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Iraq

Campaign Medal and overseas service ribbon.

James’ grandparents, who live
in Port St. John, described him as an avid outdoorsman who loved
fishing.

James lived in Brevard County for three years before joining the
Army in March 2007. He arrived in Fort Drum in July of that year.

“He
returned from his first tour of Iraq about seven months ago,” said his
grandfather, Chuck Mills. “If he could go fishing every hour of the day, he
would. He loved four-wheeling, being out in the mud.”

Valbuena’s family
is making arrangements to hold his funeral in Port St. Lucie.

Staff
writer Eric Pfahler, Kaustuv Basu of Florida Today and The Associated Press
contributed to this report.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: 27 Year Old Attempts to Commit “Suicide-By-Co…

Paragraphs 19 & 20 read:  “Since being released from

prison, Tokarev had been “suffering with major depression,” Good

said. She said he had been taking antidepressants and anti-anxiety

medication in prison but was unable to find medical assistance upon his release.

“She said he told her, “Olesya, I feel sick. My body feels

so sick, and my brain feels like it’s hurting.”

http://www.twincities.com/ci_13922340

He left a note, stole a truck and fled into a hail of

bullets

Sister says ex-con brother was suicidal and hoping

the police would kill him

By

Nick Ferraro

nferraro@pioneerpress.com

Updated: 12/03/2009 11:34:01

PM CST

The sister of the man wounded by police Wednesday night in

downtown Hastings said she believes he was trying to commitsuicide by cop.

“I’m going all the way out. Once they pull me over or anything I’m

shooting them until I run out of bullets,” Roman Tokarev wrote in a note his

sister Olesya Good’s husband found Wednesday before she alerted police.

Hours later, officers shot Tokarev, 27, after he allegedly pointed a gun

at them and tried to ram their squad cars during a chase.

“After

thinking about everything and seeing everything that happened, I think he was

trying to make the police shoot him to death … kind of commit his own suicide

by them shooting him,” Good, 29, said.

Tokarev, who emigrated from

Estonia with his family in 1996, was hospitalized in critical condition Thursday

after surgery to remove a bullet lodged near his heart, his sister said.

“The way it sounds, he was shot six to eight times,” she said, adding he

was hit twice in the arm and twice in the leg. “His left hand is totally

paralyzed.”

Tokarev had been living at his sister’s home in Elk River

and under intensive supervised release ­ reserved for high-risk offenders

­ through the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

He was released

from the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Stillwater on May 4 after serving time

for a 2005 aggravated robbery conviction in Hennepin County.

Good called

police after her husband found the note at their house about 1 p.m. and

discovered Tokarev had taken the family’s pickup truck.

“We asked them

to help us find him and save his life,” she said.

Within hours, a

warrant was issued for Tokarev’s arrest, according to the Bureau of Criminal

Apprehension.

Authorities were told that Tokarev, who also has

convictions for assault and vehicle theft, could be armed and had threatened

officers in the note, BCA spokesman Andy Skoogman said.

Tokarev was

spotted about 8 p.m. in Hastings, and federal, state, city and Dakota County

officers tried to stop him by boxing in the stolen pickup with their vehicles

near the intersection of Minnesota 55 and U.S. 61, the BCA said.

Tokarev

rammed the squad cars and pointed a gun at officers, Skoogman said.

Shots were fired, and Tokarev drove off, leading a chase through several

residential blocks. At U.S. 61 and Fourth Street, officers finally stopped the

truck. More shots were fired, and Tokarev was struck several times, authorities

said.

Investigators found a weapon in the vehicle, Skoogman said.

Good and Skoogman said it’s unclear why Tokarev went to Hastings.

The three officers who fired the shots have been placed on paid

administrative leave, a standard procedure after a police shooting.

Since being released from prison, Tokarev had been “suffering with major

depression,” Good said. She said he had been taking antidepressants and

anti-anxiety medication in prison but was unable to find medical assistance upon

his release.

She said he told her, “Olesya, I feel sick. My body feels

so sick, and my brain feels like it’s hurting.”

In his note, Tokarev

wrote that he “lost it” after a weekend visit with his parole officer.

“Apparently when (the parole officer) was over here, some things were

said or something that kind of triggered everything,” Good said.

Shari

Burt, communications director for the Department of Corrections, confirmed that

Tokarev was seen by a supervision agent Sunday, but, citing the investigation,

would not respond to Good’s claim.

Burt said Tokarev was on house arrest

but had earned his way off electronic monitoring by obtaining and maintaining

employment.

Tokarev apologized in the note to his family “for all I’ve

done” and wrote, “I will not be back. It’s my time to go. Please kiss everyone

for me. … I will remember you all until eternity.”

Good said he ended

the note by writing, “I got a gun on me that I purchased and I’m not going back

to prison. I love you all. I love you all. I love you all.”

Nick Ferraro

can be reached at 651-228-2173.

1,404 total views, 2 views today

CELEXA: Police Officer Who Shot Man Was On Celexa:

Paragraph six reads: “Holt, who investigators determined

fired the fatal shot, was ultimately released from duty. Gabriel

continues to work for the Breckenridge police department.”

Paragraph 79

reads:  “Toxicology reports taken on the three officers showed that

Holt also had 1450 NG/ML of Celexa in his urine. There were no

drugs or other substances detected in results for Gabriel or

McMullen.”

http://www.reporternews.com/news/2009/nov/28/shooting-death-not-forgotten/

Breckenridge shooting death not forgotten

It has been one year

since Michael Richardson was shot to death by Breckenridge police, but the

grieving continues for family and friends.

Shai Berry, a family friend,

organized Justice for Mike to raise funds to help Richardson’s family. Her

response is typical of those with questions that have lingered since his

death.

“Mike didn’t have to die that night,” Berry said. “Not only his

death, but the way he died left a hole in the hearts of so many that only

justice can begin to heal.”

Richardson, 37, of Albany, died from a single

gunshot wound during a confrontation with police at 12:36 a.m. Nov. 29, 2008,

initial reports said.

Breckenridge police officers Scott Gabriel and

Jason Holt were on paid leave until the grand jury in May determined there was

not enough evidence to prosecute them for the shooting.

Holt, who

investigators determined fired the fatal shot, was ultimately released from

duty. Gabriel continues to work for the Breckenridge police

department.

Many questions have surrounded the case in the weeks and

months after the shooting death.

The Reporter-News filed a public

information request with the Department of Public Safety and received copies of

the reports from officers and witnesses involved, as well as copies of in-dash

videos recorded at the scene.

However, a request to the city of

Breckenridge for the personnel files of the two officers was challenged by

attorneys for the city, even after the Attorney General of Texas ruled that the

city should release the files.

To date, the city has not turned over the

officers’ personnel files.

Mark Haney, a Fort Worth attorney who

represents Richardson’s family, also has been denied access to the officers’

personnel records.

Haney said last week he plans to file a federal

lawsuit alleging civil rights violations.

“We intend to file suit because

we believe that the death of Michael Richardson should never had occurred but

for the actions of the police department, and we intend to hold them accountable

for that loss,” Haney said. “The citizens of Breckenridge need to have some

light shined on that police department.”

Andy Messer, the attorney hired

by the city of Breckenridge, said he will “vigorously defend” the city and the

officials should a lawsuit be filed.

“We expected a lawsuit the minute we

received notice of their representation of counsel,” Messer said.

Messer

has filed motions blocking the release of the personnel records.

“We

think the Texas Rangers investigation shows the important facts of the case,”

Messer said. “We think the officers were justified in their actions.”

A

day before

The day before the shooting, Richardson spent Thanksgiving

with his mother Connie Jackson and his sister and her three children.

“We

did all of the cooking and everyone kind of helped,” Connie Jackson remembered.

“We watched football and stayed close to home.”

Then everybody napped for

a while, got up a little later and ate some more.

“I remember Michael got

him a great big piece of pecan pie and got on the bed and watched football,” his

mother recalled.

He slept at her house that night. They all got up early

that morning to go shop.

First they stopped to get cell phones for

Richardson’s two sons, Bryant and Bryson, both teenagers. Then the family went

to Walmart.

“We were calling each other on cell phones in the store and

finally as I was checking out I saw him by the Christmas trees and waved,”

Connie said.

That would be the last time she saw her son

alive.

After shopping, Richardson and some friends were out shooting

feral hogs. He left with a cooler loaded down with Gatorade and set out with a

rifle he kept in his truck.

“He usually never drank when he was hunting,”

said his uncle, James Jackson.

The hunting trip with a friend was the

reason her son had a gun in his truck, his mother, said Connie

Jackson.

Afterward, he went back to Albany where he lived, dropped off

the gifts for his two sons, Bryant and Bryson, cleaned up and headed back to

Breckenridge.

Hours before death

When he returned to Breckenridge

later that evening, Richardson reportedly headed over to Potter’s Bar and Grill.

In a report taken by investigators from the Texas Rangers, owner and bartender

Amy Potter said that Richardson usually came into the bar once or twice a

week.

On Friday, Nov. 28, the bar was busy, with about 140 customers

inside. Potter told investigators she had never met Richardson but knew who he

was. Several of her bartenders knew him.

She said he usually drank Vodka

and 7-Up but “sometimes he drinks fake drinks to give the impression he is

drinking.”

That night, Richardson paid for two rounds of shots for

friends and paid for five mixed drinks. He paid his tab of $230 at 12:15 a.m.

Potter said he was buying drinks for friends and handing them out just before

last call.

“Everyone said Michael was sober when he left the bar,” Potter

said in the statement. He took local bail bondsman Buddy Moser home that

night.

In his statement to investigators, Moser said when Richardson

asked him if he needed a ride home, he said he did. When the two left the bar,

he told investigators he thought “Michael was acting fine and was all right to

drive.”

“I went into my house and heard what sounded like seven

gunshots,” Moser’s affidavit says. “I never thought it was involving Michael.”

Moser said he called his son after hearing that Richardson had been

shot.

“At no time did I ever see a gun in Michael’s truck,” Moser

said.

As he drove away from Moser’s home, Richardson reportedly ran over

a trash can and was dragging it under his truck, he made his way down the street

and eventually landed with his truck hung up on a chain-link fence at the

intersection of West 1st Street and North Court Avenue. In his statement to

investigators, homeowner William Lord said he believed Richardson was about to

drive his truck through the home there.

Lord went to the driver’s side

window and asked Richardson what he was doing but noted he had a blank look on

his face.

The initial call to 911 was made by a woman who reported her

mailbox down.

Officers’ accounts

According to Reporter-News

archives, when officers arrived on the scene, they found Richardson’s pickup

caught on an aluminum gate post with the wheels spinning.

The officers

said Richardson did not respond to their verbal commands, and they believed he

was reaching for a .22 caliber rifle, so one of the officers fired into the

truck.

The investigation revealed that both officers fired their weapons

and that the fatal shot was fired from Holt’s gun.

Holt was dispatched to

the scene at 500 Court Street at 12:38 a.m.

Holt, who had been a police

officer for a little less than six years, said when he was approaching the

scene, he noticed a large cloud of smoke coming from a red 2007 Dodge Ram

pickup. Holt said he believed Richardson, who he called “the suspect” was

attempting to drive through the home and wanted to get away from

police.

In his statement, Holt claims he saw Richardson reach down and

touch the scope on the rifle so he opened fire.

Meanwhile Officer Scott

Gabriel arrived on the scene with Wayne McMullen, the city code enforcement

officer who was accompanying him on patrol.

In his statement, Gabriel

said he tried to get Richardson’s attention, by attempting to break out the

windows of the vehicle with a baton or the butt of his revolver, but he could

not.

He then fired shots into the tires of the vehicle and his weapon

jammed. Gabriel said he saw a rifle in the front seat but did not indicate he

saw Richardson reaching for it.

There was only one streetlight

illuminating the area, and Richardson’s windows had a dark tint. In the two to

three minutes from the time Holt arrived to the time shots were fired, Holt

maintains in his statement that he saw Richardson reach for the

rifle.

“Without any other choice, I reacted by firing several shots at

the suspect driver, through the passenger side front window,” Holt wrote in his

report. Holt said he recalled firing seven shots into the

vehicle.

Gabriel was on the driver’s side of the vehicle when he radioed

dispatch that “shots had been fired,” according to his statement.

“I

heard multiple shots being fired from the direction that Officer Holt was at,”

Gabriel reported.

Gabriel said the truck stopped moving, and he went to

the passenger side to assess the situation.

Meanwhile, Holt had radioed

in for an ambulance.

All three officers said Richardson looked at them

with a blank stare, like he did not know what was going on.

One of the

shots hit Richardson just above the right ear and killed him.

When

Gabriel finally got the door of the vehicle open, he noted Richardson was

slumped over to the right side with blood coming from his head. Gabriel assisted

medics in loading Richardson onto the ambulance.

The

aftermath

Texas Ranger Sgt. Shane Morrow was called to the scene to

conduct the investigation.

Immediately after the shooting, Holt was

escorted to the patrol car of DPS Trooper Grant Atkinson. Moments later, the

weapons of Holt, Gabriel and McMullen were confiscated, and the three officers

were taken to the police department where they gave their

statements.

Moments after the shooting, Gabriel reported that he

retrieved the rifle from the passenger side of the vehicle. Atkinson

corroborated that report, saying he offered cover while Gabriel retrieved the

rifle.

“I did not see the exact location of the rifle since I was at the

back of the pickup,” Atkinson’s statement says.

Witness Angelo Santos,

who lived across the street, said he saw an officer break out the driver’s side

window after the shots were fired.

“The officer reached in the driver

side door and grabbed a long brown item that appeared to be a rifle with black

clip … and handed it to a fireman,” Santos recalled in his

statement.

Meanwhile, Richardson was transported to the Stephens County

Memorial Hospital, where doctors pronounced him brain-dead. He was then sent to

Harris Hospital in Fort Worth, where he was pronounced dead. His body was then

transported to the Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Officer for an

autopsy.

The next day

Within 24 hours, the Texas Rangers released

Richardson’s bullet-ridden truck to his family.

And the next day, family

and friends gathered at the local wrecking yard for a memorial service to honor

Richardson. They looked at and touched the truck, which was riddled with more

than 20 bullet holes and still had Richardson’s blood covering the

console.

“He never even had a traffic ticket,” his father Wayne

Richardson said at the service.

The truck was impounded again about a

month after the shooting, so investigators could continue the

investigation.

The science

The Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s

Office ruled the death a homicide. Richardson died from a single gunshot wound

behind his right ear, which was determined to have come from Holt’s gun, a .40

caliber Glock semi-automatic handgun.

The autopsy, conducted by Dr. Nizam

Peerwani, revealed that Richardson had an enlarged heart, but there were no

other remarkable findings.

Toxicology results released in February by the

Tarrant County Medical Examiner’s Office show Richardson’s blood alcohol level

was at .053 percent, below the .08 legal limit for intoxication in

Texas.

The level of the antidepressant citalopram, known by the brand

name Celexa, was found in Richardson’s blood and wasn’t remarkable at 52 NG/ML

(nanograms). Ibuprofen also was detected in his system.

Toxicology

reports taken on the three officers showed that Holt also had 1450 NG/ML of

Celexa in his urine. There were no drugs or other substances detected in results

for Gabriel or McMullen.

Officers’ jobs

Almost immediately

questions swirled around the officers and the circumstances involved in the

shooting. Holt, 29, had only been with the department for one year and eight

months before he was fired. In the five years and seven months that Holt has

been a certified peace officer, he has worked for five law enforcement agencies,

including Breckenridge.

He also worked at the Lamb County Sheriff’s

Office, Idalou Police Department, Borger Police Department, Petersburg Police

Department and as a jailer for the Floyd County Sheriff’s Office, according to

the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education, or

TCLEOSE.

Records now indicate Holt was hired by the Wheeler County

Sheriff’s Office in August. TCLEOSE records do not show that any disciplinary

actions have been filed against him.

Gabriel, 34, remains on the

Breckenridge police force, having worked there his entire career, according to

TCLEOSE records. Gabriel became a certified peace officer in May of

2007.

The family’s hope

Connie Jackson still carries the message

in a fortune cookie that was pulled out of her son’s car the day hundreds of

friends and family gathered at the wrecking yard.

It reads: “A great

honor will be bestowed upon you in the coming year.”

His mother said the

best honor would be answers to this case.

“I would like to get to the

bottom of this and find out why my son was killed,” she said.

In a

perfect world, she wants her son back, but she knows that is

impossible.

“Plus I want my son’s name cleared, of being a drunk and

pulling a gun on a police officer because I want his kids to be able to hold

their heads up and know how respected he was.”

Justice for Mike

In

the days and weeks that followed Richardson’s death, friend and family

questioned the actions of the police.

“It is important for us to make

sure if something like this ever happens again, it is handled without taking a

man’s life,” said Berry, who founded Justice for Mike. “Mike’s family,

especially his young boys, are still feeling the anguish of losing him. Their

pain is as raw as it was one year ago.”

Berry said she and others are

overwhelmed with emotion on the anniversary of Richardson’s death.

“I

hope this story reminds everyone exactly what they have to be thankful for this

year. I am completely overwhelmed with emotion this week,” she said. “I hope

someday we can look back on all this and know we both made a difference

here.”

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SSRIs: Withdrawal is Sometimes More Severe Than the Original Problem.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Although this article at least acknowledges the problem with
rebound where the initial problem seems like nothing compared to the withdrawal

effects and rebound effects, it does not address the seriousness of withdrawal.
What is described here sounds like a piece of cake compared to what so many go
through in antidepressant withdrawal!

The FDA warns that abrupt withdrawal can possibly lead to
suicide, hostility or psychosis – generally a manic psychosis. Those are hardly

the milder withdrawal effects mentioned below! ALWAYS withdraw very, very
gradually so that you only have to deal with these milder withdrawal
effects.

________________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “It seems hard to imagine that

stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat.
Sometimes the reaction is actually
more severe than the original problem.

Paragraph nine
reads:  “Another class of medications that can trigger withdrawal

includes antidepressants such as Celexa, Effexor, Paxil and
Pristiq.
Many people who quit these drugs experience  ‘brain
zaps,’  dizziness or the sensation of having their  ‘head in a
blender,’ along with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.”

http://www.sgvtribune.com/living/ci_13913666

Rebound symptoms may keep many on drugs

Posted: 12/02/2009 10:46:51 PM PST

When people take
certain drugs for anxiety, insomnia, heartburn or headache, they are trying to
ease their discomfort. They surely don’t intend to make things worse, yet
sometimes that is what happens when they go off the medication.

It seems
hard to imagine that stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat. Sometimes the reaction is actually more severe than the

original problem.

Doctors occasionally have difficulty recognizing this
rebound effect, because they may assume that the patients’ difficulties are
simply the return of the original symptoms.

During the 1970s, Valium and
Librium were two of the most commonly prescribed drugs in America. These popular
tranquilizers eased anxiety and helped people sleep.

When they were
stopped abruptly, however, some people developed withdrawal symptoms that
included severe anxiety, agitation, poor concentration, nightmares and insomnia.
Many doctors just couldn’t imagine that such symptoms might persist for weeks,
since these drugs are gone from the body within several days. Nowadays, the

withdrawal syndrome from benzodiazepines like Ativan (lorazepam), Valium
(diazepam) and Xanax (alprazolam) is well-recognized.

Other drugs also
may cause unexpected withdrawal problems. Quite a few people have trouble
stopping certain heartburn drugs. Here’s an example from one reader: “I have
been taking Protonix for heartburn for about six months. After learning of

potential ill effects from long-term use, I tried to stop taking it. After
about a week, I had to start taking it again due to severe heartburn – the
rebound effect, I suppose. I asked my provider how I should go about
discontinuing its use, but she did not know.”

Many physicians assumed
that severe heartburn upon discontinuation was the reappearance of the

underlying digestive problem. In the case of medications such as Aciphex,
Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix, however, an innovative study
demonstrated that perfectly healthy people suffer significant heartburn symptoms
they’d never had before when they go off one of these drugs after two months of
taking them (Gastroenterology, July 2009).

In addition to
benzodiazepines and heartburn medicines, other drugs can cause this type of
rebound phenomenon. Decongestant nasal sprays are notorious for causing rebound
congestion if used longer than three or four days. We have heard from people who
got hooked and used them several times a day for years.

Another class of
medications that can trigger withdrawal includes antidepressants such as Celexa,
Effexor, Paxil and Pristiq. Many people who quit these drugs experience “brain
zaps,” dizziness or the sensation of having their “head in a blender,” along
with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.

All these
medications have two things in common: Stopping suddenly triggers a rebound with
symptoms similar to those of the original problem, and providers have very
little information on how to ease their patients’ withdrawal difficulties.

Patients deserve a warning before starting a drug that may be difficult
to stop. Providers should learn how to help patients stop a medication when they
no longer need it.

Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds
a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert. Write to them in
care of their Web site: www.PeoplesPharmacy.com

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EFFEXOR: Police Officer Becomes Aggressive With Captain: Suit: NJ

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Czech’s report indicated Ruroede
suffers from a seizure disorder and as a consequence takes
Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone, all of which
have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also claimed
that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk of over
aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/78389717.html

Former officer‘s suit gets a court date
Thursday, December 3, 2009


Community News (Lodi Edition)
STAFF WRITER

A former police
lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go before the court
early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against the borough, the
police department and the mayor and council earlier this year following his
termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec. 9, 2008.
Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County Superior
Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede was fired
from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert Czech, Esq. of
Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided “untruthful
responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions of March 23,
2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt. George Egbert.
Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate, withheld information,
failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and handled firearms while
unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological evaluation determined
that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit, Ruroede seeks to have
Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police department and pay
lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges against Ruroede stem
from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney Station bar in East
Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at the bar prior to the
fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm during the course of a
verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that Ruroede lifted him “by the
jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off the ground.”

In
the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a derogatory remark about a
female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert
grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued in the manner he
did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s testimony,
according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert called
both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a

seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path the
mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John Boppert
of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert Wunsch,
was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

A
former police lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go
before the court early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against
the borough, the police department and the mayor and council earlier this year
following his termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec.
9, 2008. Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County
Superior Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede
was fired from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert
Czech, Esq. of Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided
“untruthful responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions
of March 23, 2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt.
George Egbert. Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate,
withheld information, failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and
handled firearms while unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological
evaluation determined that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit,
Ruroede seeks to have Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police
department and pay lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges
against Ruroede stem from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney
Station bar in East Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at
the bar prior to the fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm
during the course of a verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that
Ruroede lifted him “by the jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off
the ground.”

In the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a
derogatory remark about a female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the
bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued
in the manner he did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s
testimony, according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert
called both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a
seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance
Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path
the mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John
Boppert of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert
Wunsch, was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Son Beats Mother: Drives Car into Abutment: CAN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from
antidepressants can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over months
or years depending on length of use, under the supervision of a qualified
and experienced specialist, if available.

Withdrawal is often more severe than the
original symptoms or problems.
Refer to
CD on safe withdrawal for guidelines “Help! I Can‘t Get Off My

Antidepressant!”

Paragraph 11 reads:  “According to an agreed statement,
Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told police that his son never had a good
relationship with his mother, suffers from severe depression and
doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.”

http://www.ottawacitizen.com/health/pleads+guilty+attacking+mother/2295992/story.html

Man, 28, pleads guilty to attacking his mother

Woman told police she feared for her life

By Andrew Seymour,
The Ottawa CitizenDecember 3, 2009

OTTAWA ­ The 28-year-old son of a
former high tech executive has pleaded guilty to assault causing bodily harm,
for grabbing his mother by the neck, smashing her head on the floor, covering
her nose and mouth to prevent her from breathing and throwing her down a flight
of stairs.

Roman Osadca admitted he was angry at his mother Elizabeth
Osadca on Oct. 7, 2008 after learning his ex-girlfriend had married. So he
charged toward his mother and tossed her on the floor, repeatedly punching and
shaking her head from side to side before placing both hands over her nose and
mouth.

When his mother ­ who described seeing stars and began losing
consciousness ­ fought back by kicking and punching him, he threw her down
the basement stairs.

According to an agreed statement of facts, Elizabeth
Osadca lay dazed at the bottom of the stairs for a few minutes before being able
to quietly climb the stairs and then run to a neighbour’s house to call
police.

Roman Osadca, who had already fled the home in a car, eventually
crashed into a light standard near the corner of Carling Avenue and Moodie
Drive. The light pole fell and hit another car.

Osadca ended up in the
same emergency ward at the Queensway-Carleton hospital as his mother, who had
suffered a cut to the back of her head, a bruised and swollen eye as well as a
red, swollen bump and small cigarette burn to her forehead.

Elizabeth
Osadca ­ who court heard Wednesday doesn’t want her son to go to jail ­
told police she was fearful for her life and believed that her son was going to
kill her.

Following his arrest, Osadca admitted attacking his mother,
telling police he “should have stopped after the first punch,” but never
intended to kill her.

The day of the attack, Roman Osadca had learned his
ex-girlfriend had married a man from the Dominican Republic. Osadca’s mother had
discovered the information and told the woman to tell her son about the new
relationship ­ and he blamed her for what happened.

Police went to
Elizabeth Osadca’s house afterward and found a large hole in the kitchen wall as
well as a knife planted in the wall of the stairs leading to the basement.

According to an agreed statement, Roman’s father, Danny Osadca, told
police that his son never had a good relationship with his mother, suffers from
severe depression and doesn’t take his medication as prescribed.

Danny
Osadca is the founder of the Osadca Group, a Nepean consulting group. He is also
a former chief executive of Med Eng Systems.

Calling the attack a “once
in a lifetime situation,” Roman Osadca’s lawyer Rod Sellar said his “extremely
remorseful” client ­ who apologized in court for his actions ­ is
receiving treatment for depression. Osadca, who has also pleaded guilty to
dangerous driving, should receive a conditional sentence, Sellar argued. But
assistant Crown attorney Shawn Eagles argued a six-month jail term was more
appropriate given the prolonged nature of the “vicious attack” and the “profound
breach of trust” in a child’s attacking his own mother.

Sentencing is set
for Dec. 7.
© Copyright (c) The Ottawa
Citizen

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