CELEXA: 18 Year Old High School Student Threatens Classmates:

Paragraph four reads:  “Camperlengo said in court that
she believes Crider has adjustment disorder, and that he reacted emotionally
after a stressful event.
Crider had been taking the
antidepressant Celexa on and off, Camperlengo testified, and he reported
side effects such as feeling “speeded up” that may have affected his
behavior.”

Paragraph nine reads:  ” ‘If there is a
misjudgment on the part of his psychiatrist,
there are lives that could be
taken,’ Lowe said in court.”

http://www2.dailyprogress.com/cdp/news/local/crime/article/school_threat_suspect_denied_bail/51435/

School threat suspect denied bail

By The
Daily Progress Staff

Published: January 25, 2010

An 18yearold
Western Albemarle High School student accused of threatening to kill four
students was denied bond this morning in Albemarle County General District
Court.

Patrick Dittmar Crider has been held in Albemarle-Charlottesville
Regional Jail on a charge of threatening to kill or harm someone on school

property in connection with threats made against fellow students on Facebook.
Dr. Vanessa Camperlengo, a psychiatrist specializing in children and
adolescents, testified today that she didn’t believe Crider was a threat to
himself or others.

According to court documents, someone believed to be
Crider had an online conversation Jan. 13 during which threats were made to kill
four specific students the following day. After the shootings, the person
intended to declare his love for a girl and shoot himself in the head, the
records state.

Camperlengo said in court that she believes Crider has
adjustment disorder, and that he reacted emotionally after a stressful event.
Crider had been taking the antidepressant Celexa on and off, Camperlengo
testified, and he reported side effects such as feeling “speeded up” that may
have affected his behavior.

When asked about the Facebook messages,
Camperlengo said Crider was in a specific state of mind.

“I see that as
an stirring excerpt from Patrick at the bottom of an emotional abyss, but that
is not where he lives,” Camperlengo testified.

Darby Lowe, deputy
commonwealth’s attorney, said in court that police had been called previously
when the same victims reported feeling threatened by Crider. That report came
Dec. 11.

Lowe argued that Crider shouldn’t be granted bond.

“If
there is a misjudgment on the part of his psychiatrist, there are lives that
could be taken,” Lowe said in court.

David B. Franzen, Crider’s attorney,
said in court that his client has no criminal record or history of violence.
Franzen argued that his client had a lot of support from family and friends and
could be supervised constantly.

“[He] made an immature judgment,” Franzen
said in court. “Whether or not that in fact was a crime has yet to be
determined.”

Crider is scheduled to have a preliminary hearing Feb.
18.

Read the full story in Tuesday’s Daily
Progress.

1,032 total views, no views today

SARAFEM (PROZAC) & ROBITUSSIN: Brittany Murphy Dies Suddenly: CA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy
(
www.drugawareness.org): Brittany
Murphy died from the use of multiple serotonergic medications – meds that
increase serotonin. She may have had pneumonia, but pneumonia does not kill that
quickly. There were clearly other contributing factors when death is so sudden
and without much warning.

When Heidi Connelly published her information on Fen-Phen and Redux causing
heart valve problems (something Brittany already suffered from) she found that
it was the elevated levels of serotonin produced by the Fen-Phen and Redux that
caused a gummy gooey glossy substance to build up on the heart valves and keep
them from shutting properly. So if Brittany‘s heart valve already did not shut
properly and you raise her serotonin levels with two serotonergic drugs – Prozac(Sarafem) and Robitussin you build the level of gummy gooey glossy substance on
that heart valve and you are in trouble.

But beyond that the increase in serotonin constricts muscle tissue
restricting air into the lungs, blood flow throughout the body, etc. – all the
major organs are constricted by elevated serotonin. When the serotonin level
gets too high (as it does when you mix two meds that increase it) you produce
death via multiple organ failure. This is what killed Daniel, Anna Nicole
Smith’s young son. It is called Serotonin Syndrome.
So, in Brittany‘s case I firmly believe that the elevated serotonin
produced by these drugs put the nail in her coffin.
Paragraph four reads:  “Investigators found prescription
medication for depression, seizures, anxiety and pain. Monjack told Lauer his
late wife used Vicoprofen and Sarafem during her menstrual
cycle. ‘”Most of the medications are mine. I suffer from seizures,’
Monjack declared. The screenwriter began to stutter and added,  ‘I suffer
from, you know, heart… my heart stopped on December 3rd when we landed from
Puerto Rico’.”
SSRI Stories note:  Sarafem is, molecule for
molecule, the same exact drug as Prozac.  It goes by a different name
because it is registered with the FDA for use in PMS.

http://extratv.warnerbros.com/2010/01/brittany_murphys_family_continues_to_deny_drug_rumors.php

Brittany
Murphy‘s Family Continues to Deny Drug Rumors

Posted on January 21, 2010Brittany Murphy‘s
husband and mother sat down with Matt Lauer on the “Today” show to
discuss the actress’ sudden death.

Murphy

died Dec. 20, and the cause of death is still unknown; toxicology
results
are expected in a few weeks.

“Let’s set the record straight
once and for all — Brittany was not taking any medication for her mood, for
anorexia,” Murphy‘s husband Simon Monjack said. “It’s utterly ridiculous
that these rumors have perpetuated.”

Investigators found prescription
medication for depression, seizures, anxiety and pain. Monjack told Lauer his
late wife used Vicoprofen and Sarafem during her menstrual cycle. “Most of the
medications are mine. I suffer from seizures,” Monjack declared. The
screenwriter began to stutter and added, “I suffer from, you know, heart… my
heart stopped on December 3rd when we landed from Puerto Rico.”

See

Brittany‘s life in photos

Murphy‘s mother Sharon began to
shake her head when Lauer asked about Brittany‘s rumored cocaine use. “It’s just
so horrific. She was diagnosed with a heart murmur when she was a young teenager
and she was terrified of anything happening to her. She never did any drugs,
ever.” Sharon replied.

The two also denied Brittany had any type of
eating disorder. “You just need to go to her favorite restaurant, Chateau
Marmont, and speak to any waiter, who would tell you that she would happily
order four plates of food and eat them all,” Monjack stated.

Monjack
also claims Murphy‘s role in “Happy Feet 2” was pulled and it broke her heart.
He explained, “Hollywood is a village and once you upset the villagers they talk
and they gossip and they rumor. They have blood on their hands, and I hope they
wash them with very hot water because of the way they treated Brittany Murphy

while she was alive.”

The grieving husband and mother have established The Brittany Murphy
Foundation
in her memory.

1,500 total views, no views today

LEXAPRO: Vehicular Manslaughter: No Alcohol: Idaho

Paragraph three freads:  “The prosecutor’s office
previously alleged Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol,
or was grossly negligent in causing Redfern’s death.
They alleged he had been involved in four crashes on that day, two prior
to the fatal crash and one immediately afterward.”

Paragraphs
seven and eight read:  Stevens failed two sobriety tests, court documents
allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police questioned him. He
reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant.
A
bottle of Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

“However, tests done on blood taken from Stevens after his arrest
came back negative for intoxicants [alcohol], according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.”

http://www.magicvalley.com/news/local/article_82226ad0-3e75-5e78-95fe-27073b884547.html

Stevens pleads guilty to vehicular manslaughter

By
Ariel Hansen – Times-News writer | Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am |
(0)
Comments

HAILEY ­ Nearly a year after Bert Redfern died in a
March 10 car crash on Idaho Highway 75 in Hailey, a Twin Falls man has pleaded
guilty to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter for the fatal crash.

Cody
Stevens, 29, of Twin Falls, had been charged with felony vehicular manslaughter.
On Tuesday, just weeks before his district court trial was set to begin, he
pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor, which carries a penalty of up to a year in
prison and a $2,000 fine.

The prosecutor’s office previously alleged
Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or was grossly
negligent in causing Redfern’s death. They alleged he had been involved in four
crashes on that day, two prior to the fatal crash and one immediately
afterward.

According to court documents, Stevens allegedly left his job
in Jerome after a 12-hour shift at 6 a.m. March 10, and drove north. In Lincoln
County, he was allegedly reported as a reckless driver after he got close enough
to “rub mirrors” with the reporting party at about 7:20 a.m. At about 9:45, he
allegedly hit a tree south of Bellevue, telling police he swerved to avoid a
deer.

After leaving his totaled truck in Bellevue and renting a truck in
Hailey, Stevens returned to a Bellevue body shop. He then headed toward Ketchum
when he allegedly caused the noon-time collision that resulted in Redfern’s
death. He then allegedly flipped his rental truck onto a curb in downtown
Hailey, where police took him into custody.

Stevens failed two sobriety
tests, court documents allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police
questioned him. He reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant. A bottle of
Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

Stevens was taken for blood testing at St. Luke’s Wood River
Regional Medical Center, and he was later taken back to the hospital after
becoming increasingly unresponsive and incoherent during police questioning,
according to court documents.

However, tests done on blood taken from
Stevens after his arrest came back negative for intoxicants, according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.

A civil case for wrongful death is pending against Stevens, filed by
Redfern’s widower, and Stevens’ plea to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter can
be used against him in that case.

The county case has been sent back to
the magistrate court, and a sentencing hearing has not yet been
scheduled.

Ariel Hansen may be reached at ahansen@magicvalley.com or
208-788-3475.

Posted in Local, Crime-and-courts

on Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am Updated: 10:57 pm.
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Story

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LEXAPRO: Caused Mania: Man Died After Being Pepper Sprayed 10 TIMES!: FL

Paragraphs 36 through 38 read:  “His doctors had
prescribed Lexapro
for his depression
and Joyce blames the
medication for his high and low mood swings. Patients on
Lexapro report mood
swings
and paranoia among a host of side effects, so it is advised patients
gradually withdraw from the drug.””

His
doctor had planned to take him off the drug,
but she says her husband’s
medical surveillance fell between the cracks when the doctor left to work
somewhere else.”

In the meantime, while in Ohio, Christie was planning to
paint the garage floor and take apart, clean, and re-assemble lawn furniture. He
had become more outgoing and talkative, she said. When he suddenly left
to go to Fort Myers to visit his brother, he went to a mall and opened
a department store account, things he hadn’t done
before.

Paragraphs ten trhough twelve from the end read:

“Christie ended up at a North Fort Myers hotel. He was initially arrested for
disorderly intoxication and causing a disturbance.
The
counter woman at Arby’s gave Nick a free coffee because she thought he had
Alzheimer’s disease.

Joyce says her husband couldn’t
remember her number, or his son’s.
Two days later on March 27, he was
arrested again for trespassing.

This time when officers took her husband
into custody, Joyce says they locked his medications in his truck and never
retrieved them.

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories note:
Amnesia is listed as a frequent side effect to
antidepressants in the Physicians Desk Reference. Alcohol cravings are also
known to be caused by antidepressants, as is mania and
violence.

http://www.injuryboard.com/national-news/peppersprayedman-dies-in-jail-what-happened-to-nick-christie-.aspx?googleid=277120

Federal Lawsuit
Pending

The widow of an Ohio man who died in police custody in Fort
Myers, Florida last March, will file a federal lawsuit for violating her
husband’s constitutional rights by failing to recognize that he was mentally
ill.

Joyce Christie, of Girard, Ohio, and her son, plan to file the
action against the Lee County Sheriff’s Office and Prison Health Services (PHS),
the private company that oversees medical care for the jail, which had taken
custody of Nicholas Christie for trespassing.

Her attorney, Nick DiCello
(IB member), of the Cleveland firm of Spangenberg, Shibley & Liber LLP, says
his firm has filed the notices required under Florida state law of an intention
to sue.

“Letters of intent to file a civil lawsuit for medical
malpractice, wrongful death, and civil rights violations, negligence, pain and
suffering have been sent,” he tells IB
News.

Christie, 62, was arrested last March after traveling from Ohio
to Fort Myers while suffering, what his widow describes as a mental breakdown
[manic reaction to medication]. Arrested twice for disorderly conduct and
trespassing, Nick Christie was pepper sprayed ten times over the course of his
43-hour custody.

Suffering from emphysema, COPD, back and heart problems,
the jail staff said his medical files were not available or immediately sought
at the time of his arrest. But DiCello says Christie gave his medical history
and list of medications to the jail days earlier during his first encounter with
law enforcement.

His medication list was found in the back pocket of his
pants when Christie’s personal effects were returned to his
widow.

What Happened To Nick
Christie?

Sometime between the time he was arrested on March 27, 2009
around 2:00 p.m., and March 31 at1:23 p.m. when he was pronounced dead, Christie
had been sprayed with ten blasts of pepper spray, also known as OC (Oleo-resin
Capsicum), which is a derivative of cayenne pepper.

The medical examiner
has ruled his death a homicide.

On January 6, the Lee County State
Attorney’s office mimicked a lengthy investigation by the Lee County Sheriff’s
Office, clearing the officers of any wrongdoing in the death.

Assistant
State Attorney Dean Plattner and Chief Investigator Kevin Smith found the
jailers did not break policy guidelines. A separate internal review of policy
was not conducted and the five corrections officers have remained on the
job.

“My blood is boiling,” Joyce Christie, 59, told the News-Press. “I knew it was going to end this way
because the corrections officers were never taken off their jobs during the
investigation.”

A Failure to
Indict

Assistant State Attorney Dean Plattner says in his memo that
in order to prove manslaughter, the office would have to prove someone showed a
“reckless disregard for human life” to the extent that they should have known it
would likely cause death or great bodily injury.

“The facts of the case
do not support this level of proof,” says the office.

Attorney DiCello
says he is shocked that the state attorney didn’t come to the conclusion there
was a crime.

“All he needs to come to a conclusion that there was
probable cause there was a crime. The local community should have been given the
opportunity to indict. They weren’t given that opportunity,” he
says.

DiCello says despite the state attorney’s conclusion, the federal
case has a different standard of review.

“They have to prove beyond a
reasonable doubt there was some type of criminal intent. We have to prove it
fell beneath the standard of care and these officers knew they were violating
this man’s constitutional rights.”

DiCello says strapping an obese,
62-year-old with a heart condition and COPD to a restraining chair, pepper

spraying him and not allowing him water to wash off should qualify.

“Case
law as a matter of law defines that conduct as a violation of constitutional
rights and affords it no protection under the law,” he says.

The standard
of care is established by the county and Prison Health Services, under contract
with Lee County for $9 million annually, one of 160 contracts PHS holds
nationwide.

Lee County, Sgt. David Valez, tells IB News the
company is NCCHC accredited and “they must maintain that high standard.” There
is no independent review by the county.

Under the contract, PHS is
responsible for conducting a medical evaluation of everyone coming into the
system.

Never Saw A Doctor

His jailers
say Nicholas Christie was combative, despite the fact that he was restrained in
a chair so he allegedly wouldn’t spit at his jailers.

But three inmates
who shared Christie’s cell block told the Fort Meyers News-Press that they thought the use
of pepper spray was excessive and that deputies ignored the victim’s pleas for
help.

“While he was sitting in the chair, they sprayed him two more
times,” said Ken Cutler. His whole head was turning purple and almost blue,” he
says, “He was gasping.”

The other inmates say the pepper spray was so
intense they were gagging in the cell block.

“He was constantly telling
them I can’t breathe and I got a heart condition,” he says.

Dr. Robert
Pfalzgraf, deputy chief medical examiner, concluded that stress caused by
restraint and pepper spray were irritants and stressors to his heart. He says
that 99 percent of the time those sprayed do not die. Christie was the 1
percent.

The medical examiner’s report indicates that the death was

caused by “hypoxic encephalopathy following resuscitation for cardiac arrest,
cardiac shock with congestive heart failure, physiologic stress following
restraint and noxious effects of oleoresin capsicum.”

A homicide does not
necessarily mean that the death was a criminal act only that it was caused by a
person or persons.

DiCello says take a look at Pepper Spray on YouTube videos to see it can down
someone for 40 minutes, even if it is washed off.

“You’ll see Marines
crying, now imagine being sprayed ten times, you’re obese, have COPD and having
a manic episode. Ten times and the last time not washed down for a half hour
strapped down so you can’t rub his eyes.”

Mental
Health Issues

Joyce Christie told IB News last June that her
husband had started showing signs of mania. He had recently retired and thought
he was going to go fishing, she said, but diverticulitis shut down his colon,
then he went into a depression after being hospitalized for COPD ( chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Christie had quit smoking years ago, but the former boilermaker worked
around asbestos and nuclear power plants, she says.

His doctors had
prescribed Lexapro for his depression and Joyce blames the
medication for his high and low mood swings. Patients on Lexapro report

mood
swings
and paranoia among a host of side effects, so it is advised patients
gradually withdraw from the drug.

His doctor had planned to take him off
the drug, but she says her husband’s medical surveillance fell between the
cracks when the doctor left to work somewhere else.

In the meantime,
while in Ohio, Christie was planning to paint the garage floor and take apart,
clean, and re-assemble lawn furniture. He had become more outgoing and
talkative, she said. When he suddenly left to go to Fort Myers to visit his
brother, he went to a mall and opened a department store account, things he
hadn’t done before.

Joyce Christie was so concerned she says she
contacted the Lee County Sheriff’s office and issue a welfare BOLO (Be On The
Lookout). Ms. Christie even had the sheriff of her home town contact Lee County
to stress the seriousness of her husband’s condition and the fact that he needed
to take his medication.

“He begged them to take Nick to the hospital.
They said he’s having a good time, he needs a few days away. All they had to do
was say ‘Let us talk to your doctor to confirm.’ They didn’t do it. Captain
Begowski told the officer, ‘If you don’t take him now, I’m going to tell you,
you’re going to be dealing with him in a couple of hours.’”

That forecast
proved true.

Christie ended up at a North Fort Myers hotel. He was
initially arrested for disorderly intoxication and causing a disturbance. The
counter woman at Arby’s gave Nick a free coffee because she thought he had
Alzheimer’s disease.

Joyce says her husband couldn’t remember her number,
or his son’s. Two days later on March 27, he was arrested again for
trespassing.

This time when officers took her husband into custody, Joyce
says they locked his medications in his truck and never retrieved
them.

Joyce frantically flew to Fort Myers March 28, but police would not
let her see Nick. She says they wouldn’t even tell him she was there. Finally,
an officer suggested she could bond him out of police custody.

When she
finally was allowed to see her husband it was too late.

He had been taken
by ambulance to Gulf Coast Hospital where Joyce says Nick’s eyes were taped shut
and he had 40 tubes taped to his body. Doctors told her he had a 10 percent
chance to live. The nurses told her when he was brought in naked that he had so
much pepper spray on him doctors had to change their gloves as they became
saturated with the orange spray.

No one in the sheriff’s office had
contacted her, and until he arrived at the hospital, Nick Christie had never
seen a doctor. Someone in the hospital, shocked by his condition, suggested she
contact an attorney.

“Nick had a life he was somebody my husband, a
father to my son. He’s somebody I miss very much. It shouldn’t have happened. He
should be here. Three weeks later I get his ashes back from Florida in a mail
truck. My husband, he was somebody, he wasn’t just a nobody,” Joyce Christie
says.

Attorney Nick DiCello says the state attorney’s report clearing the
officers will not hurt the federal case. The fact that Christie was sprayed at
least once after being restrained in a chair with a hood over his head violates
any qualified immunity defense the county and Prison Health Services may
claim.

Besides a violation of the law, DiCello is concerned about the
violation of another human being.

“Humanity has failed here. And now they
aren’t going to address the failure. Us as a people, we need to recognize we’ve
all failed and make it right, not ‘Let’s just move on from this failure.’ People
shouldn’t do this to people. Nothing could warrant the treatment and death this
guy experienced.

“A 62-yr-old retiree strapped to a chair and died. I
don’t get it.” #

1,002 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Father Takes 2 Daughters on Terror Ride: Massachusetts

Paragraph five reads:  “It was not immediately clear what
precipitated Thursday’s terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off
carpenter was taking antidepressants, has been having
medical and family issues, and had banged his head against the truck prior to
the incident.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100109/NEWS/1090332/-1/news

Freetown man held on bail for allegedly crashing truck with young
daughters inside

By Brian
Fraga
bfraga@s-t.com
January 09, 2010 12:00 AM

FALL RIVER ­ A
Freetown man ordered his two young daughters into his pickup truck and took them
on a terrifying ride around his property Thursday afternoon, crashing into
rocks, trees, a camper and a building, while the girls screamed and asked their

father if he was trying to kill them, according to authorities.

The 10-
and 12-year-old girls were cut by flying glass, and one girl’s head slammed
against a window, shattering the glass, authorities said. The ordeal ended when
the truck slammed into the camper and stalled, allowing the girls to escape and
run into their house, where they called 911, according to court
records.

The children were taken to St. Anne’s Hospital in Fall River and
treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

The girls’ father, Mark W.
Haskins, 39, of 24 Locust St., faces numerous criminal charges that include
assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, reckless operation of a motor
vehicle, malicious destruction of property and failing to have the girls wear
seat belts.

It was not immediately clear what precipitated Thursday’s
terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off carpenter was taking
antidepressants, has been having medical and family issues, and had banged his
head against the truck prior to the incident.

“He has little recollection
of what happened here,” said defense lawyer Donald Friar, who described the
episode as “an aberration.”

Haskins was arraigned on the charges Friday
in Fall River District Court and held on $10,000 cash bail. Friar had asked for
$500 bail, but Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Gonzalez cited concerns for
the children’s safety and noted that Haskins had originally fled from
police.

Haskins, who is the son of retired Freetown Fire Chief Wayne
Haskins, turned himself in to local police just before 11 a.m. Friday. On

Thursday, Freetown and Berkley police used dogs to scour the Freetown woods for
more than four hours, while a state police helicopter searched from the
air.

Haskins allegedly ran into the woods after he went inside his house
and apologized to his daughters, telling them he loved them and that it would be
the last time they saw him, court records said.

Police said the girls’
mother was reluctant to cooperate with officers.

When Freetown police
arrived just after 4:30 p.m., Thursday, they were met by Martha Haskins, who
allegedly cursed at the officers when they told her they were investigating the
incident.

Police said she told the officers, “We can smash our own things
if we want,” and, “It’s not a big deal. Nobody got killed.”

Martha
Haskins also reportedly resisted efforts to transport the girls to the
hospital.

Police said she also scolded her daughters for calling 911,
telling them: “I’m going to stay with your father because we’re married and you
two can go live with DSS. I don’t care.”

The Department of Children and
Families, formerly the Department of Social Services, was contacted and is
investigating. According to court records, a DCF case worker told police the
agency dealt with the family years ago when the couple reportedly abandoned a
son who was subsequently taken into DCF custody.

Alison Goodwin, a DCF
spokeswoman, said the girls are currently in the mother’s custody.

A
phone message left Friday at the Haskins’ residence was not
returned.

Freetown police interviewed the girls at the hospital Thursday.
They said their father ordered them into his truck, then began driving into
trees, rocks, a small building and a camper on the Locust Street property, court
records said.

When one girl tried to call for help on her cell phone,
Haskins ordered her to put it away. The girls said he pointed at objects right
before crashing into them. But when one girl asked him he if was trying to kill
them, Haskins said, “No, I’m not going to kill you.”

Police later secured
a search warrant and seized computer equipment connected to a surveillance
system on the property.

Haskins is scheduled to return to court Feb. 3.
Mooney ordered him to stay away from his daughters and to comply with any DCF
instructions.

619 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Policeman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs four through seven read:  “In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick became
violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After swearing
at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived, overturned
furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a picture
frame and fought with his wife.”

“The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of
Scotch.”

“But it was when he was told he was being arrested later that
evening that Gulick went ballistic.”

“Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but
overall calm situation quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick
fought back.”

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories Note:  The
Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
and the antidepressant
in the human body.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2010/01/12/12428306-qmi.html

Violent cop acted ‘superhuman’

Constable pleads guilty
to discreditable conduct at hearing
By SCOTT TAYLOR, QMI Agency

OTTAWA – A police
disciplinary hearing heard dramatic testimony yesterday about Const. Jeff
Gulick’s violent conduct in May 2008.

Gulick pleaded guilty yesterday to
discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

He had previously
been found guilty of assaulting a police officer, uttering threats to cause
bodily harm, escaping lawful custody and mischief after officers tried to arrest
him at his home May 22, 2008.

In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick
became violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After
swearing at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived,
overturned furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a
picture frame and fought with his wife.

The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of Scotch.

But it was
when he was told he was being arrested later that evening that Gulick went
ballistic.

Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but overall calm situation
quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick fought back.

“He
started grabbing at my right side and I could feel my holster and gunbelt being
pulled.”

Gulick threatened to kill his fellow cops as he struggled with
what Const. Michael O’Reilly said was “superhuman” strength.

Gulick was
finally overcome after being shocked with a Taser by one of four officers who
had joined the fight.

Gulick was taken to the Ottawa Hospital’s Civic
Campus emergency room, but when they arrived Gulick had shed both wrist and
ankle cuffs and bolted across Carling Ave. to the Experimental Farm, where he
once again was shot with a Taser.

O’Reilly said the situation had “gone
as sideways as it can go.”

Earlier yesterday, a female police officer
testified she feels like an outcast among fellow officers as a result of her
involvement and subsequent testimony in Gulick’s disciplinary hearing.

Sgt. Holly Watson said she’s heard “through the rumour mill” that fellow
officers support Gulick and there “was never any support for the four of us who
were assaulted (by Gulick during the arrest).”

Watson added she has
received no support from the Police Association either. She also testified that
she still worries about where Gulick is when she goes to her car after work.

Police Chief Vern White is scheduled to testify today.

669 total views, 2 views today

ZOLOFT: Man Fires Shots into Country Club: Goes Manic for First Time: MN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): I am going to
comment on this one statement from this article because I become absolutely
furious when I hear this over and over and over again when AA is in a position
to help and will not. I quote, “He also has been through alcohol treatment
and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous,” So, WHY is AA not more helpful in
teaching those with a problem with alcohol that antidepressants CAUSE
OVERWHELMING CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL?!!! They would certainly not have near as much
business if they did! It just makes me sick to hear over and over again that
they encourage the use of antidepressants among those who already have problems
with alcohol. It makes no sense!!! They seem to be far more
susceptible to the manic effects of antidepressants.

Paragraph six reads:  “If the case had gone to trial,
Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
defense. The claim
: a switch in the fall of 2008
to the antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become
manic-depressive for the first time in his life.”

http://www.startribune.com/local/81151627.html?elr=KArksLckD8EQDUoaEyqyP4O:DW3ckUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUnciaec8O7EyUsl

Man pleads guilty to firing shots at country club

The defendant said that friends had tried to get him help
before the incident at Minikahda Country Club in Minneapolis. Had the case gone
to trial, his attorney had planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
defense.

By ROCHELLE OLSON,

Star Tribune

Last update: January 11, 2010 – 12:07 PM

A 64-year-old Minneapolis man pleaded guilty today to second-degree assault for
shooting at the Minikahda Country Club and said afterward that he hopes
something can be done to make it easier for adults with psychological problems
to get help.

For me to do anything harmful to the club, I had to be
crazy because I loved the club,” Joseph C. Rice said in an interview after his
plea in front of Hennepin County District Court Judge Beryl Nord. “When you’re
out of your mind, the worst thing is you don’t know you’re out of your
mind.”

According to the charges: Police received a call at 2 a.m. from an
employee at the club, 3205 Excelsior Blvd., reporting that he had spotted Rice
outside the building holding a gun, had heard multiple shots, and then had seen
Rice drive away in an older red Ferrari. Police tracked Rice to his nearby home.
In addition to assault, he was charged with drive-by shooting, reckless
discharge of a firearm and two drinking and driving offenses. All but the
assault charge were dropped.

Rice will have to serve about three months
in the county workhouse. He paid $3,091 to the club for the damage. He will pay
more than $100,000 to get his Ferrari back.

“I feel really sorry for what
I did. I really valued my membership in the club,” he said.

If the case
had gone to trial, Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary
intoxication” defense. The claim: a switch in the fall of 2008 to the
antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become manic-depressive

for the first time in his life.

Birrell had filed notice with the court
of plans to call an expert witness, a physician, who would testify that drugs
such as Zoloft can cause mania in a small percentage of the population. He and
Rice acknowledge that the defense would have been complicated by Rice’s heavy
drinking at the time.

But Rice said in the weeks leading up to the
incident, friends were trying to get him into a hospital for help, but were
unsuccessful. “It’s almost like you have to do something bad, but then it’s too
late,” Rice said of his friends’ efforts to get him treatment.

After the
shooting, his 31-year-old son and his psychiatrist succeeded in getting him into

a 30-day in-patient program at Fairview Riverside Hospital. Rice said he was
immediately taken off Zoloft and put back on Wellbutrin. He also has been
through alcohol treatment and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous, he
said.

Rice said he will send the club an apology through Birrell. “The
way to say you’re sorry is to live a better life,” he said.

He is
expected to begin serving his workhouse sentence in February.

Rochelle
Olson • 612-673-1747

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CELEXA, PAIN KILLERS, ATIVAN: Financier Danny Pang Commits Suicide: CA

Paragraph six reads:  “Supervising Deputy Coroner Kelly
Keyes said the following drugs were found in Pang’s system: citalopram
[Celexa] (antidepressant)
, dihydrocodeine (pain reliever),
hydrocodone (pain reliever), lorazepam (anti-anxiety medication), oxycodone
(pain reliever), oxymorphone (pain reliever) and THC (ingredient in marijuana).

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/01/newport-beach-financierdanny-pangs-death-officially-suicide.html

Newport
Beach financier Danny Pang‘s death officially ruled a suicide

January 11, 2010 |  7:13 pm

The death of 42-year-old Newport
Beach financier Danny Pang has officially been ruled a suicide caused by the
combined effect of seven drugs, the Orange County Sheriff-Coroner’s Department
has determined.

Pang was found unconscious Sept. 11, 2009, in his
Newport Beach home and was taken to Hoag Hospital, where he died the next day.

His death came less than two months after an Orange County federal grand
jury accused Pang of concealing more than $300,000 from the government. The FBI
also alleged he stashed gold bullion in a hidden safe.

Pang was also
facing an SEC lawsuit for allegedly misappropriating millions of dollars from
investors through his company Private Equity Management Group Inc. in Irvine.

He denied any wrongdoing and was free on a $1-million bond at the time
of his death.

Supervising Deputy Coroner Kelly Keyes said the following
drugs were found in Pang’s system: citalopram (antidepressant), dihydrocodeine
(pain reliever), hydrocodone (pain reliever), lorazepam (anti-anxiety
medication), oxycodone (pain reliever), oxymorphone (pain reliever) and THC
(ingredient in marijuana).

Pang first made headlines in 1997 when his
wife, a former stripper, was shot to death in their home. No one has been
convicted of the crime.

— Corina Knoll

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother’s Baby Missing: Arizona

Paragraphs four through six read:  “”She should have
sought professional help. She did seek help for post partum
depression and she was on medication and during that
time she seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she
hopped in Bob Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old
mother, who allegedly told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

SSRI Stories note:  Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from any of these
medications can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over a period of
a year or more, under the supervision of a qualified and experienced specialist,
if available.
Withdrawal is sometimes more severe than the original
symptoms or problems.

http://www.kpho.com/news/22168065/detail.html

Johnson’s Grandfather Thinks She’s Lying

Bob Johnson Still Believes Baby Gabriel Is Alive

Pat McReynolds
Reporter,
KPHO.com

POSTED: 10:26 pm MST January 6, 2010
UPDATED: 6:43 am MST
January 7, 2010

TEMPE, Ariz. — Bob Johnson said his
granddaughter, Elizabeth, has always been secretive.

“If she didn’t want
you to know something, you ain’t gonna find out,” Johnson said.

He said
moving in and out of five foster homes as a child made her that way. But he said
the straight “A” student also developed an irrational temper that led to bouts
of rage.

“She should have sought professional help. She did seek help
for post partum depression and she was on medication and during that time she
seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she hopped in Bob
Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was
last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old mother, who allegedly
told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

Elizabeth Johnson was arrested last week in Florida on suspicion of
custodial interference after she didn’t show up for a custodial hearing.

“She had this cockamamie idea that she was going to change her Social
Security number and name and his Social Security number and name and run
forever,” Bob Johnson said.

Instead, in an exclusive interview with CBS
5, Elizabeth Johnson said she simply gave Gabriel to a couple she met in a park.

“I trusted them. I believe in my heart they’re good people,” said
Elizabeth Johnson on the phone from jail.

But her grandfather doesn’t
buy it. He tried to envision her scenario.

‘Oh by the way, how would you
like to have a baby, oh it’s free, yeah it’s free,’ Bob Johnson said. “That’s
hard. That’s hard to really believe, but it’s a simple story. It’s a story that
you can repeat without stumbling.”

The last time Bob Johnson saw Gabriel
was when the whole family got together for Thanksgiving. He has pictures of
Elizabeth Johnson posing with the boy’s father, Logan McQueary.

“She’s
the sweet Elizabeth,” Bob Johnson said when pointing to a picture of her
smiling.

He thinks she gave Gabriel to a family in Texas, and is lying
now so the boy will never be found. But she has threatened to harm the child,
and Bob Johnson wonders if her past and her struggles with self control
eventually got the best of her.

“It’s possible that in a moment of
anger, depression, whatever, that she carried out her threat. I don’t even want
to think about it because, what a waste. What a waste,” said Bob Johnson.

Copyright 2010 by KPHO.com. All rights
reserved.

1,318 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Infant Sexual Abuse Case : Female Child Care Director: WI

Paragraph 27 reads:  “The defense witnesses Thursday
included a psychologist who evaluated Benz and agreed with her prior diagnoses
of being manic-depressive and bi-polar and suffering from depression and
anxiety. Dr. Gene Braaksma said Benz was taking anti-depressants
and mood stabilizers in June 2007.”

http://www.sheboyganpress.com/article/20091204/SHE0101/912040448/1062/SHE01/Judge-to-rule-today-on-mistrial-motion-in-Mary-Benz-infantabusecase

Judge to rule today on mistrial motion in Mary Benz infant abuse
case

By Eric Litke • Sheboygan Press
staff • December 4, 2009

The defense is seeking a mistrial in the Mary
Benz infant abuse case after Benz’s attorney stumbled upon evidence he said was
valuable to his client’s case and not previously disclosed by the
prosecution.

Defense attorney Richard Hahn made the motion Thursday after
spotting a social worker’s case file while he was in District Attorney Joe
DeCecco’s office editing an audio recording earlier in the day. In a notation
made June 28, 2007 ­ two days after a 10-month-old girl was found to have
significant vaginal injuries ­ the doctor who examined her said the parents
could not be ruled out as suspects and the injuries could have occurred earlier
than he said when he testified.

The note was made before the
pediatrician, Dr. Thomas Valvano, interviewed the parents and differs from his
final findings, but Hahn said he should have been made aware of the report so he
could question Valvano about the statements. Valvano testified Wednesday and has
since returned to Oregon, where he now lives.

“All of this from an
investigative standpoint is a complete and absolute surprise,” said Hahn, adding
that he said he should have received the file during discovery. “That raises
three issues that I would have utilized with great prominence in my cross
examination of Dr. Valvano.”

Judge Terence Bourke will rule on the motion
for the mistrial this morning.

This was the fourth straight day Hahn
sought to have the case thrown out before it reached the jury, but the first
time DeCecco asked for time to prepare a response before Bourke
ruled.

Court records show Hahn filed his demand for discovery in June
2008. Discovery is when attorneys for both sides must share the evidence they
have gathered.

Hahn said he spotted the file sitting in a box on
DeCecco’s floor while the two editing an audio recording of an interview with
Benz that was played for the jury Thursday. That editing delayed the start of
the trial from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

The file in question was created by
the Sheboygan County Division of Social Services, which conducted an
investigation in cooperation with but separate from the Sheboygan County
Sheriff’s Department after the girl’s injury was discovered. The injury, an
inch-long vaginal tear, was discovered the same day the child was cared for at
Our Lady of the Lakes Child Care Center in Random Lake, where Benz was

director.
(2 of 3)

Benz, 51, is charged with felony child abuse and
three counts of misdemeanor resisting or obstructing an officer. Her trial began
Monday after 2½ years of delays from a 10-month investigation, numerous pretrial
motions and two adjourned trial dates.

The case file has not yet been
mentioned in the presence of the jury, as Hahn presented his motion after the
jury was sent home for the day Thursday. After the motion, social worker Laura
Lemon was called to testify as an unscheduled witness about the contents of the
case file.

Lemon said such files are typically given to the District
Attorney’s Office upon request, but she did not know if it was requested in this

case or when. The file includes a record of people contacted during Lemon’s
investigation, a final report and documentation gathered throughout the
investigation.

The case was closed Aug. 14, 2007, because no perpetrator
had been identified, Lemon said.

The key section cited by Hahn was a note
from a Social Services employee who fielded the call from Valvano and reported
that he wanted the agency to know the parents could not yet be ruled out and the
incident could have happened June 25. Valvano said at that point the day care
appeared the “most suspicious” in terms of where the injury likely
happened.

Valvano testified Wednesday that the injuries occurred 12 to 24
hours prior to his examining the child at 2 a.m. June 28.

Another case

note said Valvano told Social Services in a June 28 meeting at Children’s
Hospital in Milwaukee that the girl’s injury could have been caused by a finger,
and there is no indication a sharp object was used or what exactly caused the
injury.

Benz in third interview: ‘I don’t recall’

The
shortened day of testimony preceding Hahn’s motion included a third recorded
interview with Benz in which she changed key details from prior interviews and
repeatedly said “I don’t recall” when confronted about
inconsistencies.

The interview was conducted by Detective Mark Mancl of
the Sheboygan County Sheriff’s Department on July 26, 2007, after serving a
search warrant at Benz’s home.
(3 of 3)

Mancl focused several of his
questions on Benz’s alleged actions after a June 29, 2007, interview. After Benz
told Mancl then that she changed only two of the girl’s diapers on the day in
question, two day care employees testified that she called and asked them to say
they changed two other diapers when they hadn’t.

In the recording played
Thursday, Benz said she didn’t recall discussing the case with anyone other than
Ed Ritger, an attorney affiliated with the day care, didn’t recall telling one
girl she had been framed ­ as the girl testified she did ­ and didn’t
recall leaving a voicemail saying she messed up and needed help. That voicemail
was played in court Tuesday.

Benz did, however, say for the first time
that she changed all of the victim’s diapers on the day in question. She would
not say why she said otherwise in the two prior interviews, June 27 and
29.

Benz also wouldn’t say why she claimed June 29 that a volunteer had
been caring for the infants during the victim’s first 90 minutes at the day care

when on June 27 she didn’t list that worker as one of the people present. Benz
then said she didn’t recall if the woman was there or had worked with the
infants.

The woman, Rita Schmid, has testified she arrived at 6:30 a.m.
­ around the time the victim did ­ but left when Benz said she wasn’t
needed. She also said Benz called her after the June 29 interview and asked her
to say she worked until 8 a.m. and saw the victim in good spirits.

Asked
directly, Benz repeated previous denials in saying she has no knowledge of the
girl’s injuries and didn’t cause them.

“There was nothing wrong. I had no
concerns when (the victim) left at 4 o’clock,” Benz says in the interview before
deflecting responsibility. “This is the first time dad picks (her) up, and now
we have a problem.”

More defense witnesses testify

The five-hour delay
further disrupted scheduling for the trial, which was to end today. The
prosecution still has not formally rested its case, as Mancl has been on and off
the stand three times to allow witnesses for the defense to testify as
originally scheduled.

The defense witnesses Thursday included a
psychologist who evaluated Benz and agreed with her prior diagnoses of being
manic-depressive and bi-polar and suffering from depression and anxiety. Dr.
Gene Braaksma said Benz was taking anti-depressants and mood stabilizers in June
2007.

Braaksma, who spent about seven hours testing Benz and looking
through her mental health history, said she is “limited in her capability” to
deal with stress. In response to a question by DeCecco referencing Benz
allegedly asking the workers to lie and forging a document, Braaksma said he
would expect a person with Benz’s diagnoses to “crumble” rather than take
logical action to cover a crime.

Benz, 51, is charged with felony
child abuse and three counts of misdemeanor resisting or obstructing an officer.
Her trial began Monday after 2½ years of delays from a 10-month investigation,
numerous pretrial motions and two adjourned trial dates.

The case file
has not yet been mentioned in the presence of the jury, as Hahn presented his
motion after the jury was sent home for the day Thursday. After the motion,
social worker Laura Lemon was called to testify as an unscheduled witness about
the contents of the case file.

Lemon said such files are typically given
to the District Attorney’s Office upon request, but she did not know if it was
requested in this case or when. The file includes a record of people contacted
during Lemon’s investigation, a final report and documentation gathered
throughout the investigation.

The case was closed Aug. 14, 2007, because
no perpetrator had been identified, Lemon said.

The key section cited by
Hahn was a note from a Social Services employee who fielded the call from
Valvano and reported that he wanted the agency to know the parents could not yet
be ruled out and the incident could have happened June 25. Valvano said at that
point the day care appeared the “most suspicious” in terms of where the injury
likely happened.

Valvano testified Wednesday that the injuries occurred
12 to 24 hours prior to his examining the child at 2 a.m. June
28.

Another case note said Valvano told Social Services in a June 28
meeting at Children’s Hospital in Milwaukee that the girl’s injury could have
been caused by a finger, and there is no indication a sharp object was used or
what exactly caused the injury.

Benz in third interview: ‘I don’t recall’

The
shortened day of testimony preceding Hahn’s motion included a third recorded
interview with Benz in which she changed key details from prior interviews and
repeatedly said “I don’t recall” when confronted about
inconsistencies.

The interview was conducted by Detective Mark Mancl of
the Sheboygan County Sheriff’s Department on July 26, 2007, after serving a
search

Reach Eric Litke at (920) 453-5119 and

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