10/19/1999 – PFIZER REJECTS NEUTRAL, COURT-APPOINTED EXPERT

Here is news release in a pivotal wrongful death case involving Zoloft.
For more information on this case, you may want to visit
(drugawareness.org/memorial/matt-miller)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (OCTOBER 19, 1999):

PLAINTIFFS WILLING TO HAVE SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE IN WRONGFUL
DEATH/SUICIDE CASE AGAINST MANUFACTURER OF ZOLOFT MEASURED BY NEUTRAL,
COURT-APPOINTED EXPERTS. PFIZER IS NOT.

MARK AND CHERYL MILLER OF KANSAS CITY HAVE FILED SUIT AGAINST PFIZER,
ALLEGING THAT ITS $2 BILLION DOLLAR PER YEAR PSYCHOACTIVE DRUG “ZOLOFT”
CAUSED THEIR 13 YEAR OLD SON TO COMMIT SUICIDE 7 DAYS AFTER HE WAS
GIVEN SAMPLES OF THE DRUG. PFIZER VEHEMENTLY DENIES THAT ITS DRUG
CAUSES ANY PATIENT TO COMMIT ACTS OF VIOLENCE OR SUICIDE.

TAKING THEIR CUE FROM A RECENT SUPREME COURT OPINION, THE MILLERS HAVE
SUGGESTED THAT THE JUDGE COULD AND SHOULD APPOINT A “NEUTRAL”,
OBJECTIVE EXPERT TO ADVISE HER AS TO WHETHER THE EXPERTS ON BOTH SIDES
ARE USING “SCIENTIFICALLY RELIABLE” METHODOLOGIES AND REASONING.

THE MILLERS’ COUNSEL, ANDY VICKERY OF HOUSTON, TEXAS
(andy@…) SAID THAT HE WAS DISAPPOINTED WITH PFIZER’S
UNWILLINGNESS TO HAVE A NEUTRAL SCIENTIST ADVISE THE COURT. “THE DRUG
COMPANIES YAP AND YAP ABOUT JUNK SCIENCE ALL OF THE TIME,” VICKERY
SAID, “BUT IT SEEMS TO ME THAT `JUNK SCIENCE’ TO THEM MERELY MEANS
SCIENCE FROM SOMEONE THAT THEY AREN’T PAYING AND CAN’T CONTROL”. THE
MILLERS’ PRINCIPAL LIABILITY EXPERT, DR. DAVID HEALY, WROTE THE HIGHLY
ACCLAIMED HARVARD PRESS BOOK, “THE ANTIDEPRESSANT ERA”, AND HAS ALREADY
BEEN RECEIVED BY ONE FEDERAL COURT AS A QUALIFIED EXPERT IN THIS AREA.

FEDERAL JUDGE KATHRYN VRATIL OF KANSAS CITY WILL DECIDE THE MOTION.

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10/19/1999 – Paxil Lawsuit Filed

This article just ran in the Salt Lake Tribune about a lawsuit filed
against the makers of Paxil. Two years ago this young woman and her
boyfriend found my members.aol.com/atracyphd web site. They called me
for help as they came to the realization that what they thought was
“helping” her was actually the problem – her medication. She was very
sensitive to medications. While on the SSRI antidepressants, she became
so suicidal that her boyfriend, a brain chemist, had to handcuff her to
him in order to keep her from hurting herself! Their story will give
you some insight as to what a nightmare these medications can cause for
some people.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
———

Instead of making her well, woman says drug sent her …
Spinning Out of Control

Monday, October 18, 1999

BY SHAWN FOSTER
THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE

Natalia Victorovna Sevastianenko, a Utah college student from the
former Soviet republic of Belarus, had severe stomach pains. But a
doctor and nurse practitioner thought the discomfort might be a symptom
of depression.

After all, their patient was thousands of miles from home and alone in
a foreign country.

The medical staff recommended she take the anti-depressant Prozac.
After a series of phobic episodes and fainting, the staff changed the
prescription to a related drug, Paxil. That was when Sevastianenko said
she began to think about suicide. She made five attempts on her life
and was haunted by obsessive, irrational thoughts about hurting her
boyfriend and others.

Now, Sevastianenko is suing the pharmaceutical company that produces
Paxil for failing to provide “proper, honest [and] candid warnings.”

More at…..

http://www.sltrib.com/1999/oct/10181999/utah/39162.htm

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10/17/1999 – Fen-Phen Settlement on Shaky Ground

To our ICFDA Subscribers–

It was announced on Friday that American Home Products, maker of Redux
and Pondimin, is being sued by 11,000 plaintiffs. Now the majority
of those afflicted with heart and lung problems from the drug, 8,000
in all, say they are not interested in the proposed $3.75 billion
settlement offer.

Why should they be?

“I don’t know if there is an individual in the United States that would
qualify for $1.5 million under this settlement,” said Marc Bern, whose
New York City law firm represents 5,000 plaintiffs.

This case should serve as a warning to those companies now marketing
other SSRI medications which can have similar adverse effects in their
patient population. The users of these serotonergic medications
represent a much larger population than Fen-Phen users–now upwards
of 50 million individuals worldwide!

If this is the largest product liability suit to date, what might the
future bring?

For the full story, click on the link below.–Dr Ann Tracy, Executive
Director, ICFDA

Settlement on Shaky Ground
Thousands of Fen-Phen Users May Reject Offer

By Amy Westfeldt
The Associated Press

N E W A R K, N.J., Oct. 14 — Thousands of people suing American Home
Products Corp. for injuries allegedly suffered while taking the
fen-phen diet drug combination won’t participate in a proposed $3.75
billion settlement, threatening the resolution of one of the largest
product liability cases ever, lawyers say.

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/fenphen991014.html

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10/13/1999 – Ann Blake-Tracy on San Francisco Radio Saturday

Dr. Ann Tracy, Executive Director of the International Coalition of
Drug Awareness, will be interviewed this Saturday morning (10/16) from
9am to 10am PDT time on KGO Radio in San Francisco. You can listen to
live streaming audio on KGO’s web site at <www.kgo.com>.

[Start times in other Time Zones: MDT=10am; CDT=11am; EDT=Noon]

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10/13/1999 – Attempted Murder by Man on Zoloft

This case out of Maryland is so tragic. The perpetrator took Zoloft
and now has no memory of the incident. Even his mother said he
“hallucinated” on the drug. The young couple were deeply in love and
had a great relationship. This story, too, combines elements of “road
rage” with the attempted murder.

This is just one of many stories we continue to review, now almost
daily, on how these drugs can cause psychotic breaks in some
individuals and no memory of the violence later. Notice also, how sleep
deprivation, a known side-effect of these drugs, contributed to this
incident.

Thanks to one of our ICFDA directors for passing this along.

As a reminder to interested subscribers, if you see articles like
these, please bring them to our attention by forwarding them to
<mmiller1@…>.

———–
Sep. 22, 1999, The Capital

Police Say Man Tried to Kill Wife

An Annapolis man with no history of prior violence was charged
yesterday with trying to kill the wife he adored in a car crash near
the State House earlier this month.

In a mysterious case that still puzzles city police, Douglas Lund, 36,
of 1 Colonial Ave., was ordered held without bond on a charge of
attempted second-degree murder.

He awaits a competency evaluation today in the county detention center,
where he’s being held. Another bail review hearing will follow within
the next few days, a spokesman for the State’s Attorney’s Office said.

Police have found no motive for Mr. Lund’s actions on Sept. 7, when he
crashed his car on Bladen Street and allegedly beat his wife, Amy Lund,
32, an assistant state’s attorney for Dorchester County.

“They were doing great,” said city police Detective Jim Bryant, who
investigated the case with the State’s Attorney’s Office. “He never
abused her in any way. This was one of those off-the-wall things.”

But Mr. Lund’s mother, Jo Ann Lund, blames the drug Zoloft, which her
son was taking for depression.

“He took the drug and started hallucinating,” she said.

Mr. Lund, a full-time student at Bowie State University, had been
suffering sleeplessness for several weeks and had asked his wife to go
for a drive.

About 3 a.m., they were headed home when Mrs. Lund saw her husband run
a red light and switch lanes on Rowe Boulevard, heading toward the
State House, police said.

Driving toward construction site barriers on Bladen Street, he
allegedly unfastened his wife’s seat belt before intentionally crashing
his 1990 Honda Accord into a metal fence, running over several “Road
Closed” signs without hitting the brakes, police said.

Mr. Lund forced his wife from the car, grabbed her neck and hair and
beat her head against the pavement several times, police said.

Grunting, but never speaking, he dragged her about 30 feet from the
scene, Detective Bryant said. Then he slung her body over his shoulder
and carried her across the grassy median between Bladen Street and Rowe
Boulevard.

Crossing Rowe Boulevard, he dumped her on the grass behind low-hanging
tree branches and flagged down a passing vehicle.

It took six hours of surgery to repair her shattered vertebrae,
Detective Bryant said. She also suffered a broken collarbone and
finger, abrasions and a black eye.

She was released Sept. 15 from the Shock-Trauma Center at University
Hospital in Baltimore and is no longer staying in the area, police
said.

According to Mr. Lund’s mother, the Lunds had a loving relationship,
still holding hands after 11 years of dating and marriage.

The message on their anniversary cards this summer was identical:
“Thank you for the best six years of my life.”

With no children, the Lunds, who lived in Annapolis sporadically for
eight years, were apparently on a career track. Mr. Lund had just begun
student teaching in his final semester of college.

According to his mother, he never suffered mental problems, other than
worrying too much. His family calls him “Mr. Applesauce” for his
healthy lifestyle and eating habits, she said.

But Mr. Lund is dyslexic and has Attention Deficit Disorder, and in the
past few months his worries and stress over student teaching became
overwhelming, she said.

“He just panicked about going to the board, and the children being able
to spell better than he did,” Mrs. Lund said.

One morning he visited his mother in tears, and gave her his guns for
fear that he might kill himself.

After three weeks without sleeping and eating, Mr. Lund went to a
doctor who prescribed Zoloft — a drug with warnings of fatal reactions
and mental status changes. He was told to take it on a weekly basis.

Mrs. Lund believes her son was overcome by hallucinations on the
morning of the attack.

Mr. Lund was committed to Sheppard Pratt Health System in Baltimore
County following the offense after he told police he felt like hurting
himself, Detective Bryant said.

He told Detective Bryant he was “dazed” and has no memory of the
incident.

“All he remembers is driving down the road and carrying his wife to the
hospital,” Detective Bryant said. “I thought it was strange that he was
headed the wrong way.”

Mr. Lund had no history of violence, and his wife’s main concern was
that the arrest would tarnish his clean record, Detective Bryant said.

Annapolis Attorney Gill Cochran, who is tentatively representing Mr.
Lund, said he plans to seek detention for his client at a medical
facility such as Sheppard Pratt. He will eventually enter a plea of
“not criminally responsible,” he said.

“Psychological difficulties are clearly involved in this case,” he
said.
Copyright © 1999 The Capital, Annapolis, Md.

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10/01/1999 – Doctor: Link Between Medicines, Killing

Recent article in the Smithville Review regarding Robert Kirkwood’s
tragic experience with anti-depressants.

Two area cases involved anti-depressants
By DENNIS STANLEY, THE SMITHVILLE REVIEW
(Editor’s Note: This is the second of a two-part series.)

http://smithvillereview.edge.net/index.ez?Form.sess_id=8934&Form.sess_key=938122849&viewStory=483

In October, 1993 Wilma J. Adcock of the Antioch Community shot her
nine- and 15- year-old sons in the chest twice with a .357 revolver and
then turned the gun on herself.

In July this year, Rosemarie Kirkwood of Lebanon drove to a scenic
overlook above Center Hill Lake in DeKalb County and shot her two young
children and then shot herself.

Is there a connection? Ann Blake-Tracy, Director of the
International Coalition For Drug Awareness, thinks there’s a definite
connection — anti-depressant medication.

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09/24/1999 – John Horgan New York Times Interview

Here’s an insightful interview from the New York Time with Mr. John
Horgan, entitled “A Heretic Takes On the Science of the Mind.”

In 1996, Mr. Horgan, then a senior writer with The Scientific American,
published “The End of Science: Facing the Limits of Knowledge in the
Twilight of the Scientific Age,” a 281-page essay in which he argued
that scientific inquiry has gone about as far as it can go and that the
questions remaining for it to answer are unanswerable. Many scientists
were outraged, but the book sold nearly 200,000 copies.

This month, Mr. Horgan will no doubt be making a new set of enemies
with the release of his latest work — “The Undiscovered Mind — How
the Human Mind Defies Replication, Medication and Explanation” (Free
Press, $25). “I think of myself as a heretic,” he says, “who is
challenging the central dogma that scientific progress is eternal.”

Copyright 1999 The New York Times Company

http://www10.nytimes.com/library/national/science/092199sci-conversatio
n-horgan.html

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09/23/1999 – Analysis of Sudden Retraction in Ashbrook Case

The following comes to the ICFDA courtesy of Ian Goddard, a tireless
researcher and journalist sympathetic to our mission of educating
others to the dangers of mind-altering medications:

The report that Prozac was found in the home of Larry Gene Ashbrook,
who went on a murder spree in a Texas church, has suddenly changed. The
AP reports that investigator “Lt. Mark Krey retracted his earlier
remarks in which he said police found a vial of the antidepressant
Prozac with Ashbrook’s name on it.” [1]

The new story is that the only medications in the house were his
fathers, but the father of Larry is named Jack — two different names!
How could police have mistaken a vial with the name “Jack” on it for
one with the name “Larry” on it? The initial report states:

“A doctor had prescribed the anti-depressant drug Prozac for Larry Gene
Ashbrook … police found a Prozac vial with Ashbrook’s name and want
to ask doctors why it was prescribed. …FBI officials said they ALSO
found nine vials of prescription drugs for Jack Ashbrook…” (emphasis
added) [2]

So the initial report clearly indicates that a distinction had been
made between vials with “Larry” on them and vials with “Jack” on them,
since nine vials belonged to Jack and one vial belonged to Larry. It
also stipulates that since the Prozac vial was Larry’s, they planned to
take the next step of contacting the doctor who made the prescription,
which indicates that they were really sure it said “Larry,” not “Jack.”

Furthermore, the initial Star-Telegram report said that Larry’s father
was “his anchor to reality and his caretaker to ensure he took his
medication.” But now it seems that his father did not ensure he took
his medication because it suddenly seems that he took no medication.
There out is to say he took another medication.

Gee, this certainly appears to have all the signs of a cover-up. In
fact, such a dramatic change of story is prima-facie evidence of a
cover-up. The WorldNetDaily recently reported that anti-psychiatry
activist Dennis Clarke

“…claims that pharmaceutical companies go to great lengths and
expense to cover up the problems that take place. When an incident of
violence occurs, the pharmaceutical “crash teams” go to work to keep
things quiet, according to Clarke.

Teams of psychiatrists are sent to the places where incidents take
place and quickly work to see that medical records are kept sealed,
doctors are convinced to remain silent, and victims are given
monetary payments to prevent them from ever going to court.

“It’s all being covered up, and it’s deliberate. There are billions
and billions of dollars at stake here,” explained Clarke. …” [3]

Think how easy it could be, a couple million dollars could change a lot
of stories, like maybe the one that just changed. Such expenses could
easily be less than the loses in sales that would occur if people
realize that these drugs are harmful and if law suits start rolling in
not only from users but the people they killed. Clearly, there needs to
be an investigation of this now-we-found-it-now-we-didn’t
investigation.

[1] AP: Police retract remarks about drugs found:
http://www.express-news.net/auth/ennews/ap/texas/d0645.html

[2] The Star-Telegram: Prozac found at Wedgwood
Baptist killer’s house. By Kathy Sanders 9/20/99:
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:METRO22/1:METRO22092199.ht
ml
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:DFW2/1:DFW2092199.html

[3]
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/bluesky_bresnahan/19990429_xex_doping_our_
k.sht
ml

GODDARD’S JOURNAL: http://www.erols.com/igoddard/journal.htm

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09/21/1999 – Prozac Found at Wedgwood Baptist Killer’s House

This just released today.

Prozac found at Wedgwood Baptist killer’s house
By Kathy Sanders
Star-Telegram Staff Writer

FORT WORTH — A doctor had prescribed the anti- depressant drug Prozac
for Larry Gene Ashbrook, but investigators are unsure whether he had
been taking it when he killed seven people and then himself in a
southwest Fort Worth church last week, police said yesterday.

http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:TOPSTORY/1:TOPSTORY092199.html

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09/18/1999 – Robert Kirkwood, ICFDA Director, Speaks Out

Mr. Robert Kirkwood of Lebanon, Tennessee, lost his family to
antidepressants. He now serves as an area director in Tennesse, and
only weeks after his loss, he is courageously trying to educate others
to the dangers these drugs pose. This article appeared recently in the
Smithville Review. It’s entitled–

Grieving father warns of drug dangers: Wife, mother who took lives of
their two young children was under treatment.

http://smithvillereview.edge.net/index.ez?viewStory=474

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