EFFEXOR: Death/Possible Suicide: England

Paragraph four reads:  “Post-mortem tests showed the 44-year-old had three times the fatal dose of the anti-depressant venlafaxine [Effexor] in her body.”

Fourth paragraph from the end reads:  “Mr Williams recorded an open verdict.”

Mr Bray said before her death she seemed “happy as a lord”, even though she had been threatened with eviction from her home.

Family and friends said they could not imagine Miss Jeynes taking an overdose to kill herself, although confirmed she had taken overdoses before.

Coroner quizzes boyfriend in overdose inquest

10:17am Friday 7th August 2009

THE boyfriend of a Malvern woman who died of a drug overdose was asked by a coroner if he had pushed the pills down her throat himself.

Elizabeth Jeynes was found in bed by her boyfriend with her eyes “rolling”, an inquest was told.

She was pronounced dead on arrival at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, Worcester, at about 2pm on Thursday, March 26, after ambulance crews had battled to resuscitate her.

Post-mortem tests showed the 44-year-old had three times the fatal dose of the anti-depressant venlafaxine in her body.

Her boyfriend George Bray said he received a call from Miss Jeynes at 1.30am on the day of her death saying that she was bored.

Mr Bray and friend Alan Cooper went to her home in Langland Avenue, Malvern, and took her back to Mr Cooper’s flat where she was put to bed because they believed she was drunk.

Mr Bray said he had not seen the mother-of-three take any pills or alcohol, although he said he could smell drink on her and that she was “stumbling all over the place”.

When Mr Bray got up at 7am, he noticed something was wrong.

“All I could see was just her eyes rolling and that’s when I called the ambulance,” said Mr Bray.

“I tried to talk to her and put a bit of water on her face.”

Mr Bray said before her death she seemed “happy as a lord”, even though she had been threatened with eviction from her home.

Family and friends said they could not imagine Miss Jeynes taking an overdose to kill herself, although confirmed she had taken overdoses before.

Worcestershire coroner Geraint Williams asked Mr Bray: “Did you hold her down and force tablets down her throat? Did you spike her drink with tablets and force it down her secretly?”

Mr Bray answered “no” to both questions.

Mr Williams told family and friends: “You may think this man has murdered Miss Jeynes, that he’s a liar but I can only go on the evidence. I have no evidence to suggest he’s not telling me the truth.”

Mr Cooper was warned he risked facing a criminal charge of perjury after he gave inconsistent answers about how long he had known Miss Jeynes, the time they arrived at her flat and when the ambulance was called.

Mr Williams said Mr Bray was “unconvincing” and that Mr Cooper was “unreliable” and “evasive”.

“I find both of those witnesses to be unsatisfactory and in some regards, dishonest,” he said.

Mr Williams said if Mr Bray had called an ambulance at about 7am and Miss Jeynes was pronounced dead at 2pm, crews must have been working to revive her for four to five hours inside the flat which was “inconceivable”.

But Mr Williams said he was satisfied that Miss Jeynes took the overdose voluntarily and that the postmortem examination showed no physical injuries to suggest she had been held down.

Mr Williams recorded an open verdict.

After the inquest Miss Jeynes’ daughter Katie said: “My mum was a kind person who would help anyone. She can rest in peace now.”

Miss Jeynes’ mother Hannah Passey said: “I lost my son Kenneth Passey more than 20 years ago in a car crash. Now I have lost my daughter.”

Her best friend, Margaret Ives, of Marsh Close, Malvern, said: “That woman had a heart of gold. She was a goodt-hearted lady.”

1,047 total views, 3 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Kills Mother & His Own Daughter – Michigan

Third paragraph from the end reads:  “Donna Vanniekerk told Defense Attorney Lesley Kranenberg that her husband  ‘used to be kind and loving but he turned mean and vindictive’  after his father died in 2004. She said he had been seeing a therapist and taking medication for depression.

Paragraph five reads:  “Vanniekerk was found in a bed in the motel and arrested and now is charged with two counts of open murder. He listened Thursday as the first witnesses testified in his preliminary examination before Calhoun County District Court Judge John Holmes. Testimony will continue in September when a pathologist is expected to testify that Brenda Vanniekerk and her granddaughter Laura Vanniekerk died from an overdose of medication.”

http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/article/20090807/NEWS01/908070314/1002/NEWS01/Wife-testifies-against-man-in-slayings

Wife testifies against man in slayings

Trace Christenson • The Enquirer • August 7, 2009

As Johan Vanniekerk straddled his wife, hitting and choking her, she told him she couldn’t breathe.Advertisement

“I know,” Donna Vanniekerk remembers him saying, “because I am going to kill you tonight.”

“I started screaming and he started strangling me harder. He said, ‘Don’t worry about the girls. When I am done killing you, I am going to kill them, too.”

Johan Vanniekerk didn’t kill anyone that night, April 30, but the 41-year-old Fort Wayne, Ind., man is charged with the May 1 death of his mother, 72, and his daughter, 3, in a Marshall motel. Investigators have alleged that Vanniekerk assaulted his wife in their Fort Wayne apartment and then the next day drove his mother and daughter to Marshall, where they were killed in a motel room.

Vanniekerk was found in a bed in the motel and arrested and now is charged with two counts of open murder. He listened Thursday as the first witnesses testified in his preliminary examination before Calhoun County District Court Judge John Holmes. Testimony will continue in September when a pathologist is expected to testify that Brenda Vanniekerk and her granddaughter Laura Vanniekerk died from an overdose of medication.

Donna Vanniekerk said she and her husband had been married 12 years but the relationship had soured and the couple separated because of his depression.

On the night of April 30, she said her husband entered their apartment a few minutes after a male co-worker, who was repairing some computers, had left.

“He took me down the hall and he put me on the bed,” Donna Vanniekerk told Prosecutor Susan Mladenoff. “He climbed on top of me and started hitting me and strangling me.”

A few minutes later the assault stopped and she said her husband made her promise he could move back with her and their three daughters and they would be together. She said she decided to act normally “because I thought I was dead and he was going to kill me and the girls.”

The next morning she prepared to go to work, took Laura to the apartment of her mother-in-law Brenda Vanniekerk, who provided child care, and then took the two older girls to school. There, an administrator called police and later Johan Vanniekerk realized the authorities were involved.
(2 of 2)

The couple exchanged some phone calls and text messages but when Donna Vanniekerk and the police went to Brenda Vanniekerk’s apartment, they found she and her granddaughter were gone.

At 4:15 p.m. that Friday, Donna Vanniekerk received a text message from her husband which said “we have reached the point of no return,” and then another which said “this is all your fault, you have no one to blame but yourself.”

She continued to call her husband and, when he finally answered, she asked about her mother-in-law.

“She is already dead,” she said her husband replied.

And when Donna Vanniekerk asked about Laura, her daughter, he said, “she is dead, too.”

“I started screaming and said she is my baby. He said, ‘not anymore,’ and hung up.”

Donna Vanniekerk told Defense Attorney Lesley Kranenberg that her husband “used to be kind and loving but he turned mean and vindictive” after his father died in 2004. She said he had been seeing a therapist and taking medication for depression.

Marshall Patrol Officer Andrew Groeneveld testified he was one of several officers to enter two rooms rented by Vanniekerk at the Comfort Inn in Marshall.

Groeneveld said in the room he entered shortly after 5:30 p.m., they found Vanniekerk on one bed, with labored breathing, and the child already dead on another bed.

Trace Christenson can be reached at 966-0685 or tchrist@battlecr.gannett .

1,715 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT, PAIN KILLER & ALCOHOL: Husband Kills Wife of 29 yrs & Self: TX

Note from Dr. Tracy: Antidepressants and pain killers SHOULD NOT be used
in combination! I absolutely cannot believe how common this is that doctors
will prescribe these drugs together and then add alcohol on top of that?!

Also the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a
craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.
Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant in the body.
_________________________________________________

Paragraph five reads: "Edwards father, Carl Edwards of Longview told the
East Texas News that his son was taking pain and depression medication and
routinely drank. ‘He would drink tequila in the evenings and we all know
alcohol and drugs don’t mix,’ said Edwards shortly after returning from
delivering his granddaughters to their maternal grandparents."

_http://www.ktre.com/Global/story.asp?S=10781274&nav=2FH5

_ (http://www.ktre.com/Global/story.asp?S=10781274&nav=2FH5)
_Husband kills wife and himself with children in home_
(mip://02e30f08/default.html#)
Connie Mae Edwards was apparently shot by her husband, who then killed
himself

By Donna McCollum – _bio_
(http://www.ktre.com/Global/story.asp?S=9747103&nav=menu118_10_2) | _email_ (mailto:dwiggins@ktre.com)

NACOGDOCHES, TX (KTRE) – New information on a murder suicide investigation
that happened around 1:30 Thursday morning. The normally quiet ‘Village
Gate’ subdivision off Park Street in Nacogdoches was awakened by the sound of
gunfire and screaming children.

Today the neighborhood has returned to its peaceful nature, but neighbors
are still wondering what made Carlton Wayne Edwards shoot and kill his
wife, Donnie Mae Edwards. The 46 year old woman was shot twice with a handgun,
the same one Edwards used on himself. All this happened with the couple’s
two young daughters in the same house.

"The older daughter, she was terrified last night when it first happened,"
Art Wheeles, a neighbor said. "Then she got her senses together and then s
he was real alert. She knew what she was talking about. She gave the
police department a real good description of everything that happened. Both of
them were coping with it quite well and they knew whatever happened, they
couldn’t undo it."

Tonight the children Wheeles would voluntarily take to Vacation Bible
School are with an older sister and maternal grandparents in Mississippi.
Wheeles also volunteered with another neighbor to clean up the blood spill left
in the hallway. "We didn’t want the family to return for the girl’s things
and see this," explained Wheeles. Following an autopsy, their parents will
be buried in Mississippi.

Edwards father, Carl Edwards of Longview told the East Texas News that his
son was taking pain and depression medication and routinely drank. "He
would drink tequila in the evenings and we all know alcohol and drugs don’t
mix," said Edwards shortly after returning from delivering his granddaughters
to their maternal grandparents.

The Edwards are SFA alum’s. Mr. Edwards just got a food delivery job. His
wife was a dietician with Aramark at SFA. They were married on Christmas
day, 29 years ago. The couple had recently moved back to Nacogdoches after
selling a home in Mississippi. According to the older Edwards, his son and
daughter-in-law were experiencing financial difficulties, yet preparing to
build a new house. Edwards said, "I’m afraid you’re going to see more of this
kind of thing as the economy worsens."

©2009 KTRE. All rights reserved. This material may not be published,
broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

1,776 total views, 6 views today

Paxil: Iraq War Vet Suicidal: Holds Police At Bay for 9 Hours: Michigan

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: Yet another suicidal vet who first overdosed on his
antidepressant and Xanax and then became homicidal enough that he was going
to shoot police – often in an attempt to commit what is now called suicide
by cop. These drugs produce both suicide and violence as we see once again
in this case.
________________________________________________________________

First three sentences read: "A suicidal veteran who held Howell Police at
bay for more than nine hours Thursday night into early this morning is
hospitalized and undergoing psychiatric evaluation. Howell Police Chief George
Basar says that just before 6 oâ

829 total views, 2 views today

PAXIL: Road Rage Death: Woman Drives on Wrong Side of Freeway: No Alcoh…

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: Why are police still looking for the reason why she
was driving the wrong way on the freeway when they already know she was on
Paxil? A large number of these cases of driving the wrong way on the freeway
involve these antidepressants.
__________________________________________________________

Paragraph one reads: "A Monroeville woman who died in a crash while
driving the wrong way on the Pennsylvania Turnpike was awaiting trial on two
cases involving drugged driving, according to court records."

Paragraphs eight and nine read: "Allegheny County Judge Jeffrey Manning
had issued an arrest warrant for Baker because she failed to appear July 15
for a hearing on drugged driving charges filed in April by Monroeville
police. Baker was found at 1:39 a.m. April 26 in a sport utility vehicle that
was hanging over the edge of a hillside, according to a police affidavit."

"Baker was incoherent and unable to pass three field sobriety tests but
there was no noticeable odor of alcohol on her breath, the affidavit says.
She told the officer she was on Paxil, an antidepressant."

_http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_634872.htm
l_
(http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/pittsburgh/s_634872.html)

By _Brian Bowling
_ (mailto:bbowling@tribweb.com)
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Thursday, July 23, 2009

A Monroeville woman who died in a crash while driving the wrong way on the
Pennsylvania Turnpike was awaiting trial on two cases involving drugged
driving, according to court records.

Andrea Baker, 36, died Tuesday night after striking two east-bound
tractor-trailers near Monroeville as she drove her sport utility vehicle
west-bound, state police said.

Her son, Aiden Baker, 2, who was strapped into a child seat in the SUV,
escaped with a bruised left cheek, police said.

The Allegheny Medical Examiner’s Office ruled Baker’s death accidental and
concluded she died from blunt force trauma to the abdomen and legs.
Toxicology results will be available in three to four months, a medical examiner
said.

The truck drivers were not injured.

State police are still investigating why Baker was traveling in the wrong
direction. A toll ticket found in her vehicle shows that she may have
entered the turnpike at the Allegheny Valley interchange.

Court records show Baker was cited twice in the last year for driving in
the wrong lane. Other citations from police in Pittsburgh, Springdale, East
Deer, West Deer, Tarentum, North Versailles and Edgewood include careless
driving, reckless driving, running a stop sign and ignoring a traffic
control device.

Allegheny County Judge Jeffrey Manning had issued an arrest warrant for
Baker because she failed to appear July 15 for a hearing on drugged driving
charges filed in April by Monroeville police. Baker was found at 1:39 a.m.
April 26 in a sport utility vehicle that was hanging over the edge of a
hillside, according to a police affidavit.

Baker was incoherent and unable to pass three field sobriety tests but
there was no noticeable odor of alcohol on her breath, the affidavit says. She
told the officer she was on Paxil, an antidepressant.

Monroeville police charged Baker with drugged driving again on May 6 after
another motorist called because her sport utility vehicle was weaving.
Baker slurred her words and her eyes had a dazed look, but there was no odor
of alcohol, the police affidavit says. She failed three field sobriety tests.

833 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault of an officer: Australia

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: This sounds too familiar to the Donald Schell case in
Wyoming that went to trial after he took Paxil for two days and then shot
and killed his wife, daughter, infant granddaughter and himself. The jury
ruled in that case that the two antidepressants were the main cause of that
tragic murder/suicide.

Cases like this immediately make me wonder about the P450 2D6 liver enzyme
that is never tested for in patients before giving them an SSRI. There are
about 7 – 10% of the population who lack that liver enzyme because
genetically they did not inherit it. Without the enzyme you cannot metabolize an
antidepressant and you hit toxic levels rapidly.
____________________________________________________________

Paragraph four reads: "Lawyer Ian Pilgrim said that Warren intended to
plead guilty and had been under significant personal and financial stress. He
had started taking anti-depressants two days before the incident, Mr Pil
grim said."

_http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/07/22/assault-accused-giv
en-bail/_
(http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/07/22/assault-accused-given-bail/)

Assault accused given bail
22nd July 2009

©istockphoto/antb

A MAN who allegedly bashed a female police officer with a pick handle
after she went to his home to attend a domestic dispute was released on bail
yesterday.

Gregory Paul Warren, 38, was charged with assault occasioning bodily harm
while armed and serious assault after allegedly attacking two officers at
Urraween on Sunday afternoon.

He was subdued using capsicum spray.

Lawyer Ian Pilgrim said that Warren intended to plead guilty and had been
under significant personal and financial stress. He had started taking
anti-depressants two days before the incident, Mr Pilgrim said.

Prosecutor Sergeant Kathryn Stagoll opposed bail because of Warren’s
unpredictability and volatility. â

954 total views, no views today

Virginia Tech Gunman’s Mental Records Found

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: The most important records in this case have never
been released. These may be interesting but we still need to know what he had
been prescribed over the period of time before the shooting. Roommates
spoke of him taking his antidepressant that morning, but then we never heard
another word about it.

_http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090722/ap_on_re_us/us_virginia_tech_shooting_
(http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090722/ap_on_re_us/us_virginia_tech_shooting)

By BOB LEWIS and SUE LINDSEY, Associated Press Writers Bob Lewis And Sue
Lindsey, Associated Press Writers â

779 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Soldier Charged with Attempted Murder: Colorado

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: Yet ANOTHER antidepressant-induced violent
incident!!!! Just how many of these do we need to witness in one area before society
begins to connect the dots back to these deadly drugs they are giving to so
many soldiers for PTSD?!

How many antidepressant-induced murder cases from the Ft Carson/Colorado
Springs area did I send out last week – 4 or 5? You could almost use
Colorado Springs as a microcosm sounding a warning to the rest of the world about
the potential antidepressant dangers we all face with the widespread use of
these drugs.
__________________________________________________________________

Paragraphs 45 through 47 read: "How did it come to this — a decorated war
veteran who sought help now charged with trying to kill his wife?"

"Delgado’s medical records reveal that in the nearly three months between
his mother’s death and the incident in September, the soldier sought help
four times at the behavioral health unit at the base hospital."

"Each time, he was referred to a civilian doctor. He saw the off-base
doctor twice, and was prescribed anti-depressants, sleeping pills and
anti-anxiety drugs."

_http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/08/06/accused.soldier.ptsd/

_ (http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/08/06/accused.soldier.ptsd/) By Jim
Spellman and Wayne Drash
CNN

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado (CNN) — Army Spc. Thomas Delgado saved lives
as a combat medic on the front lines in Iraq, earning a Purple Heart when a
bomb rocked his vehicle during his nearly yearlong tour. Back home, he was
sometimes assigned the role of insurgent during combat training at a mock
Iraqi village in California.

Thomas Delgado is charged with trying to kill his wife just days after
their fifth wedding anniversary.

"He told me he felt like he never left" Iraq, said his wife, Shayla.

Soon after his return in December 2005, Delgado realized something many
war veterans fail to recognize. He was suffering from post-traumatic stress
and needed help. He complained of "fear of losing self control," "feelings
of hopelessness" and "paranoia," medical records show.

The 25-year-old soldier is now at the center of a controversial attempted
murder case, charged with trying to kill his wife in September 2008. She
says prosecutors have it all wrong. Her husband of five years needs medical
help, not prison. And, she says, he never tried to kill her.

Delgado’s case may become one of the first to be heard at a
soon-to-be-opened special veterans’ trauma court in Colorado. The court was created to
get professional medical care for military veterans suffering from
trauma-related disorders who are accused of crimes. An estimated 20 percent of Iraq
war veterans suffer from _post-traumatic stress disorder_
(http://topics.cnn.com/topics/post_traumatic_stress_disorder) .

Delgado’s only previous run-in with the law was a minor traffic violation.

Delgado medically retired from the Army Wednesday, and was scheduled to
appear Thursday at a bond hearing to decide if he gets sent back to jail
while awaiting his November trial. The hearing may also determine if his case
gets moved to the new veterans’ court.

"I feel like it was 100 percent preventable," Shayla Delgado told CNN.
"All we’ve really wanted this whole time was someone to help us, someone to
give him treatment."

The district attorney’s office, which covers El Paso and Teller Counties,
declined to comment for this story.

Delgado praised his wife for standing by his side.

"I would definitely be another one of the lost causes if I didn’t have her
backing me up in my corner. She’s just been amazing, doing amazing things
on my behalf," he told CNN by phone.

"It’s unfortunate that it took an incident like this to get proper
treatment."

He said his lawyer advised him not to talk about the night in question.
"I’m hoping to stay out of jail," he added.

What really happened?

For the Delgados, the evening of September 24, 2008, just days after their
fifth wedding anniversary, began with drinks and an argument. Then
everything escalated with whirlwind speed.

Shayla Delgado says her husband grabbed a gun and rattled off suicidal
thoughts. "I’ve been thinking about how I’m going to do it," she recalled him
saying. "I just can’t live like this any more. I can’t do it, I can’t do
it."

"He was telling me, ‘Take our son and leave because you don’t want to be
here for this,’" she said, breaking down in tears. "I was really, really
scared."

She says she pleaded, begged him, to get on the phone with his father. The
two spoke. The soldier kept telling his dad how much he loved him, she
says. She rushed to the bedroom, cradling their sleeping year-old son, and
sprinted out of the apartment.

She dropped the infant off at a neighbor’s and returned home, heading
straight to the bathroom where her husband was holed up. She kicked in the
door. "I see him with the gun in his mouth and I just ripped the gun from his
arms and I ran."

It was during that scuffle to wrestle the gun away, prosecutors say, that
the soldier tried to kill his wife, breaking her nose and attempting to
choke her. Prosecutors have charged Thomas Delgado with one count of
first-degree attempted murder and an array of other charges. They have offered a
plea bargain of 5 to 15 years in prison — a deal Delgado has so far rejected.

A police report on the incident says Shayla Delgado was treated for a
broken nose at a hospital, but she had no "visible marks on her neck at that
time." The police affidavit says she told authorities her husband wrapped his
arm around her neck in the fight for the gun. "Ms. Delgado stated that she
was in fear that he was going to kill her or hurt her very badly," the
affidavit says.

She then got away and he pursued her, according to the affidavit. "He
followed her into the bedroom and again attempted to choke her once more," it
says. "Ms. Delgado stated she stopped fighting in belief that he would let
her go and after a few moments he did."

Shayla Delgado told CNN her nose was broken as a result of the struggle
for the gun — not from a malicious, intentional blow from her husband. Her
husband was in crisis, she says, and she saved him from suicide in a violent
scuffle.

Delgado’s medical records, reviewed by CNN, indicate he remembers few
details from that night. Delgado, who was taking the anti-anxiety drug Ativan,
"believes that he got suicidal while intoxicated, got a weapon to kill
himself, his wife wrestled with him through this, called the police, and with
her visible injuries, he was taken into custody for assault and attempted
murder," the medical records say.

"He has limited recall of these events," the records say. "He feels if his
mother had not died, ‘that day’ would not have happened." His mother had
died three months earlier, in June 2008, after battling breast cancer.

Trauma court for veterans

The veterans’ court is being set up in response to an alarming trend: A
growing number of veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are returning
home and committing crimes — from offenses like theft and forgery to more
serious charges like domestic violence and murder. However, the court will
not deal with homicide cases.

Fort Carson is at the epicenter of the problem, with 14 homicides and
attempted homicides there since 2005. Numerous soldiers have been charged with
an array of other offenses.

"If you catch this early, you stop a cycle of people who are
self-medicating or acting out in a violent way," says Ron Crowder, a district court
judge and retired major general from the National Guard who served in Vietnam.

Crowder has been tapped to preside over the new court, which will model
itself after a handful of others already established in the United States.
Veterans and active-duty soldiers accused of crimes will be offered plea
bargains in exchange for mental health treatment that will be rigorously
monitored. The district attorney’s office will be heavily involved in deciding
which cases get sent to the veterans court.

Crowder says the goal of the court is "to get these people the help they
may have not gotten heretofore."

According to a recent U.S. Army study, only 65 percent of authorized
positions at the behavioral health department at Fort Carson were filled in
2008, forcing Army doctors to send half of all cases to civilian doctors off
base.

Fort Carson, home to about 25,000 soldiers, has seen the number of
soldiers seeking help skyrocket to 2,400 walk-in cases a month — or nearly 1 in
every 10 soldiers.

"I’m trying to track my population and identify people who are
symptomatic," said Col. George Brandt, the senior behavioral health officer at the
base hospital.

Brandt came on board last year with a mission to improve mental health
care for troubled soldiers. He has brought staffing levels up to 74 percent,
with a total of 14 psychiatrists, 14 psychologists and 29 social workers. "I
always want more staff and resources," Brandt said. "We’re trying to build
the system right, get the care near where the soldiers are, increase
access."

The facility does not have any in-patient care on the base. Even with
staffing shortcomings, Brandt said, "I’m never going to let a soldier go
without care who asks for it."

One nearby facility utilized by Fort Carson, he said, has a staff
consisting of two-thirds former military members who are specially trained in PTSD.
"If I can’t provide it, I’m going to get a civilian colleague to help me
with that," Brandt said.

Maj. Gen. David Perkins, the new commander of Fort Carson, told CNN the
base has spent a lot of time assessing problems with PTSD and trying to
develop solutions. One of the biggest concerns, he said, is overcoming the
stigma of seeking help.

"This is the key point that we’re focusing on across the Army," he said.
"You have seen, from four-star generals on down, personally come out and
talk about their issues with post-traumatic stress disorder. And this alone
has created a large momentum to taking the stigma away."

A soldier’s journey

Delgado was deployed to _Iraq_ (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/iraq_war) as
a combat medic in January 2005, stationed about 20 miles south of Baghdad.
His war at home began around Christmas of that year.

His medical records show that he "treated more Iraqi casualties than
Americans," but he twice lost comrades — one from war wounds in the field and
another to infection. "States he saw it all," the records say. "He takes
great pride in being a competent combat medic. He notes he has had great
emotional distance, feeling numb and disconnect since his tour."

Delgado’s first job back in the States, at Fort Irwin in California, was
to train combat soldiers in a mock Iraqi village. Sometimes, he dressed in
Army fatigues and battled would-be bad guys; other times, he suited up as an
Iraqi villain, according to his wife.

Delgado first began getting treatment for his PTSD at Fort Irwin,
according to his family. At that time, his mother was dealing with terminal breast
cancer back in the couple’s home state of Colorado. In March 2008, as his
mother’s condition worsened, the Army relocated Delgado to be near his
mother’s side and the couple, now with a young son, moved to Fort Carson.

He worked at the emergency room of Evans Army Community Hospital on base,
and spent his time off with his ailing mother. She died in June 2008, and
according to his wife, that’s when he began to unravel. Three months later,
he was arrested.

How did it come to this — a decorated war veteran who sought help now
charged with trying to kill his wife?

Delgado’s medical records reveal that in the nearly three months between
his mother’s death and the incident in September, the soldier sought help
four times at the behavioral health unit at the base hospital.

Each time, he was referred to a civilian doctor. He saw the off-base
doctor twice, and was prescribed anti-depressants, sleeping pills and
anti-anxiety drugs.

"It scared me, because I didn’t know what was really happening," his wife
said of his troubled state. "I didn’t know what was going on."

Shayla Delgado believes the treatment her husband received was inadequate.
Unfortunately, she says, it took his arrest to get him the care he needed:
in-patient treatment at civilian facilities specializing in PTSD.

While her husband tries to heal from his invisible war wounds, she’s
trying to clear his name.

"It’s just so sad because, you know, my husband’s a really good person,"
she said, weeping. "He deserves to be treated better."

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Experts: Women are drinking more, DUIs are up 28.8% from 1998-2007

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: After researching and warning for two decades that this crisis with alcohol consumption would come, I can tell you the reason so many women are now drinking is because they are the main ones taking antidepressants which in turn cause overwhelming cravings for alcohol. And it has long been known that women suffer more adverse reactions to antidepressants than men do.

But why cravings for alcohol? These drugs drop the blood sugar causing cravings for sugar and/or alcohol and NutraSweet. Sugar and alcohol initially bring the blood sugar up quickly causing one to instinctively reach for them in a “self medicating” way because they quickly address the low blood sugar level. The problem with doing this is that both substances then drop the sugar levels even lower than before thus producing a vicious cycle of craving more and more sugar and/or alcohol. (To read the science behind this go to www.drugawareness.org)
Another aspect to this increased use in alcohol being tied to antidepressant use is the fact that antidepressants produce mania or Bipolar Disorder so frequently. (See the research article we posted earlier this week showing that 81% of those diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder have been found to have previously taken antidepressants or Ritalin.)
Initially doctors refused to prescribe the first SSRI, Prozac, because of its strong potential to chemically induce mania. There are several types of mania that are recognized. Many have never even heard of these types of mania. And most do not think of these various types of mania when they hear the term Bipolar. Let’s list just a few to shed some additional light on this drinking problem women, who have always taken more antidepressants than men, have developed since these drugs have become so widespread in use.

Pyromania: A compulsion to start fires
Kleptomania: A compulsion to embezzle, shoplift, commit robberies
Dipsomania: An uncontrollable urge to drink alcohol
Nymphomania and erotomania: Sexual compulsions – a pathologic preoccupation with sexual fantasies or activities

So there it is in black and white plain as day – one of the forms of mania, dipsomania, is described as an “uncontrollable urge to drink alcohol.” Could it be any clearer?

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And look at one of the comments from the article below:
“Younger women feel more empowered, more equal to men, and have been beginning to exhibit the same uninhibited behaviors as men,” said Chris Cochran of the California Office of Traffic Safety.
Does that not describe manic behavior – “empowered” or all powerful with grandiose thoughts of one’s self and “uninhibited”? Those have always been earmarks warning of mania.
Hopefully this news about women and drinking will FINALLY wake America up to what first caught my attention with the use of antidepressants – the OVERWHELMING out-of-character cravings for alcohol that is produced by these drugs. (Find much more additional information on this subject at www.drugawareness.org)
Ann Blake Tracy, Ph.D., Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
Website:
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare
& CD or audio tape on safe withdrawal: “Help! I Can’t Get
Off My Antidepressant!”
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Experts: Women are drinking more, DUIs are up

http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/ap/brand/SIG=br2v03/*http://www.ap.org

AP – Graphic shows driving under the influence arrests for men and women for 1998 and 2007; includes alcohol-impaired …
By LISA A. FLAM, Associated Press Writer Lisa A. Flam, Associated Press Writer 10 mins ago

NEW YORK – It seemed too horrendous even to imagine. But the case of the mother who caused a deadly wrong-way crash while drunk and stoned is part of a disturbing trend: Women in the U.S. are drinking more, and drunken-driving arrests among women are rising rapidly while falling among men.

And some of those women, as in the New York case, are getting behind the wheel with kids in the back.

Men still drink more than women and are responsible for more drunken-driving cases. But the gap is narrowing, and among the reasons cited are that women are feeling greater pressures at work and home, they are driving more, and they are behaving more recklessly.

“Younger women feel more empowered, more equal to men, and have been beginning to exhibit the same uninhibited behaviors as men,” said Chris Cochran of the California Office of Traffic Safety.

Another possible reason cited for the rising arrests: Police are less likely to let women off the hook these days.

Nationwide, the number of women arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs was 28.8 percent higher in 2007 than it was in 1998, while the number of men arrested was 7.5 percent lower, according to FBI figures that cover about 56 percent of the country. (Despite the incomplete sample, Alfred Blumstein, a Carnegie Mellon University criminologist, said the trend probably holds true for the country as a whole.)

“Women are picking up some of the dangerously bad habits of men,” said Chuck Hurley, CEO of Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

In New York’s Westchester County, where Diane Schuler’s crash killed her and seven other people last month, the number of women arrested for drunken driving is up 2 percent this year, and officers said they are noticing more women with children in the back seat.

“We realized for the last two to three years, the pattern of more female drivers, particularly mothers with kids in their cars, getting arrested for drunk driving,” said Tom Meier, director of Drug Prevention and Stop DWI for the county.

In one case there, a woman out clubbing with her teenage daughter was sent to prison for causing a wrong-way crash that killed her daughter’s friend.

Another woman was charged with driving drunk after witnesses said she had been drinking all day before going to pick up her children at school. Authorities said the children were scared during the ride, and once they got home, they jumped out of the car, ran to a neighbor’s house and told an adult, who called police. The mother lay passed out in the car, and police said her blood alcohol level was 0.27 percent — more than three times the legal limit.

In California, based on the same FBI figures, women accounted for 18.8 percent of all DUI arrests in 2007, up from 13.5 percent in 1998, according to the California Office of Traffic Safety.

Nearly 250 youngsters were killed in alcohol-related crashes in the U.S. in 2007, and most of them were passengers in the car with the impaired driver, according to the National Highway Safety Administration.

“Drunk drivers often carry their kids with them,” said MADD’s Hurley. “It’s the ultimate form of child abuse.”

Arrests of drunken mothers with children in the car remain rare, but police officers can generally list a few.

In the Chicago suburb of Wheaton, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia‘s daughter was stopped by police after she pulled away from a McDonald’s with three of her kids in the car. She pleaded guilty to drunken driving and was sentenced to 18 months of court supervision.

Sgt. Glen Williams of the Creve Coeur, Mo., police department recalls stopping a suspected drunken driver on her way to pick up two preschoolers.

Sometime later, “she told me it actually changed her life, getting arrested,” he said. “She was forced to get help and realized she’d had a problem.”

The increase in arrests comes as women are drinking excessively more than in the past.

One federal study found that the number of women who reported abusing alcohol (having at least four drinks in a day) rose from 1.5 percent to 2.6 percent over the 10-year period that ended in 2002. For women ages 30 to 44, Schuler’s age group, the number more than doubled, from 1.5 percent to 3.3 percent.

The problem has caught the attention of the federal government. The Transportation Department’s annual crackdown on drunken driving, which begins later this month, will focus on women.

“There’s the impression out there that drunk driving is strictly a male issue, and it is certainly not the case,” said Rae Tyson, spokesman for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. “There are a number of parts of the country where, in fact, the majority of impaired drivers involved in fatal crashes are female.”

Schuler’s relatives have denied she was an alcoholic and said they were shocked to learn of her drug and alcohol use before the July 26 crash. The wreck, about 35 miles north of New York City, killed Schuler, her 2-year-old daughter, her three nieces and three men in an oncoming SUV she hit with her minivan. Schuler’s 5-year-old son survived his injuries.

Schuler, a cable company executive, could have had a drinking problem that her family didn’t know about, said Elaine Ducharme, a psychologist in Connecticut who has seen more excessive drinking, overeating, smoking and drug abuse during the recession.

Unlike men, women tend to drink at home and alone, which allows them to conceal a problem more easily.

Because of this, they seek treatment less often than men, and when they do, it is at a later stage, often when something catastrophic has already happened, said Dr. Petros Levounis, director of the Addiction Institute of New York at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center.

“Our society has taught us that women have an extra burden to be the perfect mothers and perfect wives and perfect daughters and perfect everything,” Levounis said. “They tend to go to great lengths to keep everything intact from an external viewpoint while internally, they are in ruins.”

In the current recession, women’s incomes have become more important because so many men have lost their jobs, experts say. Men are helping out more at home, but working mothers still have the bulk of the child rearing responsibilities.

“Because of that, they have a bigger burden then most men do,” said clinical psychologist Carol Goldman. “We have to look at the pressures on women these days. They have to be the supermom.”

And just becoming a parent doesn’t mean people will stop using drugs or alcohol, Ducharme said: “If you have a real addictive personality, just having a child isn’t going to make the difference.”

___

Associated Press writers Solvej Schou in Los Angeles, Mark Tarm in Chicago and Betsy Taylor in St. Louis contributed to this report.


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DEPRESSION MED: Woman Stabs To Death A Man On A Stairwell: Australia

Paragraph three reads:  “Defence solicitor Bernie Balmer said Epshtein was on medication for anxiety, bipolar, depression, pain and one to lower her heart rate.”

http://www.theage.com.au/national/woman-in-court-over-stabbing-murder-20090803-e6l0.html

Woman in court over stabbing murder

Steve Butcher

August 3, 2009 – 12:04PM

A 21-year-old woman charged with the stabbing murder last week of a man in a St Kilda stairwell has appeared in court.

A lawyer for Natasha Epshtein told Melbourne Magistrates Court today his client had been treated by two doctors for five separate health conditions.

Defence solicitor Bernie Balmer said Epshtein was on medication for anxiety, bipolar, depression, pain and one to lower her heart rate.

Epshtein appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate Dan Muling in a low-cut, black t-shirt with close-cropped hair and tattoos on her upper chest.

She is charged with murdering Peter James Len on July 30.

Mr Balmer said she would consent to a DNA sample being taken at a later date.

She was remanded to appear again on November 30.

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