ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Mother Kills Daughter’s Rapist: Spain

First paragraph reads: “A MUM who killed her daughter’s rapist by throwing petrol over him and setting him alight has been jailed for nine years. Maria del Carmen Garcia Espinosa’s daughter Veronica was raped by a man from their home town, Benejuzar, in 1998 when she was just 13. Veronica’s mother has been in counselling and on anti-depressants ever since. But in June 2005, the rapist was on weekend leave from prison, where he was serving a nine-year sentence, and Maria del Carmen saw him in the family’s local bar.”

http://www.euroweeklynews.com/2009073061426/news/costa-blanca/jail-for-mum-who-killed-her-daughters-rapist.html

Thu, 30 July 16:33 2009

Jail for mum who killed her daughter’s rapist

BENEJUZAR

The deceased ‘provoked and intimidated’ the mother, who had been depressed since the rape

A MUM who killed her daughter’s rapist by throwing petrol over him and setting him alight has been jailed for nine years. Maria del Carmen Garcia Espinosa’s daughter Veronica was raped by a man from their home town, Benejuzar, in 1998 when she was just 13. Veronica’s mother has been in counselling and on anti-depressants ever since. But in June 2005, the rapist was on weekend leave from prison, where he was serving a nine-year sentence, and Maria del Carmen saw him in the family’s local bar.

The bar was next to the stop where Veronica caught her bus every day, leading her mother to believe his presence in the area was aimed at provoking and intimidating the family. Antonio Velasco is said to have approached Maria del Carmen and asked her how her daughter was in order to scare her. A distraught Maria del Carmen returned home and fetched a vat of petrol, a court heard. She then went back to the bar where she doused her daughter’s rapist in fuel and set him alight.

The woman was then found hours later in Alicante ‘in a disoriented state’, police say. Meanwhile, the man died in Valencia’s La Fe hospital from third-degree burns affecting 60 per cent of his body. Family members of the arrested woman say the deceased’s relatives had sold their assets to avoid having to pay compensation owed to Veronica, now 24. But Veronica’s mother has now been ordered to pay them 140,000 euros. She has also been sentenced to nine years in prison.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Police Officer Dead: Shooter Dies Also: shooter was o…

Headline reads:
Coroner: “Shooter was prescribed antidepressants.”
Paragraph four reads: “The shooting left Sgt. David Kinterknecht dead, along with the suspect, Dennis Gurney, who lived at the home.”

http://www.montrosepress.com/articles/2009/07/30/news/doc4a71057ebf681398337489.txt

Injured officers face lengthy recovery

Coroner: Shooter was prescribed antidepressants

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By Katharhynn Heidelberg
Daily Press Senior Writer
Published/Last Modified on Thursday, July 30, 2009 4:11 AM MDT

MONTROSE ­ Two officers shot Saturday can expect an extensive recovery process, the chief of police said.

Montrose Police officers Larry Witte and Rodney Ragsdale were hit in the legs with shotgun blasts while responding to a domestic violence call in the Cobble Creek area.

“I think it’s going to be weeks to months before we see them back to work,” Police Chief Tom Chinn said.

The shooting left Sgt. David Kinterknecht dead, along with the suspect, Dennis Gurney, who lived at the home.

Witte was released from Montrose Memorial Hospital Tuesday, to a hero’s welcome from other officers. Ragsdale’s release from St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction was expected today, Chinn said.

He said both men will need extensive rehab.

­­­

The above is an excerpt from the story that appeared in today’s print edition. The excerpts, usually the first few paragraphs, may not reflect all relevant information that was reported. We encourage readers to obtain the full story by reading the print edition or our e-edition, To subscribe, call (970) 252-7081 or click on the subscription link on the main page.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 52% of Women Who Committed Suicide in 2006 Were taking a…

Paragraph three reads: “We first looked at antidepressant prescriptions. Of the 776 Scandinavian men in the sample, 259 (32%) (age-adjusted 95% confidence interval [CI]=28.5–35.2) filled a prescription for antidepressants in the 180 days before death. The corresponding figures were 176 of the 333 Scandinavian women in the sample (52%) (CI=46.7–57.5), 32 of the 102 foreign-born men (31%) (CI=21.6–39.5), and 21 of the 44 foreign-born women (43%) (CI=28.7–58.1).”

http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/59/1/116-a

Psychiatr Serv 59:116-a-117, January 2008
doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.59.1.116-a
© 2008 American Psychiatric Association

Letter

Ethnic Differences in Antidepressant Treatment Preceding Suicide in Sweden
To the Editor: In the October 2007 issue Ray and colleagues (1) observed that the odds of receiving treatments for mood disorders in the year preceding suicide were lower for African Americans. The study of racial-ethnic differences in drug utilization among individuals with severe mood disorders is important. We analyzed whether similar undertreatment is present in Sweden, a country of nine million inhabitants. However, because Sweden has a different racial-ethnic composition than the United States, we analyzed country of birth instead of race.

We analyzed all suicides and deaths from undetermined intent among persons aged 18 to 84 in 2006 (N=1,255, or about 95% of all suicides). We examined use of prescription drugs in the 180 days before death. Persons born in Sweden, Denmark, and Norway, representing the Scandinavian countries, were compared with persons born in all other countries.

We first looked at antidepressant prescriptions. Of the 776 Scandinavian men in the sample, 259 (32%) (age-adjusted 95% confidence interval [CI]=28.5–35.2) filled a prescription for antidepressants in the 180 days before death. The corresponding figures were 176 of the 333 Scandinavian women in the sample (52%) (CI=46.7–57.5), 32 of the 102 foreign-born men (31%) (CI=21.6–39.5), and 21 of the 44 foreign-born women (43%) (CI=28.7–58.1).

We also examined use of antipsychotic drugs. Among Scandinavian men, 100 (13%) (CI=10.1–14.5) filled a prescription for an antipsychotic in the 180 days before death. The corresponding figures were 81 of the Scandinavian women (24%) (CI=19.5–28.9), 19 of the foreign-born men (18%) (10.7–25.4), and 16 of the foreign-born women (32%) (CI=19.8–44.6). Use of lithium was 2% or less in all groups.

As a comparison we analyzed use of these drugs among persons aged 18 to 84 years in the Swedish population in 2006 by country of birth. Among Scandinavian men, 6.1% (CI=6.05–6.10) had at least one filled prescription for an antidepressant. The corresponding figure for foreign-born men was 6.5% (CI=6.43–6.59). Among Scandinavian women the figure was 11.7% (CI=11.68–11.76), compared with 11.1% (CI=11.02–11.20) for foreign-born women. We did not analyze differences in inpatient or outpatient admission before suicide, although we have previously commented on postdischarge suicides in Sweden (2).

We have some minor concerns about the study by Ray and colleagues (1). Data used in that study represented suicides in different periods­1986 to 2004. Over those years, at least in Sweden, policies in regard to inpatient care changed. We also suspect that use of antidepressants increased substantially in the United States since the early 1990s as a result of the introduction of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The increase in use of SSRIs in Sweden was sixfold between 1990 and 2004. In the study by Ray and colleagues, the mean age of African Americans who committed suicide was also nearly ten years lower than that of whites, which may indicate socioeconomic or other differences in the underlying white and African-American populations from which the samples were drawn.

Although one might suspect relative undertreatment of psychiatric disorders in the non-Scandinavian population in Sweden, it could not be verified by our analyses because we studied only drug utilization without knowledge of the underlying disease prevalence. However, the rates of prescription were similar for Scandinavians and foreign-born persons in our sample who filled a prescription for an antidepressant in the months before they committed suicide­and who therefore could be said to have been suffering from a severe mood disorder. This, together with the observed similar rates of prescription in the general population, could indicate equal access to drug treatment. The study by Ray and colleagues highlights an important issue in research on socioeconomic inequalities in care. Racial-ethnic differences in the use of medications may result from differences in religious and cultural beliefs that can affect both health-seeking behavior and attitudes toward suicide.

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MEDS FOR PTSD: Soldier with brain injury, treated for PTSD commits suicide

Note: Anyone who has suffered a brain injury should never be given an antidepressant according to Dr. Jay Seastrunk, a neurologist. It can lower the seizure threshold and produce seizure activity faster than normal.

Also keep in mind that antidepressants affect memory so strongly that “amnesia” is listed as a “frequent” side effect. Combine that with the information we have that Alzheimer’s is a condition of elevated serotonin levels and antidepressants are designed to specifically increase serotonin levels and you can see how many of the problems Ray was dealing with we being caused by the medication he was being given.

Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director, International Coalition for Drug Awareness, www.drugawareness.org
____________________________________________________________________________________

In the very hours we were celebrating Andrew in Washington, tragedy was unfolding in Texas. Lt. Col. Raymond Rivas, a 53-year old civil affairs officer who had dedicated his career to rebuilding war torn countries, was found dead in his car in the parking lot of Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio Texas.

Colleagues of Ray’s said prescription pills and notes he wrote to his family and wife, Colleen, were found. A military source told me all indications are Ray took his own life.

His devastated family understandably declined to talk publicly, and the military won’t discuss the case citing privacy concerns. But friends and colleagues I spoke to confirmed that Ray had suffered multiple blast injuries to his brain from bomb attacks during several deployments over the years.

In October 2006, Ray survived an attack in Iraq that rendered him briefly unconscious. He was transferred to Europe but somehow talked the doctors into sending him back to the war zone. A week later, ill and confused, he was sent back to the United States.

A close associate tells me that at first, despite being diagnosed with traumatic brain injury in Iraq, some doctors thought Ray might be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. They didn’t realize he had all the symptoms of traumatic brain injury. He had trouble talking, reasoning and remembering.

He was sent to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio so he could be near his family, but for the first few months he just sat in his room. Fellow soldiers helped him with his bathing, dressing and eating.

Finally, Ray was assigned a case manager, and things began to move rapidly. He got therapy and was able to go home.

But by all accounts from his friends, Ray had become seriously debilitated by the injuries to his brain. A private email shown to CNN revealed that Ray had been diagnosed with rapidly emerging Alzheimer’s disease. The cumulative impact of all those bomb blasts were destroying his brain. Colleagues say Ray knew he might have to move to an assisted living facility.

Ray’s doctors are not discussing his treatment because of privacy concerns.

A colleague told me Ray was tired and in pain on the night of July 15. He was found in his car in the parking lot at the army hospital where he had spent so long trying to get better.

http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/07/27/starr.extraordinary/index.html?iref=24hours
Behind the Scenes: Triumph and tragedy for two wounded soldiers

* Story Highlights
* CNN’s Barbara Starr celebrated a victory and mourned a loss on July 15
* An injured Marine was celebrating getting into Harvard Law School
* On same night, a warrior with a traumatic brain injury was found dead in his car
* Men’s stories are linked — both pleaded with the government to aid injured soldiers

By Barbara Starr
CNN Pentagon Correspondent

WASHINGTON (CNN) — Where were you on the night of July 15? You may not even remember, but for me it was an extraordinary evening, an evening of unimaginable triumph and unbearable tragedy.

But I would not actually know everything that happened until the night was long over.

A couple of weeks before July 15, a friend who works with injured troops emailed me to say it was time for Andrew’s going away party.

Andrew Kinard is a young Marine I first met a few years ago at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington where he was recovering from a devastating IED attack in Iraq. He had stepped on the roadside bomb and lost his entire body below the hips.

The party being arranged was Andrew’s farewell to D.C. Andrew is off to the rigors of Harvard Law School. He’s says he’s itching to get into a courtroom.

You need to remember the name Andrew Kinard. Many of his friends believe Andrew is such an amazing man that he will become president of the United States. If I had to bet, I’d say it could happen.

I wouldn’t have missed the party for the world. I was touched that this tight-knit community of wounded warriors had included me in this very special, very intimate evening.

There was a display of photos of Andrew serving in Iraq. I suddenly realized I never knew how tall he was before the war. There were a few sniffles and wiping of eyes in the room for a Marine whose dream of service to his country ended within a few months of getting to Iraq. But sniffles didn’t last long and the evening became one of hugs, laughter and good wishes (and more than a few beers) for a young Marine who had triumphed over what the war had dealt him.

But my warm feelings didn’t last long. The next day another source in the wounded troop community came to me in the Pentagon hallway with another tale.

“You have to do something about the story of Ray Rivas,” he said.

In the very hours we were celebrating Andrew in Washington, tragedy was unfolding in Texas. Lt. Col. Raymond Rivas, a 53-year old civil affairs officer who had dedicated his career to rebuilding war torn countries, was found dead in his car in the parking lot of Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio Texas.

Colleagues of Ray’s said prescription pills and notes he wrote to his family and wife, Colleen, were found. A military source told me all indications are Ray took his own life.

His devastated family understandably declined to talk publicly, and the military won’t discuss the case citing privacy concerns. But friends and colleagues I spoke to confirmed that Ray had suffered multiple blast injuries to his brain from bomb attacks during several deployments over the years.

In October 2006, Ray survived an attack in Iraq that rendered him briefly unconscious. He was transferred to Europe but somehow talked the doctors into sending him back to the war zone. A week later, ill and confused, he was sent back to the United States.

A close associate tells me that at first, despite being diagnosed with traumatic brain injury in Iraq, some doctors thought Ray might be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. They didn’t realize he had all the symptoms of traumatic brain injury. He had trouble talking, reasoning and remembering.

He was sent to Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio so he could be near his family, but for the first few months he just sat in his room. Fellow soldiers helped him with his bathing, dressing and eating.

Finally, Ray was assigned a case manager, and things began to move rapidly. He got therapy and was able to go home.

But by all accounts from his friends, Ray had become seriously debilitated by the injuries to his brain. A private email shown to CNN revealed that Ray had been diagnosed with rapidly emerging Alzheimer’s disease. The cumulative impact of all those bomb blasts were destroying his brain. Colleagues say Ray knew he might have to move to an assisted living facility.

Ray’s doctors are not discussing his treatment because of privacy concerns.

A colleague told me Ray was tired and in pain on the night of July 15. He was found in his car in the parking lot at the army hospital where he had spent so long trying to get better.

But Ray will be remembered for all he did for others. Even with all his suffering, he wanted to make sure other injured troops were helped. In April he and his wife Colleen went to Capitol Hill to testify with other wounded warriors about their needs.

Sitting on that panel with Ray was Andrew Kinard.

All AboutBrooke Army Medical Center

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MED for DEPRESSION: 5 Dead at Baghdad Psychiatric Center: May 11th: Ir…

Paragraphs 8 through 10 read: “Russell went to the combat stress center at Camp Liberty where mental-health workers evaluate soldiers for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Russell was close to the end of his deployment. He was given medication and his sidearm was taken away, a routine precaution for soldiers receiving counseling.”

“On May 11, after a dispute at the center, Russell was ordered to leave. Outside, he allegedly grabbed a gun from his escort, burst into the center and started firing. He submitted to arrest minutes later.”

Dead were Navy Cmdr. Charles Springle, 52, of Wilmington, N.C.; Maj. Matthew Philip Houseal, 54, of Amarillo; Staff Sgt. Christian Enrique Bueno-Galdos, 25, of Paterson, N.J.; Spc. Jacob David Barton, 20, of Lenox, Mo., and Pfc. Michael Edward Yates Jr., 19, of Federalsburg, Md.

http://www.amarillo.com/stories/072809/new_news8.shtml

Web-posted Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Soldiers’ families await hearing
Los Angeles Times

SHERMAN – Tears come to Elizabeth Russell’s eyes when she thinks of the five American soldiers her son is accused of gunning down in a moment of rage in Iraq.

She prays for them: the Navy officer, the Army psychiatrist, and three enlisted men, and their widows, parents and children.

She also prays for her son, Army Sgt. John Russell, who faces five counts of premeditated murder for what happened May 11 at a combat stress center near Baghdad.

Russell, 44, is in custody in Kuwait, awaiting an Article 32 hearing, the military equivalent of a preliminary hearing. Under military law, a conviction can carry a death sentence; the minimum is life in prison.

In more than seven years of war in Afghanistan and Iraq, there have been cases of alleged attacks among U.S. troops, but never one in which a soldier stands accused of killing five colleagues.

The Russell case also brings up issues of how the Army evaluates the mental health of troops in combat zones, many of whom, like Russell, have endured repeated deployments. The Army is now studying the psychological services available to soldiers in Iraq.

Russell had been a competent communications technician but hardly a stellar performer. After 16 years, he was still a sergeant. He had lost a stripe earlier for unauthorized absence.

Russell went to the combat stress center at Camp Liberty where mental-health workers evaluate soldiers for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Russell was close to the end of his deployment. He was given medication and his sidearm was taken away, a routine precaution for soldiers receiving counseling.

On May 11, after a dispute at the center, Russell was ordered to leave. Outside, he allegedly grabbed a gun from his escort, burst into the center and started firing. He submitted to arrest minutes later.

Dead were Navy Cmdr. Charles Springle, 52, of Wilmington, N.C.; Maj. Matthew Philip Houseal, 54, of Amarillo; Staff Sgt. Christian Enrique Bueno-Galdos, 25, of Paterson, N.J.; Spc. Jacob David Barton, 20, of Lenox, Mo., and Pfc. Michael Edward Yates Jr., 19, of Federalsburg, Md.

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Postpartum Depression & Medication: Mother Dismembers her Infant: Texas

Paragraph 3 reads: “‘She was a sweet person and I still love her, but she needs to pay the ultimate price for what she has done,’ the baby’s father, Scott W. Buchholtz, told the San Antonio Express-News Monday. ‘She needs to be put to death for what she has done’.”

Paragraph 8 reads: “Sanchez and Buchholtz lived together during the pregnancy and the first two weeks after their son was born, Buchholtz told the Express-News. The paper reported that an infection complicated Sanchez’s recovery from giving birth, and she was required to use a catheter for about a week. That setback darkened her mood, and she was soon diagnosed with postpartum depression.”

Paragraphs 9 & 10 read: “She moved out of the couple’s shared home July 20. On Saturday, she showed up to see Buchholtz at his parents’ house. She became agitated when he told her he needed a copy of the baby’s birth certificate and Social Security card, Buchholtz told the paper.

Sanchez ran out of the home with her son in a car seat, threw the car seat into the front passenger seat of her car and sped away without buckling him in, the paper said. She left behind a diaper bag, her purse and her medication.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5j65NeeVH5ihfMyvu7qiBZWQBV-kgD99NHC180

By PAUL J. WEBER (AP) – 1 hour ago

SAN ANTONIO ­ Relatives of the Texas mother of a 3 1/2-week-old boy found dismembered in his bedroom said she was diagnosed with schizophrenia and postpartum psychosis, and the father of the slain baby said he wants the woman executed.

Otty Sanchez, 33, is charged with capital murder in the death of Scott Wesley Buchholtz-Sanchez. When authorities found the infant’s body Sunday, Sanchez told officers the devil made her do it, police said.

“She was a sweet person and I still love her, but she needs to pay the ultimate price for what she has done,” the baby’s father, Scott W. Buchholtz, told the San Antonio Express-News Monday. “She needs to be put to death for what she has done.”

Relatives and Buchholtz told the newspaper Sanchez’s mental health deteriorated in the week before her son’s death. Buchholtz, who called his son “baby Scotty,” said she often talked about how she needed to see a counselor. Sanchez told detectives she had been hearing voices.

Otty Sanchez’s aunt, Gloria Sanchez, told The Associated Press that her niece had been “in and out” of a psychiatric ward, and that the hospital called several months ago to check up on her.

Sanchez was hospitalized Tuesday with self-inflicted stab wounds and was being held on $1 million bail. Police have said she does not have an attorney. Authorities found the baby with three of his toes chewed off, his face torn away and his head was severed.

Otty Sanchez’s sister and her sister’s two children, ages 5 and 7, were in the house at the time, but none were harmed.

Sanchez and Buchholtz lived together during the pregnancy and the first two weeks after their son was born, Buchholtz told the Express-News. The paper reported that an infection complicated Sanchez’s recovery from giving birth, and she was required to use a catheter for about a week. That setback darkened her mood, and she was soon diagnosed with postpartum depression.

She moved out of the couple’s shared home July 20. On Saturday, she showed up to see Buchholtz at his parents’ house. She became agitated when he told her he needed a copy of the baby’s birth certificate and Social Security card, Buchholtz told the paper.

Sanchez ran out of the home with her son in a car seat, threw the car seat into the front passenger seat of her car and sped away without buckling him in, the paper said. She left behind a diaper bag, her purse and her medication.

Buchholtz’s mother called 911, and a sheriff’s deputy investigated the incident as a disturbance, according to court records. The next day, authorities said, she killed her son.

Officers called to Sanchez’s house at about 5 a.m. Sunday found her sitting on the couch screaming “I killed my baby! I killed my baby!” San Antonio Police Chief William McManus said.

McManus described the crime scene as so grisly that police officers barely spoke to each other while looking through the house.

Copyright © 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: Man Out of Prison for 3 Hours: England

Notice from the article below that this fellow had been abruptly discontinued from his antidepressant when incarcerated in November. Then while still in the critical withdrawal stage was re-introduced to the use of an antidepressant – likely a new one since jails and prisons have access to a select few they prescribe. So he likely had three strikes against him leading to his sudden and very determined suicide.

Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director, International Coalition For Drug Awareness

Paragraph four reads: “The jury inquest at Nottingham Coroner’s Court heard Mr Brown had been at the prison for five weeks and was four days away from being released when he was seen by a psychiatrist and given anti-depressants.”

SSRI Stories note: The most likely time for suicidal behaviors and SSRI antidepressants are: 1. When first starting the drugs: 2. When stopping the drugs. 3. While increasing the dose: 4. While decreasing the dose. 5. When switching from one SSRI to another antidepressant.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Coroner-criticises-healthcare-Nottingham-Prison/article-1196220-detail/article.html

Coroner criticises healthcare at Nottingham Prison
Monday, July 27, 2009, 07:00

1 reader has commented on this story.
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A CORONER has criticised health services at Nottingham Prison after an inmate committed suicide hours after his release.

Gary Brown, 39, of Cranwell Road, Strelley, drowned on December 24, 2007.

He was seen jumping off Trent Bridge less than three hours after he was released from the prison.

The jury inquest at Nottingham Coroner’s Court heard Mr Brown had been at the prison for five weeks and was four days away from being released when he was seen by a psychiatrist and given anti-depressants.

Notts coroner Dr Nigel Chapman said there was a “huge gap” between Mr Brown seeing a GP on his arrival at the prison and seeing a psychiatrist.

The inquest heard there was a lack of communication between health workers, and one doctor at the prison called it “an entirely haphazard system”.

Mr Brown arrived at Nottingham Prison on November 15, 2007. He saw a GP, Dr Lloyd, the next day, who said Mr Brown was not showing symptoms of mental health problems.

Mr Brown said he had previously been prescribed anti-depressants but Dr Lloyd did not renew the prescription as he could not obtain any previous medical records.

Other members of the health team said they tried to get hold of Mr Brown’s medical records but were unable to trace them.

Dr Julian Kenneth Henry, who also saw Mr Brown, told the inquest the amount of time between the prisoner arriving and seeing a psychiatrist was “unprecedented”.

He said: “Unfortunately, in a prison setting there are an awful lot of people involved and there are failures of communication on a daily basis.

“It’s an entirely haphazard system. It’s a very disjointed system and there is not an excuse for it.”

Mr Brown saw psychiatrist Dr Trevor Boughton on December 20 and was given a prescription for anti-depressants.

Dr Boughton said Mr Brown seemed anxious but not psychotic or suicidal.

He said: “He seemed very eager to be released from prison. He spoke very fondly of his brother, whom he was hoping to spend Christmas with.”

The inquest heard the medication was not likely to have had any effect on Mr Brown by the time he was released four days later.

Senior prison officer Vince McGonigle said Mr Brown was released between 9am and 9.30am on December 24 and seemed “in an agitated state”.

Less than three hours later, at around 11.45am, a member of the public saw him jump from Trent Bridge into the River Trent.

Kyle Charles told the inquest: “I saw a person in the water and tried shouting at him. I managed to get the orange ring off the wall and threw that into the water but he swam away from it.

“When he saw me taking my jacket off he held his nose and then started to push himself under the water. He went down, came back up, went down and never came back up again.”

Mr Brown’s body was pulled from the water at 2.55pm. There was no evidence of any violence and no alcohol found in his system.

The jury returned a verdict of suicide, with a majority of six to two. They said there had been a “severe breakdown” of communication during Mr Brown’s care.

Coroner Dr Chapman said: “Clearly there have been difficulties here and the prison has taken those on board.”

But he said Mr Brown’s time in prison would have been a good opportunity to put him on medication and monitor him.

He added “a simple phone number” for a crisis team would be beneficial for people leaving prison.

samantha.hughes@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Pharmacist Kills Robber: Includes False Memories: Oklahoma

Paragraph 8 reads: “‘I can’t ever get rid of that, and so I’m treated with a sleeping medication and anti-depressants to try to get me past that.”

http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/article.aspx?subjectid=12&articleid=20090726_298_0_Apamcs638535

Record of OKC pharmacist involved in shooting in doubt

By NOLAN CLAY NewsOK.com
Published: 7/26/2009 8:00 AM
Last Modified: 7/26/2009 8:02 AM

A pharmacist charged with murder told police he had killed before, while overseas in the first Gulf War. But according to his military records, he was never there.

Instead, Jerome Jay Ers-land spent the war in 1991 as the pharmacy chief at the military hospital at Altus Air Force Base in southwestern Oklahoma, records show.

Ersland fatally shot a robber May 19 at the Reliable Discount Pharmacy in Oklahoma City.

The shooting attracted national attention when prosecutors charged him with first-degree murder, alleging he went too far while defending himself. Military veterans rallied to his support after he described himself as an Army veteran injured during Operation Desert Storm. He told The Oklahoman in May he hurt his back during a mortar attack.

Ersland, 57, of Chickasha, insisted again Friday that he served in Iraq during the war. He said he flew overseas from Altus to supply Army troops with nerve agent antidotes and spent time in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Iraq. He said he was there for about 48 days, both before and after the war started. He said he was in the Air Force but serving as a liaison to the Army. He insisted he was injured while overseas, but didn’t know how bad he was hurt at the time. He said he hid his back injury from the military so “I wouldn’t get kicked out.”

He would not say Friday whether he killed anyone in combat.

“There’s no way to prove it,” Ersland said. “And I found out if you can’t prove it, you can’t say it. … I know now that I have to be able to prove everything on paper. … I can tell you one thing, though. That is: I do have dreams, bad nightmares, about that, every night. … That’s every night. They’re just horrible dreams, about six specific soldiers being dead … lying beside one another and they haven’t been body bagged yet and I knew all of them. And then I always dream about body parts of Iraqis, of people.

“I can’t ever get rid of that, and so I’m treated with a sleeping medication and anti-depressants to try to get me past that.”

The government last week released to The Oklahoman eight pages about Ersland’s military service, first in the Army and then in the Air Force. Reporters also reviewed other records about Ersland’s military service.

Prosecutors doubted Ersland’s accounts about his Gulf War service, and they subpoenaed his military papers from the government to check his statements. Prosecutors received a thick envelope of Ersland’s military papers Thursday.

“They verify exactly what we assumed about … his comments about his military record,” Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater said.

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PAXIL: Man Kills Brother: Arizona

THIS MAKES ME SICK!!!!! I CALLED ON THIS CASE AS SOON AS IT HAPPENED AND IT WAS RIGHT IN MY HOME AREA ON TOP OF THAT!!!!! THEY SHOULD NOT HAVE LOST THIS CASE!!

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Gene & Rosie Meysenburg
To:
Date: Mon, 27 Jul 2009 13:08:16 -0500
Subject: PAXIL: Man Kills Brother: Arizona
Paragraphs 10 through 15 read: “Was drug to blame?”

“Defense attorney David Thorn said it is not accurate that the blackout was caused by drinking, though Elliott had a couple of glasses of wine the afternoon before the incident.”

The police report stated nothing about Elliott being extremely intoxicated; he was lucid, articulate and cooperative, Thorn said.

Instead, the blackout could have been caused by an anti-depressant called Paxil, which Elliott had recently been prescribed, Thorn said. There have been several civil cases contending Paxil caused someone to kill themselves or someone else without warning.

Doctors interviewed by the defense could not say beyond a reasonable doubt that Paxil was the cause, Thorn said. However, there is evidence the drug can cause a small percentage of people to take out-of-character actions.

Hoggatt said he did not have enough information to draw conclusions from the Paxil cases.

http://www.douglasdispatch.com/articles/2009/07/26/news/breaking_news/doc4a6bf083dbd2b495068709.txt

Man gets 11-year term for killing his brother
By Adam Curtis
Wick News Service
Published/Last Modified on Saturday, July 25, 2009 11:59 PM MDT

BISBEE ­ More than a year after fatally shooting his brother, Jason Elliott, with a shotgun in the Double Adobe area, Wayne Michael Elliott, 37, received his sentence Friday.

Elliott, who pleaded guilty last month in Cochise County Superior Court to second-degree murder, was sentenced to 11 years without the possibility of early release. Judge Wallace Hoggatt decided Elliott will receive credit for the 446 days he has already served and will not have to pay restitution to his family.

Elliott could have been sentenced to as much as 22 years in prison or as little as 10 years. Hoggatt said a mitigated term was appropriate in this case because of several factors, including the fact that Elliott called the police himself and cooperated with officers at the scene.

Anthony Elliott, the defendant’s father, asked the judge to take this into consideration. At the time of the incident, Anthony Elliott said, he was traveling to England and there was no one else at the house to call authorities. There were two vehicles at the house, which was only about 15 miles from Mexico, but his son did not try to flee, Anthony said.

Other mitigating factors included Elliott’s minimal criminal history and his history of alcoholism, Hoggatt said. “I don’t think anyone questions his remorse in this case.”

Elliott has told the court he has no memory of what happened but still pleaded guilty. On Friday, he said, “I would do anything to change what happened, I would do 50 years in solitary confinement without a second thought.

“I know we need resolution to help my parents move on. I will accept whatever you give me.”

Prosecuting attorney Doyle Johnstun said the fact Elliott was blacked out from drinking could pose an even greater danger to the community. “Given his history of problems with alcohol, it’s far from certain this wouldn’t happen again.”

Johnstun recommended 10 to 16 years in prison, based on the potential risk to the community but also factoring in the wishes of the victims.

Was drug to blame?

Defense attorney David Thorn said it is not accurate that the blackout was caused by drinking, though Elliott had a couple of glasses of wine the afternoon before the incident.

The police report stated nothing about Elliott being extremely intoxicated; he was lucid, articulate and cooperative, Thorn said.

Instead, the blackout could have been caused by an anti-depressant called Paxil, which Elliott had recently been prescribed, Thorn said. There have been several civil cases contending Paxil caused someone to kill themselves or someone else without warning.

Doctors interviewed by the defense could not say beyond a reasonable doubt that Paxil was the cause, Thorn said. However, there is evidence the drug can cause a small percentage of people to take out-of-character actions.

Hoggatt said he did not have enough information to draw conclusions from the Paxil cases.

Before being escorted out of the courtroom, Elliott wished his sister a happy birthday.

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Paragraphs 10 through 15 read: “Was drug to blame?”

“Defense attorney David Thorn said it is not accurate that the blackout was caused by drinking, though Elliott had a couple of glasses of wine the afternoon before the incident.”

The police report stated nothing about Elliott being extremely intoxicated; he was lucid, articulate and cooperative, Thorn said.

Instead, the blackout could have been caused by an anti-depressant called Paxil, which Elliott had recently been prescribed, Thorn said. There have been several civil cases contending Paxil caused someone to kill themselves or someone else without warning.

Doctors interviewed by the defense could not say beyond a reasonable doubt that Paxil was the cause, Thorn said. However, there is evidence the drug can cause a small percentage of people to take out-of-character actions.

Hoggatt said he did not have enough information to draw conclusions from the Paxil cases.

http://www.douglasdispatch.com/articles/2009/07/26/news/breaking_news/doc4a6bf083dbd2b495068709.txt

Man gets 11-year term for killing his brother
By Adam Curtis
Wick News Service
Published/Last Modified on Saturday, July 25, 2009 11:59 PM MDT

BISBEE ­ More than a year after fatally shooting his brother, Jason Elliott, with a shotgun in the Double Adobe area, Wayne Michael Elliott, 37, received his sentence Friday.

Elliott, who pleaded guilty last month in Cochise County Superior Court to second-degree murder, was sentenced to 11 years without the possibility of early release. Judge Wallace Hoggatt decided Elliott will receive credit for the 446 days he has already served and will not have to pay restitution to his family.

Elliott could have been sentenced to as much as 22 years in prison or as little as 10 years. Hoggatt said a mitigated term was appropriate in this case because of several factors, including the fact that Elliott called the police himself and cooperated with officers at the scene.

Anthony Elliott, the defendant’s father, asked the judge to take this into consideration. At the time of the incident, Anthony Elliott said, he was traveling to England and there was no one else at the house to call authorities. There were two vehicles at the house, which was only about 15 miles from Mexico, but his son did not try to flee, Anthony said.

Other mitigating factors included Elliott’s minimal criminal history and his history of alcoholism, Hoggatt said. “I don’t think anyone questions his remorse in this case.”

Elliott has told the court he has no memory of what happened but still pleaded guilty. On Friday, he said, “I would do anything to change what happened, I would do 50 years in solitary confinement without a second thought.

“I know we need resolution to help my parents move on. I will accept whatever you give me.”

Prosecuting attorney Doyle Johnstun said the fact Elliott was blacked out from drinking could pose an even greater danger to the community. “Given his history of problems with alcohol, it’s far from certain this wouldn’t happen again.”

Johnstun recommended 10 to 16 years in prison, based on the potential risk to the community but also factoring in the wishes of the victims.

Was drug to blame?

Defense attorney David Thorn said it is not accurate that the blackout was caused by drinking, though Elliott had a couple of glasses of wine the afternoon before the incident.

The police report stated nothing about Elliott being extremely intoxicated; he was lucid, articulate and cooperative, Thorn said.

Instead, the blackout could have been caused by an anti-depressant called Paxil, which Elliott had recently been prescribed, Thorn said. There have been several civil cases contending Paxil caused someone to kill themselves or someone else without warning.

Doctors interviewed by the defense could not say beyond a reasonable doubt that Paxil was the cause, Thorn said. However, there is evidence the drug can cause a small percentage of people to take out-of-character actions.

Hoggatt said he did not have enough information to draw conclusions from the Paxil cases.

Before being escorted out of the courtroom, Elliott wished his sister a happy birthday.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Senate Orders Study on Military Suicides

Paragraphs 7 & 8 read: “By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.”

“That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.”

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2009/07/military_suicides_antidepressants_072309w/

Senator: Study prescriptions-suicide link
By Rick Maze – Staff writer
Posted : Thursday Jul 23, 2009 11:32:42 EDT

The Senate on Wednesday ordered an independent study to determine whether an increase in military suicides could be the result of sending troops into combat while they are taking antidepressants or sleeping pills.

Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., who pushed for the study, said he does not know whether there is a link, but he believes prescription drug use, especially when it is not closely supervised by medical personnel, needs a closer look.

“One thing we should all be concerned about is that there are more and more of our soldiers who are using prescription antidepressant drugs … and we are not clear as to whether they are under appropriate medical supervision,” Cardin said.

The problem, he said, is that some antidepressants “take several weeks before they reach their full potential,” and during that time there is a risk of increased suicidal thoughts among 18- to 24-year-olds ­ an age group that includes many service members.

When people taking antidepressants are deployed, they may not be under close medical supervision, especially if they are in a unit that is on the move in combat, Cardin said.

“Surveys … have shown that as many as 12 percent of those who are serving in Iraq and 17 percent of those who are serving in Afghanistan are using some form of prescribed antidepressant or sleeping pills,” Cardin said. “That would equal 20,000 of our service members.”

By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.

That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.

The reports would not include names or any specifics that would identify the service members, Cardin said. “We protect their individual privacy,” he said. “There is no stigma attached at all to this survey.”

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———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Atracyphd1@aol.com
To: post@drugawareness.org, DCKCCPAS@aol.com, Atracyphd2@aol.com
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2009 03:08:48 EDT
Subject: ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Senate Orders Study on Military Suicides
Paragraphs 7 & 8 read: “By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.”

“That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.”

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2009/07/military_suicides_antidepressants_072309w/

Senator: Study prescriptions-suicide link
By Rick Maze – Staff writer
Posted : Thursday Jul 23, 2009 11:32:42 EDT

The Senate on Wednesday ordered an independent study to determine whether an increase in military suicides could be the result of sending troops into combat while they are taking antidepressants or sleeping pills.

Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., who pushed for the study, said he does not know whether there is a link, but he believes prescription drug use, especially when it is not closely supervised by medical personnel, needs a closer look.

“One thing we should all be concerned about is that there are more and more of our soldiers who are using prescription antidepressant drugs … and we are not clear as to whether they are under appropriate medical supervision,” Cardin said.

The problem, he said, is that some antidepressants “take several weeks before they reach their full potential,” and during that time there is a risk of increased suicidal thoughts among 18- to 24-year-olds ­ an age group that includes many service members.

When people taking antidepressants are deployed, they may not be under close medical supervision, especially if they are in a unit that is on the move in combat, Cardin said.

“Surveys … have shown that as many as 12 percent of those who are serving in Iraq and 17 percent of those who are serving in Afghanistan are using some form of prescribed antidepressant or sleeping pills,” Cardin said. “That would equal 20,000 of our service members.”

By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.

That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.

The reports would not include names or any specifics that would identify the service members, Cardin said. “We protect their individual privacy,” he said. “There is no stigma attached at all to this survey.”

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