ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder Attempt: England

Paragraph 11 reads: “Kiss had claimed that he could not remember the incident and was not criminally responsible for his actions due to the effects of prescribed sleeping tablets and anti-depressants he had been taking at the time as he struggled to come to terms with the fact his wife wanted a divorce.”

http://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/4447290.Crossways_husband_guilty_of_attempting_to_murder_wife/

Crossways husband guilty of attempting to murder wife
8:43am Friday 19th June 2009
By Harry Hogger »

WIFE-BEATER Joseph Kiss has been found guilty of attempted murder for a brutal attack which was likened to a ‘scene out of a horror movie’.

Kiss was found guilty of trying to kill his wife of over 20 years by striking her repeatedly with a bottle of sparkling wine while she was lying in bed at their home in Crossways on June 13 last year.

I have never seen injuries of that extent or severity before. I was distressed by her injuries. The bed and the wall were blood soaked to such an extent that I was forced to look away. I could only describe what I saw as a scene from a horror movie.
PC Nicholas Gravenor

The defendant remained passive as the jury revealed its verdict at Dorchester Crown Court and Judge Samuel Wiggs told him sentencing would be delayed while a psychiatric report on him was prepared, which could take several weeks.

Odd job man Kiss, 47, of Brewers Walk, Crossways, was remanded in custody and faces a maximum punishment of life imprisonment for the offence.

Following the verdict police praised the strength of mother-of-three Donna Kiss after her husband was convicted for the brutal attack.

Detective Chief Inspector Marcus Hester, from Weymouth CID, said after the trial: “The verdict was the correct verdict in the eyes of Mrs Kiss’s family and the court.

“I must pay tribute to the strength of Donna Kiss and her family in what has been a horrific year for them.

“In due course the court will deal with Mr Kiss as they see fit.”

DCI Hester added that Mrs Kiss was lucky to survive the attack, which left her with severe facial injuries including lacerations to her ear and face, a broken jaw, nose and eye socket and knocked out several teeth.

Kiss had claimed that he could not remember the incident and was not criminally responsible for his actions due to the effects of prescribed sleeping tablets and anti-depressants he had been taking at the time as he struggled to come to terms with the fact his wife wanted a divorce.

He said he remembered going to bed that evening and the next thing he recalled was hearing a dog barking and leaving his wife’s bedroom before realising he was covered in blood.

The prosecution case claimed the effects of the medication was just a convenient excuse, and Kiss had intended to kill his wife because he was angry about the impending break-up of their marriage.

DCI Hester said: “This was a sustained, pre-planned attack on a mother whilst she was asleep in her bed with the intention of killing her.

“It is fortuitous, I believe that on June 13 last year Donna Kiss didn’t lose her life.”

In a brief statement issued through DCI Hester after the trial, Mrs Kiss selflessly paid tribute to the jurors in the trial and Detective Sergeant Paul Auger, who was in charge of the investigation.

She said: “I am very grateful to the jury for the verdict and would like to personally thank DS Paul Auger for his excellent work over the past year.”

Police and paramedics who were first called to the scene of the attack have been commended for keeping their cool when faced with ‘a scene of horror’.

The ferocious nature of Kiss’s attack on his wife even left 999 service crews shocked.

Earlier in the trial, one police officer called out to the Kiss home in Crossways said the bedroom was like ‘a scene from a horror movie’ and a paramedic who treated Donna Kiss said it was one of the most horrific things she had witnessed in her career.

Jurors heard a statement from PC Nicholas Gravenor, who helped the ambulance crew escort Mrs Kiss to an ambulance and stayed at the property to investigate the crime scene.

He said: “I have never seen injuries of that extent or severity before. I was distressed by her injuries.”

He added: “The bed and the wall were blood soaked to such an extent that I was forced to look away. I could only describe what I saw as a scene from a horror movie.”

The jury also heard from paramedic Tamisa Hicks, who had been working in the ambulance service for 17 years, who treated Mrs Kiss at the scene.

She said: “I was led into the bedroom, the lights were on, and I saw one of the most horrific sights I have ever seen in my career.

“A lady who I now know to be Donna Kiss was sat up on the bed, covered from head to toe in blood.

“She was sat with congealed blood all around her head, there was blood on the walls and spatters of blood on the ceiling.”

DCI Marcus Hester praised all those who attended, as well as staff at Dorset County Hospital where Mrs Kiss was treated, for keeping their heads and carrying out their duties in the circumstances.

He said: “The officers attending the scene along with the paramedics faced a scene of horror but acted professionally and quickly along with casualty staff in saving Mrs Kiss’ life.

“I would like to thank all those involved in all agencies.”

Residents of Brewers Walk in Crossways said they were shocked to learn of Joseph Kiss’s vicious attack behind closed doors.

A neighbour, who did not wish to be named, said: “Mrs Kiss is a lovely person.

“Everyone around here feels so sorry for her.

“After it happened I didn’t see her for a while. I’d always see her walking her labrador before that.”

Another neighbour remembers hearing voices and seeing paramedics come to Mrs Kiss’s rescue after she received life-threatening injuries.

Drinkers at the Tavern Social Club in Crossways remember seeing Kiss visit the club on Friday evenings to play pool.

A club committee member said: “He was very quiet and always kept himself to himself.

“He didn’t drink much.”

A club regular, who wished to remain anonymous, said he was stunned that Kiss was capable of committing the crime.

He added: “It’s against his nature. I never saw him with his wife.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Inpatient in Psych Hospital Kills Self: England

Paragraphs 10 & 11 read: “He was given anti-depressants, only allowed to leave on escorted visits and monitored every 10 minutes, for his own safety.”

“But on the day before he died, mental health staff ruled Mr Boss’s condition had improved and he could be allowed out on short, unescorted visits.”

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Procedures-followed-teacher-suicide/article-1089798-detail/article.html

Teacher killed himself after leaving ward for cigarette
Friday, June 19, 2009, 10:01

PROPER procedures were not followed before a Nottingham teacher hanged himself in hospital, a coroner has said.

Adam Boss was found hanged in a toilet at the Queen’s Medical Centre, where he was being treated in a Notts Healthcare Trust-run psychiatric ward for depression and anxiety.

The 36-year-old, from Carrington, was allowed to leave the ward for a cigarette on November 12, but his name was not written on a board to show he had left.

Staff should have passed the information to a senior nurse, to make sure he was back before a 15-minute time limit.

But an inquest in Nottingham was told they did not notice Mr Boss had not returned until 25 to 35 minutes after he left.

Minutes later, the English teacher was found hanged in a toilet.

He had been acting deputy head teacher of Greenwood Dale School in Sneinton before moving to Elliott Durham School in Mapperley.

A father-of-two, he was admitted to hospital voluntarily, suffering from depression and anxiety.

He had told a GP he had detailed plans to kill himself.

He was given anti-depressants, only allowed to leave on escorted visits and monitored every 10 minutes, for his own safety.

But on the day before he died, mental health staff ruled Mr Boss’s condition had improved and he could be allowed out on short, unescorted visits.

Psychiatrist Dr Nick Mepham said: “He was happy with that. He was absolutely confident he could keep himself safe.

“When asked about his level of impulsiveness, he said he was not an impulsive person.”

The psychiatric wards at the QMC are not run by the Nottingham University Hospitals Trust, which runs the rest of the hospital..

Recording a verdict of suicide, Notts Coroner Dr Nigel Chapman said Mr Boss was “certainly off the ward for longer than 15 minutes” before staff looked for him.

He said: “His name was not on the whiteboard and neither were the proper procedures followed as to allowing him off the ward and not knowing how long he was off the ward.”

“He has gone outside for a cigarette and then, for whatever reason, we often don’t find reasons, he has gone into that toilet and done an act to take his own life.”

Mr Boss’s father, Gerald, told the hearing he could “only speculate” why his son took his own life.

He said: “I know he had a massive fear that he wouldn’t recover. He felt he was letting his family down.

“He loved teaching and he loved working with young people. From the young people’s accounts, that regard was reciprocated.

“He had a fine future and a lovely family. He had no obvious reason to do what he did, other than his illness.”

robert.parsons@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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DEPRESSION MED: Assault: Also Involved Alcohol: Australia

Second paragraph from the end reads: “The court heard that on the day of the assault, Smith had been drinking and also took medication to treat depression.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.

http://www.dailyexaminer.com.au/story/2009/06/19/boatie-in-court-over-punches/

Boatie in court over punches
Tim Howard | 19th June 2009

HIJINKS on the high seas off Minnie Water in early February culminated in Grafton Local Court this week.

Ross Smith, 63, of Hiawatha Drive, Minnie Water, appeared in court on Monday on a charge of common assault.

Police facts said on February 7 Smith threatened to run over the victim of the assault.

After the victim’s wife intervened, Smith assaulted the victim with a flurry of punches. There were no injuries from the assault.

The court heard that tension between the two men started a week earlier when the victim’s boat collided with Smith’s boat at Minnie Water.

NSW Waterways and police were called to the incident.

The court heard that on the day of the assault, Smith had been drinking and also took medication to treat depression.

Magistrate Kim Pogson agreed that the assault was at the low end of the scale. He convicted Smith, but ordered the conviction not be recorded. He also placed him on a 12-month good behaviour bond.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Ex-Teacher Leaps from Building: England

Paragraphs 10 & 11 read: “He was given anti-depressants, only allowed to leave on escorted visits and monitored every 10 minutes, for his own safety.”

“But on the day before he died, mental health staff ruled Mr Boss’s condition had improved and he could be allowed out on short, unescorted visits.”

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Procedures-followed-teacher-suicide/article-1089798-detail/article.html

Teacher killed himself after leaving ward for cigarette
Friday, June 19, 2009, 10:01

PROPER procedures were not followed before a Nottingham teacher hanged himself in hospital, a coroner has said.

Adam Boss was found hanged in a toilet at the Queen’s Medical Centre, where he was being treated in a Notts Healthcare Trust-run psychiatric ward for depression and anxiety.

The 36-year-old, from Carrington, was allowed to leave the ward for a cigarette on November 12, but his name was not written on a board to show he had left.

Staff should have passed the information to a senior nurse, to make sure he was back before a 15-minute time limit.

But an inquest in Nottingham was told they did not notice Mr Boss had not returned until 25 to 35 minutes after he left.

Minutes later, the English teacher was found hanged in a toilet.

He had been acting deputy head teacher of Greenwood Dale School in Sneinton before moving to Elliott Durham School in Mapperley.

A father-of-two, he was admitted to hospital voluntarily, suffering from depression and anxiety.

He had told a GP he had detailed plans to kill himself.

He was given anti-depressants, only allowed to leave on escorted visits and monitored every 10 minutes, for his own safety.

But on the day before he died, mental health staff ruled Mr Boss’s condition had improved and he could be allowed out on short, unescorted visits.

Psychiatrist Dr Nick Mepham said: “He was happy with that. He was absolutely confident he could keep himself safe.

“When asked about his level of impulsiveness, he said he was not an impulsive person.”

The psychiatric wards at the QMC are not run by the Nottingham University Hospitals Trust, which runs the rest of the hospital..

Recording a verdict of suicide, Notts Coroner Dr Nigel Chapman said Mr Boss was “certainly off the ward for longer than 15 minutes” before staff looked for him.

He said: “His name was not on the whiteboard and neither were the proper procedures followed as to allowing him off the ward and not knowing how long he was off the ward.”

“He has gone outside for a cigarette and then, for whatever reason, we often don’t find reasons, he has gone into that toilet and done an act to take his own life.”

Mr Boss’s father, Gerald, told the hearing he could “only speculate” why his son took his own life.

He said: “I know he had a massive fear that he wouldn’t recover. He felt he was letting his family down.

“He loved teaching and he loved working with young people. From the young people’s accounts, that regard was reciprocated.

“He had a fine future and a lovely family. He had no obvious reason to do what he did, other than his illness.”

robert.parsons@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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DEPRESSION MED: Multi-Millionaire Business Man Kills Self: Ireland

Paragraph one reads “PATRICK Rocca’s suicide last January made headlines all over the world, with some drawing parallels between the millionaire businessman’s death and the end of the Celtic Tiger.”

Paragraph 9 reads: “Garda Desmond Dowd, who was the first garda on the scene on the morning of January 19, said Mrs Rocca told him that her husband ‘had been suffering from depression for the past few weeks, and was taking medication for same’.”

http://www.independent.ie/national-news/courts/rocca-was-depressed-and-wanted-to-end-it–brother-1770976.html

Rocca was depressed and wanted ‘to end it’ — brother

By Jason O’Brien

Friday June 12 2009

PATRICK Rocca’s suicide last January made headlines all over the world, with some drawing parallels between the millionaire businessman’s death and the end of the Celtic Tiger.

Yesterday, at Dublin County Coroner’s Court, the true tragedy of the 42-year-old’s death was played out in grim reality.

His brother, Bernard, told how Patrick had been depressed in December, but was “back to himself somewhat” in the weeks before he died.

His wife, Annette, told how she returned to the family home in Castleknock in Dublin after dropping their two boys to school on January 19, only to find her husband lying in the garden with a shotgun at his feet.

She “knew by his colour that he was gone”.

They both spoke of how they wanted him to be remembered as “a decent and honourable man . . . a loving husband and father”. But, despite their hopes, his death will be recalled in other ways.

The US news channel CNBC described the property tycoon as the first high-profile victim of Ireland’s financial crisis, the London ‘Times’ named him as the poster boy for the Celtic Tiger, and the ‘New York Times’ said his suicide was an example of the steep personal toll of global recession.

Turmoil

There was no mention of Mr Rocca’s alleged financial turmoil during the brief court sitting in Tallaght yesterday.

Garda Desmond Dowd, who was the first garda on the scene on the morning of January 19, said Mrs Rocca told him that her husband “had been suffering from depression for the past few weeks, and was taking medication for same”.

Bernard Rocca confirmed he was aware that “things were very bad for him” shortly before Christmas. “He told me he was going to end it,” Bernard Rocca told the inquest. “His eyes were glassy, he hadn’t been sleeping, he wasn’t himself at all.”

A doctor was called for Patrick Rocca on December 20, and he was given medication.

His brother told how Patrick seemed better after Christmas and into the New Year, and was looking forward to a trip to Dubai with his family.

Bernard last spoke to him three days before he took his life. “He seemed to be his normal self, busy,” he said yesterday. “I was unaware that it would come to this.”

In her evidence Mr Rocca’s widow, dressed all in black, said that her husband had not been sleeping well, and on the morning of January 19 had gotten out of bed to work in the early hours.
He returned to bed at 7am, and was still there when she was dropping their two young boys to school. However, when she returned at 8.30am he was not in bed.

She saw their gardener outside and asked him had he seen Patrick. He had not. But she found him lying in the garden, lifeless. “I checked his pulse but knew by his colour that he was gone,” she said. Mrs Rocca called the emergency services and a neighbour for support.

A post mortem would later find that Mr Rocca died instantaneously from massive cranial and brain injuries following a single shotgun blast to the head.

Mrs Rocca, who was visibly upset yesterday, did not wish to add to her garda statement. “He was a decent and honourable man, he cared for everybody, loved everybody, a loving husband and father, and we would like Patrick remembered in that way,” she said.

Coroner Dr Kieran Geraghty said Mr Rocca clearly intended to take his own life and recorded a verdict of death by suicide.

– Jason O’Brien

Letter to the editor on this case by Ann Blake-Tracy:

Patrick Rocca DID NOT Commit Suicide

Patrick Rocca did not get a chance to become the first to fall victim to the recent financial turmoil because an antidepressant ended his life before the financial turmoil could. After specializing in antidepressant adverse reactions for two decades I respectfully challenge the verdict of the Dublin County Coroner in the death of Mr. Rocca.

As an expert witness to antidepressant adverse reactions I would have ruled that Mr. Rocca died as a result of an antidepressant-induced REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) in which 80% of the patients hurt themselves or someone else. The involvement of an antidepressant in these disorders is extremely high – of those being diagnosed with RBD in the US 86% are taking an antidepressant.

This is the same adverse reaction comedian Phil Hartman’s wife suffered which cost both her life and his a decade ago. You are not conscious in RBD and therefore, do not have sufficient conscious thought to make the decision to take your life. Instead, what the patient does is act out in a sleepwalk state the nightmare they are having.

Another example of this would be found in the first story related in the movie “The Drugging of Our Children” (www.drugawareness.org) where a young man in in the US in the state of Washington took a gun to school, held his classmates at gunpoint for 45 minutes, and to this day six years later can recall none of it. The last he recalls is going to back to bed that morning because he did not feel well.

Had Patrick Rocca somehow survived his wounds I believe he would relate the same. He may have taken his life, but I do not believe he was aware of what he was doing at that time. It is not right that his family be left with the stigma of suicide when it is not real. Since antidepressant manufacturers have never warned of this adverse reaction “negligent homicide” on their part would be a more accurate conclusion in this case.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org

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Holocaust museum shooting

An 88-year-old gunman with a virulently anti-Semitic past fatally shot a security guard inside the crowded U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on Wednesday before being shot himself by other officers, authorities said.

The assailant was hospitalized in critical condition, leaving behind a sprawling investigation by federal and local law enforcement and expressions of shock from the Israeli government and a prominent Muslim organization.

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Columbine: The Mark and Donna Taylor Tragedy

On the 10th anniversary of the Columbine shooting, we had the opportunity to interview Mark Taylor and his mother, Donna. What we learned is shocking. In the last two years, Mark’s mental capacity has been totally eroded as the result of medications he received at two forced hospitalizations in 2007.

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The Secrets of Seroxat (Paxil)

10/13/2002
The Secrets of Seroxat (Paxil)

Seroxat (Paxil) is one of the world’s biggest selling and most successful anti-depressants.

But this Panorama investigation from the BBC discovers the drug may have a darker

side–the program reports that people can get hooked on it, suffering serious withdrawal

symptoms when they try to come off it.

For some it can lead to self harm and even suicide. But little warning of these possible side effects accompanies the drug.


These sources will often require movie viewing software on your computer. Click here to download the appropriate player if needed:

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