Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

Judge Denies Rehearing in Drug Case

Associated Press

A federal judge denied a request by the maker of Paxil for a new trial in the case of a man who killed himself and three family members after taking the anti-depressant drug.
Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

8/11/2001

Judge Denies Rehearing in Drug Case

http://wire.ap.org/?FRONTID=HOME&SITE=CALOS&enter=Go

Associated Press

GlaxoSmithKline asked that they be granted a new trial in the case of the murder/suicide where the family was awarded $8 million for the deaths of four members of the Donald Schell family and the Tim Tobin family. They tried to say that Dr. David Healy who testified as an expert for the Schell and Tobin families contradicted himself in the trial. (Wow! I wonder if he looked at someone cross-eyed too?! Talk about grasping for straws!)

On Thursday Federal Judge William Beaman turned down their request stating that “the verdict was supported by reliable scientific data and that jury instructions were proper.”

Obviously GlaxoSmithKline has not been as successful at buying the verdict they desired as Lilly was in the Wesbecker murder/suicide case in Kentucky. But they assure us that they will not give up as yet. They will now head for Denver to see what they can accomplish there.

You see, as long as they can put up a strong front, they can postpone the inevitable landslide of future lawsuits against their “golden goose.” The stalling pays off in another way as well with every day bringing in another $7 million or so in profits on Paxil. It all comes back to $$$$$. Clearly loss of human life is not what matters to GlaxoSmithKline or Lilly, or Pfizer, or Solvay, etc., etc., etc.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive DirectorInternational Coalition For Drug AwarenessAuthor of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare July 2001 Edition – (1-)

A federal judge denied a request by the maker of Paxil for a new trial in the case of a man who killed himself and three family members after taking the anti-depressant drug.

In June, a jury determined that taking Paxil prompted Donald Schell to kill his wife, daughter, granddaughter and himself in 1998. It awarded $8 million in damages to Schell’s relatives.

Jurors returned the verdict in a civil wrongful death suit against SmithKline Beecham, the manufacturer of Paxil, the country’s second-largest selling anti-depressant. The company is now called GlaxoSmithKline PLC.

Attorneys for the company had asked U.S. Magistrate Judge William C. Beaman to overturn the jury award or allow a retrial.

The company must pay $6.4 million of the $8 million total, because the jury ruled that it was 80 percent responsible for the deaths, while Schell was 20 percent liable.

The company’s request was based in part on what it called the unreliability of the plaintiffs’ expert witness, Dr. David Healy, saying his testimony contradicted what he wrote in professional articles.

Beaman turned down the request Thursday, saying the verdict was supported by reliable scientific data and that jury instructions were proper.

GlaxoSmithKline will appeal to the U.S. 10th Circuit Court in Denver, attorney Tom Gorman said.

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Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

Paxil Maker Ordered to Pay $8 Million – Jury Says Anti-depressant Largely to Blame for Deadly Shooting Spree

The Associated Press

The manufacturer of the nation’s second-best-selling anti-depressant must pay $8 million to the relatives of a man who killed himself and three others after taking the drug Paxil, jurors said.

Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

6/6/2001

Paxil Maker Ordered to Pay $8 Million – Jury Says Anti-depressant Largely to Blame for Deadly Shooting Spree

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/dailynews/paxil010606.html
The Associated Press

The manufacturer of the nation’s second-best-selling anti-depressant must pay $8 million to the relatives of a man who killed himself and three others after taking the drug Paxil, jurors said.

Jurors in U.S. District Court considering the wrongful death civil suit returned a verdict against SmithKline Beecham today. They received the case Tuesday afternoon. Relatives of Donald Schell, 60, claim the man, originally from Gillette, Wyo., took two Paxil tablets before shooting his wife, their daughter, his granddaughter and himself to death on Feb. 13, 1998.

The survivors’ lead attorney, Andy Vickery, had asked the jury to award a total of $25 million in damages.

Besides Schell, the victims were his wife, Rita Schell, 55; their daughter, Deborah Tobin, 31; and Alyssa Tobin, 9 months. Tobin’s widower, Tim Tobin, and Donald Schell’s sister, Neva Hardy, filed the wrongful-death lawsuit.

Vickery also asked the jury to award damages to Michael Schell, the Schells’ adult son, and to Rita Schell’s mother.

The jury awarded damages in varied amounts for each death, with the largest awards $2.5 million each for the deaths of Deborah and Alyssa Tobin going to Tim Tobin.

Jury Said Drug Maker 80 Percent to Blame

In its findings, the jury concluded that Paxil could cause someone to commit suicide or homicide and that the drug was in fact a proximate cause of the deaths in this case.

The jury attributed 80 percent of the fault in the case to the drug maker and 20 percent to Donald Schell.

A call seeking comment from representatives of the drug company was not immediately returned today.

In closing arguments, Vickery said Paxil can produce suicidal and homicidal reactions in a small number of people.

“Since 1990, SmithKline Beecham knew there was a small group at risk and Don Schell was one of those vulnerable people,” he said.

The company, now GlaxoSmithKline PLC, failed to provide adequate label warnings about the possibility of violent reactions, nor did it adequately test for the risk of such reactions, he said.

Company: Drug Didn’t Have a Chance to Work

Attorneys for the company maintained that Paxil is a safe treatment for depression.

“It’s plain from the facts, science and common sense,” Charles Preuss said in closing arguments. “Don Schell’s escalating depression caused this.

“The real tragedy is Paxil didn’t have a chance to do its job and save lives,” he said. “Paxil could have saved four lives in Gillette.”

Vickery said Schell told people he hallucinated when he took Prozac a decade earlier. Preuss said Schell went through five previous bouts of depression that kept him out of work, but Schell did not follow the recommendations of at least three psychiatrists.

Also, he said, Schell had been coping with the death of his father-in-law and brother and had problems at work regarding a threatened lawsuit.

Doctors from across the United States and from England were called to testify during the 2 1&Mac218;2-week trial.

Central nervous system drugs like Paxil are GlaxoSmithKline’s biggest product group. GlaxoSmithKline’s world headquarters are in London and its U.S. research operations are based in Philadelphia.

Copyright 2001 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil Antidepressant Users vs Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and GlaxoSmithKline

Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil Antidepressant Users vs Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and GlaxoSmithKline

Commonly-Prescribed Antidepressants Are Extremely Dangerous for Some

ClassActionAmerican.com

Some 200 legal actions have been filed against Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturers of Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), and Paxil (paroxetine), respectively, to recover for suicides or homicides.
rozac, Zoloft, and Paxil Antidepressant Users v Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and GlaxoSmithKline

1/1/1998

Commonly-Prescribed Antidepressants Are Extremely Dangerous for Some

http://www.classactionamerica.com/cases/case.asp?cid=1087

ClassActionAmerican.com

Some 200 legal actions have been filed against Eli Lilly, Pfizer, and GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturers of Prozac (fluoxetine), Zoloft (sertraline), and Paxil (paroxetine), respectively, to recover for suicides or homicides–some completed, some only attempted–by patients in the first few days or weeks after they were prescribed one of these drugs. These three medications are in the same family, called SSRIs, for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. They are commonly prescribed for depression, and they work by increasing the amount of a chemical called serotonin in the brain.

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