ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 26 Year Old Man Assaults 16 Year Old Girl: Scotland

Paragraph 18 reads:  “He had attempted suicide by an
overdose and
was taking medication for
depression at the time of the offence.”

Paragraph 16
reads:  ” ‘Jim Stephenson, defending, told the High Court in Edinburgh
Smith wanted to apologise to the victim.  ‘He cannot believe he carried
out these acts,
‘  he said. ‘

http://news.scotsman.com/scotland/Rapist-such-a-risk-that.5886765.jp

Rapist such a risk that he’ll be under watch until he dies

Published Date: 05 December 2009
By JOHN ROBERTSON

A MAN who held a schoolgirl captive for seven hours and then raped her
was given a life sentence yesterday.


Ryan Smith, 26, snatched the teenager off the street and
kept her in his home overnight. She was allowed to leave after giving him a
kiss.

A judge was told that Smith, from Saughton, Edinburgh, had been
assessed as posing a “very high risk” to the public and to women in
particular.

He had earlier admitted abducting, assaulting and raping the
16yearold girl on 8 February.

The girl had never met Smith before, but
they had a mutual friend and she was in a group that was at his flat that night.

The men were drunk and there was a row between Smith and one of the
others in the street. The girl was walking away from the scene when she heard
Smith say: “You’re dead.”

He grabbed her by the neck and pushed her
against a hedge, and then dragged her into his flat.

Neil Beardmore,
prosecuting, said: “She was crying and trying to break free, but was unable to
do so. It was about midnight … there was no-one passing in the
street.”

Smith threw the girl on to a bed, and lay down beside her. He
put his hand over her mouth when someone came to the door, and then indecently
assaulted her.

She repeatedly told him to stop and hit him, but he bit
her on the arm.

“He would alternate between making threats and being
apologetic,” Mr Beardmore said.

“This continued throughout the night and
she considered trying to escape but was afraid of what the accused might do if
he caught her. She was continually in fear of her safety and her
life.”

At about 7am, Smith raped the girl, as she pleaded to go home and
was crying and shaking.

As he allowed her to leave, he told her she
would be “battered” and “killed” if she told the police.

The girl

revealed what had happened to a friend, and the police were contacted.

Mr Beardmore said she had suffered nightmares and now feared sleeping
alone or going out alone.

Jim Stephenson, defending, told the High Court
in Edinburgh Smith wanted to apologise to the victim. “He cannot believe he
carried out these acts,” he said.

The court heard Smith had an alcohol
dependency and had received treatment at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital.

He had attempted suicide by an overdose and was taking medication for
depression at the time of the offence.

His criminal record included
convictions for fireraising, and serious assault against a woman.

The
judge, Lord Brailsford, ordered that Smith must serve a minimum of seven years
before he could apply for parole.

He imposed an order for lifelong
restriction, and said Smith required treatment for underlying psychological
problems.

“An order for lifelong restriction is the only means the court
has of ensuring you will not be released until such time as the risk you pose
has been evaluated as being at an acceptable level,” Lord Brailsford
said.

If and when Smith is released, he will remain on licence for life
and be liable to be recalled to custody.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Makes Teenage Girl Angry All the Time: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How tragic that this poor young woman would have to turn to
the Dear Abby column (or whatever they call it now) for help with this! Why
would her own doctor not know enough to explain to her that this antidepressant
is causing her blood sugar to drop producing adrenalin rushes as the body’s
attempt to normalize sugar? Since adrenalin is your fight or flight hormone it
is no wonder she is angry all the time and no wonder it affects relationships as
the patients become meaner and meaner when they cannot control their blood sugar
levels due to the effects of these drugs.

You ask if she has been screened for diabetes? I may not show
up yet, but soon will with her pancreas experiencing that strong of a negative
effect from the antidepressant. This is a very bright young woman to be able to
notice what effect this drug is having upon her. And her mother may change her
mind about having her daughter take the antidepressant when her daughter
violently attacks her in a rage produced by the drug! What a shame her
mother is not listening to her as she cries out for help knowing what
violence the drugs are causing her to be capable of, yet frightened to verbalize
those horribly violent thoughts previously so completely foreign to
her.
__________________________________
Last part of paragraph two reads:  ” However, the
antidepressant causes me to be uncontrollably angry
all the time.
I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which just adds to
my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect my
relationships with friends and family.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091130/LIFE/911300302/-1/ENTERTAIN

Teen frets taking her antidepressants

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
November 30, 2009 12:00
AM

Dear Annie: I am a 16-year-old girl who still wets the bed. I have
tried everything from wearing an alarm to taking medication.

I am now on
a prescription that works by telling my kidneys to stop producing urine,
although it doesn’t work all the time. A urologist prescribed an antidepressant

that prevents me from sleeping too deeply. With the combination of these two
medicines, I no longer wet the bed. However, the antidepressant causes me to be
uncontrollably angry all the time. I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which
just adds to my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect
my relationships with friends and family.

My mom wants me to keep taking
it because it works. But, Annie, I don’t like being angry all the time, and I
don’t want to be on medication for the rest of my life. What can I
do?

­ At a Loss

Dear At a Loss: Most teens with enuresis are
exceedingly deep sleepers, and many also have a small bladder, exacerbating the

problem. We assume you have been screened for diabetes and a genetic link, and
that you don’t drink alcohol. Many sufferers do well with a moisture-sensor
alarm, and we’re sorry that doesn’t work for you. The other common treatment is
the medication you currently are using. However, since you are having unpleasant
side effects, please discuss this with your doctor. It’s possible your dosage
can be altered so you can still get the benefits without such a big emotional
swing. Also discuss exercises to strengthen and enlarge your bladder. For more
information and to keep abreast of new developments, contact the National Kidney
Foundation (kidney.org) at 1-888-WAKE-DRY
(1-888-925-3379).

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