Pills More Lethal Than Guns – Pain Meds & Sleep Apnea

Parker & Madilyn Stewart

‘We are killing innocent people’: Stunned doctor warns of opioid danger, even when taken as prescribed 

Three months after 21 year old Parker Stewart married his sweetheart, Madilyn, he and his younger sister both went in for a tonsillectomy. On the third day after surgery he  told everyone he was feeling fine and went to bed and never woke up. Pain medication he had been given and taken as prescribed had shut his breathing down and he died in his sleep.
What should be of particular interest to those taking antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics with so often disease sleep apnea resulting in the explosion in sales of CPAP machines is the fact that something that predisposes someone to the repression of respiration.

“…a person who suffers from sleep apnea — a condition in which a person’s breathing is shallow or undergoes abnormally long pauses while sleeping — is known to have a greater chance for a dangerous reaction to even a prescribed dose of painkillers, he explained.

“Measured risk factors are whether a person is known to snore loudly, frequently feels tired during the day even after good sleep, has any observed pauses in breathing at night, has high blood pressure, has a body mass index of more than 35, are over 50 years old, have a large neck size (more than 17 inches around for a man or more than 16 for a woman), or are male.

“A person is considered to be at greater threat of post-surgery complications with painkillers if they can answer yes to three or more of those factors.

“In hindsight, Gardner said, she believes her son “had possible sleep apnea.” Even when he was a young boy, she said, Stewart snored loudly.”

Read full story here:
https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900005443/we-are-killing-innocent-people-stunned-doctor-warns-of-opioid-danger-even-when-taken-as-prescribed.html
Shooting Pills Is Far More Lethal Than Shooting Bullets!
Comment from Kranny-Utah: Why aren’t these trained doctors better educated in school, let alone by Big pharma reps, about these lethal side-effects, not only of opioids, but of all toxic drugs?
These harmful side-effects aren’t new to the medical/pharmaceutical industries. Barbara Starfield M.D. published an article in a 2002 JAMA (Journal of American Medical Association), the medical journal that doctors should be familiar with, about drug-related deaths due to patients taking drugs as prescribed, and not abused. Taking statistics from the year 2000, she reported that over 250,000 deaths were attributed to drug interactions and medical procedures, making it the third leading cause of death in the United States, behind only heart disease and cancer deaths. Imagine what that number is today? Ignorance is driving too much of this current plague.
My comment in response: “Thank you kranny!!! You took the words right out of my mouth! I head the International Coalition for Drug Awareness where we focus on this very issue. Would love to have you join us.
Interesting to note is another study done by pharmacists in 1995, due to concern that the drugs they were dispensing were killing too many, was published in “Drug Topics.” They concluded that the death toll for taking prescription meds “as prescribed” was 200,000. So according to the JAMA study you quote, over a five year period the death toll increased by 50,000. Now if the deaths continued to increase only at that rate (although I would expect it to have increased at a much higher rate over the last few years) we should now, 17 years later, have a death toll of at least 420,000 annually.
Losing 420,000 per year would be like having at least two 9/11 tragedies hit this country every week! We went to war for how many years over only one 9/11? Where is the outcry for all of these senseless pharmaceutical deaths?! And people are concerned about guns?! It appears to me that shooting pills is far more lethal!
How to Make the Problem Worse!
With the information finally coming out on how very serious and very lethal these pain killers are the next move is logically to wean patients off these deadly and highly addictive drugs. But what are the new recommendations to help those with pain? What is being recommended are drugs patients who have used both types of drugs say these are FAR MORE DIFFICULT to withdraw from than these pain killers are!! Those drugs now being recommended for pain are antidepressants or Neurontin (gabapentin) or Lyrica. These patients are being led from the frying pan into a raging fire!!!

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Additional Tylenol Warnings: Now linked to SEVERE Asthma

NOTE FROM DR. ANN BLAKE TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

YET ANOTHER TYLENOL WARNING! Long known toproduce fatal liver damage . . . how many warnings do we need to get the full picture on this deadly drug? There have been increasing warnings this past year which continues toexplain why Tylenol has NEVER been found in my medicine cabinet and never will be!!!

HIGHLIGHTS from the article below:

A pair of studies suggests that the common painkiller acetaminophen — better known as Tylenol in the U.S. — may be fueling a worldwide increase in asthma. ~Reuters Health

While no one knows if the drug causes asthma by itself, another report — published along with the first study — shows for the first time that many toddlers took acetaminophen before they developed asthma symptoms such as wheezing. [I am appauled by how often this deadly drug is given to young children!]

“We have confirmed that acetaminophen use comes first, SO A CAUSAL LINK IS INCREASINGLY LIKELY, [Emphasis added]” . . .

Acetaminophen tied tochildhood wheezing and allergies

4:15pm BST

By Frederik Joelving

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A pair of studies suggests that the common painkiller acetaminophen — better known asTylenol in the U.S. — may be fueling a worldwide increase inasthma.

According to one study out Thursday, acetaminophen could be responsible for as many as four in 10 cases of wheezing and severe asthma in teens.

While no one knows if the drug causes asthma by itself, another report — published along with the first study — shows for the first time that many toddlers took acetaminophen before they developed asthma symptoms such as wheezing.

“We have confirmed that acetaminophen use comes first, so a causal link is increasingly likely,” said Dr. Alemayehu Amberbir, of Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia and the University of Nottingham in the UK.

But large-scale clinical tests are necessary before anyone cleans out their medicine cabinet, stressed Amberbir, whose findings are published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

His team followed more than 1,000 Ethiopian babies over three years. When the toddlers turned one, the researchers asked the mothers if their babies had breathing problems, and how much acetaminophen they had used.

About eight percent of the kids began to wheeze between ages one and three. Those who had been given acetaminophen during their first year — before they had breathing trouble — had up to seven times the odds of developing wheezing.

That increase held even after adjusting for fever and coughs, which in principle could have triggered both the wheezing and the use of painkillers.

“What we have is further information and a stronger association between the use of acetaminophen and asthma,” said Dr. Dipak Kanabar, who has written guidelines on painkillers, but wasn’t involved in the new studies.

But Kanabar, a consultant pediatrician at Evelina Children’s Hospital in London, cautioned that parents’ recall isn’t always accurate, which could have influenced the findings.

“We have to be careful when we give advice to parents tostress that these studies do not mean that giving acetaminophen will necessarily result in their child developingasthma,” he said.

But if the link turns out to be real, it could have a major impact on public health, according to another report in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

In that study, based on more than 320,000 teens from 50 countries, 11 percent of the children had breathing trouble — only slightly more than the percentage of American children who have asthma.

Those teens who took acetaminophen at least once a month — one third overall, and more than four in 10 Americans — doubled their odds of wheezing.

They were also more likely to have allergic nasal congestion and the skin condition eczema, Dr. Richard W. Beasley, of the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand, and colleagues report.

The researchers estimate that acetaminophen could potentially be responsible for up to four in 10 of all asthmasymptoms, including severe ones such as waking up gasping for air once a week or more.

McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the Johnson & Johnson subsidiary that sells Tylenol, said in a comment their product “has over 50 years of clinical history to support its safety and efficacy.”

“The well-documented safety profile for acetaminophen makes it the preferred pain reliever for asthma sufferers,” the company told Reuters Health in an e-mail. The company said there are no gold-standard clinical trials showing “a causal link between acetaminophen and asthma.”

However, Kanabar found in his review of the medical literature that ibuprofen — another painkiller, sometimes sold as Advil — seemed to trigger less wheezing than acetaminophen.

Ibuprofen, however, is not recommended in people withasthma, Kanabar said, and that most doctors favor Tylenol.

Aspirin, another common painkiller, is generally discouraged in children because it can cause short-term breathing problems and other rare side effects.

According to Kanabar, dropping painkillers entirely is probably a bad idea, and might cause a child to feel worse and drink less liquid, which could slow recovery.

So which painkiller should a parent choose if their child has a headache or a fever — Tylenol or ibuprofen?

At this point, said Kanabar, “you could go for either.”

SOURCE: link.reuters.com/sej74n American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, online August 13, 2010.

© Thomson Reuters 2010. TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

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