ANTIDEPRESSANT & ALCOHOL: Assault: Australia

Paragraph 10 reads:  “At the time Todd was suffering
anxiety and depression and could have suffered a blackout.”

Paragraph 13 reads:  “She said the incident had a huge impact on
her client’s marriage, his wife was left shaken and Todd had consumed alcohol while on medication and with an
empty stomach that night.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.

Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body

http://www.standard.net.au/news/local/news/general/pilot-strikes-below-the-belt/1801972.aspx

Pilot strikes below the belt

ANDREW THOMSON
14
Apr, 2010 04:00 AM

A LONG-TIME RAAF officer has piloted his way into
trouble after grabbing another man’s testicles at the Port Fairy Folk Festival.

Jeff Todd, 51, of Ramsey Court, Lowood, pleaded guilty in the
Warrnambool Magistrates Court this week to unlawful assault.

He was not
convicted and fined $1000.

The court was told that on March 7 this year
Todd was at the festival between 6.30pm and 7.30pm when he became involved in a
verbal incident in a bar with a man not known to him.
Todd bumped into the
man several times in a bar and was asked to move away before the victim
requested security personnel to assist.

Todd moved away a few paces,
made some derogatory comments, then came up behind the victim and grabbed his
testicles with significant force.

“You’ve got no balls, mate,” Todd told
the victim and there was a short struggle before he released the victim’s
testicles.

Todd was kicked out of the venue and told not to come back.

He told police during an interview he had drunk a bottle of wine and had
little recollection of the incident.

At the time Todd was suffering
anxiety and depression and could have suffered a blackout.

The victim
suffered pain for about 12 hours and Todd wrote a letter of apology which was
passed on through police.

Defence counsel Danielle Svede said Todd had
no prior convictions, glowing references and had not drunk alcohol since the
incident.

She said the incident had a huge impact on her client’s
marriage, his wife was left shaken and Todd had consumed alcohol while on
medication and with an empty stomach that night.

Ms Svede said her client
was on 12 months leave from the air force, had undertaken anger management and
knew his behaviour was inappropriate.

Magistrate Jonathan Klestadt said
there should be no doubt in anyone’s mind that the defendant’s actions were
appalling.

He said the folk festival was not a place to be confronted by
drunken, boorish behaviour and assaulted.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Policeman Becomes Violent: Canada

Paragraphs four through seven read:  “In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick became
violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After swearing
at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived, overturned
furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a picture
frame and fought with his wife.”

“The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of
Scotch.”

“But it was when he was told he was being arrested later that
evening that Gulick went ballistic.”

“Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but
overall calm situation quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick
fought back.”

Drugawareness & SSRI Stories Note:  The
Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
and the antidepressant
in the human body.

http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2010/01/12/12428306-qmi.html

Violent cop acted ‘superhuman’

Constable pleads guilty
to discreditable conduct at hearing
By SCOTT TAYLOR, QMI Agency

OTTAWA – A police
disciplinary hearing heard dramatic testimony yesterday about Const. Jeff
Gulick’s violent conduct in May 2008.

Gulick pleaded guilty yesterday to
discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

He had previously
been found guilty of assaulting a police officer, uttering threats to cause
bodily harm, escaping lawful custody and mischief after officers tried to arrest
him at his home May 22, 2008.

In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick
became violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After
swearing at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived,
overturned furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a
picture frame and fought with his wife.

The hearing was told Gulick was
on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of Scotch.

But it was
when he was told he was being arrested later that evening that Gulick went
ballistic.

Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but overall calm situation
quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick fought back.

“He
started grabbing at my right side and I could feel my holster and gunbelt being
pulled.”

Gulick threatened to kill his fellow cops as he struggled with
what Const. Michael O’Reilly said was “superhuman” strength.

Gulick was
finally overcome after being shocked with a Taser by one of four officers who
had joined the fight.

Gulick was taken to the Ottawa Hospital’s Civic
Campus emergency room, but when they arrived Gulick had shed both wrist and
ankle cuffs and bolted across Carling Ave. to the Experimental Farm, where he
once again was shot with a Taser.

O’Reilly said the situation had “gone
as sideways as it can go.”

Earlier yesterday, a female police officer
testified she feels like an outcast among fellow officers as a result of her
involvement and subsequent testimony in Gulick’s disciplinary hearing.

Sgt. Holly Watson said she’s heard “through the rumour mill” that fellow
officers support Gulick and there “was never any support for the four of us who
were assaulted (by Gulick during the arrest).”

Watson added she has
received no support from the Police Association either. She also testified that
she still worries about where Gulick is when she goes to her car after work.

Police Chief Vern White is scheduled to testify today.

428 total views, 3 views today

EFFEXOR: Police Officer Becomes Aggressive With Captain: Suit: NJ

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Czech’s report indicated Ruroede
suffers from a seizure disorder and as a consequence takes
Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone, all of which
have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also claimed
that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk of over
aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/78389717.html

Former officer‘s suit gets a court date
Thursday, December 3, 2009


Community News (Lodi Edition)
STAFF WRITER

A former police
lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go before the court
early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against the borough, the
police department and the mayor and council earlier this year following his
termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec. 9, 2008.
Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County Superior
Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede was fired
from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert Czech, Esq. of
Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided “untruthful
responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions of March 23,
2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt. George Egbert.
Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate, withheld information,
failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and handled firearms while
unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological evaluation determined
that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit, Ruroede seeks to have
Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police department and pay
lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges against Ruroede stem
from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney Station bar in East
Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at the bar prior to the
fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm during the course of a
verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that Ruroede lifted him “by the
jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off the ground.”

In
the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a derogatory remark about a
female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert
grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued in the manner he
did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s testimony,
according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert called
both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a

seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path the
mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John Boppert
of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert Wunsch,
was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

A
former police lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go
before the court early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against
the borough, the police department and the mayor and council earlier this year
following his termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec.
9, 2008. Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County
Superior Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede
was fired from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert
Czech, Esq. of Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided
“untruthful responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions
of March 23, 2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt.
George Egbert. Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate,
withheld information, failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and
handled firearms while unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological
evaluation determined that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit,
Ruroede seeks to have Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police
department and pay lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges
against Ruroede stem from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney
Station bar in East Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at
the bar prior to the fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm
during the course of a verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that
Ruroede lifted him “by the jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off
the ground.”

In the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a
derogatory remark about a female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the
bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued
in the manner he did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s
testimony, according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert
called both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a
seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance
Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path
the mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John
Boppert of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert
Wunsch, was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

590 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Mother Leaves Children Home Alone for 3 Days: Australia

Paragraph seven reads:  “Defence solicitor Travis George
said the woman was under extreme pressure at the time, was taking
antidepressants
and was struggling to cope with one of her
children’s unruly behaviour.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.

Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/11/25/homealone-mum-walks-out-on-kids/

Home alone: Mum walks out on kids

Loretta Bryce |
25th November 2009

A STRESSED-OUT single mum who left her kids home
alone for three nights while she went on a binge has been ordered to perform 150
hours community service.

The 32-year-old Maryborough mother left her

children, aged 10, 11 and 14, to fend for themselves between October 21 and
October 24.

She appeared in the Maryborough Magistrates Court where she
pleaded guilty to leaving her children unsupervised for an unreasonable period
of time.

Prosecutor Sergeant Michael Quirk said the woman saw the kids
off to school on the 21st before heading out to a pub where she got
drunk.

The woman continued to drink excessively for the next three days,
staying at motels for two nights and at a friend’s home the other
night.

The children’s attempts to contact their mum were
unsuccessful.

Defence solicitor Travis George said the woman was under
extreme pressure at the time, was taking antidepressants and was struggling to
cope with one of her children’s unruly behaviour.

Mr George said she had
sought help from mental health services, her GP and the Department of Child
Safety in the fear she would have a breakdown but was not given the help she
needed.

“It all got too much on the morning of this offence,” Mr George
said.

“The children’s behaviour was out of control.

“My client
cracked and went on a bender.

“She drank to excess and came home to find
her children gone.”

Mr George said the Department of Child Safety had
since stepped in to help and the children were under alternative care until the
end of the month, when they would be returned to their mother.

The woman
had the support of her own mother and was not likely to re-offend, Mr George
said.

Magistrate John Smith sentenced the woman to 150 hours unpaid
community service and did not record a
conviction.

322 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault with Knife: England

Second paragraph from the end reads:  “He was
taking anti-depressants when he met his ex by accident in a
pub and began drinking heavily.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.
Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.eveshamjournal.co.uk/news/4757634.Heartbroken_man_stabbed_best_friend/

Heartbroken man stabbed best friend

5:09pm Tuesday
24th November 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

A HEARTBROKEN man stabbed his best friend in the stomach after
breaking up with his girlfriend.

John Withers had been homeless since
the split but was given shelter by Trevor Phillips, a former work colleague.

But Withers got drunk after an unexpected meeting with his ex-partner
and returned to Mr Phillips’ house in the village of Wickhamford, near Evesham,
in “a zombie state”, said Alex Warren, prosecuting.

He stuck the kitchen

knife four inches into Mr Phillips’ stomach in an unprovoked attack.

When police arrived, Withers was drinking a can of beer and the victim
still had the blade protruding from his body, Worcester Crown Court heard.

Withers, aged 44, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to unlawful
wounding and was jailed for 27 months.

Judge Richard Rundell said an
inch or two either way and Withers could have been facing a murder charge.

He accepted a defence submission that the attack was “inexplicable” and
said Withers might have mental health issues.

Mr Phillips, who lived
with his wife and step daughter, had known the defendant for 15 years and took
pity on him when he became homeless at the end of his romance, said Mr Warren.

But on June 26 Withers was spoken to by Mr Phillips about being drunk
and an argument blew up.

Later that evening Withers returned to the
address. The victim was making coffee when he felt the knife blow.

The
blade did not enter the abdominal cavity and he recovered after an operation.

Francis Laird, defending, said Withers had gone through a stressful
break-up and was “totally heartbroken”.

He was taking anti-depressants
when he met his ex by accident in a pub and began drinking heavily.

Mr
Laird said: “He became overwhelmed and did something quite inexplicable. He is
deeply sorry for what he did. It may have been out of his control.”

402 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Knife Attack: England

Second paragraph from the end reads:  “He was
taking anti-depressants when he met his ex by accident in a
pub and began drinking heavily.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians
Desk Reference states that antidepressants can
cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse.
Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol
simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the
antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.eveshamjournal.co.uk/news/4757634.Heartbroken_man_stabbed_best_friend/

Heartbroken man stabbed best friend

5:09pm Tuesday
24th November 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

A HEARTBROKEN man stabbed his best friend in the stomach after
breaking up with his girlfriend.

John Withers had been homeless since
the split but was given shelter by Trevor Phillips, a former work colleague.

But Withers got drunk after an unexpected meeting with his ex-partner
and returned to Mr Phillips’ house in the village of Wickhamford, near Evesham,
in “a zombie state”, said Alex Warren, prosecuting.

He stuck the kitchen
knife four inches into Mr Phillips’ stomach in an unprovoked attack.

When police arrived, Withers was drinking a can of beer and the victim
still had the blade protruding from his body, Worcester Crown Court heard.

Withers, aged 44, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to unlawful
wounding and was jailed for 27 months.

Judge Richard Rundell said an
inch or two either way and Withers could have been facing a murder charge.

He accepted a defence submission that the attack was “inexplicable” and
said Withers might have mental health issues.

Mr Phillips, who lived
with his wife and step daughter, had known the defendant for 15 years and took
pity on him when he became homeless at the end of his romance, said Mr Warren.

But on June 26 Withers was spoken to by Mr Phillips about being drunk
and an argument blew up.

Later that evening Withers returned to the
address. The victim was making coffee when he felt the knife blow.

The
blade did not enter the abdominal cavity and he recovered after an operation.

Francis Laird, defending, said Withers had gone through a stressful
break-up and was “totally heartbroken”.

He was taking anti-depressants
when he met his ex by accident in a pub and began drinking heavily.

Mr
Laird said: “He became overwhelmed and did something quite inexplicable. He is
deeply sorry for what he did. It may have been out of his control.”

417 total views, 2 views today

PROZAC: Suicide: Woman Set Herself on Fire: England

Paragraph nine reads:  “By this time she was also
taking Prozac
and diazepam and had been given
several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/4749233.Brighton_mum_who_set_herself_on_fire_was_depressed_after_redundancy__inquest_hears/

Brighton mum who set herself on fire was depressed after redundancy,
inquest hears

2:33pm Thursday 19th November 2009

A Brighton mother-of-two committed suicide by dousing herself in barbecue lighter
fluid and setting it alight after battling with a chronic alcohol problem and
depression since being made redundant, an inquest heard today.

Birgit Bartlett’s body was found by her daughter in the garden of her home in
Hollingbury Crescent on August 8.

An inquest at Brighton County Court
heard the 51-year-old died of suffocation after inhaling the flames which
enveloped her body.

Pathologist Mark Taylor, who carried out a
post-mortem examination, said she had an acute thermal injury to her windpipe
and believed she would have died “rapidly”.

Mr Taylor said she had low
levels of alcohol in her blood, equal to having consumed around four units, but
added that he found excess fat around her liver, “in keeping with her history of
chronic alcohol abuse,” although this did not contribute to her death.

Mrs Bartlett’s husband, Michael, said his wife began drinking heavily
when she was made redundant in 2007 and he and his adult son and daughter would
often find empty bottles of wine hidden around the house.

In 2008 she
stopped drinking when she became employed as an admin assistant, but took it up
again when she lost the job in February of this year.

This time her
alcohol abuse was worse, and she took to drinking a bottle of spirits a day. Mr
Bartlett said the family confiscated her credit cards and cheque book in a bid
to stop her.

By this time she was also taking Prozac and diazepam and
had been given several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.

During a visit to her GP in March she denied thoughts of suicide but
admitted she had been feeling low, before she was admitted to hospital in May
after setting fire to her duvet cover while in bed.

She suffered third
degree burns to her thigh and lower back and was referred to the local community
mental health team.

The inquest heard that German-born Mrs Bartlett had
no previous psychiatric problems but her sister had committed suicide six years
ago.

Psychiatrist Graham Walton said he saw Mrs Bartlett three times in
July but said he felt “she didn’t want to engage” with him.

He said he
did not think she seemed suicidal but “she did admit there was endless
drinking”.

Mr Bartlett said his wife underwent a detoxification
programme to try to stop her from drinking and said she felt “ashamed” of her
condition.

“She was petrified that somebody she knew would see her going
in or out,” he added.

In the days leading up to her death she told him,
“I’ll never find another job” and “I’m no good”, the inquest heard.

On

the day she died Mr Bartlett said he noticed she was missing so thought she
might have gone for a walk and he searched her local haunts. He arrived back at
the house at around 1.30pm to find police, fire engines and ambulances outside.

Detective Sergeant Helen Paine of Sussex
Police
told the inquest that officers were satisfied that there were no
suspicious circumstances surrounding Mrs Bartlett’s death.

Summing up,
Dr Karen Henderson, assistant deputy coroner for Brighton and Hove, said the
inquest had found “little evidence that she seriously wished to stop drinking”.

She added: “She was also offered a lot of help from social services, her
GP, and from substance misuse services. It is quite clear she did not wish to
engage with these services.

“The manner of her death is truly terrible
but we have heard evidence that her death would have been mercifully brief and
mercifully painless.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, she added: “I know
that the family did everything they possibly could to help Birgit,” and offered
them her condolences.

Mr Bartlett declined to comment on the hearing.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Violence: Stand-Off: Oregon

Paragraph 3 reads:  “According to a Clackamas County
Sheriff’s report, Hatcher took a large amount of antidepressant
medication
coupled with alcohol
just before 9 p.m. on Nov. 18 and
turned violent. Family members fled the home, called the police and said Hatcher
wanted responding officers to shoot him. Emergency responders began arriving
shortly after the call and attempted to initiate communication with
Hatcher.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.estacadanews.com/news/story.php?story_id=125878060687193400

Standoff with armed gunman ends peacefully

SWAT team called in to negotiate with Estacada man

By Evan Jensen

The
Estacada News, Nov 20, 2009

Bret Hatcher.

Submitted
photo / Estacada News

Twenty-five miles east of downtown Estacada,
near the Ripple Brook Ranger Station on Highway 224, a mentally disturbed
Estacada man went on a rampage Nov. 18, breaking windows, chasing family members
from the home and firing shots from a .22-caliber rifle.

But after a
two-hour standoff with Clackamas County Sheriff’s deputies and SWAT negotiators,
Brent A. Hatcher, 28, was taken into custody and booked in the Clackamas County
Jail for unlawful use of a weapon and reckless endangerment, with bail set at
$200,000. Charges of attempted murder were dropped, but Hatcher remains in jail
under close supervision.

According to a Clackamas County Sheriff’s
report, Hatcher took a large amount of antidepressant medication coupled with
alcohol just before 9 p.m. on Nov. 18 and turned violent. Family members fled
the home, called the police and said Hatcher wanted responding officers to shoot
him. Emergency responders began arriving shortly after the call and attempted to
initiate communication with Hatcher.

“At 10:14 p.m., Bret Hatcher
answered the telephone at the resident and declared repeatedly that he had a
rifle and would shoot to kill,” CCSO Public Information Officer Jim Strovink
said.

At 10:22 p.m., deputies at the rear entrance of the residence
saw Hatcher exit the residence with rifle in hand. While the Special Weapon and
Tactics Team was being mobilized, deputies continued to try and make contact
with Hatcher, then heard two gunshots fired in their direction.

“The
stationed deputies on the perimeter could hear the rounds whipping through the
tree line in close proximity to where they were positioned,” CCSO Capt. Kevin
Layng said.

At 11:16 p.m., SWAT negotiators made contact with Hatcher by
phone and continued to attempt to calm him and develop an exit plan to take
Hatcher into custody without anyone getting hurt.

“Clackamas County’s
SWAT negotiators receive extensive training in the art of communicating with
people in challenging situations, especially those with mental-health issues,”
Strovink said. “… An estimated 35 percent of all inmates at the Clackamas County
Jail suffer from some form of mental-health issue.”

SWAT negotiators were
able to take Hatcher into custody without incident and transport him to the
Clackamas County Jail. Upon collecting evidence from the scene, investigators
found that the .22-caliber weapon Hatcher fired had malfunctioned and one round
was found jammed in the chamber, making the weapon inoperable.

“This
incident involves a man mixing his medication with alcohol, destroying his home,
chasing his family from the resident, and then arming himself with a rifle…”
Strovink said. “… but it did have a successful conclusion. He was safely brought
into police custody, with no injuries to anyone. … The SWAT negotiators did a
commendable job, calmly managing a difficult and threatening subject on the
phone and securing a peaceful
surrender.”

530 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTs: Murder: Youth Kills Friend: Oklahoma

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________

Paragraph 16 reads: “While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “’I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them’.”

“Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.”

http://www.chickashanews.com/local/local_story_302093409.html

Published: October 29, 2009 08:34 am

The Express-Star

Ronson Bush’s mother Tina Black took the stand on Wednesday to ask the court to spare her son’s life.

On day two of his trial, Bush admitted killing his friend Billy Harrington but still refuses to say he meant to do it. Because of his refusal, Grady County District Attorney Bret Burns is asking District Judge Richard Van Dyck to hand down a death sentence.

The jury was excused when Bush changed his plea to guilty, and now the decision whether Bush lives or dies in solely in the hands of Van Dyck, who will render his decisiion at 10 a.m. today.

“We had a life before alcohol and drugs, we had laughs and family time and we went to church,” Black said. “If a family has not experienced alcohol and drugs, they had better thank the Lord because they’re an ugly thing that make your child someone you don’t know.”

In her plea to save her son’s life. Black said she is not angry with Ronson for herself, but she is angry for her grandson Brennan, Ronson’s son.

“Brennan loved going out in the truck with his dad,” Black said. “He asked me, ‘If my dad got life, do you think they’d let him go out in the truck one more time?’”

Black said she thinks a person can love their children even if they do not like their actions.

“There was something that fired up that anger, that wasn’t normal,” Black said.

The next witness to testify was Gail Poyner, Ph. D., a licensed psychologist who deals primarily in forensic psychology.

Poyner performed a psychological evaluation of Bush and researched the effects of the medications Bush was taking.

Poyner said members of Bush’s family described him as “flipped out,” “crazy” and “paranoid,” and that Bush experiences anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, severe drug and alcohol problems and says his brain feels “itchy.”

“Likely he was misdiagnosed or not diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder,” Poyner said. “He is severely mentally ill and his involvement with crime is highly correlated with his mental illness.”

Poyner criticized the lack of treatment Bush received after he was admitted to Griffin Memorial Hospital in Norman.

“I very strongly believe at a professional level had Griffin offered a modicum of treatment, this (the murder) could have been possibly avoided,” Poyner said. “They simply did not give him any treatment, no group therapy, no individual therapy. It was documented he was suicidal, yet they did not treat him for that.”

Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.

While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them.”

Dr. David Musick, a full professor of sociology at the University of Northern Colorado, also testified.

Describing Bush’s family as “good folks,” Musick discussed alcoholism as a disease and how the “horrific” drug methamphetamine creates powerful addictions in humans.

“The defendant (Bush) has a serious alcohol problem that is overflowing into violence,” Musick said. “As a child, he was a pawn being pulled back and forth by his family who had different parenting styles which creates unbearable pain so he covers up the pain with alcohol and illicit drugs.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Charges for Shoplifting: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic reactions.
Keep in mind that antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. Two types of mania seem apparent in this case:
Dypsomania – an overwhelming craving for alcohol & Kleptomania – compulsion
to take things that are not yours.
Paragraph eleven reads:  “He suffers from
depression and is taking medication for it and on
this day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t
account for why he did it.”


http://www.nwemail.co.uk/news/asda_shoplifter_was_in_severe_financial_straits_1_628597?referrerPath=news/

Asda shoplifter was in ‘severe financial straits’

Published at 13:10, Monday, 26 October 2009

A MAN tried
to flee a supermarket with £270-worth of goods and only enough cash for a taxi
home, a court heard.

Paul Richard Charnley stole the items from the Asda
store in Barrow.

But the 40-year-old was caught.

On Thursday,
Charnley appeared at Furness Magistrates’ Court over the theft.

Mr Andrew
Dodd, prosecuting, told the court: “He went into the store and went round
looking at various items, filling his trolley with various goods.

“Once
it is full, he goes into the cafe area where there is no CCTV coverage and is
observed placing items into carrier bags and into the top of the trolley and
then proceeds to leave without any intention of paying for any goods.”

Mr
Dodd said Charnley was followed by store staff and detained outside.

The
court heard Charnley was in “severe financial straits” and had been out of work

for 15 months.

He was said to be “hungry” and only had £5 on him that he
intended to use to pay for a taxi back to his home in Laburnum Crescent, Barrow.

Miss Karen Templeton, defending, told the court: “He says he is
absolutely ashamed of himself and he has been worried sick about coming here.

“He suffers from depression and is taking medication for it and on this
day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t account for why he
did it.

“He takes this very seriously and is very remorseful about what
he has done.”

Charnley pleaded guilty to stealing items valued at £270.44
belonging to Asda on October 7.

Presiding magistrate Mr Les Johnson gave
Charnley a six-month conditional discharge.

Mr Johnson did not force
Charnley to pay a fine due to his money problems.

Published by http://www.nwemail.co.uk

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