ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Sex Abuse: Woman (32) Has Affair with 14 Year Old Boy: PA

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Finally someone involved in one of these cases is beginning to
connect the dots back to medication. She thought it was the anti-anxiety drugs
without knowing that it is rare for one of these cases not to involve an
antidepressant, not an anti-anxiety med, even though they would certainly
contribute as well. But antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. One of those types of mania is
nymphomania.
TWO ANTIDEPRESSANTS given together???!!!! When are doctors
ever going to learn that they cannot do that without expecting toxic
reactions?!
_____________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228
Park St., Grove City, told Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove
City psychiatrist
had prescribed her four separate anti-anxiety
medications
and two anti-depressants, all of which she
was to take daily.”

Paragraph 5 reads:  “Defense attorney Veronica
Smith said prior to Mrs. Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal life as a wife, mother,
and worker.”

Published October 28, 2009 10:01 pm –

UPDATE: Woman blames drugs for sex with

boy

By Matt Snyder
Herald Staff Writer

PINE TOWNSHIP ­

A former Pine Township woman facing felony
charges for having sex with a boy while he was 14 and she was 32 blamed her
actions on judgment clouded by taking multiple anti-anxiety
medications.

Tammy Lynn Woodley, 33, of 228 Park St., Grove City, told
Common Pleas Judge John C. Reed that a Grove City psychiatrist had prescribed
her four separate anti-anxiety medications and two anti-depressants, all of
which she was to take daily.

“So, essentially the main responsibility for
this is the medication, not you?” asked a somewhat incredulous Miles K. Karson
Jr., assistant district attorney.

“Essentially, yes,” Woodley replied.
She said she does not think she ever would have slept with the boy or been
involved in other petty criminal cases if not for the meds. “My mind was not
clear,” she said.

Defense attorney Veronica Smith said prior to Mrs.
Woodley’s alleged over-medication, she had no prior record. She led a normal
life as a wife, mother, and worker.

Reed sentenced Ms. Woodley to 6 to 12
months, just under the standard range for statutory sexual assault and unlawful
contact with a minor. She will be paroled after six months, he said, if she
behaves herself in Mercer County Jail.

Mrs. Woodley will also be on
probation for 16 years and must register as a Megan’s Law sex

offender.

According to police, Mrs. Woodley and the boy, who is now 15,
knew each other through a relative. She started picking him up after school in
September of 2008, and went for rides or walks in the park. Her husband once
said the two acted like “two teenagers in love.”

Mrs. Woodley said things
got out of hand Oct. 27, 2008, and she had sex with the boy against her better
judgment.

“After it was all done, remorse set in and I realized what had
just happened. After that I took him home,” she said.

The boy’s father
told police the next day that Mrs. Woodley had seduced his son. Both parents
attended Mrs. Woodley’s sentencing. They did not speak, but Karson said they
wanted to show their continued desire for a prosecution.

The boy told
police he and Mrs. Woodley kissed and talked about getting serious, but both
acknowledged their age difference.

After charges were filed, Mrs. Woodley
sent a letter to the boy while he was on the school bus through her 8-yearold

son. Charges of intimidating witnesses and corruption of minors were dropped in
that case as part of her plea.

Mrs. Woodley said she had sent the letter
because she wanted to know how he was doing. She said she’d sent him letters
through her son in the past.

As part of her probation, Mrs. Woodley will
not be allowed contact with underage children besides her own, unless a
responsible adult is present to supervise.

431 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Commits Suicide: England

Paragraph 28 reads;  “Mrs Davis received counselling
and was on anti-depressants,’ he said. ‘Mr Davies said
their marriage had been blissfully happy and he thought the financial problems
had been settled.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1223333/Husband-blames-Lloyds-wifes-suicide-bank-pulls-family-firms-overdraft.html

Husband blames Lloyds for wife’s suicide after bank pulls family firm’s
overdraft


Last updated at 3:05 PM on 27th October 2009

A
husband has claimed Lloyds bank was partly to blame for his wife’s suicide after
it suddenly pulled their overdraft.

Mark Davis says the bank’s actions
helped drive his wife Victoria to throw herself in front of a train earlier this
year.

An inquest into her death heard a £16,000 tax demand was also
hand-delivered to the family home on the morning of her suicide.

The
hearing was told Mrs Davis had battled to juggle her job as company secretary
for the family firm and coping with its debts with being a mother to two young
children.

‘Blissfully happy’: Mark and Victoria Davis. He claims
Lloyds bank was partially to blame for her suicide because it pulled their
overdraft

Her husband, from whom she kept secret the extent of the
family’s chauffeur business’s woe, insisted Lloyds TSB was also partly to
blame.

After the inquest, he told how they had been with the bank for
years and had always had the loan renewed on a yearly basis.

This was
suddenly changed to monthly renewals and then finally withdrawn, cutting adrift
the family chauffeur car business which then went bust, he claimed.

‘We
did everything they asked us to do and then they moved the goal posts and kept
moving them. I am extremely bitter about it,’ Mr Davis said.

‘Lloyds bank
holds some of the responsibility for her death. We banked with Lloyds for many
years and had a very successful business. But at the beginning of this year,
they were themselves in serious financial difficulties.

‘We had an
extremely large overdraft of £30,000 which was secured on our house and other
guarantees. Previously it had been renewed annually but suddenly it was only
renewed monthly and then it was pulled completely.

‘How can we run a
business on that basis? I had a letter from the bank yesterday saying they were
still holding a personal guarantee of mine and they wanted it paid.

‘But
my company has now gone into liquidation and as far as I can, I shall make sure
that Lloyds don’t get a penny.’

Mrs Davis committed suicide on railway
tracks near the couple’s home in Chalford, near Stroud in Gloucestershire in
May.

After her death, some 4,000 letters she had hidden away were found.
Ironically, many contained payments from customers that would have eased their
financial problems.

Following the inquest jury’s verdict of suicide, her
husband said he could not understand why she had kept the extent of their debts
from him.

He said: ‘She must have been frightened to tell me because I
can be a bit fiery but she was a very intelligent woman and after what we had
been through, I can’t believe she kept it all from me.’

The inquest in
Cheltenham heard that Mrs Davis had struggled to cope with handling the
company’s debts with being a mother to their two children, aged six and
four.

Mr Davis said she was a ‘fantastic woman‘ and wonderful mother.

‘We went through a low point but we got through it with the help of
counselling and I thought we had come out the other side. I clearly missed
something. Nothing was as important as us and our family,’  he
said.

The inquest heard Mrs Davis went and knelt in front of a train on
May 13 after receiving the tax demand.

Train driver Ian Green told how he
sounded his horn when he spotted someone on the track and that at first, she had
stepped out of harm’s way.

‘As I approached the first short tunnel around
a bend at about 50 miles an hour, I saw a person standing near the line at the
far end. There was work taking place on the line that day so I was not alarmed,’
he said.

‘I immediately sound a double horn warning and the person
stepped back from the line. But as the train drew closer she stepped forward and
knelt down on the line facing away from me. I applied the brakes but there was
nothing I could do to avoid her.’

An Audi belonging to Mr and Mrs Davis
was found parked in a lay-by nearby. The inquest heard there was a three-page
debt management letter on the front seat referring to the unpaid tax bill.

The family firm, Chauffeurwise Ltd, had succeeded at first but had to
sell half its fleet of eight cars when trade slowed, the hearing was told.

By 2008, it was in ‘deep financial trouble’, John Wilson from the
British Transport Police said.

‘Mrs Davis received counselling and was
on anti-depressants,’ he said. ‘Mr Davies said their marriage had been
blissfully happy and he thought the financial problems had been
settled.

‘But since her death 4,000 letters have been found which had
been secreted around the house, and many contained cheques from customers which
had they been cashed would have helped the company’s situation.’

The
inquest heard the Inland Revenue had contacted Mrs Davis several times about the
outstanding debts and that even on the morning of her death, she had not shown
signs of unusual behaviour on the phone.

Her GP Dr Susie Weir said her
health had been generally good until 2006 when she gave her anti-depressants
because she was struggling to cope with working full time and caring for her
young children.

She saw her again in March 2009 and said she did not
remember her being stressed or in a low mood but that she was back on
anti-depressants at that
point.

462 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: Man Steps in Front of Train: England

Paragraph four reads:  “The court heard that Mr Khan had
been seen by a psychiatrist and was taking anti-depressants at the
time of his death.
No note was found among his possessions.”

http://www.theboltonnews.co.uk/news/4696210.Guard_from_Bolton_hit_by_train_identified_by_DNA/

Guard from Bolton hit by train identified by DNA

9:20am Thursday 22nd October 2009

A SECURITY guard hit by a train
on a Bolton railway line was identified by his DNA.

An inquest jury
recorded an open verdict on Mohammed Younis Khan, aged 46, whose remains were
found on April 10, the morning after a train driver reported hitting something
in the dark at Gilnow, half a mile from Bolton Station.

Pakistan-born Mr
Khan lived alone in View Street, Daubhill, and was one of seven children brought
up in Bolton after his parents moved to Britain.

The court heard that Mr
Khan had been seen by a psychiatrist and was taking anti-depressants at the time

of his death. No note was found among his possessions.

Train driver
David Baker told the court he had been driving the Transpennine Express train
from Blackpool to Manchester, at 11.30pm, on April 9, and heard a thud. However,
after stopping at the next signal he could find no evidence of an impact.

A search was made of the line, but it was only in daylight that Mr
Khan’s body.

388 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Two English School Boys Threaten to Blow Up High School

Paragraphs 16 & 17 read:  “Especially when one
looks at the sort of material put out by the perpetrators of those atrocities
and the material presented
at the trial by the
Manchester prosecutors.

The
same Columbine wannabe mentality is present; the same edgy mix of bravado,
inflated egos, and sharp intellect. The stock
references to anti-depressants are there,
too.

http://www.hs.fi/english/article/COMMENTARY+Innocents+and+innocence+over+spree-killing+trial/1135249503237

COMMENTARY: Innocents and innocence over spree-killing
trial


Manchester teenagers’ plans provide an eerie reminder

By William Moore

Last week a jury at Manchester Crown Court
found two teenage English boys innocent of charges of conspiracy to murder and
conspiracy to cause explosions.
The jury took
just 45 minutes to dismiss the evidence offered by the prosecution – quite an
impressive body of material by any standards, and some of it disturbingly
familiar in tone to people in this country – and to accept the defence counsel’s
plea that this was mere “fantasising” and the “hare-brained” schemes of two

essentially well-adjusted teenagers.

The
upshot of the court acquittal was that a large number of people in Britain
commented acidly on online forums about the cost to the taxpayer of the
“unnecessary prosecution” by the police and the Crown Prosecution Service, and
also raised the spectre of “thought-crime”, bringing some well-worn Orwellian
images into the spotlight.
A few others –
drawn mostly from the usual suspects of the “hang ‘em high” law & order
brigade, which naturally makes them easy targets – did question the wisdom of
what the boys had done to get themselves into trouble in the first
place.

Writing a diary about blowing up

large numbers of people at Audenshaw High School and a local shopping centre as
a tribute to the 1999 Columbine Massacre on the 10th anniversary (last April) is
not, perhaps, the best way of making friends and influencing
people.
Having plans of the school and details
of how acetone peroxide can be used as a detonator was also probably
unwise.

What has interested me about the
case is less the acquittal of the boys – it was always going to be hard to

determine how close Matthew
Swift
and Ross
McKnight
actually were to going through with their plans – and more the
apparent nonchalance with which the case has since been forgotten, lost in the
undergrowth of the latest celebrity scandal or drowned by the drumbeats of an
upcoming election campaign.
It is almost as if
the British perception is that nice, white, quite intelligent but somewhat
dysfunctional teenagers who have read too much Nietzsche “wouldn’t really do
that sort of thing, now would they?”
It’s some
foreign madness.
This was just harmless
adolescent day-dreaming, spawned by an excess of splatter-movies. End of
story.

Is this touching innocence, wilful
negligence, or outright hubris?
Are they
deliberately distancing themselves from “the American disease”, and perhaps
forgetting it can happen closer to home than in
Colorado?
I imagine most Britons would claim
it is none of those things – the two teenagers “just weren’t terrorists” –
although interestingly the “T-word” was never used about these alleged would-be
spree killers.
On the other hand, some online
commentators have dared to suggest that had they been called Khan or even
O’Connor, the jury would have taken a good deal more than 45 minutes to reach a
decision, notwithstanding the fact that the defendants’ motives were only
adolescent angst and rage against their teachers and classmates, and not
Jihadist zeal or the last knockings of the Irish
question.

Where things get a bit messy is
if one views the case from Finland, with the hindsight of Myyrmanni, of Jokela,
and of Kauhajoki.
Especially when one looks at
the sort of material put out by the perpetrators of those atrocities and the
material presented at the trial by the Manchester
prosecutors.
The same Columbine wannabe
mentality is present; the same edgy mix of bravado, inflated egos, and sharp
intellect. The stock references to anti-depressants are there,
too.
It all seems dishearteningly familiar,
and Jokela’s Pekka-Eric
Auvinen
even gets a favourable name-check, along with the Columbine killers
and Seung-Hui
Cho
from Virginia Tech.

Those who
suggest the authorities should have done nothing might like to step into the
shoes of the Kauhajoki police inspector who is currently facing charges of
negligent dereliction of duty and a civil suit from the relatives of those shot
at the Kauhajoki Vocational School by Matti
Juhani Saari
, for apparently deciding that Saari’s online bluster was no
more than that.
The British police can hardly
have been unaware of the ordure that would have rained down on their heads had
they stood idle, and if…

But back to

innocence. Shortly after I landed up in Finland, several decades ago, I was
having a drink in a Helsinki hotel bar when I was approached by a heavy-set
plainclothes policeman who wanted to open my briefcase, which I’d left with my
coat at the door.
As we did so, I naturally
asked him what his reasons were.
“We’ve had a
bomb call.”
He looked at his
watch.
“Ten minutes. Everyone has to get
out.”
Oh.
Right.

My case was clean, but we all left
the bar and stood around outside while the sniffer-dogs worked through the
building.
Many of the bar’s patrons pressed
their noses to the hotel’s large plate-glass windows to see better what was
going on.
I stood well back on the other side
of the street; I had after all just arrived from London, where an IRA bomb had
killed one person and injured around 20 at a tube station, only a few weeks
before I left the country.
I was stunned at
the spectacle. These crazy-ass Finns were going to be sliced toast if anything
bigger than a New Year’s firecracker went off in
there.

Of course, nothing DID explode, and
the sweetest touch was that when we returned to our beers, we discovered that
some cheeky sod – the bomb hoaxer, perhaps – had hung on until the very last
minute and had gone around emptying the abandoned glasses down his thirsty
throat.
I laughed, and felt sort of warm and
fuzzy inside: what a nice country, where people are still so naïve and innocent
about such matters.

Finnish innocence was
cruelly exposed in October 2002 when a rucksack went off and the skylights fell
in at the Vantaa mall, and several people never made it home from the
shops.
It was exposed again in November 2007,
and yet again last September.
At the time, The
Times Berlin correspondent Roger
Boyes
raised hackles hereabouts by describing the events in Jokela as “a
very Finnish affair”.

I wonder if he would
stand by that assertion now, when it appears that at least on paper the two boys

in Greater Manchester don’t look THAT different from the one in Greater
Helsinki.
Yes, Pekka-Eric Auvinen followed
through on his nihilist rantings and they did not, but disaffected adolescents
with destructive dreams do not seem to be a peculiarly Finnish
disease.
Et in Arcadia super-ego?

431 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Commits Suicide: Husband Charged for Assisting: Florida

Paragraph asix reads:  “Deputies say Ragan and his wife
were having marital problems and his wife was on
anti-depressants.
She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.”

http://www.myfoxorlando.com/dpp/news/brevard_news/091409_assisted_suicide_charge

Brevard man charged with assisted suicide

Updated:
Tuesday, 15 Sep 2009, 12:23 AM EDT
Published : Monday, 14 Sep 2009, 5:15 PM
EDT

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) – A Brevard County man has been

charged with assisted suicide after police say he helped his wife kill herself.
Investigators say this is one of the more bizarre cases they’ve ever
seen.

A 4-year-old child was left without his mom after she took her own
life and now he could lose his father too. Kevin Ragan was arrested for helping
his wife commit suicide.

In the frantic 911 call he told a dispatcher his
30-year-old wife was depressed and had been drinking. He says she threatened to
kill herself and admits offering her some loaded guns.

Ragan on 911 Call:
“I was being a smart a** and threw like three guns on the bed. I’m like, then do
it. And, she just picked the 40 caliber hand gun up.”

The rest of the 911
call on that sad day is too graphic to air, a distraught Ragan crying and asking
for an ambulance.

Deputies say Ragan and his wife were having marital
problems and his wife was on anti-depressants. She was pronounced dead at the
hospital.

Now more than three months later, after deputies got
confirmation from the medical examiner that the death was in fact a suicide,
they charged Ragan with assisting a suicide. He was arrested and bonded
out.

No one was home on Monday when a FOX 35 crew went to the Ragan home
but neighbors say they are stunned.

FOX 35 checked and found that Ragan
has no criminal history in Brevard
County.

409 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Compulsions for Alcohol, Violence: Man Stabs Friend: England

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for

alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol

were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

408 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Attacks Another Woman & Gets One Year Jail Term: England

Last two paragraphs read:  “He said: “She was on
anti-depressants at the time.
It seems the combination of those
circumstances and difficulties at the time led her to flare up in an
inappropriate, serious manner.”

” ‘There was a conversation and she
reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner’.”

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Mum-jailed-vicious-city-centre-attack/article-1331385-detail/article.html

Mum-of-three jailed after vicious city centre attack

Saturday, September 12, 2009, 07:00

20 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A MOTHER-OF-THREE has been jailed for a
year after attacking a woman she accused of being a prostitute.

Kerrie
Thomas, 31, of Stotfield Road, Bilborough, repeatedly punched the woman in the
face and kicked her.

The victim, who had been out with a friend on
Valentine’s Night, lost her little fingernails as she defended herself and had
scratches to her jaw and a swollen nose.

Police came to her rescue and
tracked down and arrested Thomas.

At Nottingham Crown Court, Thomas
pleaded guilty to assault causing actual bodily harm.

Judge Dudley
Bennett said she would get credit for her plea, but added: “This was a very
serious assault. It was a gratuitous assault, unprovoked, upon another woman of
a similar sort of age.

“You punched her and kicked her in the face on the
floor, and it has had a profound effect on her. The fact remains you have a
number of prior convictions for violence, house burglary, robbery and wounding
in 2001. This kind of gratuitous violence cannot be tolerated.”

The
victim, aged 36, had been with a friend at 2am on Sunday, February 15, when she
was attacked.

She was eating food in St James’s Street, Nottingham city
centre, when she saw Thomas with an elderly friend and went to check he was OK
as she thought he was vulnerable.

Thomas came over, said, “how dare you”,
and accused the woman of being a prostitute and taking advantage of the man, the
court heard.

Robbie Singh, prosecuting, said after Thomas punched the

woman in the face, she fell to the floor and curled up in a ball. She was then
kicked in the face. Afterwards, the victim had bruising to her head and could
not brush her hair or speak properly for a week.

“In April this year she
said she was nervous, her confidence has gone and she has to be met in town if
she catches a bus on her own,” said Mr Singh.

Andrew Wesley, mitigating,
said Thomas was previously in a long-term relationship that broke up against a
background of domestic violence.

He said: “She was on anti-depressants at
the time. It seems the combination of those circumstances and difficulties at
the time led her to flare up in an inappropriate, serious manner.

“There
was a conversation and she reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost

475 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: 20 Year Old Hangs Self – England

Paragraph 11 reads: “A doctor in Birmingham prescribed
Mr A’Court with anti-depressants on April 27,
which he had been
taking since April. He did not have a history of
mental health problems.”

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/4590785.Flackwell_Heath_student_hanged_himself/

Flackwell Heath student hanged himself

11:13am
Thursday 10th September 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

By Lawrence Dunhill
»

A POPULAR student from Flackwell Heath hanged himself after the
break-up with his girlfriend left him severely depressed, an inquest heard.

Alexander A’Court killed himself in the garage of his family home The
Beeches, Treadaway Road, on May 25.

Mr A’Court was a pupil at John
Hampden Grammar School
before going to the University of Birmingham to study
Geography.

More than 500 friends have joined a Facebook group dedicated
to him, which says “he was a great friend and will be missed by all.”

The identity of Mr A’Court’s ex-girlfriend was not revealed. The inquest
was shown a “suicide letter” which Mr A’Court had sent to her, but this it was
not read out.

The 20yearold had been unfaithful to the girlfriend, who
ended their relationship on March 15, coroner Richard Hulett told the inquest at
Amersham Law Courts yesterday.

His father Stephen A’Court had to cut his
son down from the roof of the garage. He told the inquest: “Alex was a long way
from his problems in Birmingham, but in this electronic age of Facebook and
mobile phones he was never able to separate himself from those problems.”
Mobile phone records show that Mr A’Court telephoned his ex-girlfriend at
1.03pm. It was estimated that he died soon after this.

The inquest heard
that Mr A’Court had seemed “positive” that morning and was planning a holiday
before sharing some “light-hearted banter” with his brother Sam at around
12.45pm.

Stephen A’Court said he became concerned about his son’s mental
health after the break-up of his relationship and encouraged him to seek medical
help.

A doctor in Birmingham prescribed Mr A’Court with anti-depressants
on April 27, which he had been taking since April. He did not have a history of
mental health problems.

Mr A’Court was referred to a senior professor on
May 14 but was diagnosed as a “low suicide risk”.

Mr Hulett told the
inquest: “The relationship became the be all and end all for Alex. He rapidly
deteriorated into depression and severe mood swings.

“It is dreadful and
tragic that a 20yearold with such obvious prospects has chosen to take his
life quite suddenly.”

He found that Mr A’Court had taken his own life.

Ashleigh Barton from London wrote on the Facebook page: “You were such a
lovely guy and so loved by all. I don’t think it will ever sink in and I’ll
never get my head around why. I just hope you’re happier now than you were when
you were still here.”

Tom Bowers, who also went to John Hampden Grammar,
wrote: “I’ll never forget the way you went out of your way to help me fit in
when I first started at Tesco, it meant so much and always will. You were always
such a laugh and brilliant at putting a smile on anyone’s face.”

450 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN MEDS: Man in Wheelchair Robs Bank: Florida

Paragraph nine reads:  “Reed lost the use of both of his
legs in 1986 from a gunshot wound. One of his legs was amputated just five
months before the robbery. His attorney argued he was
on anti-depressants and pain medication at the time.”

http://www.wftv.com/countybycounty/20813137/detail.html

Wheelchair-Bound Bank Robber Sentenced To Jail

Posted: 12:32 pm EDT September 9, 2009Updated: 1:16 pm EDT September 9,
2009

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. — The man who robbed a bank in his

wheelchair, and then hid the money in his prosthetic leg, was back in court
Wednesday morning. Christopher Reed entered a guilty plea and will serve time in
jail.

Reed wasn’t given any breaks because of his physical condition. In
fact, Judge John Harris said robbing the bank and threatening to blow it up were
both serious offenses. He ended up following sentencing guidelines and sent Reed
to prison for three years.

Reed, 48, took responsibility for his crimes,
apologizing from his wheelchair.

“I would like to say to the employees
and customers … that I am very, very sorry for my actions that day,” Reed said.

The paraplegic Merritt Island man drove his motorized wheelchair into
Space Coast Credit Union in November 2008. With a black stick and a lighter in
his hand, he told the teller he wanted $40,000 or he was going to blow the bank
up.

Reed’s defense attorney, though, in asking for leniency, said he
never caused any panic.

“Customer actually held the door for Mr. Reed
after Mr. Reed had just robbed the bank,” Reed’s attorney argued.

Reed
was caught not far from the bank. The sheriff’s helicopter was barely in the air
when he was spotted nearby. Deputies found $1,300 stuffed in his prosthetic leg.

Reed lost the use of both of his legs in 1986 from a gunshot wound. One
of his legs was amputated just five months before the robbery. His attorney
argued he was on anti-depressants and pain medication at the time.

The
judge, though, noted he faced 30 year years in prison before the plea agreement.

“These are very serious crimes that you have committed here,” Judge
Harris said.

The judge sentenced him to 34 months in prison and three
years of probation and he isn’t allowed into a Space Coast Credit Union again.
His attorney tried to get a lighter sentence, questioning whether there were
adequate facilities for men in Reed’s condition, but Judge John Harris shot that
notion down right away.

514 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Death: Taxi Driver Hangs Self: Another Open Verdict: …

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

There should be warnings that anyone who has had a problem
with alcohol or illegal drugs should NEVER take antidepressants! The drugs
should be contraindicated for this group of people. They suffer the worst side
effects. And the question should always be in the cases, “Which came first the
alcohol problems or the antidepressant that causes alcoholcravings?”

____________________________________
Paragraph one reads:  “A KIDDERMINSTER man found hanging
in his home suffered from anxiety and depression, an inquest into his death

heard.”

Paragraph four reads:  “The 46-year-old unemployed taxi
driver was seeing psychiatrists for his mental health problems and
was taking anti depressants.”

http://www.kidderminstershuttle.co.uk/news/4661282.Open_verdict_for_Kidderminster_man_found_hanging/

Open verdict for Kidderminster man found hanging

10:14am Friday 2nd October 2009

A KIDDERMINSTER man
found hanging in his home suffered from anxiety and depression, an inquest into
his death heard.

Dean Haigh, of Dunclent Crescent, who the inquest heard
had problems with alcohol, was found by his son Jason, at about 11am, on August
2.

The inquest at Stourport also heard that days before his death, Mr
Haigh seemed “very” upset and had a number of things on his mind but did not
mention that he wanted to take his own life.

The 46-year-old unemployed
taxi driver was seeing psychiatrists for his mental health problems and was
taking anti depressants.

Deputy Coroner, Margaret Barnard, said: “The
report provided by the consultant psychiatrist assessed that each time Mr Haigh
had contact with his mental health doctors, the risk assessment did not reveal
any active thoughts of suicide.”

She added that she was not satisfied
beyond reasonable doubt that Mr Haigh wanted to take his own life and recorded
an open verdict.

497 total views, no views today