ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Stabs Boyfriend 11 Times: Spain

Second paragraph reads:  “A woman who stabbed her boyfriend after his repeated insulting remarks about her weight at a family dinner has been sentenced to two years in prison for the attack. The ruling took into account that she was emotionally disturbed by his comments and also that she stabbed him after mixing alcohol with anti-depressants.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.

http://www.typicallyspanish.com/news/publish/article_22874.shtml

Typically Spanish – Spain News : National

Spanish woman gets 2 years for stabbing the boyfriend who called her fat

By m.p. – Aug 31, 2009 – 2:29 PM

He made the comments publically at a family dinner in a local restaurant

A woman who stabbed her boyfriend after his repeated insulting remarks about her weight at a family dinner has been sentenced to two years in prison for the attack. The ruling took into account that she was emotionally disturbed by his comments and also that she stabbed him after mixing alcohol with anti-depressants.

It happened last year after the dinner in a local restaurant in Abrera, Barcelona province, where the victim is said to have publically told his girlfriend that she was too fat to run, and should stop eating as she was so fat and would have to find another man.

He is reported to have refused to discuss his comments once they returned home.

After taking some of the anti-depressants prescribed by her doctor and drinking two cans of beer, the accused attacked her boyfriend with a kitchen knife as he lay lying in his bed, inflicting a total of 11 stab wounds. EFE reports that she stopped when she realised what she was doing, insisting on taking him to hospital and calling the police.

The court gave her the minimum sentence, ruling that she was affected by the mix of drugs and alcohol and by her humiliating experience in the restaurant. They also found that she has low self-esteem and limited intelligence.

387 total views, 1 views today

Leslie Judd’s Story – post-partum depression – Prozac, Paxil and Trazodone

Leslie Judd’s Story

My name is Leslie Judd and I appreciate the opportunity to tell you my story. I recently had a major life change which came about because of information that was passed on to me by Young Living Essential Oils.

Eleven years ago, I experienced some serious depression which I now recognize was most likely post-partum depression, since it began following the birth of my third child. The condition was serious enough to cause me to be unable to function normally. After a visit to the doctor, I came home with a prescription for Prozac, and this was the beginning of a ten-year nightmare.

Within the first few days, I began having hallucinations and hearing voices, but had no relief from the depression. At my next appointment, the doctor prescribed Paxil and Trazodone. Temporarily, it seemed to help with the depression, but I was a zombie all of the time. I felt like I had a hangover every morning.

With Paxil and all of the anti-depressants I took from then on, I had what is called a withdrawal or “wear-off” effect, which means that my body soon adjusted to the new dosage and then I would need a higher dosage. Symptoms of this effect were electrical sensations throughout my body, shudders and whoosh sound with every move. Also, a trailing feeling when I moved or turned my head. This increased until the doctor would change my medication and I would begin the cycle again. I began fluctuating between depression and hypomania.

The therapist I started seeing referred me to a psychiatrist, who put me on a fairly low dose of Zoloft. My initial diagnosis was Major Depressive Disorder, but soon became Dysthymia, or severe mood disorder. After trying different antidepressants, like Effexor, Serzone (now off the market due to the fact that it causes liver failure) and Wellbutrin, all of which gave only temporary relief, she decided to try lithium because my symptoms had become like that of a bipolar patient. So now the diagnosis had become Bipolar II Disorder.

Next, the doctor decided to experiment with different types of drugs such as anti-seizure medications (such as Topamax, Depakote, Lamictal and Neurotin) and anti-psychotics (such as Risperdal, Sroquel, and Zyprexa), which caused me to have a multitude of other side-effects such as tremors, visual disturbances, anxiety and nervous problems for which I was prescribed benzodiazepines. Guess what? I became even more depressed and I was more ill than I had ever been before in my life.

The inherent back problem I have had since I was a teenager was now getting worse. The medications decreased my pain tolerance. I developed fibromyalgia. I became obsessed with illness and with pain. I gained an excessive amount of weight. I also began behaving impulsively, lost interest in relationships and developed social phobias such as agoraphobia (fear of public places, not wanting to leave home). I would panic in crowds, break out in a sweat, and collapse in terror.

I could not feel joy or affection, and didn’t want anyone to touch me. I became obsessed with death. Sometimes, I cried uncontrollably without knowing why. I felt like I was a burden to everybody. I spoke with slurred speech, couldn’t find words and had loss of memory. The tremors became so severe that I could no longer write a check or sign my name. This only led to more anti-social behavior and self isolation.

Every month when I went to my doctor, my medication and dosage were changed. There was a point during the ten years that I realized the medication was making me sick, especially when I got lithium toxicity. My body was holding on to all fluid, I was bloated beyond recognition, my pupils were dilated (one more than the other), I started to get panicky and I had constant nausea and severe headaches along with other symptoms which alarmed my husband, and he called my doctor, who told me to stop taking the medication immediately.

This stopped the toxicity from progressing, but the immediate withdrawal caused me to crash into an even deeper depression. More medication, without relief. More suicidal ideation. Alcohol binges.

When I was released and came home, I was worse than ever. I was having hallucinations. I shook uncontrollably, which was actually a side effect of anti-seizure medications, and I had to move my legs constantly. My eyes were dead and I had absolutely no energy and no desire to do anything. I felt empty. My family rallied to get me back on my feet and friends brought dinner to help out. It was as if I was seeing things from outside of my body, but I actually remember very little from this time period.

An attempted suicide made for my second hospital stay, where I was humiliated in front of other patients by psychiatric techs, after which I made another attempt to end my life while I was still in the hospital. To get out of the hospital, I lied by telling them I felt better. Eight days later, I went home on new drugs.

After two weeks at home, I was back in the hospital for another eight days. I was so out of it. I felt like I was in a vacuum. I did things contrary to my nature, not even thinking of the consequences. Nothing mattered. On leaving the hospital following my third stay, I was told that my diagnosis was Bipolar II, Panic and Anxiety Disorder, PRSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), and Borderline Personality Disorder with psychotic episodes. It seemed that I would just get worse and never be well again.

Back home, my family searched for answers. Our good friends, Brian and Barb Kuckuck, went to a Young Living convention in California and returned with help — an audio tape and a book by Ann Blake-Tracy.

The tape opened our eyes to the destruction that these drugs can cause in people’s lives. Today, I know that I have a disposition towards depression, but I am not bipolar. I am not psychotic and I do not have a borderline personality disorder. My mental and physical disorders were caused primarily by the medication I was given by my doctors. I lost ten years of my life.

I followed Ann Blake-Tracy’s guidelines for tapering off of the medication and I have been using the Cortistop and other YL supplements as well as essential oils, particularly Valor, Clarity and Peace and Calming, without which I know it would have been much more difficult to break free from the drugs. The weaning process can last up to two years, but it is worth it.

Today, I have been completely free of my medications for five months. Although I still have some residual side effects, I am living my life again and enjoying it. I thank Young Living and Ann Blake-Tracy for making me aware, I thank my husband and children for their untiring love and patience, thanks to my family for their persistence and love in searching for something to help. I appreciate my friends, who were there for me even though I didn’t know it and I especially thank my faith for giving me the strength and courage to succeed.

For more information on the essential oils discussed here, see Ann Blake-Tracy’s book, Prozac, Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare and her tape or CD entitled, “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant”. You can order these by calling 1-.

912 total views, 4 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Stealing: Woman: England

Paragraph 11 reads:  “He added,  ‘She was going through a lot of difficulties in her personal life at this time.
She was the victim of domestic violence and was on fairly strong anti-depressants’.

http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk/news/Woman-could-face-jail-after.5525458.jp

Woman could face jail after petrol pay fraud

Published Date: 05 August 2009
A 25-YEAR-OLD woman who breached a suspended prison sentence by claiming she couldn’t pay for petrol and then leaving false details at the Langney filling station will be sent to the crown court.
Joanna Marie Hunt appeared before the town’s magistrates court on Friday morning (July 31) and admitted two counts of fraud by false representation.
The court heard Hunt had been to the Esso petrol station, Langney Rise, on May 15 and 18 and filled her vehicle with £20 worth of petrol on both occasions.
She then claimed she was unable to pay and had to fill out a form stating she would return with the money within 24 hours.
On both occasions she gave a false address, number plate and mobile number on the form and on the second occasion she also put a false name.
When Hunt didn’t return to pay for the fuel the manager viewed the CCTV footage of the garage forecourt, took down her vehicle registration plate and phoned the police.
Hunt was later arrested in her vehicle, near Southend.
Prosecutor Heather Salvage told magistrates Hunt had since been back to the Esso station and paid back the money owed.
This offence put Hunt in breach of a three-month prison sentence which was suspended for 18 months and imposed on January 24, 2008.
In mitigation, Christos Christou said Hunt was at the very end of her suspended sentence.
He added, “She was going through a lot of difficulties in her personal life at this time.
“She was the victim of domestic violence and was on fairly strong anti-depressants.”
Magistrates ordered Hunt to be sentenced at the crown court and she will appear on a date to be fixed.
She was granted unconditional bail.

The full article contains 301 words and appears in n/a newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

  • Last Updated: 05 August 2009 12:05 PM
  • Source: n/a
  • Location: Eastbourne

573 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Charged with Making Bombs: Australia

First three paragraphs read:  “A MAN charged with making explosives in Melbourne’s west has been taking anti- depressants, a court has heard.”

Russell Heard, 46, of Wyndham Vale, faced the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court today charged with explosives offences.

Police allegedly discovered the explosive materials during a raid while carrying out a search warrant about 6pm yesterday.

http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,25890473-661,00.html

Wyndham Vale man charged with making an explosive substance

Gareth Trickey with AAP

August 06, 2009 05:43am

UPDATE 4.03pm: A MAN charged with making explosives in Melbourne’s west has been taking anti- depressants, a court has heard.

Russell Heard, 46, of Wyndham Vale, faced the Melbourne Magistrates’ Court today charged with explosives offences.

Police allegedly discovered the explosive materials during a raid while carrying out a search warrant about 6pm yesterday.

The court was told Heard is on anti-depressant medication and should be assessed by a doctor.

Magistrate Lance Martin suppressed publication of Heard’s image after the court heard identity might be an issue in the case.

Heard is charged with making an explosive substance with intent to damage property and possessing an explosive substance with intent to cause serious injury to property.

He made no application for bail and was remanded in custody to reappear in the same court on October 29 for committal mention.

In a media statement earlier today, police said they believed they had uncovered a clandestine laboratory for the use and manufacture of explosive substances and had seized chemicals and apparatus from the home.

Detectives stumbled upon the clandestine laboratory during a search of Mr Heard’s house.

Arson and explosives squad members were called to the house and seized chemicals and apparatus.

466 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 17 Year Old Attempts Suicide: Charged with Illegal Pos…

First sentence of paragraph 13 reads:  “About a month before the suicide attempt, the teenager was diagnosed with “major depressive disorder” and was taking prescription anti-depressants, court papers say.”

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20090806/NEWS01/908060333/1002/NEWS/Mendon+teen+charged+after+suicide+attempt

Mendon teen charged after suicide attempt

Gary Craig • Staff writer • August 6, 2009

A Mendon teenager’s attempt to commit suicide has led to his prosecution on a weapons charge.

On April 29 the teen carried his father’s .40-caliber firearm into a shed on his family property with the intent of killing himself, court papers allege.

Alerted by a suicide note, his parents called 911. Responding deputies found the 17yearold on his back in the shed with the gun “pointed at his chin,” according to a Sheriff’s Office report. The teenager relinquished the gun, the report states.

With the apparent suicide attempt averted, deputies then charged the teenager with misdemeanor criminal possession of a weapon because, they say, he was not the legal owner of the gun. And now, the District Attorney’s Office is prosecuting the teen for the illegal weapon charge, after what the teen’s lawyer says have been multiple unsuccessful attempts to reach a resolution other than a criminal charge.

“In as inappropriate, unfortunate and misplaced a use of prosecutorial discretion as the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office ever has demonstrated, my client now effectively is being prosecuted for attempting suicide,” attorney Jeffrey Wicks wrote in a motion filed this week.

District Attorney Michael Green said prosecution in such a case can be used to ensure the individual gets treatment. For instance, a sentence of probation could include continued court-ordered treatment, Green said.

“This kind of conduct can pose a threat to himself and other people,” Green said. “I’m certainly sympathetic to him and his family.”

Wicks this week filed a motion asking that the charges against the teenager be dismissed “in the interest of justice,” a part of the penal law that gives judges the discretion to dismiss charges if, for instance, the alleged crime was of questionable seriousness. Also key to requests to dismiss a charge in the interest of justice is the character of the accused and the likelihood the community would be at risk if the accused went free.

The teenager “has no previous arrests or history of violence,” Wicks states in court papers. The Democrat and Chronicle is not identifying the accused because, if found guilty, he would be adjudicated as a youthful offender under the law.
(2 of 2)

Wicks said the teenager and his family would not answer questions from the media because of the pending criminal charge.

In his suicide note, the teenager apologized to his parents “for everything,” saying: “I’ve disappointed you guys countless times.”

“You don’t deserve that,” he wrote in the note, which is included in court papers.

About a month before the suicide attempt, the teenager was diagnosed with “major depressive disorder” and was taking prescription anti-depressants, court papers say. After the attempt, he spent 19 days at an adolescent psychiatric unit. He is now on a different regimen of medication and “not only is doing well but is feeling strong, confident and future-oriented,” Wicks writes in court papers.

A conviction and the possibility of incarceration “would be catastrophic” for his continued improvement, Wicks contends.

Green said incarceration is “not the only option available here” and again emphasized that prosecution might ensure continued valuable treatment.

GCRAIG@DemocratandChronicle.com

654 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide: Man Shoots Himself: England

Paragraph 8 reads:  “Mr Hobbs, who had been diabetic for 10 years, died on May 17 from a traumatic head injury, five days after being prescribed anti-depressants.”

Last paragraph reads:  “Coroner William Morris recorded verdict of suicide.”

http://www.ely-standard.co.uk/content/ely/news/story.aspx?brand=ELYOnline&category=News&tBrand=HertsCambsOnline&tCategory=newslatestELY&itemid=WEED04%20Aug%202009%2018%3A26%3A19%3A740

Soham Man Who Was Depressed After Losing His Job Shot Himself At Home

18:21 – 04 August 2009

coroner’s court
DISTRAUGHT and depressed after losing his job, JCB driver John Hobbs shot himself in the garden of his Soham home.

Just one day after being made redundant, 63-year-old Mr Hobbs went into a deep depression.

“From that day, the John I knew and loved was gone, and we began to argue,” his loving wife Gwendoline told an inquest at Ely Magistrate’s Court on Tuesday.

“He was anxious and desperate to find a new job,” she said in a statement to the coroner. “He started to worry about bills and money, because he only received Job Seeker’s allowance.”

Mr Hobbs was so desperate to get a new job, that he even approached members of the public in the doctor’s surgery car park, asking for a job, said Mrs Hobbs.

He lost nearly two stone in weight over a 10-week period. “He looked gaunt; he was a shell of himself.

“His behaviour became worse, and he said he wished he was dead.”

Mr Hobbs, who had been diabetic for 10 years, died on May 17 from a traumatic head injury, five days after being prescribed anti-depressants.

Mr and Mrs Hobbs had been married for 43 years, and lived together in Cornmills Road at Soham.

“Sometime in the afternoon I heard a very loud bang from the rear garden, it sounded like a shotgun, I was very worried,” said Mrs Hobbs in her statement.

He started work for Bradford Properties in 1967; he was very proud of his job, and always eager to get work.

After being diagnosed with diabetes, Mr Hobbs struggled with his weight, and found taking his medication a chore.

He was looking forward to retirement, but in December last year was given 12 weeks’ notice, and even offered to work for half pay.

Coroner William Morris recorded verdict of suicide.

671 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault of an officer: Australia

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: This sounds too familiar to the Donald Schell case in
Wyoming that went to trial after he took Paxil for two days and then shot
and killed his wife, daughter, infant granddaughter and himself. The jury
ruled in that case that the two antidepressants were the main cause of that
tragic murder/suicide.

Cases like this immediately make me wonder about the P450 2D6 liver enzyme
that is never tested for in patients before giving them an SSRI. There are
about 7 – 10% of the population who lack that liver enzyme because
genetically they did not inherit it. Without the enzyme you cannot metabolize an
antidepressant and you hit toxic levels rapidly.
____________________________________________________________

Paragraph four reads: "Lawyer Ian Pilgrim said that Warren intended to
plead guilty and had been under significant personal and financial stress. He
had started taking anti-depressants two days before the incident, Mr Pil
grim said."

_http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/07/22/assault-accused-giv
en-bail/_
(http://www.frasercoastchronicle.com.au/story/2009/07/22/assault-accused-given-bail/)

Assault accused given bail
22nd July 2009

©istockphoto/antb

A MAN who allegedly bashed a female police officer with a pick handle
after she went to his home to attend a domestic dispute was released on bail
yesterday.

Gregory Paul Warren, 38, was charged with assault occasioning bodily harm
while armed and serious assault after allegedly attacking two officers at
Urraween on Sunday afternoon.

He was subdued using capsicum spray.

Lawyer Ian Pilgrim said that Warren intended to plead guilty and had been
under significant personal and financial stress. He had started taking
anti-depressants two days before the incident, Mr Pilgrim said.

Prosecutor Sergeant Kathryn Stagoll opposed bail because of Warren’s
unpredictability and volatility. â

542 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Soldier Charged with Attempted Murder: Colorado

Note from Ann Blake-Tracy: Yet ANOTHER antidepressant-induced violent
incident!!!! Just how many of these do we need to witness in one area before society
begins to connect the dots back to these deadly drugs they are giving to so
many soldiers for PTSD?!

How many antidepressant-induced murder cases from the Ft Carson/Colorado
Springs area did I send out last week – 4 or 5? You could almost use
Colorado Springs as a microcosm sounding a warning to the rest of the world about
the potential antidepressant dangers we all face with the widespread use of
these drugs.
__________________________________________________________________

Paragraphs 45 through 47 read: "How did it come to this — a decorated war
veteran who sought help now charged with trying to kill his wife?"

"Delgado’s medical records reveal that in the nearly three months between
his mother’s death and the incident in September, the soldier sought help
four times at the behavioral health unit at the base hospital."

"Each time, he was referred to a civilian doctor. He saw the off-base
doctor twice, and was prescribed anti-depressants, sleeping pills and
anti-anxiety drugs."

_http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/08/06/accused.soldier.ptsd/

_ (http://www.cnn.com/2009/CRIME/08/06/accused.soldier.ptsd/) By Jim
Spellman and Wayne Drash
CNN

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colorado (CNN) — Army Spc. Thomas Delgado saved lives
as a combat medic on the front lines in Iraq, earning a Purple Heart when a
bomb rocked his vehicle during his nearly yearlong tour. Back home, he was
sometimes assigned the role of insurgent during combat training at a mock
Iraqi village in California.

Thomas Delgado is charged with trying to kill his wife just days after
their fifth wedding anniversary.

"He told me he felt like he never left" Iraq, said his wife, Shayla.

Soon after his return in December 2005, Delgado realized something many
war veterans fail to recognize. He was suffering from post-traumatic stress
and needed help. He complained of "fear of losing self control," "feelings
of hopelessness" and "paranoia," medical records show.

The 25-year-old soldier is now at the center of a controversial attempted
murder case, charged with trying to kill his wife in September 2008. She
says prosecutors have it all wrong. Her husband of five years needs medical
help, not prison. And, she says, he never tried to kill her.

Delgado’s case may become one of the first to be heard at a
soon-to-be-opened special veterans’ trauma court in Colorado. The court was created to
get professional medical care for military veterans suffering from
trauma-related disorders who are accused of crimes. An estimated 20 percent of Iraq
war veterans suffer from _post-traumatic stress disorder_
(http://topics.cnn.com/topics/post_traumatic_stress_disorder) .

Delgado’s only previous run-in with the law was a minor traffic violation.

Delgado medically retired from the Army Wednesday, and was scheduled to
appear Thursday at a bond hearing to decide if he gets sent back to jail
while awaiting his November trial. The hearing may also determine if his case
gets moved to the new veterans’ court.

"I feel like it was 100 percent preventable," Shayla Delgado told CNN.
"All we’ve really wanted this whole time was someone to help us, someone to
give him treatment."

The district attorney’s office, which covers El Paso and Teller Counties,
declined to comment for this story.

Delgado praised his wife for standing by his side.

"I would definitely be another one of the lost causes if I didn’t have her
backing me up in my corner. She’s just been amazing, doing amazing things
on my behalf," he told CNN by phone.

"It’s unfortunate that it took an incident like this to get proper
treatment."

He said his lawyer advised him not to talk about the night in question.
"I’m hoping to stay out of jail," he added.

What really happened?

For the Delgados, the evening of September 24, 2008, just days after their
fifth wedding anniversary, began with drinks and an argument. Then
everything escalated with whirlwind speed.

Shayla Delgado says her husband grabbed a gun and rattled off suicidal
thoughts. "I’ve been thinking about how I’m going to do it," she recalled him
saying. "I just can’t live like this any more. I can’t do it, I can’t do
it."

"He was telling me, ‘Take our son and leave because you don’t want to be
here for this,’" she said, breaking down in tears. "I was really, really
scared."

She says she pleaded, begged him, to get on the phone with his father. The
two spoke. The soldier kept telling his dad how much he loved him, she
says. She rushed to the bedroom, cradling their sleeping year-old son, and
sprinted out of the apartment.

She dropped the infant off at a neighbor’s and returned home, heading
straight to the bathroom where her husband was holed up. She kicked in the
door. "I see him with the gun in his mouth and I just ripped the gun from his
arms and I ran."

It was during that scuffle to wrestle the gun away, prosecutors say, that
the soldier tried to kill his wife, breaking her nose and attempting to
choke her. Prosecutors have charged Thomas Delgado with one count of
first-degree attempted murder and an array of other charges. They have offered a
plea bargain of 5 to 15 years in prison — a deal Delgado has so far rejected.

A police report on the incident says Shayla Delgado was treated for a
broken nose at a hospital, but she had no "visible marks on her neck at that
time." The police affidavit says she told authorities her husband wrapped his
arm around her neck in the fight for the gun. "Ms. Delgado stated that she
was in fear that he was going to kill her or hurt her very badly," the
affidavit says.

She then got away and he pursued her, according to the affidavit. "He
followed her into the bedroom and again attempted to choke her once more," it
says. "Ms. Delgado stated she stopped fighting in belief that he would let
her go and after a few moments he did."

Shayla Delgado told CNN her nose was broken as a result of the struggle
for the gun — not from a malicious, intentional blow from her husband. Her
husband was in crisis, she says, and she saved him from suicide in a violent
scuffle.

Delgado’s medical records, reviewed by CNN, indicate he remembers few
details from that night. Delgado, who was taking the anti-anxiety drug Ativan,
"believes that he got suicidal while intoxicated, got a weapon to kill
himself, his wife wrestled with him through this, called the police, and with
her visible injuries, he was taken into custody for assault and attempted
murder," the medical records say.

"He has limited recall of these events," the records say. "He feels if his
mother had not died, ‘that day’ would not have happened." His mother had
died three months earlier, in June 2008, after battling breast cancer.

Trauma court for veterans

The veterans’ court is being set up in response to an alarming trend: A
growing number of veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are returning
home and committing crimes — from offenses like theft and forgery to more
serious charges like domestic violence and murder. However, the court will
not deal with homicide cases.

Fort Carson is at the epicenter of the problem, with 14 homicides and
attempted homicides there since 2005. Numerous soldiers have been charged with
an array of other offenses.

"If you catch this early, you stop a cycle of people who are
self-medicating or acting out in a violent way," says Ron Crowder, a district court
judge and retired major general from the National Guard who served in Vietnam.

Crowder has been tapped to preside over the new court, which will model
itself after a handful of others already established in the United States.
Veterans and active-duty soldiers accused of crimes will be offered plea
bargains in exchange for mental health treatment that will be rigorously
monitored. The district attorney’s office will be heavily involved in deciding
which cases get sent to the veterans court.

Crowder says the goal of the court is "to get these people the help they
may have not gotten heretofore."

According to a recent U.S. Army study, only 65 percent of authorized
positions at the behavioral health department at Fort Carson were filled in
2008, forcing Army doctors to send half of all cases to civilian doctors off
base.

Fort Carson, home to about 25,000 soldiers, has seen the number of
soldiers seeking help skyrocket to 2,400 walk-in cases a month — or nearly 1 in
every 10 soldiers.

"I’m trying to track my population and identify people who are
symptomatic," said Col. George Brandt, the senior behavioral health officer at the
base hospital.

Brandt came on board last year with a mission to improve mental health
care for troubled soldiers. He has brought staffing levels up to 74 percent,
with a total of 14 psychiatrists, 14 psychologists and 29 social workers. "I
always want more staff and resources," Brandt said. "We’re trying to build
the system right, get the care near where the soldiers are, increase
access."

The facility does not have any in-patient care on the base. Even with
staffing shortcomings, Brandt said, "I’m never going to let a soldier go
without care who asks for it."

One nearby facility utilized by Fort Carson, he said, has a staff
consisting of two-thirds former military members who are specially trained in PTSD.
"If I can’t provide it, I’m going to get a civilian colleague to help me
with that," Brandt said.

Maj. Gen. David Perkins, the new commander of Fort Carson, told CNN the
base has spent a lot of time assessing problems with PTSD and trying to
develop solutions. One of the biggest concerns, he said, is overcoming the
stigma of seeking help.

"This is the key point that we’re focusing on across the Army," he said.
"You have seen, from four-star generals on down, personally come out and
talk about their issues with post-traumatic stress disorder. And this alone
has created a large momentum to taking the stigma away."

A soldier’s journey

Delgado was deployed to _Iraq_ (http://topics.cnn.com/topics/iraq_war) as
a combat medic in January 2005, stationed about 20 miles south of Baghdad.
His war at home began around Christmas of that year.

His medical records show that he "treated more Iraqi casualties than
Americans," but he twice lost comrades — one from war wounds in the field and
another to infection. "States he saw it all," the records say. "He takes
great pride in being a competent combat medic. He notes he has had great
emotional distance, feeling numb and disconnect since his tour."

Delgado’s first job back in the States, at Fort Irwin in California, was
to train combat soldiers in a mock Iraqi village. Sometimes, he dressed in
Army fatigues and battled would-be bad guys; other times, he suited up as an
Iraqi villain, according to his wife.

Delgado first began getting treatment for his PTSD at Fort Irwin,
according to his family. At that time, his mother was dealing with terminal breast
cancer back in the couple’s home state of Colorado. In March 2008, as his
mother’s condition worsened, the Army relocated Delgado to be near his
mother’s side and the couple, now with a young son, moved to Fort Carson.

He worked at the emergency room of Evans Army Community Hospital on base,
and spent his time off with his ailing mother. She died in June 2008, and
according to his wife, that’s when he began to unravel. Three months later,
he was arrested.

How did it come to this — a decorated war veteran who sought help now
charged with trying to kill his wife?

Delgado’s medical records reveal that in the nearly three months between
his mother’s death and the incident in September, the soldier sought help
four times at the behavioral health unit at the base hospital.

Each time, he was referred to a civilian doctor. He saw the off-base
doctor twice, and was prescribed anti-depressants, sleeping pills and
anti-anxiety drugs.

"It scared me, because I didn’t know what was really happening," his wife
said of his troubled state. "I didn’t know what was going on."

Shayla Delgado believes the treatment her husband received was inadequate.
Unfortunately, she says, it took his arrest to get him the care he needed:
in-patient treatment at civilian facilities specializing in PTSD.

While her husband tries to heal from his invisible war wounds, she’s
trying to clear his name.

"It’s just so sad because, you know, my husband’s a really good person,"
she said, weeping. "He deserves to be treated better."

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My 10 Year Antidepressant-induced Nightmare Trip Into Hell

My name is Leslie Judd and I appreciate the opportunity to tell you my
story. I recently had a major life change which came about because of
information from Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy that was passed on to me by Young Living
Essential Oils.

Eleven years ago, I experienced some serious depression which I now
recognize was most likely postpartum depression, since it began following the
birth of my third child. The condition was serious enough to cause me to be
unable to function normally. After a visit to the doctor, I came home with a
prescription for Prozac, and this was the beginning of a ten-year nightmare.

Within the first few days, I began having hallucinations and hearing
voices, but had no relief from the depression. At my next appointment, the
doctor prescribed Paxil and Trazodone. Temporarily, it seemed to help with the
depression, but I was a zombie all of the time. I felt like I had a hangover
every morning.

With Paxil and all of the anti-depressants I took from then on, I had what
is called a withdrawal or “wear-off” effect, which means that my body soon
adjusted to the new dosage and then I would need a higher dosage. Symptoms
of this effect were electrical sensations throughout my body, shudders and
whoosh sound with every move. Also, a trailing feeling when I moved or
turned my head. This increased until the doctor would change my medication and
I would begin the cycle again. I began fluctuating between depression and
hypomania.

The therapist I started seeing referred me to a psychiatrist, who put me on
a fairly low dose of Zoloft. My initial diagnosis was Major Depressive
Disorder, but soon became Dysthymia, or severe mood disorder. After trying
different antidepressants, like Effexor, Serzone (now off the market due to
the fact that it causes liver failure) and Wellbutrin, all of which gave only
temporary relief, she decided to try lithium because my symptoms had
become like that of a bipolar patient. So now the diagnosis had become Bipolar
II Disorder.

Next, the doctor decided to experiment with different types of drugs such
as anti-seizure medications (such as Topamax, Depakote, Lamictal and
Neurotin) and anti-psychotics (such as Risperdal, Sroquel, and Zyprexa), which
caused me to have a multitude of other side-effects such as tremors, visual
disturbances, anxiety and nervous problems for which I was prescribed
benzodiazepines.

Guess what? I became even more depressed and I was more ill than I had ever
been before in my life.

The inherent back problem I have had since I was a teenager was now getting
worse. The medications decreased my pain tolerance. I developed
fibromyalgia. I became obsessed with illness and with pain. I gained an excessive
amount of weight. I also began behaving impulsively, lost interest in
relationships and developed social phobias such as agoraphobia (fear of public
places, not wanting to leave home). I would panic in crowds, break out in a
sweat, and collapse in terror.

I could not feel joy or affection, and didn’t want anyone to touch me. I
became obsessed with death. Sometimes, I cried uncontrollably without knowing
why. I felt like I was a burden to everybody. I spoke with slurred speech,
couldn’t find words and had loss of memory. The tremors became so severe
that I could no longer write a check or sign my name. This only led to more
anti-social behavior and self isolation.

Every month when I went to my doctor, my medication and dosage were
changed. There was a point during the ten years that I realized the medication
was making me sick, especially when I got lithium toxicity. My body was
holding on to all fluid, I was bloated beyond recognition, my pupils were dilated
(one more than the other), I started to get panicky and I had constant
nausea and severe headaches along with other symptoms which alarmed my
husband, and he called my doctor, who told me to stop taking the medication
immediately.

This stopped the toxicity from progressing, but the immediate withdrawal
caused me to crash into an even deeper depression. More medication, without
relief. More suicidal ideation. Alcohol binges.

When I was released and came home, I was worse than ever. I was having
hallucinations. I shook uncontrollably, which was actually a side effect of
anti-seizure medications, and I had to move my legs constantly. My eyes were
dead and I had absolutely no energy and no desire to do anything. I felt
empty. My family rallied to get me back on my feet and friends brought dinner
to help out. It was as if I was seeing things from outside of my body, but
I actually remember very little from this time period.

An attempted suicide made for my second hospital stay, where I was
humiliated in front of other patients by psychiatric techs, after which I made
another attempt to end my life while I was still in the hospital. To get out of
the hospital, I lied by telling them I felt better. Eight days later, I
went home on new drugs.

After two weeks at home, I was back in the hospital for another eight days.
I was so out of it. I felt like I was in a vacuum. I did things contrary
to my nature, not even thinking of the consequences. Nothing mattered. On
leaving the hospital following my third stay, I was told that my diagnosis
was Bipolar II, Panic and Anxiety Disorder, PRSD (post-traumatic stress
disorder), and Borderline Personality Disorder with psychotic episodes. It
seemed that I would just get worse and never be well again.

Back home, my family searched for answers. Our good friends, Brian and Barb
Kuckuck, went to a Young Living convention in California and returned with
help — an audio tape and a book by Ann Blake-Tracy.

The tape opened our eyes to the destruction that these drugs can cause in
people’s lives. Today, I know that I have a disposition towards depression,
but I am not Bipolar. I am not psychotic and I do not have a Borderline
Personality Disorder. My mental and physical disorders were caused primarily
by the medication I was given by my doctors.

I lost ten years of my life.

I followed Ann Blake-Tracy’s guidelines for tapering off of the medication and I
have been using the Cortistop and other YL supplements as well as essential
oils, particularly Valor, Clarity and Peace and Calming, without which I
know it would have been much more difficult to break free from the drugs.
The weaning process can last up to two years, but it is worth it.

Today, I have been completely free of my medications for five months.
Although I still have some residual side effects, I am living my life again and
enjoying it. I thank Young Living and Ann Blake-Tracy for making me
aware, I thank my husband and children for their untiring love and patience,
thanks to my family for their persistence and love in searching for
something to help. I appreciate my friends, who were there for me even though I
didn’t know it and I especially thank my faith for giving me the strength and
courage to succeed.

Leslie Judd

[For more information on the Young Living essential oils discussed here, Link

4,745 total views, 5 views today

DEPRESSION MED: Woman Stabs To Death A Man On A Stairwell: Australia

Paragraph three reads:  “Defence solicitor Bernie Balmer said Epshtein was on medication for anxiety, bipolar, depression, pain and one to lower her heart rate.”

http://www.theage.com.au/national/woman-in-court-over-stabbing-murder-20090803-e6l0.html

Woman in court over stabbing murder

Steve Butcher

August 3, 2009 – 12:04PM

A 21-year-old woman charged with the stabbing murder last week of a man in a St Kilda stairwell has appeared in court.

A lawyer for Natasha Epshtein told Melbourne Magistrates Court today his client had been treated by two doctors for five separate health conditions.

Defence solicitor Bernie Balmer said Epshtein was on medication for anxiety, bipolar, depression, pain and one to lower her heart rate.

Epshtein appeared before Deputy Chief Magistrate Dan Muling in a low-cut, black t-shirt with close-cropped hair and tattoos on her upper chest.

She is charged with murdering Peter James Len on July 30.

Mr Balmer said she would consent to a DNA sample being taken at a later date.

She was remanded to appear again on November 30.

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