zoloft

zoloft
George Mooney
I am the father of identical twin boys. The doctors that treated my sons when they were boys warned that if we ever decided to have them placed into care for the handicapped we should not agree to any physcotropic drugs. This is when I became aware of the danger of antidepressant drugs. My wife and I both agreed that this would be the case,
My wife passed away in 1984. I was diagnosed with a ”fatal” melanoma in 1986. My twins were admjtted to a ”care” agency and placed on Prozac for son David, and Zoloft for Douglas. They were placed in homes and ”supervised” which meant that they could not enjoy the freedom they enjoyed at home and were not allowed out of the sight of their caretakers for over twenty years. With the help of anti-drug people I visited a psychotherapist who asked why David was on Prozac, as he opined that David did not have a mental disorder. I then contacted a psychiatrist that asked the same question and agreed to withdraw the Prozac. David has been withdrawn from Prozac for about two years without any ill effects beyond what I precieve as side effect damage.
Douglas’ psychiatrist ignored my certified return reciept letters requesting as legal guardian that he be withdrawn from Zoloft. Douglas developed colon cancer and passed away after fourteen months of terrible suffering. Both my twins were gifted savants.

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Medical News Today: Antidepressants Produce Long-Term Depression

We read in the article below the following statements about long-term use of antidepressants producing long-term depression & withdrawal. Now all these researchers had to do to learn this sooner was read the research in my book when the first edition came out almost 20 years ago. Once again I repeat that the hypothesis behind antidepressants is INCORRECT/BACKWARDS!! And if the hypothesis is backwards the drugs are going to CAUSE what we are being told that they cure!
“. . . there are reasons to believe that antidepressant treatment itself may contribute to a chronic depressive syndrome. . .
In other words, prolonged exposure to antidepressants can induce neuroplastic changes that result in the genesis of antidepressant-induced dysphoric symptoms. The investigators propose the term ‘tardive dysphoria’ to describe such a phenomenon and describe diagnostic criteria for it. Tapering or discontinuing the antidepressant might reverse the dysphoric state. Antidepressant discontinuation may not provide immediate relief. In fact, it is likely that transient symptoms of withdrawal will occur in the initial 2-4 weeks following antidepressant discontinuation or tapering. However, after a prolonged period of antidepressant abstinence, one may see a gradual return to the patient’s baseline.”
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.orgAuthor: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of
Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I
Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!
 
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/218435.php
A New Troublesome Long-Term Effect Of Antidepressant Drugs; Tardive Dysphoria.
Editor’s Choice
Main Category: Depression
Also Included In: Psychology / Psychiatry
Article Date: 08 Mar 2011 – 0:00 PST

Treatment-resistantdepression (TRD) may be related to inadequate dosing of antidepressants or antidepressant tolerance. Alternatively, there are reasons to believe that antidepressant treatment itself may contribute to a chronic depressive syndrome. This study reports a case of antidepressant discontinuation in a TRD patient, a 67-year-old white man with onset of major depressive illness at the age of 45. He was homozygous for the short form of the serotonin transporter. He was treated off and on until the age of 59 and had been on an antidepressant continuously until the age of 67. Over the previous 2 years he had been depressed without any relief by medication or 2 electroconvulsive treatments. His medications at the time of evaluation included paroxetine 10 mg daily, venlafaxine 75 mg daily and clonazepam 3 mg daily. His 17-item Hamilton depression score was 22. Over the subsequent 6 months, he was started on bupropion and then tapered off all antidepressants, including the bupropion. His Hamilton depression score dropped to 18. The patient was not satisfied with his progress and sought another opinion to restart antidepressants. One year later, on duloxetine 60 mg daily, he continued to complain of unremitting depression.

A possible prodepressant effect of antidepressants has been previously proposed. Fava was the first to suggest that an antidepressant-related neurobiochemical mechanism of increasing vulnerability to depression might play a role in worsening the long-term outcome of the illness. Understanding of potential mechanisms of this phenomenon can be gleaned from observations regarding the short form of the serotonin transporter (5HTTR). Patients with the short form of the 5HTTR and prolonged antidepressant exposure, may be particularly vulnerable to antidepressant-related worsening. In other words, prolonged exposure to antidepressants can induce neuroplastic changes that result in the genesis of antidepressant-induced dysphoric symptoms. The investigators propose the term ‘tardive dysphoria’ to describe such a phenomenon and describe diagnostic criteria for it. Tapering or discontinuing the antidepressant might reverse the dysphoric state. Antidepressant discontinuation may not provide immediate relief. In fact, it is likely that transient symptoms of withdrawal will occur in the initial 2-4 weeks following antidepressant discontinuation or tapering. However, after a prolonged period of antidepressant abstinence, one may see a gradual return to the patient’s baseline.

Source: Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, AlphaGalileo Foundation.

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JAMA: Mild to severe depression better treated with alternatives to medications

Last month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients
with very severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild
to severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


From: nandtbearden@yahoo.com
To: ,
ssri-crusaders@yahoogroups.com, atypical_antipsychotics@yahoogroups.com,
atracyphd2@aol.com
Sent: 2/14/2010 8:12:09 A.M. Central Standard
Time
Subj: Even when treated, depression costs employers

http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/mobile/m/FullArticle/eUK/CHLTUK/nhealthNews_uUKTRE6183DO20100209

Even
when treated, depression costs employers
Tue, 09 Feb 20:05 PM
GMT

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Workers with depression stay home
sick more often than healthy colleagues, even when their disease is treated,
according to a Thomson Reuters report released on Tuesday.

The report,
commissioned by drug maker Sanofi Aventis, suggests that employers would
benefit from better treatments of their workers for depression. Depression is
the leading cause of disability among Americans aged 15 to 44, according to
the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Even when depressed patients
are treated with antidepressants, there are substantial productivity losses.
Therapies that can better manage depression may provide opportunities for
savings to employers,” the Thomson Reuters research team wrote in the Journal
of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Despite the widely
acknowledged effectiveness of antidepressant therapy, productivity costs
related to depression persist even after patients receive treatment,” Suellen
Curkendall, director of outcomes research at Thomson Reuters, said in a
statement.

“This may be due to the fact that patients often don’t
respond to the first type of antidepressant that they are prescribed. They
also may fail to take their medications on a regular basis,” added Curkendall,
who led the study.

Curkendall and colleagues analyzed insurance claims
and employee health and productivity data for more than 22,000 patients
treated with antidepressants and compared them to people without
depression.

Workers who had been treated for depression were twice as
likely as others to use short-term disability leave, they found.
Disability-related costs for a year, on average, were $1,038 for patients
treated for depression and $325 for the non-depressed workers.

“Over 40
percent of patients with depression were diagnosed with at least one of the
other included psychiatric conditions besides depression,” the researchers at
Thomson Reuters, parent company of Reuters, added.

Most common were
anxiety, dissociative and so-called somatoform disorders — a group of
disorders with physical symptoms but no apparent physical cause.

Last
month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients with very
severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild to
severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

At least 27 million Americans take antidepressants and
more than 164 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written in 2008,
totaling nearly $10 billion in U.S. sales and $20 billion globally, according
to IMS Health.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox, editing by Jackie
Frank)
Sent via BlackBerry by
AT&T

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Senator Asks How Many Soldiers are On Antidepressants

Paragraph two reads:  “Citing the rising number of suicides among active-duty
soldiers in the U.S. Army,
a senator wrote to the
secretary of defense this week asking for the ‘estimated number and percentage
of troops since June 2005 who have been prescribed antidepressant

medications while serving in Iraq and
Afghanistan’.”

http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2009/11/12/senatoraskshowmany-troops-areonantidepressants/

  • November 12, 2009, 10:11 AM ET

Senator Asks How Many Troops Are on

Antidepressants

By Jacob Goldstein

For people in their late teens
and early 20s, taking an antidepressant may actually increase
the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors
, at least during initial
treatment. So it’s important that those patients are carefully
monitored.

Citing the rising number of
suicides
among active-duty soldiers in the U.S. Army, a senator wrote to the
secretary of defense this week asking for the “estimated number and percentage
of troops since June 2005 who have been prescribed antidepressant medications
while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

The  letter is from
Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat. He said Congress must:

examine the extent to which DoD is prescribing antidepressants to its
service members, especially those deployed in-theatre, and the methods it is
employing to ensure that sufficient observation periods are conducted by
properly trained mental health providers. In short, my concern is how DoD is
managing the sheer volume and manner by which antidepressant drugs are being
administered to our service men and women overseas.

We called
and emailed the Department of Defense to ask for a reply, but they didn’t
immediately respond to our request. We’ll update this post when we hear
back.

Hat Tip: Pharmalot;
Photo: iStockphoto

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ANTIDEPRESSANTs: Murder: Youth Kills Friend: Oklahoma

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________

Paragraph 16 reads: “While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “’I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them’.”

“Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.”

http://www.chickashanews.com/local/local_story_302093409.html

Published: October 29, 2009 08:34 am

The Express-Star

Ronson Bush’s mother Tina Black took the stand on Wednesday to ask the court to spare her son’s life.

On day two of his trial, Bush admitted killing his friend Billy Harrington but still refuses to say he meant to do it. Because of his refusal, Grady County District Attorney Bret Burns is asking District Judge Richard Van Dyck to hand down a death sentence.

The jury was excused when Bush changed his plea to guilty, and now the decision whether Bush lives or dies in solely in the hands of Van Dyck, who will render his decisiion at 10 a.m. today.

“We had a life before alcohol and drugs, we had laughs and family time and we went to church,” Black said. “If a family has not experienced alcohol and drugs, they had better thank the Lord because they’re an ugly thing that make your child someone you don’t know.”

In her plea to save her son’s life. Black said she is not angry with Ronson for herself, but she is angry for her grandson Brennan, Ronson’s son.

“Brennan loved going out in the truck with his dad,” Black said. “He asked me, ‘If my dad got life, do you think they’d let him go out in the truck one more time?’”

Black said she thinks a person can love their children even if they do not like their actions.

“There was something that fired up that anger, that wasn’t normal,” Black said.

The next witness to testify was Gail Poyner, Ph. D., a licensed psychologist who deals primarily in forensic psychology.

Poyner performed a psychological evaluation of Bush and researched the effects of the medications Bush was taking.

Poyner said members of Bush’s family described him as “flipped out,” “crazy” and “paranoid,” and that Bush experiences anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, severe drug and alcohol problems and says his brain feels “itchy.”

“Likely he was misdiagnosed or not diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder,” Poyner said. “He is severely mentally ill and his involvement with crime is highly correlated with his mental illness.”

Poyner criticized the lack of treatment Bush received after he was admitted to Griffin Memorial Hospital in Norman.

“I very strongly believe at a professional level had Griffin offered a modicum of treatment, this (the murder) could have been possibly avoided,” Poyner said. “They simply did not give him any treatment, no group therapy, no individual therapy. It was documented he was suicidal, yet they did not treat him for that.”

Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.

While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them.”

Dr. David Musick, a full professor of sociology at the University of Northern Colorado, also testified.

Describing Bush’s family as “good folks,” Musick discussed alcoholism as a disease and how the “horrific” drug methamphetamine creates powerful addictions in humans.

“The defendant (Bush) has a serious alcohol problem that is overflowing into violence,” Musick said. “As a child, he was a pawn being pulled back and forth by his family who had different parenting styles which creates unbearable pain so he covers up the pain with alcohol and illicit drugs.”

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Paxil Survivor – Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil

Paxil Survivor – Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil
Ellen Heath
An Open Letter to Anyone Seeking Information About the Harmful Effects of Psychiatric Drugs:

I am writing my story because I want to do something to help inform people about the harmful effects of antidepressant drugs. It took me several years, after using antidepressant medications for more than ten, to become clear headed enough to figure out what happened to me. I wound up having a minor stroke or a seizure according to the MRI. Now I’m trying to get my life back together.

Here’s what happened:

I went to a Psychiatrist in 1990 because I couldn’t control crying jags at work. I had been sad over a horrible accident that left my 19-year-old son permanently brain injured.

The lady psychiatrist saw me for less than five minutes, announced I was clinically depressed and prescribed Prozac. When I asked, she said it was not habit forming.

I remember feeling almost immediate relief after the first dose (surprising, since she said it would take 3 weeks to take effect). All of the sudden life became wonderful! I sang to myself all day long. I was the life of every party (or so I thought). I began drinking too much and running around like I was on speed. I just had so much fun at everything I did. The world was at my feet and I was setting it on fire! Wow…why didn’t I find these drugs sooner?

But really, as the years went by, I became unattached to the world emotionally. I became very self-centered. I lost a lot of friends. I missed major life occurrences, like the death of my father. I was not there for him during his illness nor was I emotionally present at his funeral. I was absolutely giddy all of the time. My most radical act was to sue my employer. I know now that it’s better not to sue your local government! As I look back at bad life decisions and embarrassing behavior, I can only be grateful that it was not worse. I read daily of cases describing people committing crimes and displaying truly bizarre behavior on these drugs, some turning into homicidal monsters when they try to withdraw. There are people spending the rest of their lives in prison because of these drugs. I realize I am one of the lucky ones to have come out of the fog and be able to tell my story. I have an insecure (shy), reserved personality by nature, and I come from a conservative family. I know now that the ‘drug fog’ kept me from seeing what was really happening in my life for many years. I know now that I would not have made all those bad decisions had I not been on those drugs. These pharmaceuticals that I so trusted to ‘cure’ my disease of depression have altered my entire life.

I realized I wanted off the drugs in the fall of 2001. It was nothing noble on my part that I finally decided to get off (an entirely different and very long story that I am not proud of…we’ll just say I wanted to be clear headed and leave it at that). It took from the fall of 2001 until the fall of 2003. And guess what? By December 2003 I was experiencing severe brain fogginess, mental confusion and panic attacks! I was deathly afraid of what was wrong with me and just as afraid to take any kind of medication to treat the crying jags. At this point, I did not know that I was experiencing was drug withdrawal.

I began to seek help. I had an MRI done because of the terrible brain fog.(1) They found ‘non-specific white focal matter’, which the doctor said could have been caused by a minor stroke or seizure. I searched for answers for an entire year from: three PHD therapists, one medical doctor of internal medicine, one general practitioner MD and one gastroenterologist MD. None of these professionals would discuss withdrawal effects of psych drugs! One guy curtly said in a very harsh tone, “if you want to talk about antidepressant drugs, you have to go to a psychiatrist!” Another, the PHD Psychologist lady, was giddy and scatter-brained. She left me sitting in her waiting room a half hour, then sashayed in laughing hilariously, saying she was so sorry she forgot about our appointment…then she proceeded to prop her feet up on her chair with her keyboard in her lap and and pounded in my name address and insurance information, saying “you know this drill, right?” I told her that I did not want to take antipressant drugs. She quickly explained to me that “our brains need help” and gave me some websites that supported her position. I finished the session with her and asked her not to file a claim on my insurance. I gave her a check. And guess what? The next day there was a claim on my insurance website! The woman obviously was in a world of her own. I suppose I should have written her a thank-you note for yet another example of the bizarre behavior caused by drugs that claim to “help” our brains!

Well, in fairness to these professionals, I was an emotional wreck, and probably presented a scary dilemma to them. While, all doctors may not know about the devastating physical effects these drugs have on our bodies and brains, most of them have heard about suicidal tendencies associated with them, and the well documented stories of people committing horrendous acts either on or while trying to quit these drugs. I’m sure when I mentioned I had recently quit them, I was quite the pariah.

I finally found a psychologist here in Austin, Texas, Dr. John Breeding, that lent me a copy of Ann Blake-Tracy’s tape, ‘Help, I Can’t Get Off My Anti-depressants’. And wow…what a relief! I wasn’t crazy after all. It really was the drugs, as I suspected. I began reading and researching, and discovered that everything that had been happening to me was directly related to the years of antidepressant drug use.

It took a personal crisis for me to wake up. And that’s exactly what happened. The details of the crisis are not important. What’s important is that things had to get pretty bad before I realized that the antidepressant drugs were wrecking my life and absolutely destroying my soul. Author and Psychiatrist Peter Breggin writes about a spellbinding effect these drugs have on people. Believe me, I was spellbound for a long time. I absolutely accepted as truth that these drugs were helping me. Even when I got off of them it took awhile for me to ‘come back’ and fully realize how duped I had been. This year will be the 6th year I am free from those mind captivating drugs, and never have I been tempted to get back on. Each week that goes by I still continue to gain memories and mental clarity.

It’s hard to get over the fact that more than 10 years of my life were lost in a fog because of drugs that doctors said would help me. It feels like my life has been turned totally upside down because of these drugs.

There must be a reason my mind was spared. I am now supporting an effort to enhance public awareness about the harmful effects of SSRI drugs in any way I can. That is the reason for this open letter. Please people …wake up! How many more lives must be ruined before you will see the truth?

I am asking that the medical community embrace the concept of ‘informed consent’. I went to three psychiatrists. None of them were willing to discuss the negative side effects of the SSRI drugs they prescribed for me. I went to professional counselors and psychologists who said ‘our brains need help’ and ‘the drugs help so many people’. Now after extensive reading and researching, I am absolutely disappointed in the prevailing viewpoint by the mental health community that mind-altering drugs are the answer. There is clear scientific evidence that they are not. When I see the giddy, drunken behavior of people on these drugs today, I am simply appalled that they continue to be touted as helpful by professionals who take an oath do ‘do no harm’!

I have started a support group for families, friends and bio-psychiatric drug survivors as a means of helping one another to heal. The lack of support from the medical community made me feel alone and isolated much of the time as I was coming off these drugs. By forming a community support group I hope to be able to help people avoid what I went through by sharing some of the information that is not readily available to the general public. I want to do something to spare people the anguish I went through. The information that I know now that I did not know when I went through all this should be readily available. My question to the medical community is why isn’t it?

It is my opinion that SSRI drug use today is epidemic, and that our society is being adversely affected because of it. It is my belief that those of us who have been on the drugs and successfully withdrawn have a responsibility to spread the truth that we have so painfully learned. We can change the world. We must share our stories and get the truth out there. If you are in a position to spread the word about how harmful psychiatric drugs are, do so…don’t hesitate. If you touch one life, you have made a difference.

Sincerely,
Ellen Heath
Transformers Support Group

P. S. Please feel free to contact me at 512-626-7986 or e-mail me at MHEATH3@AUSTIN.RR
(1) Brain fog means: I could not think straight. I felt confused about day to day activities at work (I am a financial analyst), my short term memory was so bad that I could barely put a sentence together, and I just found myself in a state of mental confusion, not knowing if this was my fault or the rest of the world that was askew. Mental confusion is hard to describe because you don’t really recognize it until you have begun to regain your clarity. You get lost on the way to a location that you’ve travelled many times before. You forget names of people that you’ve known for years… you turn the wrong way down a familiar hallway.

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DR. IRVING KIRSCH: EXPLODING THE ANTIDEPRESSANT MYTH

http://reporter.mcgill.ca/2009/10/antidepressants-medical-boon-or-bust/

Home > Reporter

The
Reporter

McGill University | Montreal, Quebec |
Oct 09 2009

Antidepressants: medical boon or
bust?

The Biomedical Ethics Unit of the Faculty of Medicine is
proud to present Dr. Irving Kirsch who will deliver a lecture titled “The

Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth,” on Oct. 14.

When asked about the subject matter of his lecture, Dr. Kirsch, a Psychology
professor at the University of Hull, in England, said this. “Antidepressants
work – everyone knows they do. That’s what I thought too, until my colleagues
and I analyzed the clinical trial data. When I obtained the unpublished as well
as published data from the Food and Drug Administration, I found that what
everyone knew about antidepressants was wrong. Instead of treating depression
with drugs, we’ve been treating it with suggestion. A thorough review of the

research demonstrates that the chemical imbalance theory of depression is wrong.
The effect of antidepressant drugs is independent of their chemical composition.
Depression can be treated more effectively and more safely without drugs.”

The Emperor’s New Drugs; Oct. 14; 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. 3647 Peel St., room
101. Lecture is free, all are welcome. For more information contact Audrey M.
Prosser at 514-398-6980 or by email at

audrey.prosser@mcgill.ca.

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09/16/1999 – ABC News Transcript 9/15/99–SSRI Effectiveness

Thanks to one of our ICFDA Directors for obtaining the following for us:

The following message is a transcript of last night’s ABC News with
Peter Jennings: a message about the SSRIs. Tonight Peter Jennings will
discuss the “side-effects” of the SSRIs.
———————————————————————–
Peter Jennings ABC News: September 15, 1999

Peter Jennings: “Just when is the drug actually making a difference?
Antidepressants are very popular these days: sales are up 17% from just
last year. Millions and millions of prescriptions now are being
written to
battle depression and mood swings. Tonight, are these drugs really
doing
everything that people think they are? Here’s ABC’s Deborah Amos ”

Deborah Amos: “These depression fighting pills are 60 – 70% effective in
bringing relief according to the medical literature. But Thomas Moore,
who
studies drugs at George Washington University, says the numbers are
misleading”

Thomas Moore: “Millions of Americans believe that the benefits of these
drugs are much greater than they are”

Deborah Amos: “To investigate, Moore analyzed all drug company tests on
five major drugs submitted to the FDA prior to market approval: for
Paxil,
Zoloft, Effexor, Serzone and Prozac. The effectiveness of the drug was
measured against a placebo or sugar pill.”

Thomas Moore: “The effect of antidepressants drugs on depression is
only
very little different than the effect of a completely inactive placebo.”

Deborah Amos: “The highlight of Moore’s finding is the case of Prozac
with
more than $2 billion dollars in U.S. Sales. About 90% of Prozac’s
overall
effectiveness is about the same as patients taking nothing stronger
than a
sugar pill. But the label for antidepressant drugs, the prescribing
detail
for doctors, usually do not spell out the small overall differences
between
the drug and the placebos.”

Thomas Moore: “At the very least the FDA product labeling should
include a
more balanced picture of all the information they have received about
the
drug, – about all the clinical trials.”

Deborah Amos: “”The FDA says it does not put that kind of detail on the
label because it is not helpful in predicting individual outcomes. So
what
does it all mean for patients, when a placebo can have almost the same
benefits as a dug, and particularly, when a drug can have unpleasant
side-effects , —- that feeling – jumpy to <sum><sum><sum><sum><sum>

(a psychologist from the University of Conn., who has teamed up with
Thomas
Moore.)

?: “It suggests that the frontline of treatment for depression should
be
psychological rather than chemical.”

Deborah Ames: “The problem is that good therapy is expensive and not
always available. Pills are cheaper and more easily available. Deborah
Ames, ABC News, New York.”

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