Understanding Paxil Birth Defects

Ann Blake-Tracy says:

Your comment is awaiting moderation.

After two decades of tracking mothers and babies exposed to SSRI
antidepressants during pregnancy I shutter to ever see a mother take one of
these drugs. If those adverse effects listed in this article are not bad enough
to consider exposing a baby to, we have yet to witness the full effects of these
drugs upon offspring. These babies brains will not be fully developed until they
are in their 20’s. The full negative effects upon that developing brain will not
be known until then. Knowing what I know after 20 years of researching these
drugs and tracking patients who have taken them, I DO NOT WANT TO SEE WHAT IS
COMING!!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug
Awareness
http://www.drugawareness.org & http://www.ssristories.drugawareness.org

Understanding Paxil Birth Defects

In December 2005, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) posted its Paxil findings on its
website regarding pregnant women taking antidepressants. In this announcement,
GSK noted that it was revising its pregnancy precaution category from C to D.
This revision was based on recent studies that indicated positive evidence of
human fetal risk. In addition, GSK was placing this information in the WARNINGS
section of the Paxil label.
The FDA then advised pregnant women to switch from Paxil to another SSRI
drug, such as Prozac or Zoloft. This warning was based on the results of an
analysis of Sweden’s birth registry that showed women who took Paxil were 1.5 to
2 times more likely to give birth to a baby with heart defects than women who
took other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or no antidepressant
at all.
Studies also showed that complications were reported for babies born to
mothers who had taken antidepressants such as Paxil in the third month of
pregnancy. Such complications included breathing difficulties, turning blue,
seizures, changing body temperature, feeding problems, vomiting, low blood
sugar, stiffness, tremor, irritability or constant crying. In other words, just
like adults, newborn babies of mothers who have taken Paxil while pregnant,
experience similar withdrawal symptoms. Because of this, tube feeding, help with
breathing and longer hospitalization may be needed. Premature births in pregnant
women exposed to SSRIs such as Paxil have also been reported.
Based on such reports obstetricians went so far as to recommend that
women avoid Paxil and reconsider using any SSRI antidepressant during pregnancy.
Still, other physicians maintain that the benefits of mothers getting treatment
for their depression outweigh the risks to the fetus.
The most common birth defects caused by antidepressants have been found
to be holes or other malformations in the chambers of the heart. Often the

defects heal on their own, but more severe cases need surgical procedures. GSK
is investigating how Paxil could be causing such defects.
In addition, antidepressant drugs are known to imbalance blood sugar
metabolism thereby worsening gestational diabetes. However, it is doubtful that
this is explained to expectant mothers who are given such drugs.
Medical professionals in women’s mental health point out that it is
important to aptly gauge the timing of medications prescribed for women who are
pregnant. Paxil is currently one of the most popular antidepressants in the
world, and roughly 25 percent of its users are women of childbearing age —
between 18 and 45.

Nick Johnson serves as lead counsel with Johnson Law Group, with principal
offices located in Houston, Texas. Johnson represents plaintiffs with injury
cases involving Defective Drugs. Contact Nick Johnson at 1-888-311-5522 or visit
http://www.johnsonlawgroup.com

518 total views, no views today

Sen. Grassley Investigates Lilly/WebMD link Reported by Washington Post

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

Freelance writer and
cartoonist Martha Rosenberg has worked diligently to reveal the conflict of
interest in many of the pharma/medical  situations.

Please
rate this column. The rating buttons are at the top of the page after you click
on this link and are into the site. There is no
requirement to register or log-in so it should take only a few
seconds.

Thank you.

Rosie Meysenburg
Moderator:
www.SSRIstories.com

http://www.opednews.com/articles/GrassleyInvestigates-Lill-by-Martha-Rosenberg-100224-629.html

Grassley Investigates Lilly/WebMD link Reported by Washington
Post

By Martha Rosenberg (about the
author
)     Page 1 of 2 page(s)

opednews.com Permalink

For OpEdNews: Martha Rosenberg – Writer

It is
not too hard to find evidence of links between WebMD and drug giant Eli
Lilly.

A 2002 article on the gigantic medical site about pain and
depression says “Lilly is a WebMD Partner,” and an advertising award in 2004
went to the FCB “client” Eli Lilly & Co./WebMD–not clients.

Banner
and skyscraper ads for Lilly‘s blockbuster antidepressant Cymbalta on WebMD‘s
home page never seemed to yield to other advertisers in 2009–and the Washington

Post reported Lilly and WebMD to be partners in 2000.

Now Sen. Charles
Grassley (R-Iowa), ranking Republican on the Senate Finance Committee, is
investigating financial ties between Lilly and WebMD Health Corp because of a

WebMD TV ad exhorting people to undergo a Lilly depression screening.

You
can joke about the need to tell people they are depressed–do people need to be
told they have a headache?–but pharma’s screening ruse to recruit new
patient pools for the volatile drugs among teens, adolescents and new mothers is
not funny.

3,500 news articles about antidepressant linked violence
appear on the web site, SSRIstories.com, including 700 murders, 200
murder-suicides, 51 school shooting incidents and 54 postpartum depression cases
since 1989.

In addition to WebMD, WebMD Health Corp. includes the web
sites Medscape, MedicineNet, eMedicine, eMedicine Health, RxList, theHeart.org,
and drugs.com. Original partners and investors says the Washington Post included
“Microsoft, DuPont, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. (and his Fox TV networks),
Silicon Graphics and Netscape founder Jim Clark, drug maker Eli Lilly, and EDS,
the computer services company founded by H. Ross Perot.”

Lilly is not the
only pharma company receiving unmarked product placement on WebMD.

Last
summer, a video featured a woman patient confessing she was fearful of life
while a voice over said she needed treatment for “general anxiety disorder” and
the camera showed bottles of Forest Pharmaceuticals’ antidepressant
Lexapro moving down the manufacturer’s assembly line
. Get it? No disclaimer
on the video or “sponsored content” appeared.

Another unsponsored WebMD

video last summer urged people on antidepressants to remain on their therapy
“despite side effects” and a third suggested women concerned about cancer, heart
attack and stroke risks of postmenopausal hormone therapy should continue their
treatment at lowered doses. Hang in there, valued customers.

A search for
Wyeth (now Pfizer) antidepressant Effexor a few months ago on WebMD elicited a
JAMA study finding Effexor superior to other antidepressants by a Wyeth funded
second author, Graham Emslie, MD. Effexor was the drug Andrea Yates took when
she drowned her five children in 2001, a case found on
SSRIstories.

Questions about conflict of interest have surfaced at
WebMD‘s Medscape too which administers many of the lucrative drug company
sponsored continuing medical education [CME] courses in the US which doctors
must complete to keep their state licenses.

Last year psychiatrist Daniel
Carlat, MD–who recounts his adventures as a Wyeth paid Effexor promoter in the
New York Times magazine–writes that he received, as a member of Medscape, an
envelope with “a brochure from Forest Laboratories advertising Lexapro, and
nothing else. It was creepy, like Invasion of the Body Snatchers.”

While
Lilly is known for launching the SSRI antidepressant revolution with Prozac,
Cymbalta does much of the heavy lifting now with worldwide sales of $3.075
billion in 2009.

Many remember Cymbalta as the drug 19-year-old healthy
clinical volunteer Traci Johnson killed herself on, during trials on the Lilly

campus in 2004–soon after FDA investigations into suicide/antidepressant
links.

Traci had no depression history said Rev. Joel Barnaby, a
spokesman for the Johnson family, who called Lilly‘s decision to proceed with
Cymbalta’s launch as scheduled “offensive” posturing.

Five others
suicides occurred during Cymbalta clinical trials, said the FDA and twice the
rate of suicide attempts were seen in women prescribed the drug for stress
urinary incontinence–also patients with no depression to blame.

Others
remember Cymbalta as the drug Carol Anne Gotbaum, daughter-in-law of New York
City Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum, was taking during her macabre death in
police custody at the Phoenix’s Sky Harbor airport in 2007.

But now Lilly
and WebMD are pushing Cymbalta for pain since it was approved for
fibromyalgia in 2008. “Across cultures, patients who complain of pain tend to be
depressed,” says the 2002 article which calls WebMD and Lilly partners, a
finding from a “huge international study by Prozac manufacturer Eli Lilly and
Company.”

“Could your muscle aches be related to depression?” hawks WebMD

text under the heading, “Recognizing the Symptoms of Depression.” Next to it is
a picture of a depressed women with arrows pointing to the pain in her head and
neck, chest and stomach, arms and hands, legs and feet and of course
back.

“Print out this symptom diary, and fill it out. Then take it to
your doctor to discuss what may be causing your symptoms.”

This content,
we’re told, is “selected and controlled by WebMD‘s editorial staff” but “funded
by Lilly USA.”


Martha Rosenberg is
columnist and cartoonist based in Chicago I

604 total views, 1 views today

Medical examiner confirms death of 9-yr-old Colony, TX boy was

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This suicide is much too similar to little Gabriel Myers’ (7) suicide
in Florida last year – while in the custody of CPS! He too was on
similar medications when he impulsively hung himself with a shower
hose in the bathroom.

Both types of medications have an FDA black box warning for suicide
for this age group. WHY?!!! Want to talk about him being exposed to
something toxic? This is it! Why as a society do we allow this to
continue?!!! Why is it okay for doctors to give patients drugs that
could cause suicide?

Here is the warning given for Strattera which is prescribed for ADHD.
[And a similar warning was given to all antidepressant and mood
stablizing medications (which Montana was also taking).]

9/05 From Web MD: “The FDA is advising health care providers and
caregivers that children and adolescents being treated with Strattera
should be closely monitored for worsening of symptoms as well as
agitation, irritability, SUICIDAL THINKING OR BEHAVIORS, and unusual
changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of
therapy or when the dose is changed (either increased or decreased).”

“THIS MONITORING SHOULD INCLUDE DAILY OBSERVATION BY FAMILIES AND
CAREGIVERS AND FREQUENT CONTACT WITH THE PHYSICIAN, says the FDA.”
[Emphasis added]

What kind of close monitoring is this when he hangs himself in a
nurses office?! Why did none of the professionals working with Montana
withdraw him from the medications which had been producing these
suicidal thoughts for some time BEFORE he lost his life? I see these
FAR TOO OFTEN and the children are getting younger and younger as
those who should be caring for them ignore these strong FDA warnings
that are the next closest thing there is to banning a group of drugs!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/021710dnmetlancesuicide.12e83ee14.html?so=TimeStampAscending&ocp=5#slcgm_comments_anchor

Medical examiner confirms death of 9-year-old Colony boy was suicide

11:13 PM CST on Thursday, February 18, 2010

By WENDY HUNDLEY/The Dallas Morning News
whundley@dallasnews.com

The Tarrant County medical examiner’s office ruled Thursday that a
9-year-old boy from The Colony committed suicide.

Montana Lance

The determination rules out speculation that Montana Lance’s death was
an accident.

Montana was found hanging in a bathroom at Stewart’s Creek Elementary
School around 1 p.m. Jan. 21. He was taken to Baylor Medical Center at
Carrollton, where he was pronounced dead.

Lt. Darren Brockway of The Colony police said the medical examiner’s
ruling is consistent with police conclusions about the death.

“He’d gotten in trouble at school and panicked,” Brockway said. “He
just felt there was no other way out.”

There had been speculation that Montana watched a television show
about teen suicide the night before his death and was copying what he
saw with no real intention to kill himself.

“We ruled that out as an option after talking to his parents,”
Brockway said. “He didn’t watch that show.”

Also Online

01/25/10: Friends, family stunned by apparent suicide of 9-year-old boy

Link: Leave your condolences for the family of Montana Lance

Still, experts say children as young as Montana may not fully
comprehend the consequences of their actions. A suicidal act may be a
spur-of-the-moment act, like an outburst or a tantrum, they say.

“It was more of a conscious decision he made in a moment of high
anxiety,” Brockway said.

A spokesman for the Lance family could not be reached for comment
Thursday. A police report says Montana’s father had insisted the death
was accidental.

Brockway said Montana had been upset on the day of his death after he
was sent to the office for misbehaving in class. He locked himself in
the school nurse’s restroom and didn’t come out.

After about 10 minutes, the nurse got a key to open the door and found
the child unconscious.

Montana had attached the buckle of a brown cloth belt to a hook of a
device used to help disabled people use the restroom, according to a
police report. He was found with the belt around his neck with his
feet off the floor. Police found no notes or messages.

He had been taking medication for mood swings and for attention
deficit hyperactivity disorder, and had been having suicidal thoughts
for about two years, the police report states.

In 2007, Montana’s parents, Jason and Debbie Lance, sought treatment
for their son for ADHD.

In 2008, they told the doctor that the boy had been talking about
committing suicide, and he was referred to a psychiatrist, according
to the police report.

After Montana’s death, Child Protective Services opened an
investigation to determine whether abuse or neglect were contributing
factors.

That investigation has not been completed, but the family’s other two
children have not been removed from the home, CPS spokeswoman Marissa
Gonzales said.

Gonzales said CPS has had no prior involvement with the Lances and
routinely investigates child fatalities.

With the medical examiner’s ruling, police plan to close their
investigation with no charges filed, Brockway said.

731 total views, 1 views today

Medical examiner confirms death of 9-yr-old Colony, TX boy was suicide

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This suicide is much too similar to little Gabriel Myers’ (7) suicide in Florida last year – while in the custody of CPS! He too was on similar medications when he impulsively hung himself with a shower hose in the bathroom.

Both types of medications have an FDA black box warning for suicide for this age group. WHY?!!! Want to talk about him being exposed to something toxic? This is it! Why as a society do we allow this to continue?!!! Why is it okay for doctors to give patients drugs that could cause suicide?

Here is the warning given for Strattera which is prescribed for ADHD. [And a similar warning was given to all antidepressant and mood stablizing medications (which Montana was also taking).]

9/05 From Web MD: “The FDA is advising health care providers and caregivers that children and adolescents being treated with Strattera should be closely monitored for worsening of symptoms as well as agitation, irritability, SUICIDAL THINKING OR BEHAVIORS, and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the initial few months of therapy or when the dose is changed (either increased or decreased).”

“THIS MONITORING SHOULD INCLUDE DAILY OBSERVATION BY FAMILIES AND CAREGIVERS AND FREQUENT CONTACT WITH THE PHYSICIAN, says the FDA.” [Emphasis added]

What kind of close monitoring is this when he hangs himself in a nurses office?! Why did none of the professionals working with Montana withdraw him from the medications which had been producing these suicidal thoughts for some time BEFORE he lost his life? I see these FAR TOO OFTEN and the children are getting younger and younger as those who should be caring for them ignore these strong FDA warnings that are the next closest thing there is to banning a group of drugs!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/021710dnmetlancesuicide.12e83ee14.html?so=TimeStampAscending&ocp=5#slcgm_comments_anchor
Medical examiner confirms death of 9-year-old Colony boy was suicide

11:13 PM CST on Thursday, February 18, 2010

By WENDY HUNDLEY/The Dallas Morning News
whundley@dallasnews.com
The Tarrant County medical examiner’s office ruled Thursday that a 9-year-old boy from The Colony committed suicide.

Montana Lance
The determination rules out speculation that Montana Lance’s death was an accident.

Montana was found hanging in a bathroom at Stewart’s Creek Elementary School around 1 p.m. Jan. 21. He was taken to Baylor Medical Center at Carrollton, where he was pronounced dead.

Lt. Darren Brockway of The Colony police said the medical examiner’s ruling is consistent with police conclusions about the death.

“He’d gotten in trouble at school and panicked,” Brockway said. “He just felt there was no other way out.”

There had been speculation that Montana watched a television show about teen suicide the night before his death and was copying what he saw with no real intention to kill himself.

“We ruled that out as an option after talking to his parents,” Brockway said. “He didn’t watch that show.”

Also Online
01/25/10: Friends, family stunned by apparent suicide of 9-year-old boy

Link: Leave your condolences for the family of Montana Lance

Still, experts say children as young as Montana may not fully comprehend the consequences of their actions. A suicidal act may be a spur-of-the-moment act, like an outburst or a tantrum, they say.

“It was more of a conscious decision he made in a moment of high anxiety,” Brockway said.

A spokesman for the Lance family could not be reached for comment Thursday. A police report says Montana’s father had insisted the death was accidental.

Brockway said Montana had been upset on the day of his death after he was sent to the office for misbehaving in class. He locked himself in the school nurse’s restroom and didn’t come out.

After about 10 minutes, the nurse got a key to open the door and found the child unconscious.

Montana had attached the buckle of a brown cloth belt to a hook of a device used to help disabled people use the restroom, according to a police report. He was found with the belt around his neck with his feet off the floor. Police found no notes or messages.

He had been taking medication for mood swings and for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and had been having suicidal thoughts for about two years, the police report states.

In 2007, Montana’s parents, Jason and Debbie Lance, sought treatment for their son for ADHD.

In 2008, they told the doctor that the boy had been talking about committing suicide, and he was referred to a psychiatrist, according to the police report.

After Montana’s death, Child Protective Services opened an investigation to determine whether abuse or neglect were contributing factors.

That investigation has not been completed, but the family’s other two children have not been removed from the home, CPS spokeswoman Marissa Gonzales said.

Gonzales said CPS has had no prior involvement with the Lances and routinely investigates child fatalities.

With the medical examiner’s ruling, police plan to close their investigation with no charges filed, Brockway said.

879 total views, no views today

SSRI ANTIDEPRESSANT: 2008 Finnish School Shooting: 10 Dead

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): Although this is
a poor automatic translation of the document you can tell by what is translated
that it was found that as the large majority of school shooter, this shooter was
on an SSRI antidepressant when he shot himself and 10 others in the Finish
school shooting in September of 2008.

___________________________
On September 23, 2008, at Kauhajoki in Finland, a 22 year old
culinary student named Matti Saari shot and killed ten students before
killing himself.
The official report on the shooting has been released
by the Finnish Ministry and on page 58 of that report [PDF file] it states that
Matti Saari was taking an
SSRI medicinal product and
also a benzodiazepine.

Following the official report is
another newspaper report attached to this email which also explains about the

SSRI.

Automatically translated from Finnish into
English.
——————————————————————————————————————–
Page
58 reads:  “Copies terveyskeskuslääkäri was ordered medicines at the
request of depressiohoitajan
are (ssri– medicinal product) that
ahdistuskohtauksiin (alpratsolaami) patients nothing
themselves.
ahdistuskohtaukset and paniikkihäiriöt esiintymistilanteisiin and
related, social situations
that well alone. verkostokartoituksessa months
before taking any
factor network has proved to be quite a present. Apparently
factor which
medicines used properly and in any case, we had hoitomyönteinen
use and open. However, he has avoided katsekontaktia depressiohoitajaan.
hoitokontakti retained until an act, but factor will act was passed on a Friday
meeting agreed later.”

http://www.om.fi/Satellite?blobtable=MungoBlobs&blobcol=urldata&SSURIapptype=BlobServer&SSURIcontainer=Default&SSURIsession=false&blobkey=id&blobheadervalue1=inline ; filename=OMSO 11_2010 Selvitys_180 s.pdf&SSURIsscontext=Satellite
Server&blobwhere=1266333385256&blobheadername1=Content-Disposition&ssbinary=true&blobheader=application/pdf
——————————————————————————————————————–
http://www.savonsanomat.fi/teemat/kauhajoki/koulusurmaajan-l%C3%A4%C3%A4kityst%C3%A4-ei-suositella-nuorille-yhdysvalloissa/534656

koulusurmaajan medication aggression
ssri

may increase does not recommend medicinal products in the United
States
a young people a 04: 03 (last 08: 08)
figure: anu
Mattila
kauhajoella ten people in 2008 and itself was fired by Matti
Saari
mielenterveysongelmiinsa tried to obtain aid until
13-age.

freija metsähalme

kauhajoen koulusurmaaja Matti island
ssri– ate are medicinal product which is not in the United States to recommend
to less than 18 years of age.

ssri– medicines are available in the wider
young people in Finland.

-according to the studies uncontrolled use of
medicinal products ssri– aggression and may increase itsetuhoisia incentives.
These medicinal products should always be used only under medical supervision.
under 15 years of age should be a specialist, under the supervision Kuopion
university hospital (PCA) nuorisopsykiatrian Professor Päivikki laukkanen
says.

Island psyykelääkityksen had nothing ever in specialised
doctors

terveyskeskuslääkäri was ordered him on request. medication
depressiohoitajan the medicinal product ssri– grant ate ahdistuskohtauksiin
another medicinal product.

22-year-old island
kauhajoella killed in September 2008 and itself ten
people.

975 total views, no views today

PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
so.
__________________________________
Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
were the answer.
‘They made it seem like my world was falling
apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
take drugs, and
I didn’t want to, but they made me think
I really needed it. So I took them’.”

“She said that after a

few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
into a wall.’
She said that according to her doctor, these were
all symptoms of her depression, but
she thinks it was
the drugs.”

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
in cases of mild or moderate depression.

Depressing truth about antidepressants

by Tina
Amirkiai

Jan 27, 2010

If you are one of the millions of people taking
antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
placebo.

A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
severe acute depressions.”

Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

“The biological or physical
symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
“They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

Researchers used a
severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

Researchers concluded
that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
over placebo is substantial.”

Dobransky and other critics maintain that
the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
antidepressants.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
products to the general public.

Dobransky said a big part of the problem
is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
fixes like that do not exist.

“Each case needs to be set in its proper
place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

She said that
after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
thinks it was the drugs.

“I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

A spokesman for
GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
“the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
results.”

If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
Dashed line

©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
University.  A publication of the Medill
School
.

666 total views, no views today

LEXAPRO: Vehicular Manslaughter: No Alcohol: Idaho

Paragraph three freads:  “The prosecutor’s office
previously alleged Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol,
or was grossly negligent in causing Redfern’s death.
They alleged he had been involved in four crashes on that day, two prior
to the fatal crash and one immediately afterward.”

Paragraphs
seven and eight read:  Stevens failed two sobriety tests, court documents
allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police questioned him. He
reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant.
A
bottle of Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

“However, tests done on blood taken from Stevens after his arrest
came back negative for intoxicants [alcohol], according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.”

http://www.magicvalley.com/news/local/article_82226ad0-3e75-5e78-95fe-27073b884547.html

Stevens pleads guilty to vehicular manslaughter

By
Ariel Hansen – Times-News writer | Posted: Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am |
(0)
Comments

HAILEY ­ Nearly a year after Bert Redfern died in a
March 10 car crash on Idaho Highway 75 in Hailey, a Twin Falls man has pleaded
guilty to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter for the fatal crash.

Cody
Stevens, 29, of Twin Falls, had been charged with felony vehicular manslaughter.
On Tuesday, just weeks before his district court trial was set to begin, he
pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor, which carries a penalty of up to a year in
prison and a $2,000 fine.

The prosecutor’s office previously alleged
Stevens was either under the influence of drugs or alcohol, or was grossly
negligent in causing Redfern’s death. They alleged he had been involved in four
crashes on that day, two prior to the fatal crash and one immediately
afterward.

According to court documents, Stevens allegedly left his job
in Jerome after a 12-hour shift at 6 a.m. March 10, and drove north. In Lincoln
County, he was allegedly reported as a reckless driver after he got close enough
to “rub mirrors” with the reporting party at about 7:20 a.m. At about 9:45, he
allegedly hit a tree south of Bellevue, telling police he swerved to avoid a
deer.

After leaving his totaled truck in Bellevue and renting a truck in
Hailey, Stevens returned to a Bellevue body shop. He then headed toward Ketchum
when he allegedly caused the noon-time collision that resulted in Redfern’s
death. He then allegedly flipped his rental truck onto a curb in downtown
Hailey, where police took him into custody.

Stevens failed two sobriety
tests, court documents allege, and appeared increasingly intoxicated as police
questioned him. He reportedly said he had taken Lexapro, an anti-anxiety and
anti-depressant drug, and was taking Prozac, an antidepressant. A bottle of
Baclofen, a muscle relaxant, was allegedly found in the rental
truck.

Stevens was taken for blood testing at St. Luke’s Wood River
Regional Medical Center, and he was later taken back to the hospital after
becoming increasingly unresponsive and incoherent during police questioning,
according to court documents.

However, tests done on blood taken from
Stevens after his arrest came back negative for intoxicants, according to court
documents. Stevens was not charged in any of the other alleged crashes that
day.

A civil case for wrongful death is pending against Stevens, filed by
Redfern’s widower, and Stevens’ plea to misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter can
be used against him in that case.

The county case has been sent back to
the magistrate court, and a sentencing hearing has not yet been
scheduled.

Ariel Hansen may be reached at ahansen@magicvalley.com or
208-788-3475.

Posted in Local, Crime-and-courts

on Thursday, January 21, 2010 1:00 am Updated: 10:57 pm.
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EFFEXOR: Police Officer Becomes Aggressive With Captain: Suit: NJ

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Czech’s report indicated Ruroede
suffers from a seizure disorder and as a consequence takes
Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone, all of which
have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also claimed
that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk of over
aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.northjersey.com/news/78389717.html

Former officer‘s suit gets a court date
Thursday, December 3, 2009


Community News (Lodi Edition)
STAFF WRITER

A former police
lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go before the court
early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against the borough, the
police department and the mayor and council earlier this year following his
termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec. 9, 2008.
Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County Superior
Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede was fired
from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department
following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert Czech, Esq. of
Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided “untruthful
responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions of March 23,
2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt. George Egbert.
Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate, withheld information,
failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and handled firearms while
unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological evaluation determined
that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit, Ruroede seeks to have
Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police department and pay
lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges against Ruroede stem
from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney Station bar in East
Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at the bar prior to the
fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm during the course of a
verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that Ruroede lifted him “by the
jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off the ground.”

In
the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a derogatory remark about a
female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert
grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued in the manner he
did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s testimony,
according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert called
both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a

seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path the
mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John Boppert
of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert Wunsch,
was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

A
former police lieutenant’s civil suit against the borough is scheduled to go
before the court early next year.

Kelly Ruroede filed his suit against
the borough, the police department and the mayor and council earlier this year
following his termination from the Hasbrouck Heights Police Department on Dec.
9, 2008. Ruroede’s case will go before Judge Estela De La Cruz at Bergen County
Superior Court on Jan. 5, 2010, according to borough officials.

Ruroede
was fired from his position as a lieutenant of the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department following a report and recommendation by Hearing Officer Robert
Czech, Esq. of Sea Girt. Czech asserted in his report that Ruroede had provided
“untruthful responses during the course of the investigation” into his actions
of March 23, 2008 during a physical altercation with Rutherford Police Capt.
George Egbert. Czech stated in his report that Ruroede was insubordinate,
withheld information, failed to comply with laws, had unauthorized absences and
handled firearms while unqualified to do so. According to Czech, a psychological
evaluation determined that Ruroede was “unfit for duty.”

In his lawsuit,
Ruroede seeks to have Czech’s decision overturned, a reinstatement to the police
department and pay lost due to his suspension.

The bulk of the charges
against Ruroede stem from a clash between Egbert and Ruroede at the Blarney
Station bar in East Rutherford. Czech’s report indicated both men had drinks at
the bar prior to the fight.

Egbert claimed Ruroede brandished a firearm
during the course of a verbal disagreement between the two men, stating that
Ruroede lifted him “by the jacket right below the throat and lifted [him] up off
the ground.”

In the report, Ruroede told Czech that Egbert made a
derogatory remark about a female friend of Ruroede’s while she was leaving the
bar. Ruroede claimed Egbert grabbed his arm first “and that is why he continued
in the manner he did.”

Eyewitness statements corroborate much of Egbert’s
testimony, according to the hearing officer‘s report.

Czech stated Egbert
called both the Rutherford Police Department and the Hasbrouck Heights Police

Department within an hour to report the altercation while Ruroede waited until
the next day to do so.

Czech’s report indicated Ruroede suffers from a
seizure disorder and as a consequence takes Effexor, Xanex and Fludrocortisone,
all of which have side effects when combined with alcohol. The report also
claimed that an analysis of Ruroede by a psychologist suggested he is “at risk
of over aggressive expressions and over aggressive behaviors.”

Following
the March 23 incident, Ruroede received notice of suspension without
pay.

Borough Administrator Michael Kronyak said Ruroede was “appealing
[the borough’s decision] to see if the termination was valid.” Kronyak indicated
that the borough would receive legal representation from Ruderman and Glickman,
who represent the borough in labor and contract litigation, and via the
borough’s insurance carrier, the New Jersey Intergovernmental Insurance
Fund.

“We feel that we followed the correct procedure and that the path
the mayor and council took was right,” Kronyak said.

Attorney John
Boppert of Ruderman and Glickman declined to comment. Ruroede’s attorney, Albert
Wunsch, was unavailable for comment.

zaremba@northjersey.com

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PROZAC/SSRIs: Problematic [DEADLY!] For Bipolars: Dr. David Gratzer

NOTE FROM DR. TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

Problematic???!!!!!” How about using the term DEADLY? How did
we get to the point that using SSRIs is the standard “treatment” for Bipolar
patients when initially doctors would not prescribe them due to their strong
potential to induce Bipolar?! Time has certainly proven the initial fears to be
true when the number of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by a whopping
4000% from 1996 to 2004!! No wonder every third person you meet any more has the
Bipolar label!
The simple truth of the matter is (as I discuss at length in
my DVD “Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?”) that antidepressants –
especially the SSRI antidepressants – are by far the BIGGEST CAUSE on
this planet of Bipolar Disorder! And doctors prescribing these drugs as
“treatment” for Bipolar is not only unethical, it is downright criminal! Why
wouldn’t the placebo outperform the drug?! Placebos don’t CAUSE Bipolar Disorder
– Antidepressants do!
Paragraph 14 reads:  “As a physician myself, I know a
thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When I was in
residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs
. It turned out that

Prozac intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.”

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columns/Manhattan-Moment/Medicine-isn_t-perfect_-Obamacare-is-even-less-perfect-8582816-72875022.html

Dr. David Gratzer: Medicine isn’t perfect, Obamacare is even less
perfect

By: Dr. David Gratzer
Op-Ed Contributor
November 25, 2009

Pay for the blue pill that works, not the red one that
doesn’t. That’s the president’s simple prescription for improving American
health care, one that relies on government panels and committees to set
guidelines for doctors and patients alike.

At least, that’s the
theory.

The theory met messy reality last week when the U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force recommended that women in their 40s shouldn’t get
mammograms. But the secretary of health and human services — who, incidentally,
oversees this panel — thinks women probably should. And the American Cancer
Society believes that they definitely should; major private insurance companies,

for the record, will continue to fund the tests.

Confused
yet?

Recommendation from a largely unknown government panel hardly seems
like typical material for national headlines. But when it involves breast cancer
and the announcement is made in the heat of debate over health reform, people
are — understandably — concerned.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task
Force, as it turns out, is not part of a larger Obama White House rationing
conspiracy, as some would have it. Task force members were appointed by
President Bush, and they voted on this recommendation before Obama’s
inauguration.

As for cost considerations, the task force had none:
Members are mandated not to weigh dollars and cents when considering the risk
and benefits of recommendations.

That’s not to suggest that their
conclusion isn’t highly controversial. For starters, it seems counterintuitive:
Early screening for cancer makes sense.

No wonder, then, that a full 87
percent of Americans believed that routine scanning was “almost always a good
idea” in a 2004 poll published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

Today, American panels and doctors groups are moving away
from the “scan first, ask questions later” philosophy. We aren’t the only ones
having second thoughts.

In Japan, all newborns were screened for

neuroblastoma starting in 1984, but the program was scrapped a few years ago
when more babies died from unnecessary surgeries than the obscure
cancer.

For many, such reversals are deeply unsettling, a reminder that
medicine is far from an exact science.

“The history of medicine is a
record not only of brilliant success and stunning progress,” Theodore Dalrymple,
a British physician, wrote in 2002. “It is also a litany of mistaken ideas and
discarded treatments, some of which came to appear absurd or downright dangerous
after having once been hailed as unprecedented advances.”

As a physician
myself, I know a thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When
I was in residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs. It turned out that Prozac
intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.

For those on the left, the answer to the chaos of medicine is to
establish government panels. With Obamacare, for instance, White House officials
propose a commission to cut hundreds of billions from Medicare by improving the
quality of care.

How? By setting up an Independent Medicare Advisory
Commission that would guide clinical decisions for doctors and patients
alike.

The controversy over breast cancer screening, however, shows the
political and practical limitations of this one-size-fits-all approach: Medical
organizations have difficulty in setting and agreeing upon clinical guidelines,
and patients are apt to resent mandates from bureaucrats.

Leaving health
verdicts in the hands of centralized authorities is a sure way to keep making
mistakes in a field where re-examination and reversal are an unavoidable
reality.

David Gratzer, a physician, is a senior fellow at the
Manhattan Institute and author of “Why Obama’s Government Takeover of Health
Care Will Be a Disaster” (Encounter Books,
2009).

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