PROZAC: 15 Yr Old Girl Kills 9 Yr Old Neighbor “To See What It Felt Like”

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

This case helps you see clearly first hand what
the term “homicidal ideation” really means! This is a side effect of
antidepressants that goes hand in hand with “suicidal ideation”. It is a
fixation on murder – an obsessive compulsive type of adverse reaction to the
medication.
____________________________
Paragraph four reads:  “Bustamante dug two shallow
graves before killing Olten. Bustamante had a record of trying to commit suicide
and
was on the antidepressant known
as
prozac.

http://www.postchronicle.com/news/original/article_212268807.shtml

15-Year-Old Girl Indicted For Murder (Photo) Meet Alyssa
Bustamante
by Mitch
Marconi

A 15-year-old girl named Alyssa Bustamante
has been arrested and is going to court over killing a 9-year-old named
Elizabeth Olten ‘to see how it feltto kill someone.

Bustamante is to be
tried as an adult according to reports after lawmakers found out the viciousness
of her attack.

Bustamante stabbed, strangled, and cut the throat of the

9-year-old girl named Elizabeth Olten. When police asked why she killed the girl
she said she “wanted to know what it felt liketo kill someone.
Here is a
photo of young Elizabeth, who life was ended on a whim.

Bustamante dug
two shallow graves before killing Olten. Bustamante had a record of trying to

commit suicide and was on the antidepressant known as prozac.

There is
now a fight on whether or not to be her in an adult jail or possibly even a
mental institution.

Her lawyer is desperately fighting to keep her out of
jail. It‘s hard to believe that is the face of a killer. (c) tPC

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder: Mother Kills 11 Year Old Son: Attempts to Kill…

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Money and the economy is certainly a serious problem in our
society that needs to be addressed, but it should also be noted that patients
have reported for years that starting an antidepressant has killed any hope they
had for the future, no matter the problem.
_________________________________________
Fourth paragraph from the end reads:  “Taylor, who did
not have a job, confided her money woes to her sister and close friends, who
became worried about her mental state and insisted she visited
he
r GP who prescribed her antidepressants and
sleeping pills.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1217634/Mother-drowned-son11-cash-crisis-detained-indefinitely.html

Mother who drowned grammar schoolboy son, 11, in the bath over £290,000
debts is locked up indefinitely

By Arthur
Martin

Last updated at 7:21 PM on 02nd October 2009
  • Mother ‘was bitten by son on finger during struggle’
Tragic: James Taylor was drowned in the bath by his mother Jennifer in
December 2008. She has been detained indefinitely under the Mental Health
Act

A mother drugged and drowned her 11yearold son in despair after
running up debts of £290,000, a court heard yesterday.

Jennifer Taylor
was detained indefinitely under the Mental Health Act for killing James at their
home last December.

Taylor, 45, became severely depressed when her son‘s
absent father stopped sending her money to pay for James’s upbringing and
private school fees.

She had also accrued debts through credit cards and
mortgage arrears and was being harassed by creditors, the court heard.

After killing her son, she spent the next two days lying next to his
body before she stabbed herself and took an overdose.

Taylor then called
the emergency services and told the operator what she had done.

James
was found in the bath with his head submerged in the water at the family home in
New Ash Green, near Dartford in Kent.

They found Taylor in the
conservatory in bloodstained clothes. She

had stab wounds on her thighs,
breasts, wrists and arms and was white, cold and weak, the court heard.

Sentencing her at Maidstone Crown Court, Judge Andrew Patience QC
described the case as an ‘appalling human tragedy’ in which ‘the life of a
happy, bright, talented boy was wasted’.

The judge said: ‘She was
socially isolated, felt let down by others, weighed down by debt.

‘There
is no question but that she adored her son and had tried to do her best for him
but had got deeply into debt in her efforts to do so.

‘The financial
pressures upon her became intense and she developed an intense depressive
illness in the months leading up to the killing.’

He said the illness
‘led her to the belief that there was no solution to their problems other than

to take James’s life and kill herself’.

Taylor denied murdering her son
at a hearing in March, but later admitted to manslaughter on the grounds of
diminished responsibility. When arrested she said she had wanted the two of them
to die so they could ‘be in a better place’.

The court heard that both
her parents were dead and she had little support. James had never met his
father, Mohammed Al-Rafaey, described as a successful Syrian national who lived
in Abu Dhabi. Taylor had a brief relationship with him in the 1990s.

James was a pupil at Steephill,  a private primary school in
Fawkham, Kent, before he joined a nearby grammar school

He initially
sent her £1,000 a month in child maintenance and paid for James’s private school
fees but at the time of the boy’s death Taylor had only £360 available in her
current account.

She had to twice re-mortgage the house Al-Rafaey had
bought for her, had six credit cards and said creditors were constantly ringing
her. In May 2008 she begged Mr Al-Rafaey for more money and he agreed to

transfer 25,000 U.S. dollars into her account on condition she never asked for
any more.

But soon afterwards she asked for a lump sum to cover James’s
school fees for the next seven years, which he refused.

Taylor, who did
not have a job, confided her money woes to her sister and close friends, who
became worried about her mental state and insisted she visited her GP who
prescribed her antidepressants and sleeping pills.

When computer experts
looked at her internet activity in the months before James’s death they found
searches referring to ‘suicide through debt’, ‘taking a child through suicide’
and ‘drowning as my heart keeps pounding’. James was a pupil at Wilmington
Grammar School near Dartford, after being withdrawn from Steephill, a
£2,245-a-term private primary in the Kent village of Fawkham.

Chris
Tapp, director of debt charity Credit Action, said he believed society needed to

change its attitude towards money to prevent such cases happening again.

He said: ‘This is an absolutely tragic case, but what it does indicate
is the impact that financial debt and worries can have on
individuals.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Death: Taxi Driver Hangs Self: Another Open Verdict: …

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

There should be warnings that anyone who has had a problem
with alcohol or illegal drugs should NEVER take antidepressants! The drugs
should be contraindicated for this group of people. They suffer the worst side
effects. And the question should always be in the cases, “Which came first the
alcohol problems or the antidepressant that causes alcoholcravings?”

____________________________________
Paragraph one reads:  “A KIDDERMINSTER man found hanging
in his home suffered from anxiety and depression, an inquest into his death

heard.”

Paragraph four reads:  “The 46-year-old unemployed taxi
driver was seeing psychiatrists for his mental health problems and
was taking anti depressants.”

http://www.kidderminstershuttle.co.uk/news/4661282.Open_verdict_for_Kidderminster_man_found_hanging/

Open verdict for Kidderminster man found hanging

10:14am Friday 2nd October 2009

A KIDDERMINSTER man
found hanging in his home suffered from anxiety and depression, an inquest into
his death heard.

Dean Haigh, of Dunclent Crescent, who the inquest heard
had problems with alcohol, was found by his son Jason, at about 11am, on August
2.

The inquest at Stourport also heard that days before his death, Mr
Haigh seemed “very” upset and had a number of things on his mind but did not
mention that he wanted to take his own life.

The 46-year-old unemployed
taxi driver was seeing psychiatrists for his mental health problems and was
taking anti depressants.

Deputy Coroner, Margaret Barnard, said: “The
report provided by the consultant psychiatrist assessed that each time Mr Haigh
had contact with his mental health doctors, the risk assessment did not reveal
any active thoughts of suicide.”

She added that she was not satisfied
beyond reasonable doubt that Mr Haigh wanted to take his own life and recorded
an open verdict.

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LEXAPRO: Artie Lange Arrested for DUI: New York

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: Artie is right – Lexapro
would be the cause of his DUI whether he was sober or not. Considering the
strong negative effect SSRI antidepressants have upon the pancreas as they cause
drops in blood sugar and lead patients into mania (Dipsomania is described as an
“overwhelming craving for alcohol”.) it should be no surprise to anyone that an
SSRI would be the cause of many DUIs. If he is still sober, he deserves a medal
for being able to stay that way while on an SSRI antidepressant!!

__________________________________________________
Paragraphs 2 & 3 read:  “ Artie Lange was noticeably quieter than usual on
Monday morning’s broadcast, only peppering the on-air conversations with an
occasional joke or cutting remark.  About two hours into the broadcast,

Artie Lange finally broke his silence about Friday’s DUI.  After stating
that: “for once I’m actually doing something sensible and listening to my lawyer
and not talking about it,”
Artie Lange went on to tease the audience
with a few details of the incident that catapulted him to the top of Google
Trends on Friday
, despite The Howard Stern Show having been off air for

a full two weeks.”

Artie Lange insists that he blew a 0.0 on
the Breathalyzer test t
hat he was given at the scene of the
accident.  Artie Lange also reported that he was also given a urine test at
the police statio
n.  Artie Lange states that
there were no illicit drugs in his system, and that all the analysts will find
that could possibly explain his erratic driving is the
antidepressant
Lexapro.”

http://www.examiner.com/x-11279-Howard-Stern-Examiner~y2009m7d13-Is-Lexapro-to-blame-forArtie-Langes-DUI

Is Lexapro to blame for Artie Lange‘s DUI?

July 13, 9:05 AM

At long last, The
Howard Stern Show
returned to the air live this Monday morning.  With
the abundance of celebrity news to catch up on and current box office topper
“Bruno” in the studio, Howard Stern Show fans really only wanted to hear about
one thing: Artie

Lange’s DUI.  After proclaiming that he had been clean and sober for
months, Artie Lange was arrested on suspicion of DUI on Friday after a fender
bender in Tom’s River, New Jersey.

Artie

Lange was noticeably quieter than usual on Monday morning’s broadcast, only
peppering the on-air conversations with an occasional joke or cutting
remark.  About two hours into the broadcast, Artie Lange finally broke his
silence about Friday’s DUI.  After stating that: “for once I’m actually
doing something sensible and listening to my lawyer and not talking about
it,”  Artie

Lange went on to tease the audience with a few details of the incident that
catapulted him to the top of Google Trends on Friday, despite The Howard Stern
Show having been off air for a full two weeks.

Artie
Lange
insists that he blew a 0.0 on the Breathalyzer test that he was given
at the scene of the accident.  Artie Lange also reported that he was also
given a urine test at the police station.  Artie Lange states that there
were no illicit drugs in his system, and that all the analysts will find that
could possibly explain his erratic driving is the antidepressant

Lexapro.

Artie Lange spoke openly about his struggles with depression in
his recent bestselling book “
Too Fat to Fish
.”  In the past, the comedian has rejected the idea of
taking antidepressants to treat his mood, despite his willingness to dabble in
the spectrum of illegal substances.

But could Lexapro really be to blame
for Artie Lange’s DUI?  Fans, friends and family members of Artie Lange are
all thinking the same thing: the whole story sounds too fat to fishy.  In

Artie Lange’s defense, the official website for Lexapro lists among the
drug’s safety precautions:
“Patients should be cautioned about operating hazardous machinery, including
automobiles, until they are reasonably certain that Lexapro does not affect
their ability to engage in such activities.”  Although Artie Lange did not
state how long he has been taking Lexapro, he did report that he started it
“recently.”

Artie Lange has stated that he has “a lot to say” about
Friday’s DUI arrest, and that he is looking forward to talking openly on the
subject once his lawyer approves it.  Artie Lange is scheduled to appear in
court on Friday, July 17th.

Author: Liz
Brown

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: VIOLENCE: MAN STABS FRIEND: ENGLAND

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol
were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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ZOLOFT: FEMALE TEACHER OFFERS MEDS & ALCOHOL TO STUDENTS TO CLEAN HER HOUSE

Paragraph five reads:  ” ‘She befriended them before they
were even students of hers,’  Curran said.  ‘She
enticed them with Zoloft, marijuana and
alcohol, and they would come over and do favors in terms of cleaning up her

house‘.”

http://www.nwherald.com/articles/2009/09/16/02803329/index.xml

Grant High School teacher arrested

By SARAH
SUTSCHEK – ssutschek@nwherald.com

FOX LAKE – A teacher at Grant
Community High School in Fox Lake is free on bond Wednesday after police said
she provided students with alcohol, marijuana and an antidepressant in exchange
for household chores.

Kym A. Krocza, 41, of 36300 N. Wilson Road in
Ingleside, was charged with two counts of contributing to the criminal
delinquency of a juvenile, a Class 4 felony punishable by up to six years in
prison.

She taught algebra and calculus.

The Lake County Sheriff’s
Office began its investigation after a concerned parent reported that her child
had been to Krocza’s home and was given alcohol and marijuana. Another student
also had been given alcohol, marijuana and Zoloft, according to a news release.
Both students were 14-year-old female freshmen, Sheriff Mark Curran
said.

“She befriended them before they were even students of hers,”
Curran said. “She enticed them with Zoloft, marijuana and alcohol, and they
would come over and do favors in terms of cleaning up her house.”

The
incidents are believed to have taken place between January and August.
Additional charges are possible. Curran said Krocza had no previous criminal
record.

“Everybody was victimized by a person with an immoral worldview
that shouldn’t be educating our youth,” he said.

The Sheriff’s Office
encourages parents to talk with their children about the incident, and the
office continues to investigate whether there were other children
involved.

According to the school’s Web site, Krocza was arrested Tuesday
morning at her home. She has been suspended and is not allowed on school
grounds, nor is she authorized to contact students.

Superintendent John
Benedetti said that whether Krocza’s suspension will be with pay has not been
decided. He declined to comment further, other than to say she was hired in
2000.

Raedel Munster, whose son is a senior at the school, said she was
notified of the arrest Tuesday via e-mail. Her son did not know about the
accusations and did not have Krocza as a teacher, but two of her older children
did, Munster said.

“They never had anything bad to say about her,” she
said.

Munster said that she was pleased with how administrators were
handling the situation.

“I think the superintendent contacted the parents
by the best means possible to let them know that something was going on,” she
said. “I commend them for it; many school districts would try to cover these
things up.”

Had the situation arisen when her firstborn was in school,
she probably would have been upset, Munster said.

“But you realize that
there are all kinds of people in this world, and some of them become teachers,”
she said. “There are some circumstances a school district can’t
control.”

Krocza’s bond was set at $50,000. Her next court date is
Friday.

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DEPRESSION MED: WOMAN – JAIL WARNING AFTER THREATING NEIGHBORS W/KNIFE: UK

Paragraphs 14 through 16 read:  “Charles Maidstone, defending, said Ireson had been depressed since the death of her partner in February, this year.”

“This is a very sad case,” he said.

“She is on medication. She was also drinking. I understand she finds it helps her sleep.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.

http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/s/2056972_mum_warned_of_jail_after_knifing_threat

Mum warned of jail after knifing threat

By Anna Roberts
September 09, 2009

An eight-year-old girl pleaded for her mum to stop brandishing a knife at her neighbours after the womanthreatened to stab them.

Joanne Ireson wielded the kitchen knife outside her home in Cardigan Road, East Reading, at about 8pm on Tuesday, June 16.

The fracas took place after Ireson’s daughter snuck off to play outside on her own and she shouted at her to come back.

But Ireson’s concerned neighbours got “the wrong end of the stick” and called police – causing her to threaten them with the blade.

At Reading Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, August 25, Ireson – of previously good character – admitted one count of possessing the eight-inch knife in a public place and one of using violence and/or threatening behaviour towards neighbour Daniel Thiemert.

Lauren Murphy, prosecuting, explained the emergency services received three phone calls from concerned people saying a woman was waving a knife about.

She said: “A neighbour heard a person shouting and screaming. She stated Miss Ireson was screaming at her children.”

Miss Murphy said at this point Ireson said: “If you call the police I will stab you.”

She continued: “She [Ireson] pushed the neighbour and she fell over. She went in the house and came back with aknife. She said if she could not stab him she would stab herself.

“The girl [her daughter] said, ‘Will you put the knife down?’

“Another neighbour [Mr Thiemert] also said he heard shouting. He said he saw a glass object being thrown at the young girl.

“He [Mr Thiemert] said, ‘I am going to call the police’. She said, ‘Who the f*** are you?’”

At this point Ireson punched Mr Thiemert and threw a cigarette lighter at him.

Charles Maidstone, defending, said Ireson had been depressed since the death of her partner in February, this year.

“This is a very sad case,” he said.

“She is on medication. She was also drinking. I understand she finds it helps her sleep.

“This incident arose from a problem with disciplining the children.”

He suggested neighbours had got “the wrong end of the stick” and added Ireson was a caring mum.

Ireson, 36, was released on unconditional bail to reappear at Reading Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, September 15.

District Judge Peter Crabtree said: “I take into account what has been said about your difficult circum-stances and also that you are a person of good character and pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity.

“Nevertheless, taking a kitchen knife out into the street is a very serious offence.”

He said she ran the risk of a jail term.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Emotional Blunting: British Journal of Psychiatry

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): Studies like these make me crazy!!!! Why? Talk about OBVIOUS!!! Why do you need a study?! Here are their reasons for doing so and what they intended to learn. Continue reading and I will tell you where they are missing the mark with this one.

Paragraphs three & four read:

Background:
Some people who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants report that their experience of emotions is ‘blunted’. This phenomenon is poorly understood.

Aims:
To understand patients’ experiences of this phenomenon.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy CONTINUED:

1. Are emotions and consciousness blunted when you are under anesthesia?

2. The SSRI antidepressants are almost identical to the dissociative anesthetic, Serynl, first introduced in 1957 by Parke Davis Pharmaceutical. It was accompanied by studies showing it to have a “large margin of safety in humans.” Today we know the drug as PCP, Angel Dust, etc. Law enforcement, not physicians, got the drug pulled from the market due to the high number of extremely violent outbursts caused by the drug.

3. Patients coming off SSRI antidepressants commonly report that they feel as if they are coming out from under anesthesia.

4. Many patients taking the antidepressants report not being able to bond to their own babies due to this emotional blunting when given an antidepressant for Post Partum Depression after birth.

5. Patients have also reported stopping the use of the antidepressants because of the emotional blunting (for years these have been known among patients as the “I don’t give a damn” drugs). I recall one patient coming to me years ago and telling me she got off her antidepressant because she realized that she could drive off the road with her children in the car and care less. Nothing mattered.

So, my question is, if you are putting someone on antidepressants that will over time put you gradually into an anesthetised state, wouldn’t you expect “emotional blunting”?!

http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/abstract/195/3/211

The British Journal of Psychiatry (2009) 195: 211-217. doi: 10.1192/bjp.bp.108.051110
© 2009 The Royal College of Psychiatrists

Emotional side-effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors: qualitative study

Jonathan Price, DPhil, MRCPsych, Victoria Cole, MSc and Guy M. Goodwin, FMedSci DPhil

University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry, The Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK

Correspondence: Jonathan Price, University of Oxford Department of Psychiatry, The Warneford Hospital, Oxford OX3 7JX, UK. Email: jonathan.price@psych.ox.ac.uk

Declaration of interest

J.P. has received grants and honoraria from Servier and is a former shareholder in a UK company marketing a computerised CBT package for depression. G.G. has received grants from Sanofi-Aventis and Servier in the past and recent honoraria from AstraZeneca, BMS, Eisai, Lundbeck and Servier. He is a current advisor for AstraZeneca, BMS, Lilly, Lundbeck, P1Vital and Sanofi-Aventis, and a past advisor for Servier and Wyeth.

Funding

Servier, the funders, were able to comment on initial study design, but had no role in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data, and no role in the writing of the manuscript. Servier have a research programme for the development of psychotropic compounds, including antidepressants. Although they were able to comment on the final manuscript, no changes were introduced as a result of their comments, and they had no influence on the decision to submit the paper for publication. The researchers were, therefore, independent of the funders.

Background

Some people who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants report that their experience of emotions is ‘blunted’. This phenomenon is poorly understood.

Aims

To understand patients’ experiences of this phenomenon.

Method

Qualitative study, gathering data through individual interviews, a group interview and validation interviews; and searching patient websites for relevant posts.

Results

There was strong evidence that some people taking SSRIs experience significant emotional symptoms that they strongly attribute to their antidepressant. These emotional symptoms can be described within six key themes. A seventh theme represents the impact of these side-effects on everyday life, and an eighth represents participants’ reasons for attributing these symptoms to their antidepressant. Most participants felt able to distinguish between emotional side-effects of antidepressants and emotional symptoms of their depression or other illness.

Conclusions

Emotional side-effects of SSRIs are a robust phenomenon, prominent in some people’s thoughts about their medication, having a demonstrable impact on their functioning and playing a role in their decision-making about antidepressant adherence.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Businessman Shoots Self Weeks Before Wedding: England

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): PLEASE notice all of the strong warnings of serious reactions to antidepressants noted in this one short paragraph and keep in mind the FDA warning that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. Starting or stopping an antidepressant are two of the most dangerous periods of use of one of these drugs. Obviously once again this man or anyone close to this man had been given that warning.
Paragraph 13 reads:  “In the weeks leading up to his death, he wouldn’t eat properly or get out of bed, and was ignoring his Blackberry as every call seemed to bring more bad news from creditors. When my dad asked him at a family lunch if he had paid for the wedding cars, he hadn’t. He couldn’t afford to even put them on a credit card. I knew then that there was a real problem but he refused to discuss it with me. He told me that he’d been prescribed a course of antidepressants, and I suggested he see a counsellor, but he was dismissive.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-1207612/Abigail-King-describes-dealt-fianc-taking-life.html

My fiancé committed suicide weeks before our wedding after credit crunch caused collapse of his firm

By Abigail King

Last updated at 8:37 PM on 22nd August 2009

Abigail King was making final preparations for her wedding
when her fiancé Mark went missing. Although she was aware that his property business was failing in the credit crunch, she had no idea of the extent of his desperation

‘It was starting my own company that saved my life,’ says Abigail King

On a sunny morning in April 2008 I got up early. My fiancé Mark Sebire and I were getting married in five weeks’ time and I wanted to sort out the final arrangements for our wedding. I dressed up to go for a girls’ lunch and when I came downstairs, Mark hugged me and told me he loved me. As I left the house he was watching GMTV on the sofa, eating cereal.

That was the last time I saw him alive. The next day I had to identify his body at the mortuary.

To the outside world, Mark had everything to live for. He was a handsome 36-year-old property developer, popular with his friends. We were deeply in love, about to get married and shared a £1.7 million London house that Mark had bought for us to renovate.

But behind the scenes I knew that he was depressed. His business was collapsing. He had a huge portfolio of London properties once worth millions on paper but, with the credit crunch looming, he was unable to sell them. He was mortgaged to the hilt and facing financial ruin. I kept telling him that, as long as we were together, we would survive. But I didn’t realise how desperate he was not to lose what he’d built up. He put extraordinary pressure on himself to create an amazing life for us, and I believe it was that pressure that killed him.

Immediately after I left the house that April morning, Mark took a taxi to an isolated spot
and shot himself. In a letter he left for the coroner, he wrote: ‘I took my own life due to extreme financial pressure, and my poor fiancée would have been liable for my debts if we had got married. It is no one’s fault but my own.’

Mark Sebire with his beloved cocker spaniel Iggy

He could see his world falling apart and couldn’t cope with starting again. His pride wouldn’t let him admit that he was in trouble, and he didn’t know how to reach out for help.

Mark and I had met on a blind date in 2005, and from the beginning our relationship just seemed to make sense. My parents had separated when I was eight, then, when I was 14, my mother died of leukaemia at only 42; a year later my older sister Louise had a horrific car crash at 19, suffering brain injuries from which she has struggled to recover. I had always had a fear of abandonment – a fear that the people I loved were not going to stick around. Mark seemed so strong and, instinctively, I felt protected. After six months, I sold my flat and we moved into his house in Wandsworth together.

Mark had high expectations of our life together. He wanted us to be living in the country in a big house, and had the future all mapped out. He talked me into leaving my job as a letting agent as he saw it as his obligation to take care of me. He loved me running the home, and I focused on becoming the perfect housewife.

He proposed in March 2007 and we spent the months after our engagement staying on friends’ sofas while we renovated Mark’s house. It was still unfinished when we moved back in the middle of winter. We were living in one room and there was no heating or electricity. I thought, if we can get through this, we can get through anything. But at the start of the new year the fight seemed to go out of him. When Iggy, our beloved cocker spaniel, died in January, Mark was inconsolable. From that day it was as though the man I loved had disappeared. Instead of being focused, driven and full of ideas for the future, he seemed secretive and distant, and looked haunted.

In the weeks leading up to his death, he wouldn’t eat properly or get out of bed, and was ignoring his Blackberry as every call seemed to bring more bad news from creditors. When my dad asked him at a family lunch if he had paid for the wedding cars, he hadn’t. He couldn’t afford to even put them on a credit card. I knew then that there was a real problem but he refused to discuss it with me. He told me that he’d been prescribed a course of antidepressants, and I suggested he see a counsellor, but he was dismissive.

Mark put extraordinary pressure on himself to create an amazing life for us, and it was that pressure that killed him

For months we had been planning to start a family. Suddenly in February he said that we should stop trying. When I asked him why, he just kept repeating, ‘It’s not a good time’. He had stopped going into the office, and after his death I discovered his work diary. At the beginning of the year it was packed with appointments but as the weeks went on, it became almost empty. One unbearably sad entry on his to-do list just read: go for a walk. It seemed so lonely.

A week before he died, I had the final fitting for my wedding dress. Mark knew I had been exercising and dieting and was really nervous that I wouldn’t get into it, but he showed no interest. I found out later that while I was having the fitting, he was registering me as his next of kin.

Even though the day he died started normally enough, that morning I had a sense of unease. But I didn’t start panicking until I realised his mobile was switched off – that was so unlike him. Unable to get hold of him, I rang all his friends but no one had heard from him. Then he failed to turn up at an afternoon meeting. His best friend Giles came over and we rang everyone who knew him. Finally, in the evening, I rang the police, but they told me they couldn’t file a report until he had been missing for 12 hours.

Abigail and Mark on holiday together in Portugal and the Maldives in 2007

When two uniformed policemen knocked on the door at 1am, I just felt a sense of relief that they had come to register him as missing. Then I saw his business partner Justin standing behind them. He was ashen. They told me that the body of a man had been found at Bisley shooting range in Surrey with a driving licence registered to Mark.

It was completely disorientating. The room where we had been laughing together just hours earlier was now a dark place where people were clinging to each other.

As the news spread, friends and family started arriving at the house. My stepmother Rosemary drove down from Gloucestershire. I remember at about 4am someone telling me to go upstairs and rest, but lying on our bed was unbearable. Everything was as Mark had left it the previous morning and the sheets still smelt of him. The police also told me that he had registered me as his next of kin, which meant that I would have to identify him.

The following day, in a state of shock, I drove 50 miles to see Mark’s mother and then another 50 to his father (they are divorced), to tell them that their son was dead. Then I went to identify his body. When I got to the police station, I was taken to a small waiting room. Two officers came in and took some papers out of a brown envelope. They were the suicide notes Mark had left. When they were put in front of me, I knew he had really gone.

He could see his world falling apart and couldn’t cope with starting again

He turned out to have made careful plans. In the week before his suicide he arranged to meet friends he hadn’t seen for months, as if saying goodbye to them, and some of the letters were dated as much as three weeks earlier. In one addressed to me, he wrote simply: ‘My darling Aby. What can I tell you that you don’t know already? I’m sorry. M.’

It appears that he wrote all the other notes first and left mine until last. It was almost as though he had written it so many times in his head that he couldn’t write it on the page, and it ended up being just one sentence.

Mark was buried in a country churchyard in Surrey, close to both his parents’ homes. On the morning of the funeral I drove out to Bisley shooting range. I felt I had to see the exact spot where he died. The instructors at the range showed me where his body had been found. I sat on the grassy verge in the spring sunshine and laid some roses on the spot. Then I drove to the funeral parlour and put Iggy’s ashes at his feet and a rose on his chest. He was being buried with love from me. That gave me huge comfort.

At the funeral there was a sense of bewilderment that someone so young should have died in this way. His family were on one side of the church and mine were on the other – just like at a wedding.

Our wedding day had been planned for 17 May. I had a gospel choir booked for the church in Gloucestershire, and 300 guests invited to a reception at a country house hotel with four live bands. My wedding dress alone cost £10,000. It was ridiculously grandiose, and incredibly expensive to cancel. My dad and stepmother stepped in and made all the calls. I now see how ludicrous it all was. I remember suggesting to Mark that we should do a low-key wedding, but he wanted the big affair. He was so proud of me.

At a fitting for her Vera Wang wedding dress and the invitation

On what would have been our wedding day, my stepmother Rosemary took me to Cyprus. She is like a second mother to me, and married my dad in 1997. At the time when we would have been saying our vows, I sat on the beach and looked up at the sky, visualising every moment. It was as if I could see it actually happening in a parallel universe.

Suicide is like a bomb exploding, because the person who dies leaves injured people all around them, suffering incredible pain and grief. You naturally look for someone to blame. Mentally I accused everyone – creditors, Mark’s friends, even my own family – for not supporting us both more. Then I blamed myself. I was tortured about why I hadn’t seen that he was in such a state of emotional crisis. But why hadn’t he told me how desperate he felt? I still can’t forgive him for not having faith in us. I was sure we could have made it through together.

His mother blamed me for not looking after him. Four months after the funeral she wrote me a letter in which she said she held me responsible for his death. I don’t judge her; she was in terrible pain. She said she did not want me around the family. We have not been in contact since.

My best friend, whom I have known for 25 years, also withdrew from me. Her brother
had invested heavily in Mark’s business and was hit hard when it collapsed. Even my own family have found his suicide difficult to deal with: today, Mark’s name is barely mentioned.

People are guilt-ridden over what they could have done to stop it, and no one likes to dwell on such negative emotion too long, so they push it away as quickly as possible. Only a handful of close girlfriends helped me through – ringing me when I was too unhappy to get out of bed, forcing me to go out for supper with them, convincing me that I wasn’t a bad person, that this was just a bad thing that had happened to me.

In the end it was starting my own company that saved my life. I had to move out of our home seven weeks after Mark died because his family wanted it back to sell it, so I moved into a rented studio flat in Fulham. The joint bank account was empty, and he left me with hefty debts that I am still trying to resolve.

But I was well trained by Mark to be a wife – organising builders, events and running a home – so why not be a wife for hire? I sold my engagement ring. It was a constant reminder of what had happened – and it was also the only valuable thing I owned. I bought a second-hand Volkswagen Polo with some of the money, and put the rest into a business called My Domestic Goddess – providing a home service that organises people’s lives while they are at work. I collected children from school, picked up parking permits, walked dogs.

Hard work got me on my feet again, and helped me through the rest of the year. As I gradually regained my emotional strength, it occurred to me that Mark wouldn’t have recognised me as the woman he had wanted to protect and provide for – but doing this for myself was an essential part of the grieving process, of helping me deal with the gap he had left.

Everything was as Mark had left it that morning and the sheets still smelt of him

At the beginning of this year, I started to see a Cruse bereavement therapist, to whom I am able to tell the dark thoughts that you can’t reveal to people you love because they would worry so much about you. And one of my first instincts was to get another dog. My new cocker spaniel Lily has brought joy back into my life. I know Mark would have adored her. When it’s a sunny day and I’m walking Lily in the park, I think, yes, I do forgive him. But, ultimately, there is no forgiveness because there is no real closure.

Today I have a new boyfriend, Tim. He’s 43 and is an incredible support, but it’s early days. I’m only 32 so maybe one day I will get married, but I am a very different person now to how I have been in previous relationships. I’m stronger, and I’m also more humble. The old Abigail was self-centred and ungrateful. I see her as a spoilt brat and I don’t recognise her now.

Now, just over a year on, I sometimes see in my mind’s eye how my life might have been – Mark and I walking hand in hand in the countryside with dogs running alongside us. Then I drive back alone to my small flat. It’s pointless to wallow in dreams – I have to look towards the future. I don’t know what it holds, and I like it that way. I have no expectations. Expectations are what killed Mark.

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CYMBALTA: Five Patients Commit Suicide During Clinical Trials: U.S.A.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
So even though 19 year old bible college student, Tracy Johnson’s, suicide was the only one we heard about happening in the clinical trials with Cymbalta (taking place within Lilly’s own laboratory in a “healthy volunteer”), there were apparently FOUR MORE SUICIDES in the clinical trials?!!
Paragraphs five &  six read: “While people say many of Cymbalta’s side effects are manageable, some users experience effects that are extremely frightening and potentially dangerous. Some patients found the drug tends to trigger heart palpitations and increase anxiety levels and elevate the severity suicidal thoughts or impulses.”

“A 19-year-old college student who had shown no outward signs of depression killed herself at an Eli Lilly & Company laboratory in Indianapolis where she had been participating in a company drug trial for the experimental antidepressant. Four other patients who were given the drug during earlier trials also committed suicide.”

ADDITIONAL COMMENT BY Ann Blake-Tracy: HOW LONG ARE THEY GOING TO BEAT THIS RIDICULOUS HYPOTHESIS TO DEATH WHEN THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO EVIDENCE, NOR HAS THERE EVER BEEN, THAT THE SSRI ANTIDEPRESSANTS DO THIS AND MOST ESPECIALLY THERE IS NO EVIDENCE THAT THEY “RESTORE BALANCE TO THE EMOTIONS”??????!!!!!!

I QUOTE ONCE AGAIN THE NEVER ENDING SEROTONIN LIE: “The drug works by preventing serotonin and noradrenaline from being reabsorbed back into the nerve cells in the brain. This helps prolong the mood-lightening effect of any released serotonin and noradrenaline, restoring balance to the emotions of the patient.”

http://www.emaxhealth.com/1357/25/33042/cymbalta-side-effects.html

Submitted by Tyler Woods Ph.D. on Aug 22nd, 2009
Posted under:

Cymbalta, generic name Duloxetine Hydrochloride, has certain side effects consumers should be aware of.

Cymbalta manufactured by Eli Lilly is a serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressant used to treat major depression. It is prescribed to treat pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy, which is a painful nerve disorder associated with diabetes that affects the hands, legs, and feet. Cymbalta has only recently been approved for use to treat fibromyalgia if people can tolerate Cymbalta’s side effects.

The drug works by preventing serotonin and noradrenaline from being reabsorbed back into the nerve cells in the brain. This helps prolong the mood-lightening effect of any released serotonin and noradrenaline, restoring balance to the emotions of the patient. Cymbalta may also be used in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

Among the more common Cymbalta side effects that users complain about is being fatigued even after a good night’s sleep. Blurred vision, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, and issues with both constipation and diarrhea, agitation, irritability, increased, hostility, high blood pressure, decreased libido, hot flashes, fatigue, rash, and increased sweating have also been reported.

While people say many of Cymbalta’s side effects are manageable, some users experience effects that are extremely frightening and potentially dangerous. Some patients found the drug tends to trigger heart palpitations and increase anxiety levels and elevate the severity suicidal thoughts or impulses.

A 19-year-old college student who had shown no outward signs of depression killed herself at an Eli Lilly & Company laboratory in Indianapolis where she had been participating in a company drug trial for the experimental antidepressant. Four other patients who were given the drug during earlier trials also committed suicide.

Anyone taking Cymbalta should understand that they can be at risk while driving, handling machines, or performing other hazardous activities such as working on tall ladders as it can cause dizziness or drowsiness.

Many people report that there were no Cymbalta side effects except for a lowered sexual drive and feel the drug gave them back their life. Like other antidepressants, Cymbalta should not be stopped suddenly if you have been on it for some time. Your brain receptors will adjust to it, and suddenly stopping can cause crying jags, agitation, dizziness, nausea, or headache. You should always talk with your doctor or healthcare provider to work out a plan to slowly decrease your medication to avoid withdrawal symptoms.

People are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit

www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

References
New York Times
Drugs.com
Source:
Tyler Woods Ph.D.

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