ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Man Has Huge Cache of Weapons in his House: MA

Paragraph six reads:  “According to police reports,
Girard was engaging in target practice in a makeshift, illegal shooting range in
the attic of his 23 Bridge St. condo. He also had a six-month supply of food and
prescription drugs, including

anti-depressants.”

http://www.thebostonchannel.com/news/22530569/detail.html

Police: Armed Man Prepared For ‘Armageddon’

Officers Find Tear Gas, Grenades In Massachusetts Home

POSTED: 6:05 am EST February 11, 2010
UPDATED: 1:41 pm EST February
11, 2010

MANCHESTER-BY-THE-SEA, Mass. —

A Massachusetts man is in jail facing weapons charges after his wife turned him in

to police for having a huge cache of weapons, including rifles, tear gas
grenades and explosives, inside his North Shore condominium.

Gregory
Girard, 45, of Manchester-by-the-Sea was arrested Tuesday, police said, after he
allegedly told officers he was preparing for Armageddon.

He allegedly
told his wife, Kristine Girard, a licensed psychiatrist, that he was convinced
the end of the world was near.

“He’s convinced that martial law is
imminent, and that he made the following statements recently to (his wife):
‘Don’t talk to people. Shoot them instead. It’s fine to shoot people in the
head, because traitors deserve it,” state prosecutor Honor Segal told a judge at
Girard’s arraignment hearing.

Girard was arraigned in Salem District
Court on four counts of possession of an infernal device and four counts of

possession of a dangerous weapon and is now facing a dangerousness hearing on
Friday.

According to police reports, Girard was engaging in target
practice in a makeshift, illegal shooting range in the attic of his 23 Bridge
St. condo. He also had a six-month supply of food and prescription drugs,
including anti-depressants.
e
Police said they found about
20 high-powered rifles, shotguns and handguns, and armor-piercing bullets, in

the Girard’s second-floor condo. The weapons were purchased legally and were
registered, but officers said they also found grenades, which are illegal.

Girard’s weapons licenses were immediately revoked.

He was
described as cooperative when officers arrived to arrest him. Stunned neighbors
in the couple’s high-end condo complex said the Girards were a nice couple.

“I don’t think he was intending to harm anybody … no, I never heard
anything,” a neighbor said.

Girard has no criminal record. He pleaded
not guilty and was ordered held without bail at his arraignment.


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ANTIDEPRESSANTS-ANTIPSYCHOTICS: Man Threatens UT Gov, Judge, Prosecutor, etc

In an affidavit filed in Provo’s 4th District Court, Herrin wrote that
Taylor underwent psychological evaluations at the Utah State Hospital, where he
was previously confined for one year and nine months, and was arrested in 2004
for allegedly threatening Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. A doctor who oversaw Taylor’s
treatment after his release from the Utah State Hospital said Taylor is prone to
violence when he is not taking antipsychotic and antidepressant
medications.

Orem man charged with threatening officials

Jeremy Duda – DAILY HERALD | Posted: Monday, March 17,
2008 11:00 pm | No
Comments Posted

Defense attorneys have requested a competency hearing for an Orem man who is
charged with threatening a number of high-profile public officials, including a
judge, a police chief and Lt. Gov. Gary Herbert.

Bradley Roberts Taylor, 42, was charged in late February with one count of
terroristic threats, a second-degree felony, after a Utah Highway Patrol trooper
who is responsible for protecting dignitaries at the Utah State Capitol said she
learned of threatening e-mails to Herbert and Rep. Brad Daw, R-Orem. Trooper
Carolina Herrin wrote that Taylor also made threatening comments about Judge

John Backlund of Orem’s 4th District Court, Orem police Chief Michael Larsen and
Orem city prosecutor Robert Church.

Taylor will be evaluated by two doctors before his next hearing, which is
scheduled for April 23, according to prosecutor Chad Grunander. In an affidavit
filed in Provo’s 4th District Court, Herrin wrote that Taylor underwent
psychological evaluations at the Utah State Hospital, where he was previously
confined for one year and nine months, and was arrested in 2004 for allegedly
threatening Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. A doctor who oversaw Taylor’s treatment after
his release from the Utah State Hospital said Taylor is prone to violence when
he is not taking antipsychotic and antidepressant medications.

According to the affidavit, Taylor said in an e-mail to Herbert that he has
been a victim of government tyranny and oppression for the past 20 years. Taylor
wrote to Herbert that he wanted the government to return his driver’s license
and dismiss DUI charges that were filed against him. In an e-mail to Daw, he
wrote that he wanted his Second Amendment rights to be restored, Herrin said.
Taylor sent more than 63 threatening e-mails to Daw, including one in November
in which he wrote that he has “no problem using justifiable lethal force in self
defense,” and, “If I have to defend myself, it will be a bloody revolution,”
according to Herrin’s affidavit.

Taylor also referenced a February shooting spree in which Charles Lee
Thornton killed five people at a city council meeting in Kirkwood, Mo. Thornton
had a long history of disagreements and hostility with city officials.

“Now, I demand justice, liability and victim reparation for the 20 years of
hell,” Taylor wrote, according to Herrin’s affidavit. “I want to avoid
bloodshed, but I see no other way. The spirit of the Lord has revealed to me
that revolution is inevitable.”

Taylor is being held at the Utah County Jail on $100,000 cash-only bail.
Grunander said the case is stayed while court officials await the results of his
psychological evaluation.

“I can’t speak to what his specific intentions were with respect to the
allegations, but certainly, having received a case like this from law
enforcement, this is a case we treat very seriously,” Grunander said. “We’re
very serious about addressing this matter and finding out what Mr. Taylor was up
to, and I think the $100,000 cash-only bail is evidence of the seriousness of
this case.”

Herrin wrote that she spoke with Taylor’s roommate and another close friend
of his, both of whom said that Taylor is extremely violent, speaks often of
killing and harming government officials, and is “just waiting for the right
opportunity to present itself.” Taylor’s roommate and friend said that he has
owned several weapons and is an avid shooter.

Posted in Local on Monday, March 17,
2008 11:00 pm

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Court overturns conviction in 2005 child neglect case

When Schieck discussed the plea agreement, the court said he was aware that
Snyder “had a significant history of mental health problems, including a
previous institutionalization, antidepressant prescriptions and recent suicide
attempts.”

  • Saturday, January 30, 2010
  • 54° | Mostly Cloudy

    Court overturns conviction in 2005 child

    neglect case

    By Cy Ryan

    Fri, Jan 15, 2010 (3:40 p.m.)

    CARSON CITY – In a 2-1 decision, the Nevada Supreme Court has voided the
    second-degree murder conviction of Charlene Snyder in a highly publicized child

    neglect case in Las Vegas.

    The court said trial lawyer David Schieck failed to request a psychiatric
    evaluation prior to advising her to plead guilty.

    Snyder’s 2-year-old daughter, Adacelli, had cerebral palsy and weighed only
    11 pounds at the time of her death in the summer of 2005. She was found dead
    inside the family’s mobile home in a room filled with animal and human feces and
    rotting food.

    When Schieck discussed the plea agreement, the court said he was aware that
    Snyder “had a significant history of mental health problems, including a
    previous institutionalization, antidepressant prescriptions and recent suicide
    attempts.”

    The court said the lawyer was aware “of the highly unusual behavior she
    exhibited in allowing her home to, in effect, become a cesspool.

    In light of trial counsel’s knowledge, he was unreasonable in failing to
    request a psychiatric evaluation prior to counseling appellant (Snyder) to plead
    guilty.”

    Schieck had testified he did not order the evaluation because he believed
    Snyder was competent. The court said, “the standard for competency is not the
    same as that for insanity, nor is it relevant to appellant’s state of mind when
    her daughter died.”

    The court said a psychiatric evaluation may have supported the only line of
    defense for Snyder of “insanity or that she lacked the requisite state of
    mind.”

    The majority decision was signed Justices Michael Cherry and Michael Douglas.
    Dissenting was Justice Mark Gibbons, who said Snyder had not met her burden to
    show her lawyer was incompetent.

    Snyder, now 32, will return to district court in Las Vegas for new
    proceedings.

    Both Snyder and her boyfriend Jack Richardson, now 29, were sentenced to
    terms of 10 years to life on the second-degree murder conviction.

    Discussion: 2 comments so far…

    1. By LasVegasLawyerGal
      1/15/10 at 4:57 p.m.

      Of course, the part not mentioned by the article is that in practice,
      requesting a psych eval for one’s client means a transfer of the matter to
      Judge Glass–who rarely, if ever, finds anyone incompetent. This is not to
      dispute that attorneys should request psych evals when it appears to them that
      mental competency is in issue–but it is a bit rich for our Supreme Court to
      posit that a psych eval would have magically changed the outcome.

    2. By Launce
      1/16/10 at 4:19 p.m.

      LVLG is correct, but nonetheless, the Court shows some intestinal fortitude
      in sending this back to District Court. The mob’s hunger for blood
      notwithstanding, this is a clear example of someone who could not, should not
      be responsible for the care of a disabled infant. The mob wants to punish
      Snyder for the community’s failure to look out for the most
      vulnerable.

  • 496 total views, no views today

    ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Two Brothers Commit Suicide One Week Apart: Arkansas

    Paragraphs eight and nine read:  ”  ‘One guy last
    year locked himself inside a bathroom and shot himself, and this was a
    retired military man that was highly decorated
    , Bearden said. “Then
    come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the week before in
    another state.”

    “The correlation between the two brothers was

    anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm
    that the prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden
    said it happens too often that prescription drugs change
    the mindset of a person.”

    Paragraph four reads:  “Bearden
    added,  ‘People need to know that we do, in fact, have a problem in Saline
    County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here anymore. Every once in
    awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
    drugs’.”

    http://www.bentoncourier.com/content/view/204346/1/

    Coroner: Teen Drug Death Rate High

    Saturday, 06
    February 2010

    The hand reaches down as another parent
    enters the room fearing the worst. The large black bag slowly unzips and the
    worst fear a parent never wants to believe, that moment is here. Inside the
    darkness of the body bag lies someone’s son, daughter, nephew, their niece ­
    someone’s good friend, and another family is torn apart with grief, confusion,
    and a wish it was them instead.

    It is a day that
    Will Bearden has seen too often in his 13 years as the Saline County Corner, and
    18 years previously riding on an ambulance as an EMT. Nearly everyday Bearden
    has to tell yet another family what caused the death of a loved one, and
    surprising to many, he said nearly 90 percent are due to drugs and
    alcohol.


    In fact, in 2009 alone, Bearden said that about 60 deaths were related
    to drugs and alcohol, and nearly 30 of those deaths involved teenagers living in
    Saline County, and state officials say the county leads the state in the number
    of fatal drug overdoses.

    “When you say it won’t happen to me or my family,
    you are about to eat your words, because I have seen it happen time and time
    again,” Bearden said. “I work in it every day, and I see a lot of sad families
    asking what they could have done to help their son or daughter.”
    Bearden added, “People need to know that we do, in fact,
    have a problem in Saline County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here
    anymore. Every once in awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street
    drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
    drugs.”
    Bearden said even Arkansas Chief Medical Examiner
    Charles Kokes believes “Saline County has one of the highest percentages of
    deaths caused by drug overdoses.”
    But it isn’t just teens that are dying from prescription
    drugs or alcohol; everyone is at risk, he said. From fatality accidents to
    accidental overdoses to suicides, people “age 85 and down” have deaths related
    to the rise in prescription drug abuse.
    One guy last year locked himself inside a bathroom and
    shot himself, and this was a retired military man that was highly decorated,”
    Bearden said. “Then come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the
    week before in another state.”
    The correlation between the two brothers was
    anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm that the
    prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden said it
    happens too often that prescription drugs change the mindset of a
    person.
    “Drugs definitely affect a person’s mental state,” he
    said. “I also believe that it’s a mental disease when someone gets hooked on
    drugs. Many people addicted believe they have pain (whether physical, mental or
    emotional) and they take medications for their pain. Some aren’t trying to do
    harm; they just take too much and then some just go and take their lives, and
    probably wouldn’t have if they wouldn’t have had so much medication affecting
    their mental state.”
    Bearden said of the nearly 60 deaths in Saline County
    last year, around 22 were ruled suicides. After the bodies are sent to the
    Arkansas State Crime Lab for toxicology screens, most come back with some type
    of drugs in their system, the majority being prescription drugs.
    “I’ve had to help out with a lot of those autopsies
    because the medical examiner is overloaded with cases all the time, and I’ve
    seen where pills aren’t even digested in the stomach yet and sometimes are still
    in a person’s mouth,” Beard said. “What makes this job tough is when you have to
    approach the loved ones of those that died. I’ve seen a lot of divorces and
    hatred with families after a son or daughter’s death because the parents keep
    blaming each other … it’s just a real sad thing to see, and I see it too
    often.”
    Bearden also recalls many trips to the Saline Memorial
    Hospital in which a person survived an overdose. But it isn’t in any way
    pleasant for anyone, he said.
    “Three or four times a night I bet someone overdoses on
    drugs, but survives from having their stomachs pumped and they fight with the
    doctors and nurses,” Bearden said. “It’s got to be a unbelievable pain to have a
    stomach pumped, but they shouldn’t have put themselves in that situation if they
    didn’t want that to happen and the medical staff has to do whatever they can to
    save their life.”
    Then there is the criminal side of people hooked on
    drugs. Once, Bearden said he left the home of an older person that had just
    died  and later returned to the home to retrieve medications to help with
    the death investigation.
    “It wasn’t even 30 minutes later that I returned to the
    home,” he said. “I found the back door kicked in and inside were two teenagers
    going through the medicine cabinets. They were ambulance-listening and chasing
    in hopes of finding prescription drugs.”
    Bearden said police and others are now even warning
    families to not list the addresses of the deceased. He said the prescription
    drug abusers do everything from listen to police/fire/ambulance scanners, to
    chasing ambulances to even reading obituaries in newspapers.
    “It has unfortunately come to that point,” Bearden said.
    “Don’t tell people where the family is because they’ll break in and look for
    whatever (prescription) drugs they can find.”
    However, Bearden believes this can be overcome. He said
    people first need to listen and believe there is a problem and then work
    together to find solutions.
    “We’ve got to get the message to the younger kids and we
    can do that by getting the parents and grandparents involved in teaching them
    and making them realize that it can happen to them,” Bearden said. “I think we
    need more programs in school to recognize and talk about this problem. And the
    younger the children we can reach, the better we can be in helping it all end.
    But really the best way is by word of mouth.”

    One program Bearden said he is
    “100 percent behind” is the Operation Medicine Cabinet. (See related
    article.)

    Most importantly, Bearden said people have to truly
    believe there is a problem with prescription drug abuse in Saline County.

    Unzipping another body bag and
    having to tell parents that their child is gone is a part of the job Bearden
    wishes he never has to do again, but it happens ­ much too often.

    “ … It will send chills up
    your spine,” he said. “ … Letting parents in to identify the body … that’s
    real stuff, and I want to change that. If we can all work together, we can end
    it.”

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    ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Tell All Book: “Side Effects: Death”: by Former Lilly Exec

    Paragraphs two & three read:  “Many of the
    horrific school, workplace and mass shootings that have plagued parts of the
    world over the years
    may not have occurred if the pharmaceutical
    industry had been completely honest about the side effects of psychotropic
    medication, according to the new book Side Effects: Death – Confessions of a
    Pharma Insider
    by former executive director of the Swedish Branch of Eli

    Lilly & Company John Virapen.”

    “Virapen claims that
    anti-depressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors
    (SSRIs
    ) were known to have suicidal and homicidal side effects, even during
    clinical trials.
    Thanks to spin marketing and paid, positive articles in
    scientific journals, he points out, the adverse reactions were often ignored or
    given little thought by prescribing physicians and patients.”

    http://www.prlog.org/10514103-what-big-pharma-knows-sideeffectsdeath.html

    What Big Pharma Knows – “Side Effects: Death

    Former pharmaceutical executive director reveals industry
    secrets

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    PR Log (Press
    Release)
    Feb 01, 2010 – P.O. Box 9949, College Station, TX.
    77842 • Phone/Fax: 877-376-4955
    http://www.virtualbookworm.cominfo@virtualbookworm.com

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Contact: Virtualbookworm.com Publishing Inc.

    877-376-4955
    reviews@virtualbookworm.com

    What Big Pharma
    Knows – “Side Effects: Death

    Many of the horrific school, workplace and
    mass shootings that have plagued parts of the world over the years may not have
    occurred if the pharmaceutical industry had been completely honest about the
    side effects of psychotropic medication, according to the new book Side Effects:

    Death – Confessions of a Pharma Insider by former executive director of the
    Swedish Branch of Eli Lilly & Company John Virapen.

    Virapen claims
    that anti-depressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were
    known to have suicidal and homicidal side effects, even during clinical trials.
    Thanks to spin marketing and paid, positive articles in scientific journals, he
    points out, the adverse reactions were often ignored or given little thought by

    prescribing physicians and patients.

    Virapen also asserts the
    pharmaceutical industry has engaged in bribery and other major forms of
    corruption to gain approval for and in the marketing of many drugs used to treat
    such conditions as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD),
    schizophrenia, arthritis, pain, diabetes and many others. The industry also
    “makes up” illnesses to enhance sales and market shares, he says.

    To
    boost sales, Virapen writes, large pharmaceutical corporations spend about
    $35,000–$40,000 per year and per practicing doctor to persuade them to prescribe
    their products. In addition to covering or “massaging” the negative effects of
    drugs, many of the companies engage in “off-label marketing,” which encourages
    physicians to prescribe the medicines for conditions for which they haven’t been
    approved, Virapen reveals.

    Born in British Guyana, John Virapen went
    from a door-to-door conman to a pop star, to a pharmaceutical representative to
    executive director of one of the largest drug companies in the world. He admits
    to participating in bribery, false information and deception to help launch and
    market some of the most popularly prescribed (and most dangerous) drugs. In an
    effort to exorcise his demons and expose the tactics and dangers of the
    pharmaceutical industry, he wrote this expose.

    The book has been
    published in four languages around the world and is a best-seller in Europe.

    Side Effects: Death – Confessions of a Pharma Insider is available in
    softcover (ISBN 978-1-60264-516-5) and e-book (ISBN 978-1-60264-517-2) hardcover
    from Virtualbookworm.com, Amazon.com, and Barnesandnoble.com. This book can also
    be ordered from most bookstores around the United States and United Kingdom.
    More information can be found at the book’s official website, www.sideeffectsdeath.com.



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    PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

    NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

    This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
    describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
    on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
    condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
    RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
    it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
    nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
    so.
    __________________________________
    Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
    asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
    considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
    were the answer.
    ‘They made it seem like my world was falling
    apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
    take drugs, and
    I didn’t want to, but they made me think
    I really needed it. So I took them’.”

    “She said that after a

    few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
    dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
    things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
    have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
    into a wall.’
    She said that according to her doctor, these were
    all symptoms of her depression, but
    she thinks it was
    the drugs.”

    http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

    Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
    in cases of mild or moderate depression.

    Depressing truth about antidepressants

    by Tina
    Amirkiai

    Jan 27, 2010

    If you are one of the millions of people taking
    antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
    placebo.

    A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
    Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
    found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
    moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

    The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
    Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
    trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
    produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
    severe acute depressions.”

    Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
    believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
    symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
    angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
    to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

    “The biological or physical
    symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
    “They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
    social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

    Researchers used a
    severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

    clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
    antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

    Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
    depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
    compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
    in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

    Researchers concluded
    that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
    over placebo is substantial.”

    Dobransky and other critics maintain that
    the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
    hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
    antidepressants.

    In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
    restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
    then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
    products to the general public.

    Dobransky said a big part of the problem
    is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
    According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
    stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
    fixes like that do not exist.

    “Each case needs to be set in its proper
    place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
    is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

    One antidepressant user, who
    asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
    considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
    answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
    said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
    they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

    She said that
    after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
    thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
    happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
    me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
    according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
    thinks it was the drugs.

    “I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
    her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
    ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
    case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

    A spokesman for
    GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
    “the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
    studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
    disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
    results.”

    If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
    Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
    to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
    may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
    Dashed line

    ©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
    University.  A publication of the Medill
    School
    .

    483 total views, no views today

    ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Father Kills Wife, 2 Small Children & Self: UT

    Paragraphs 22 and 23 read:  “Natasha Matern said her
    father was distraught over the separation. Last week, he checked
    himself into LDS Hospital for depression and remained there a few
    days,
    Natasha Matern said. When he left, the hospital prescribed
    an anti-depressant,
    she said.”

    “Both Natasha Matern and
    Merkley said they had never known Justin Matern to be violent.
    Natasha Matern said her father had a concealed carry permit because the family
    used to live in what they thought was a dangerous neighborhood in Salt Lake
    City.”

    http://www.sltrib.com/News/ci_14034390

    Money problems put stress on couples, and Justin and Melissa Matern were
    one of those couples.

    Melissa Matern was constantly trying to find rent
    and grocery money, one of her former co-workers said Saturday. Justin Matern’s
    daughter said he pawned pool cues and his wife asked him to sell more.

    Even Justin Matern’s final text message to his surviving family
    discussed money.

    “My dad’s never been a horrible guy,” said Natasha
    Matern. “He just snapped.”

    Justin Matern on Thursday shot and killed his
    wife, Melissa, then murdered their sons, 6-year-old Gabriel and 4-year-old
    Raiden. Matern, 36, then killed himself.

    The killings occurred at the
    West Jordan apartment Melissa Matern and the boys moved to after leaving her
    husband. Justin Matern left a note at work discussing his plans and sent text
    messages after the killings.

    Natasha Matern, a 16-year-old daughter from
    one of Justin Matern’s previous relationships, said her father sent his sister a
    text message saying he killed them and he was next. The text also said his
    sister could expect a check to pay for the funerals, Natasha Matern said. It was
    unclear whether Justin Matern was discussing an insurance policy or something
    else.

    “Nobody knew what he was going to do,” said Natasha Matern.
    “Everybody was shocked. A lot of people even talked to him that day or the day
    before and he was laughing.”

    Melissa Matern told Jennifer Geneile
    Merkley, one of her former co-workers, there were problems in the marriage.
    Merkley said Melissa complained her husband was not home often enough to help
    with parenting and chores.

    Instead, Justin Matern would hang out with
    his friends and stay away from home, Merkley said. Meanwhile, Melissa, a
    certified nurse’s assistant, worked two jobs and a total of 60 to 70 hours a
    week, Merkley said.

    Merkley, who worked with Melissa at Woodland Park
    Care Center in Salt Lake City, said Melissa would leave the third shift there to
    go to work at another nursing home.

    “She was constantly trying to put
    together rent money or grocery money,” Merkley said.

    Justin Matern
    “wasn’t the greatest of men,” Merkley said. “He didn’t put his family ahead of
    anything else.”

    Court records show the state placed a tax lien against
    Justin and Melissa Matern in 2004 and again in 2008. In 2006, a judge issued a
    $700 judgement against the couple in a debt-collection case. Records show the
    family had at least four addresses since 2003.

    Natasha Matern said her

    father also worked two jobs. He was a tattoo artist at a parlor in Salt Lake
    City and also loaded freight for a shipping company. The shipping company
    recently laid him off, she said.

    Justin Marten was a good pool player
    and collected cues, his daughter said. He pawned some of the cues to raise
    money, and Natasha Matern wanted her husband to pawn his hunting bow, too, she
    said.

    “Even though she knew my dad didn’t have that much money, she
    still tried to get him to pawn his own things,” she said.

    Natasha Matern
    lived with her father and stepmother for many years and watched her brothers for
    several hours a day, the teenager said. Natasha Matern said she grew tired of
    baby-sitting so much.

    “I tried to talk to them about it,” she said, “but
    they would tell me if I wanted stuff I would have to baby-sit so they could earn
    money.”

    A few months ago, the teenager moved in with her mother in
    Ogden.

    Merkley said Melissa Matern threatened to leave her husband
    several times, but stayed. Merkley does not know what finally persuaded Melissa
    Matern to leave.

    Natasha Matern said her father was distraught over the
    separation. Last week, he checked himself into LDS Hospital for depression and
    remained there a few days, Natasha Matern said. When he left, the hospital
    prescribed an anti-depressant, she said.

    Both Natasha Matern and Merkley
    said they had never known Justin Matern to be violent. Natasha Matern said her

    father had a concealed carry permit because the family used to live in what they
    thought was a dangerous neighborhood in Salt Lake City.

    Merkley said
    she’s angry at Justin Matern and her one comfort is her belief that anyone who
    commits suicide “burns in Hell.”

    “How could you look at your own flesh
    and blood and pull the trigger on a 4-year-old?” Merkley said.

    Natasha
    Matern said she thinks her father decided to kill his wife and himself and
    killed the boys because he did not want them to grow up in a foster home. She
    does not believe the murders were justified, but understands what he was
    thinking.

    “I’m mad but there’s also nothing I can do,” she said.

    ncarlisle@sltrib.com

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    ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Father Takes 2 Daughters on Terror Ride: Massachusetts

    Paragraph five reads:  “It was not immediately clear what
    precipitated Thursday’s terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off
    carpenter was taking antidepressants, has been having
    medical and family issues, and had banged his head against the truck prior to
    the incident.”

    http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100109/NEWS/1090332/-1/news

    Freetown man held on bail for allegedly crashing truck with young
    daughters inside

    By Brian
    Fraga
    bfraga@s-t.com
    January 09, 2010 12:00 AM

    FALL RIVER ­ A
    Freetown man ordered his two young daughters into his pickup truck and took them
    on a terrifying ride around his property Thursday afternoon, crashing into
    rocks, trees, a camper and a building, while the girls screamed and asked their

    father if he was trying to kill them, according to authorities.

    The 10-
    and 12-year-old girls were cut by flying glass, and one girl’s head slammed
    against a window, shattering the glass, authorities said. The ordeal ended when
    the truck slammed into the camper and stalled, allowing the girls to escape and
    run into their house, where they called 911, according to court
    records.

    The children were taken to St. Anne’s Hospital in Fall River and
    treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

    The girls’ father, Mark W.
    Haskins, 39, of 24 Locust St., faces numerous criminal charges that include
    assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, reckless operation of a motor
    vehicle, malicious destruction of property and failing to have the girls wear
    seat belts.

    It was not immediately clear what precipitated Thursday’s
    terror ride, but Haskins’ lawyer said the laid-off carpenter was taking
    antidepressants, has been having medical and family issues, and had banged his
    head against the truck prior to the incident.

    “He has little recollection
    of what happened here,” said defense lawyer Donald Friar, who described the
    episode as “an aberration.”

    Haskins was arraigned on the charges Friday
    in Fall River District Court and held on $10,000 cash bail. Friar had asked for
    $500 bail, but Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Gonzalez cited concerns for
    the children’s safety and noted that Haskins had originally fled from
    police.

    Haskins, who is the son of retired Freetown Fire Chief Wayne
    Haskins, turned himself in to local police just before 11 a.m. Friday. On

    Thursday, Freetown and Berkley police used dogs to scour the Freetown woods for
    more than four hours, while a state police helicopter searched from the
    air.

    Haskins allegedly ran into the woods after he went inside his house
    and apologized to his daughters, telling them he loved them and that it would be
    the last time they saw him, court records said.

    Police said the girls’
    mother was reluctant to cooperate with officers.

    When Freetown police
    arrived just after 4:30 p.m., Thursday, they were met by Martha Haskins, who
    allegedly cursed at the officers when they told her they were investigating the
    incident.

    Police said she told the officers, “We can smash our own things
    if we want,” and, “It’s not a big deal. Nobody got killed.”

    Martha
    Haskins also reportedly resisted efforts to transport the girls to the
    hospital.

    Police said she also scolded her daughters for calling 911,
    telling them: “I’m going to stay with your father because we’re married and you
    two can go live with DSS. I don’t care.”

    The Department of Children and
    Families, formerly the Department of Social Services, was contacted and is
    investigating. According to court records, a DCF case worker told police the
    agency dealt with the family years ago when the couple reportedly abandoned a
    son who was subsequently taken into DCF custody.

    Alison Goodwin, a DCF
    spokeswoman, said the girls are currently in the mother’s custody.

    A
    phone message left Friday at the Haskins’ residence was not
    returned.

    Freetown police interviewed the girls at the hospital Thursday.
    They said their father ordered them into his truck, then began driving into
    trees, rocks, a small building and a camper on the Locust Street property, court
    records said.

    When one girl tried to call for help on her cell phone,
    Haskins ordered her to put it away. The girls said he pointed at objects right
    before crashing into them. But when one girl asked him he if was trying to kill
    them, Haskins said, “No, I’m not going to kill you.”

    Police later secured
    a search warrant and seized computer equipment connected to a surveillance
    system on the property.

    Haskins is scheduled to return to court Feb. 3.
    Mooney ordered him to stay away from his daughters and to comply with any DCF
    instructions.

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    ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Policeman Becomes Violent: Canada

    Paragraphs four through seven read:  “In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick became
    violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After swearing
    at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived, overturned
    furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a picture
    frame and fought with his wife.”

    “The hearing was told Gulick was
    on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of
    Scotch.”

    “But it was when he was told he was being arrested later that
    evening that Gulick went ballistic.”

    “Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but
    overall calm situation quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick
    fought back.”

    Drugawareness & SSRI Stories Note:  The
    Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

    can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
    alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
    and the antidepressant
    in the human body.

    http://cnews.canoe.ca/CNEWS/Canada/2010/01/12/12428306-qmi.html

    Violent cop acted ‘superhuman’

    Constable pleads guilty
    to discreditable conduct at hearing
    By SCOTT TAYLOR, QMI Agency

    OTTAWA – A police
    disciplinary hearing heard dramatic testimony yesterday about Const. Jeff
    Gulick’s violent conduct in May 2008.

    Gulick pleaded guilty yesterday to
    discreditable conduct under the Police Services Act.

    He had previously
    been found guilty of assaulting a police officer, uttering threats to cause
    bodily harm, escaping lawful custody and mischief after officers tried to arrest
    him at his home May 22, 2008.

    In an agreed statement of facts, Gulick
    became violently angry after failing his use of force requalification. After
    swearing at instructors, Gulick went home and, before other officers arrived,
    overturned furniture, stabbed a couch and wall with a butcher knife, punched a
    picture frame and fought with his wife.

    The hearing was told Gulick was
    on anti-depressants and had consumed half a bottle of Scotch.

    But it was
    when he was told he was being arrested later that evening that Gulick went
    ballistic.

    Sgt. James Heafy said a tense but overall calm situation
    quickly became a “life-or-death struggle” as Gulick fought back.

    “He
    started grabbing at my right side and I could feel my holster and gunbelt being
    pulled.”

    Gulick threatened to kill his fellow cops as he struggled with
    what Const. Michael O’Reilly said was “superhuman” strength.

    Gulick was
    finally overcome after being shocked with a Taser by one of four officers who
    had joined the fight.

    Gulick was taken to the Ottawa Hospital’s Civic
    Campus emergency room, but when they arrived Gulick had shed both wrist and
    ankle cuffs and bolted across Carling Ave. to the Experimental Farm, where he
    once again was shot with a Taser.

    O’Reilly said the situation had “gone
    as sideways as it can go.”

    Earlier yesterday, a female police officer
    testified she feels like an outcast among fellow officers as a result of her
    involvement and subsequent testimony in Gulick’s disciplinary hearing.

    Sgt. Holly Watson said she’s heard “through the rumour mill” that fellow
    officers support Gulick and there “was never any support for the four of us who
    were assaulted (by Gulick during the arrest).”

    Watson added she has
    received no support from the Police Association either. She also testified that
    she still worries about where Gulick is when she goes to her car after work.

    Police Chief Vern White is scheduled to testify today.

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    ZOLOFT: Man Fires Shots into Country Club: Goes Manic for First Time: MN

    NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): I am going to
    comment on this one statement from this article because I become absolutely
    furious when I hear this over and over and over again when AA is in a position
    to help and will not. I quote, “He also has been through alcohol treatment
    and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous,” So, WHY is AA not more helpful in
    teaching those with a problem with alcohol that antidepressants CAUSE
    OVERWHELMING CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL?!!! They would certainly not have near as much
    business if they did! It just makes me sick to hear over and over again that
    they encourage the use of antidepressants among those who already have problems
    with alcohol. It makes no sense!!! They seem to be far more
    susceptible to the manic effects of antidepressants.

    Paragraph six reads:  “If the case had gone to trial,
    Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
    defense. The claim
    : a switch in the fall of 2008
    to the antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become
    manic-depressive for the first time in his life.”

    http://www.startribune.com/local/81151627.html?elr=KArksLckD8EQDUoaEyqyP4O:DW3ckUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUnciaec8O7EyUsl

    Man pleads guilty to firing shots at country club

    The defendant said that friends had tried to get him help
    before the incident at Minikahda Country Club in Minneapolis. Had the case gone
    to trial, his attorney had planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
    defense.

    By ROCHELLE OLSON,

    Star Tribune

    Last update: January 11, 2010 – 12:07 PM

    A 64-year-old Minneapolis man pleaded guilty today to second-degree assault for
    shooting at the Minikahda Country Club and said afterward that he hopes
    something can be done to make it easier for adults with psychological problems
    to get help.

    For me to do anything harmful to the club, I had to be
    crazy because I loved the club,” Joseph C. Rice said in an interview after his
    plea in front of Hennepin County District Court Judge Beryl Nord. “When you’re
    out of your mind, the worst thing is you don’t know you’re out of your
    mind.”

    According to the charges: Police received a call at 2 a.m. from an
    employee at the club, 3205 Excelsior Blvd., reporting that he had spotted Rice
    outside the building holding a gun, had heard multiple shots, and then had seen
    Rice drive away in an older red Ferrari. Police tracked Rice to his nearby home.
    In addition to assault, he was charged with drive-by shooting, reckless
    discharge of a firearm and two drinking and driving offenses. All but the
    assault charge were dropped.

    Rice will have to serve about three months
    in the county workhouse. He paid $3,091 to the club for the damage. He will pay
    more than $100,000 to get his Ferrari back.

    “I feel really sorry for what
    I did. I really valued my membership in the club,” he said.

    If the case
    had gone to trial, Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary
    intoxication” defense. The claim: a switch in the fall of 2008 to the
    antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become manic-depressive

    for the first time in his life.

    Birrell had filed notice with the court
    of plans to call an expert witness, a physician, who would testify that drugs
    such as Zoloft can cause mania in a small percentage of the population. He and
    Rice acknowledge that the defense would have been complicated by Rice’s heavy
    drinking at the time.

    But Rice said in the weeks leading up to the
    incident, friends were trying to get him into a hospital for help, but were
    unsuccessful. “It’s almost like you have to do something bad, but then it’s too
    late,” Rice said of his friends’ efforts to get him treatment.

    After the
    shooting, his 31-year-old son and his psychiatrist succeeded in getting him into

    a 30-day in-patient program at Fairview Riverside Hospital. Rice said he was
    immediately taken off Zoloft and put back on Wellbutrin. He also has been
    through alcohol treatment and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous, he
    said.

    Rice said he will send the club an apology through Birrell. “The
    way to say you’re sorry is to live a better life,” he said.

    He is
    expected to begin serving his workhouse sentence in February.

    Rochelle
    Olson • 612-673-1747

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