ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Famous Supermodel Jumps Six Floors to Her Death: Columbia

Paragraph 2 reads: “According to a Colombian newspaper, police are
confirming that Marulanda leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia
apartment. Reports are also indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a
result of a recent separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The
stress of the split and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on
antidepressants to help her cope with her most recent troubles. According to
reports, Lina had only been married to Onate for four months.”

http://www.rightcelebrity.com/?p=8523

Lina Marulanda, a famous and successful supermodel from Columbia has died
at the young age of 29. She was born on May 15th, 1980 in Medellin,
Colombia. Not only was Marulanda a popular television host, but she will be
remembered as one of Columbia’s most successful models. The news came April 22,
2010 that Lina jumped to her death, falling from her sixth floor apartment,
surely to be devastating news to those close to her.

According to a Colombian newspaper, police are confirming that Marulanda
leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia apartment. Reports are also
indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a result of a recent
separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The stress of the split
and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on antidepressants to help her
cope with her most recent troubles. According to reports, Lina had only been
married to Onate for four months.

Lina started modeling at the age of 12 years of age and went on to work as
a television presenter on the Colombian news show, CM&Y Caracol.

There has been no official statement from Lina’s family, friends or
employer. Our thoughts go out to her family and friends. This has to be
devastating news for those close to Lina Marulanda.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Two Dead: Oregon

Paragraph seven reads: “The family had known Phillips for years. They
said he took numerous medications, including antidepressants and pain
medications while he waited for hip-replacement surgery.”

http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100422/NEWS/4220320/
-1/NEWSMAP

April 22, 2010

By Anita Burke
Mail Tribune

MEDFORD ­ Family, friends and a west Medford neighborhood mourn a
murder-suicide that left a man and woman dead on Monday.

Gregory Alan Phillips, 57, shot his former girlfriend, Evalina Maria
Lattoure, 39, three times in the head and neck with a .22-caliber revolver
before fatally shooting himself, Medford police said. The shootings happened at
about 2:20 p.m. Monday in the driveway of a duplex at 725 Beekman Ave.,
where the two, along with other roommates including Lattoure’s 9-year-old
daughter and the girl’s father, were moving.

The group had lived just down the street in a house that was foreclosed in
January and they had just been evicted, Jackson County Circuit Court
records show.

“They were very nice people,” said Dustin Wilhelmi, who lives in the
adjoining unit of the duplex and saw Phillips shoot himself. “I don’t know why
he would do that to her.”

Lattoure’s 17-year-old son, who lives with other relatives in Jackson
County and asked that his name not be published, said Phillips “took the life
of a great and wonderful woman.”

He said his mother also has a 22-year-old son who lives in California, as
well as a sister and other relatives who were gathering to plan a funeral.

The family had known Phillips for years. They said he took numerous
medications, including antidepressants and pain medications while he waited for
hip-replacement surgery.

“Maybe he wasn’t in his right mind when he did this,” Lattoure’s teenage
son said, wondering compassionately what the loss must be like for Phillips’
aging mother in California, who must now deal with the knowledge that her
son is a murderer.

Medford police Lt. Bob Hansen said that Lattoure and Phillips had argued
earlier in the day, but each had left, apparently to cool down separately.
Investigators didn’t release details about that conflict.

Phillips’ car was in the driveway of the duplex Monday afternoon when
Lattoure pulled up, police said. She approached his car, then was shot.

An autopsy showed that a fatal shot hit Lattoure’s spine, her son said.

As neighbors heard shots Monday afternoon and called 9-1-1, Medford police
quickly notified Washington Elementary and South Medford High schools,
which went into precautionary lockdown, as did the Medford School District’s
central office.

School officials praised prompt and clear communication from police, who
evaluated the potential threat to schools. As soon as investigators
determined that everyone involved in the shooting was dead, the lockdown was lifted.

Washington Principal Joe Frazier said police and schools train to work
well together in emergencies and that training paid off.

Teachers had information about the shooting right away so they could
grieve after school, Frazier said. Then, on Tuesday morning, the school gathered
students to acknowledge the tragedy that had happened in the neighborhood
and reassure them that they were safe in school, he said.

Teachers provided some time for students to deal with grief, then helped
them return their focus to learning, he said. The district provided
additional counseling for a few students who needed more help.

The Children’s Advocacy Center is also assisting Lattoure’s family,
officials said.

Reach reporter Anita Burke at 541-776-4485, or e-mail
aburke@mailtribune.com.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Death: Man Becomes Violent, Lunges at Police, Shot Dead: GA

Paragraphs three and four read: “The officer gave several verbal commands
for the suspect to drop the knife. That’s when the suspect lunged towards
the officer and the officer opened fire,” said Cpl. David Schiralli,
spokesman of the Gwinnett County Police Department.”

“CBS Atlanta spoke to Bagley’s family. They said he was a huge teddy bear
and a wonderful grandfather. They said he suffered from depression since
losing his wife of 15 years a few months ago. He also had congestive heart
failure. He was on muscle relaxers, antidepressants and painkillers. Bagley
also needed oxygen to breathe.”

http://www.cbsatlanta.com/news/23181264/detail.html

Family Questions Police In Gwinnett Shooting

Suspect’s Family Questions Police On Shooting Of 59-Year-Old
by Hena Daniels, CBS Atlanta News Reporter

POSTED: 8:26 am EDT April 17, 2010
UPDATED: 8:06 am EDT April 18, 2010

LAWRENCEVILLE, Ga. — Gwinnett police are investigating a shooting
involving an officer at the Tanglewood Apartments in Lawrenceville.

Witnesses described 59-year-old Gene Bagley as irrational and in a daze
Saturday morning as he took a huge knife to a Ford Fusion in his parking lot,
breaking the back window. The owner of the vehicle told CBS Atlanta she
heard the suspect outside her apartment and that’s when she called police.

“The officer gave several verbal commands for the suspect to drop the
knife. That’s when the suspect lunged towards the officer and the officer opened
fire,” said Cpl. David Schiralli, spokesman of the Gwinnett County Police
Department.

CBS Atlanta spoke to Bagley’s family. They said he was a huge teddy bear
and a wonderful grandfather. They said he suffered from depression since
losing his wife of 15 years a few months ago. He also had congestive heart
failure. He was on muscle relaxers, antidepressants and painkillers. Bagley
also needed oxygen to breathe.

”I don’t think he’s capable of lunging. He’s too old and has too many
physical ailments,” said son-in-law Damon Wycoff.

The only conclusion Bagley’s family can come to is he may have mixed his
medications, but they still have tough questions for Gwinnett County police.

“Neighbors say he was shot three times. I don’t understand. He’s a
59-year-old man who can barely breath, overweight. Yeah, I understand he came at
them with a knife, but 3 times I don’t understand. Why couldn’t they use a
Taser?,” asked stepdaughter Maria Wycoff.

The police officer, a veteran on the force, has been placed on routine
administrative leave.
Copyright 2010 by cbsatlanta.com. All rights reserved. This material may
not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

603 total views, 0 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder Attempt: Man Took 6 Time Prescribed Dose: Canada

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (_www.drugawareness.org_ (http://www.drugawareness.org)
):

This reminds me of a case I had in Florida years ago where a young man was
staying with friends and had been a little “down” lately. He remembered
that the wife in the family had a bottle of Zoloft she had placed on top of
the fridge instead of taking it because she did not like how it made her
feel. He knew it was for depression and thought it might make him feel better
so he took one.

After a little while he did not feel any difference so he took another, and
another, and another until he had taken six pills. After that he cannot
remember anything about what happened. All he knows is what others told him
he did which was he started drinking and then stabbed a stranger over 100
times with a screwdriver killing him. He is now spending the rest of his life
in prison.
________________________________________________

Paragraph two reads: “Adrien John Lepage, 55, had told the court he
robbed and kidnapped the young woman in the hope police would kill him and put
him out of his misery. He wasn’t thinking straight and didn’t mean to hurt
anyone, he said.”

Paragraph seven reads: “Lepage testified last Friday that he suffers from
depression and that on the morning of Nov. 30, he took six times his
prescribed dose of anti-depressant medication.”

_http://www.cbc.ca/canada/new-brunswick/story/2010/04/15/nb-attempted-murder
-verdict.html_
(http://www.cbc.ca/canada/new-brunswick/story/2010/04/15/nb-attempted-murder-verdict.html)

N.B. kidnapper found guilty of attempted murder

Last Updated: Thursday, April 15, 2010 | 3:50 PM AT

CBC News

Adrien John Lepage is escorted by police on Dec. 1, 2009. (CBC)

A Saint John man has been found guilty of attempted murder in connection
with the kidnapping of a bartender who was abandoned in a remote gravel pit
with a plastic bag taped around her head.

Adrien John Lepage, 55, had told the court he robbed and kidnapped the
young woman in the hope police would kill him and put him out of his misery.
He wasn’t thinking straight and didn’t mean to hurt anyone, he said.

Hampton provincial court Judge Henrik Tonning wasn’t convinced. He said no
matter how hard he looked for reasonable doubt, he could not find any.

Lepage, who was taking notes in the prisoner’s box throughout Thursday’s
proceedings, showed no reaction to the guilty verdict.

He will be sentenced on May 27 on the attempted murder charge, to which he
had pleaded not guilty. He will also be sentenced on charges of unlawful
confinement and theft, to which he had pleaded guilty.

The judge ordered a pre-sentence report and victim impact statement.

Left for dead

Lepage testified last Friday that he suffers from depression and that on
the morning of Nov. 30, he took six times his prescribed dose of
anti-depressant medication.

He also said he had been having problems with his girlfriend that day,
before he walked into the Barnwood Pub in Quispamsis, in southern New
Brunswick.

The bartender had testified that Lepage ordered food and drinks before
approaching her at the bar and telling her he would blow her head off if she
didn’t give him the money in the cash register.

He told her to carry the $400 outside, away from the pub’s security
cameras, she said. Then he threw her into his van and drove 55 kilometres to a
gravel pit near Lepreau. He said: “Have a nice life,” then drove away, she
told the court.

The woman, who had no coat, was soaking wet and covered in mud, with her
arms and legs bound with duct tape. She managed to free herself and walk to
Highway 1, where two drivers pulled over to help her.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Patients Report 20 Times More Side Effects Than Doctors Report

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

In answer to the question asked in the title of this article,
“Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?,” I should remind you of the comment made by the psychiatric nurse who
attended one of my lectures a couple of years ago. After listening to me discuss
the potential side effects of SSRI antidepressants she stood and said, “Dr.
Tracy we never get to hear what you have shared with us here tonight, but I know
it is true because I am on Lexapro and have suffered nearly every one of the

side effects you mentioned. But you do not know what is going on out here. At
least 75% of the doctors and nurses I work with are on these drugs! The drug
reps are telling them they are in a stressful profession and will surely end up
suffering depression as a result so they need to get started on these drugs now
in order to help prevent that.”

Of course my first response was, “With these drugs affecting
the memory so strongly as to cause “amnesia” as a frequent side effect, if you
cannot even remember who you are, how do you remember what your patients
need?”
She admitted that they do not remember and have to constantly
remind one another and then they attribute it to old age setting
in.
So perhaps by the time these doctors get around to reporting
the patientsside effects they have forgotten what those side effects were that
they were to report. Of course these drugs also produce much more business
for the doctors by producing side effects and bringing patients back in for
follow up treatment so there is also a financial incentive to not report and
give the drugs a bad record. No matter the reason it is clear that the
situation is causing a very serious situation for patients and public safety in
general.
Paragraph three reads:  “The investigators followed 300
patients who were in ongoing outpatient treatment for depression
over six weeks. The authors compared what the patient reported on a
standardized scale of 31 different side effects (Toronto Side

Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating psychiatrist
on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect between
psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects
reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris.
When the investigators concentrated on
those side effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still

reported 2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/charting-the-depths/201004/why-dont-psychiatrists-notice-when-patients-experience-medication-si

Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?

If side effects fall in the forest, do they make a sound?

Published on April 20, 2010

A rich scientific study raises more

questions than it answers.

This point is exempified by new work conducted
at Rhode Island Hospital and published in the Journal of Clinical
Psychiatry
.

The investigators followed 300 patients who were in
ongoing outpatient treatment for depression over six weeks. The authors compared
what the patient reported on a standardized scale of 31 different side effects
(Toronto Side Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating
psychiatrist on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect
between psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects

reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris. When the investigators concentrated on those side
effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still reported
2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.

The authors summarize their provocative findings in mild
language, “The findings of the present study indicate that clinicians do not
record in their progress notes most side effects reported on a side effects

questionnaire by psychiatric
outpatients receiving ongoing pharmacological treatment for depression.”

Obviously
all is not well in the state of Demark. Although the findings concern the
treatment of depression, they raise broader questions about the doctor-patient
relationship.

Why is there such a massive disconnect between what
psychiatrists and patients report, on something so basic as whether prescribed
medications are having untoward effects? Do psychiatrists not ask enough
questions about side effects? Do psychiatrists not dig deep enough into

patients‘ responses? Are psychiatrists hearing what patients say, but not
documenting it in their notes? Or is the problem more on the patient side? Are
patients reluctant to speak candidly to their doctors about side effects (i.e.,
yes, I am having problems with sexual functioning)? Or do patients freeze up and
forget their experiences when asked in the heat of the moment (it is easier to
respond to a standardized list of side effects using pencil and paper)? Or is it
the situation that is to blame for this disconnect? Are patient-doctor
interactions in this day and age simply too rushed to insure efficient or
effective transfer of information?

Whatever the explanation,
psychiatrists appear to believe that patients are having fewer problems with
medications than they truly are. It is hard to see how psychiatrists can act in
the best interest of their patients if they do not know what their patients are
experiencing!!!!

The researchers recommend the use of a self-administered
patient questionnaire in clinical practice to improve the recognition of side

effects for patients in treatment. This study reveals a chasm of
misunderstanding between doctors and patients. This recommendation is a
sensible, but baby, step towards narrowing
it…

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Death: Ireland

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Death by misadventure!” What is that? “Death by medicine” is
far more accurate! When antidepressants CAUSE overwhelming cravings for alcohol

or Dipsomania (an uncontrollable urge to drink alcohol) why was this case not
determined to be murder by medicine? That is what it was. When the drug causes
you to mix a deadly combo that takes your life then it is murder by medicine in
my book!

______________________________________
First three paragraphs read:  “AN A&E consultant has
warned of the “lethal” consequences of combining alcohol and prescription
medication
following the death of Bertie Ahern’s
nephew from a mixture of drink and anti-depressants.”

“Dr Chris
Luke said people were admitted every day suffering from the effects of legal
drug and alcohol cocktails. Dr Luke, a consultant at Cork University Hospital,
said legal drugs were as dangerous as illegal drugs
and the public needed to be made aware of the dangers”.

“He was
commenting after an inquest found that Dylan Ahern, the son of former Dublin
City Councillor Maurice Ahern, had been killed by a combination of
anti-depressant medication and alcohol.
A jury returned a verdict of

death by misadventure.”

http://www.herald.ie/national-news/booze-and-pills-alert-after-bertie-tragedy-2139007.html

Booze and pills alert after Bertie tragedy

Thursday April 15 2010

AN A&E consultant has warned
of the “lethal” consequences of combining alcohol and prescription medication
following the death of Bertie Ahern’s nephew from a mixture of drink and
anti-depressants.

Dr Chris Luke said people were admitted every day
suffering from the effects of legal drug and alcohol cocktails. Dr Luke, a
consultant at Cork University Hospital, said legal drugs were as dangerous as
illegal drugs and the public needed to be made aware of the dangers.

He
was commenting after an inquest found that Dylan Ahern, the son of former Dublin
City Councillor Maurice Ahern, had been killed by a combination of
anti-depressant medication and alcohol. A jury returned a verdict of death by
misadventure.

Toxic

“Every week on our observation ward at CUH, we
have several cases of people who have poisoned themselves with booze and
whatever was in the medicine cabinet,” Dr Luke said.

“When giving talks
to parents, teenagers and colleagues, I always start by saying the first drug is

alcohol and it’s always the first chapter in any story of substance abuse.

“Nine out of 10 times when people poison themselves, it involves
alcohol. We would rarely get a case of an overdose of anti-depressants or other
drugs without alcohol being consumed first.

Alcohol also sensitises
parts of the body like the heart, brain and stomach lining, making them more
susceptible to being affected by other drugs.

“It amplifies the toxic
effect of each compound so the synergy they have is greater than the sum of
their parts in their effect on the body.”

Dr Luke said the effect could
be either a more intense tranquilising effect, or a paradoxical stimulation,
leaving people either almost comatose, or “off their heads”.

He said a
large number of people who self-harmed with alcohol and drugs did so either
accidentally or impulsively.

They can become aggressive, violent and
paranoid and can suffer from a rapid heart rate, high blood pressure or
“electrical chaos” in the brain, leading to seizures or even heart attacks and
fatal strokes. “Booze and drugs are always a dangerous combination,” he
added.

hnews@herald.ie

– Andrew
Phelan

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Antidepressant Use Doubles in UK in Past Decade, Even Greater Increase Last Year

But tonight doctors warned that some people are being
put on the drugs unnecessarily, especially those with milder symptoms of
depression, partly because there is too little access to “talking therapies”,
which use discussion rather than drugs to tackle problems.

“I’m concerned that too many people are being
prescribed antidepressants and not being given counselling and cognitive
behaviour therapy, because access to those therapies, while it is improving, is
still patchy,” said Professor Steve Field, the chairman of the Royal College of
General Practitioners, which represents the UK‘s family doctors.

“More people are being diagnosed with depression, but
many of them would be treated better by having access to talking therapies,
especially those with mild to moderate depression. I’m concerned that these
people are being treated with medication unnecessarily,” he added.

GPs felt “cornered” into giving patients
antidepressants because of a lack of alternatives, he said.

“Talking therapies are just a good [as medication]
for treating mild depression, and CBT can be just as good for more serious
depression. But the provision for these therapies hasn’t been good,” said Field.
However, more GPs were gaining more of a choice between tablets and talking
treatments, he said.

Antidepressant use rises as recession feeds wave of worry

Prescriptions have doubled in decade,
NHS figures show, with doctors warning drugs are covering for counselling
shortage

Seroxat antidepressant pills.
Seroxat [Paxil] antidepressant pills.
Photograph: Jack Sullivan/Alamy

The number of antidepressants prescribed by the NHS
has almost doubled in the last decade, and rose sharply last year as the
recession bit, figures reveal.

The health service issued 39.1m prescriptions for drugs to tackle depression in England in 2009, compared
with 20.1m in 1999 – a 95% jump. Doctors handed out 3.18m more prescriptions
last year than in 2008, almost twice the annual rise seen in preceding years,
according to previously unpublished statistics released by the NHS’s Business
Services Authority.

The increase is thought to be due in part to improved
diagnosis, reduced stigma around mental ill-health and rising worries about jobs
and finances triggered by the economic downturn.

But tonight doctors warned that some people are being
put on the drugs unnecessarily, especially those with milder symptoms of
depression, partly because there is too little access to “talking therapies”,
which use discussion rather than drugs to tackle problems.

“I’m concerned that too many people are being
prescribed antidepressants and not being given counselling and cognitive
behaviour therapy, because access to those therapies, while it is improving, is
still patchy,” said Professor Steve Field, the chairman of the Royal College of
General Practitioners, which represents the UK‘s family doctors.

“More people are being diagnosed with depression, but
many of them would be treated better by having access to talking therapies,
especially those with mild to moderate depression. I’m concerned that these
people are being treated with medication unnecessarily,” he added.

GPs felt “cornered” into giving patients
antidepressants because of a lack of alternatives, he said.

“Talking therapies are just a good [as medication]
for treating mild depression, and CBT can be just as good for more serious
depression. But the provision for these therapies hasn’t been good,” said Field.
However, more GPs were gaining more of a choice between tablets and talking
treatments, he said.

Peter Byrne, the director of public education at the
Royal College of Psychiatrists, whose 12,450 members include the UK‘s 6,300
consultant psychiatrists, echoed Field’s concern. It said it was unsurprising
that prescriptions were rising after a decade of investment in mental health services. “The optimistic view is that
more people are being uncovered and treated. My concern is that people with mild
depression should not be put on antidepressants,” he said.

Consultant psychiatrist Tim Kendall, director of the
National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health, which drafts NHS guidance on
the drugs, said: “Antidepressants are offered too frequently in primary care
because the waiting lists for alternative treatments are too long. Doctors need
to think hard about putting people on these drugs because they can be hard to
get off and have significant side-effects.”

The NHS does not record how many people take
antidepressants, but up to one in six people suffers from some form of
depression during their life. The recession has produced greater demand for NHS
help with mental health problems.

In 2009 all of us – whether we work in general
practice, general hospitals or specialist services – are seeing an increase in

referrals from the recession. The stresses of the downturn are the last straw
for many people,” said Byrne.

The Labour government invested hundreds of millions
of pounds in “talking therapies”, in an effort to help jobless people with
chronic problems get back into work and couples negotiate relationship
difficulties. The Lib-Con coalition has promised to continue prioritising such
treatments. But Byrne disputed claims about long waiting times.

The falling cost of antidepressants may have an
effect. Ten years ago each prescription cost £16, but this has fallen to just £6
today, which means the NHS spend has fallen, from £315m in 1999 to £230m last

year.

Dr Hugh Griffiths, the government’s mental health
tsar, said that while the causes of, and risk factors for, depression were
complex “the recession can have an impact. A rise in prescriptions might also
reflect a greater awareness and willingness to seek support and better diagnosis
by GPs”.

“Psychological therapies, which can be offered
alongside or as an alternative to medication, provide choice in treatment. We
are closely looking at how we can improve access”, said Griffiths.

A survey in March for the mental health charity Mind,
which asked people if they had sought help for work-related stress since the
downturn began, found 7% had begun medical treatment for depression and 5% had
started counselling.

A spokeswoman for Mind, Alison Cobb, said the fact
antidepressants are now licensed for use in a wider range of conditions, such as
social anxiety and post traumatic stress, was also a
factor.

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MEDICATIONS: Yet Another So Called “Terrorist” on Meds!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Take away these serotonergic medications on both sides of this war and
there would be no war, and likely never would have been a war – except for those
determined to have one for profits only!
From the LA Times report just three months after 9/11 we learned
that the Taliban psychiatrist had posters of antidepressants all over his
office and he was reported as saying that what the Taliban needed was not more
guns, but more Prozac. Of course it follows that if they needed
more, he already had them on antidepressants. He then made this
chilling statement that clearly says anyone he saw would be prescribed
one of these drugs: “Allah has given these drugs great power. Taking them
is like swallowing a little piece of God.”
We now have so many of our US military on these drugs that for several
years now we have lost more soldiers to suicide than we have in combat.
Even those that make it back home are lucky to wake up in the mornings because
so many of them are dying in their sleep from the drug combos they are
being prescribed by the VA.
On top of all that we have those like this fellow being arrested as a
terrorist” because of his reactions to his medications‘ It reminds me of the
young man I attempted to help in Israel several years ago. He was so painfully
shy that his doctor gave him Paxil to treat his Social Anxiety Disorder. His
family read my book and were alarmed and very concerned, but the young man
“seemed to be doing okay” on the drug and they thought that if they just
watched him carefully he would be okay. So they watched carefully, they thought,
until he got up in the middle of the night, blew up an Army jeep, and began
ranting and raving about wanting to be a suicide bomber! (Keep in mind that he
went on this drug because he was shy!) Needless to say no one was more
embarrassed and shocked by his behavior than he was!
_________________________________________
Speaking out in her son’s defense, Nadia Alessa admitted he suffered from
severe anger management issues, but insisted he does not pose a threat to the
country where he was born to Palestinian immigrants.

“Anything makes him
angry,” Nadia Alessa, told CNN of her son. “But he’s not a terrorist; he’s a
stupid kid.”

In interviews with CNN and The New York Times, Alessa said her
son was so full of rage, he began seeing psychiatrists and taking medications to
control his moods at age 6. The boy known for screaming at his mother and
roughing up his father’s car changed schools no less than 10 times, the Times
reported.

Who Are the Alleged New Jersey Jihadists?

Updated: 1 hour 15 minutes ago

Michelle Ruiz

Michelle Ruiz Contributor

AOL
News

(June 13) — The two New
Jersey men arrested at New York’s John F.
Kennedy Airport and charged with conspiring to kill U.S. troops overseas were
troubled, rebellious teens, according to reports. The pair’s brushes with the
law and extreme anti-American sentiments eventually sparked an elaborate
take-down by the FBI.

Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, 20, of North Bergen, N.J.,
and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, 24, of Elmwood Park, N.J., were reportedly nabbed
with help from an undercover rookie New York policeman of Egyptian descent, The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.,
reported
. Alessa’s mother, Nadia Alessa, told CNN she thought the man Alessa
and Almonte called “Bassim” recorded provocative remarks the pair made and built
a case against them.

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Marshals on Wednesday June 9, 2010 shows Mohamed Mahmoud Alessa (left) and Carlos Eduardo Almonte (right).

U.S. Marshals/AP
Family and friends of the alleged New Jersey jihadists,
Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, left, and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, say the pair were
rebellious teens. Alessa and Almonte were arrested June 5 at New York’s JFK
airport, where they planned to fly separately to Somalia by way of Egypt to join
a terrorist organization, the FBI said.

In November 2009, the
officer’s wire captured potentially damning conversations between Alessa and
Almonte.

“A lot of people need to get killed, bro. Swear to God. I have
to get an assault rifle and just kill anyone that even looks at me the wrong
way, bro,” Alessa said, according to transcripts included in the criminal
complaint. “My soul cannot rest until I shed blood. I wanna, like, be the
world’s known terrorist. I swear to God.”

Speaking out in her son’s
defense, Nadia Alessa admitted he suffered from severe anger management issues,
but insisted he does not pose a threat to the country where he was born to
Palestinian immigrants.

“Anything makes him angry,” Nadia Alessa, told
CNN of her son. “But he’s not a terrorist; he’s a stupid kid.”

In
interviews with CNN and The New York Times, Alessa said her
son was so full of rage, he began seeing psychiatrists and taking medications to
control his moods at age 6. The boy known for screaming at his mother and
roughing up his father’s car changed schools no less than 10 times, the Times
reported.
Alessa alarmed students and
staffers at two public high schools — North Bergen and KAS Prep in 2005 and
2006, after threatening to “blow up the school, mutilate gays and punish women
who were not subordinate to men,” school officials told the Times.

The
Department of Homeland Security was alerted and North Bergen relegated Alessa to
a public library to receive his lessons under the watchful eye of a security
guard, a school spokesman said, because “administrators felt that his presence
in school posed a safety threat to other students and staff.”

Despite his
behavioral issues, Alessa’s mother said she gave her son new clothes and cell
phones.

“He was a spoiled kid,” she told the Times. “He acted like a
teenager. He thought he was a king.”

In 2005, Alessa reportedly met
Almonte, a naturalized citizen of Dominican descent who in the previous year had
converted from Catholicism to Islam. Almonte, who had been arrested for bringing
a knife to school and drinking beer in a public park, reportedly visited local
mosques and called himself Omar.

A year later, the FBI received a tip
that the two men discussed holy war and killing non-Muslims, prompting
authorities to begin to “keep a watch” on them, according to the Times. The men
traveled to Jordan in February 2007 hoping to be recruited by a militant
jihadist group, the FBI said. By 2008, Almonte was posting quotations from
jihadist clerics on his Facebook page and searches of his computer revealed he
was following teachings from al-Qaida leaders, including Osama bin
Laden.

The undercover New York policeman infiltrated their inner circle
in 2009, The Star-Ledger reported. Nadia Alessa told CNN she told her son she
was suspicious of his new friend.

“Since I saw him, I warned my son and
Carlos,” she said. “But my son say, ‘Always you say about my friends they are
undercover.’ ”

Authorities allege that Alessa and Almonte’s separate
flights to Egypt on June 5 were part of their plot to go to Somalia to join
al-Shabaab, which in 2008 was designated a terrorist organization by the U.S.
government. The men were arrested and charged with conspiring to kill, maim and
kidnap persons outside the country. They were denied bail last week by a federal
judge who called them a flight risk and a potential danger to the
public.

A Swedish woman claiming to be Alessa’s fiancee, 19-year-old
Siham Abedar, 19, told New Jersey’s The Record she broke
down in tears after learning of his arrest. She said she was waiting for him in
Egypt, where they planned to marry. She denied Alessa wanted to “do jihad or
whatever.”

“I know it’s not true,” she said. “I know he wanted to get
married. He wanted to have kids. He wanted to do a lot of things.”

Filed under: Nation, Crime, Top
Stories

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Star D Study – Only 3% Remission, Not 67%

Last paragraph reads:  “”Although the study‘s reports make no
mention of this outcome, their data show that after a year of continuation
treatment following remission, of the 4,041 patients who entered the program
only 108 (3%) had a sustained remission — all the other patients either dropped
out or relapsed. Yet STAR*D‘s authors and the NIMH have publicized the study as
showing a 67% success rate for

antidepressants.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mad-in-america/201005/update-the-stard-report
May 19, 2010, Psychiatry

Update on the STAR*D Report
The
documented recovery rate in the STAR*D trial–worse than thought?
Published
on May 19, 2010

Two months ago, I wrote a post about a New Yorker
article that reported that 67% of the depressed patients in the STAR*D trial
“recovered.” As I noted in that post, the 67% figure was a highly exaggerated
number. Only 51% of the 3,671 patients who entered the trial ever remitted, even
for a short period. Furthermore, only about 20% of the patients remitted and
then reported to STAR*D investigators, at some point during a 12-month follow-up
period, that they were still doing well.

But this left an obvious
question, one that I hadn’t been able to find an answer to in the published

STAR*D reports. How many of the 3,671 people who entered the trial remitted and
then stayed well and in the trial throughout the entire 12-month follow-up? That
number would provide a documented long-term recovery rate for patients in the
trial.

A few days ago, Allan Leventhal sent me a 2009 article he
coauthored with David Antonuccio, and in it, they successfully identified this
number (finding it in a confusing graphic I hadn’t been able to decipher.) In
their computations, they relied on STAR*D reports that told of 4,041 initial
participants (3,671 was the number of “enrolled” patients counted in the
analysis of drug-remission rates), and then they came to this bottom-line
conclusion about the documented long-term recovery rate:

“Although the

study‘s reports make no mention of this outcome, their data show that after a
year of continuation treatment following remission, of the 4,041 patients who
entered the program only 108 (3%) had a sustained remission — all the other
patients either dropped out or relapsed. Yet STAR*D‘s authors and the NIMH have
publicized the study as showing a 67% success rate for antidepressants.”

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PAXIL: Acquitted of DUI: Involuntary Intoxication: Virginia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy
(www.drugawareness.org):

Because the package insert for Paxil
warns that this antidepressant does produce “alcohol cravings” and we know how
common it is for mania to be induced by SSRIs, with one type of mania being
“Dipsomania” – an overwhelming compulsion to drink alcohol” – this
information needs to be spread far and wide ASAP! Patients are NOT warned
of this when they are given this drug! Few are even given the package insert
which is a “failure to warn” on the part of both the drug maker and the
pharmacist. How many DUIs are being caused by the SSRI antidepressants? We know
that DUIs in middle aged women, the main users of SSRIs, have DOUBLED over
a recent 10 year period. Is there a connection? As a society we need to know.
Where is MADD on this issue?
___________________________________________
The Fifth case from the end reads:  “Defendant was on Paxil, an
anti-depressant drug, and had a few drinks after playing golf. He was arrested
and charged with DUI after weaving through traffic.  He was “obviously
impaired” according to his lawyer.  ‘The worst I’d ever seen in 25 years’.”

“An expert testified that Paxil, taken with alcohol, has an “additive
effect” in some people.  The Defendant was never told about this.  The
Court acquitted the Defendant because to self-administer an intoxicant, one must
be aware that they are consuming an intoxicant.

http://virginiadui.poweradvocates.com/dui_defenses.html

4.
Involuntary Intoxication .  Commonwealth v. Moore, February, 2003 (Fairfax
Co. GDC).

Defendant was on Paxil, an anti-depressant drug, and had a few
drinks after playing golf.  He was arrested and charged with DUI after
weaving through traffic.  He was “obviously impaired” according to his
lawyer.  “The worst I’d ever seen in 25 years.”

An expert testified
that Paxil, taken with alcohol, has an “additive effect” in some people.

The Defendant was never told about this.  The Court acquitted the Defendant
because to self-administer an intoxicant, one must be aware that they are
consuming an intoxicant.

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