Execise: Greatly Helps Anxiety: Anxiety Disorder Association of America

First two paragraphs read:  “Healthcare providers to prescribe antidepressants for patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, these medications can sometimes come with harmful side effects. As a result, the drugs can sometimes end up doing more harm than good.”

“According to findings that were presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety DisorderAssociation of America, more mental health professionals should begin prescribing alternative health resources such as exercise to their patients who suffer from anxiety as multiple reports have shown that it helps treat the condition.”

http://www.betterhealthresearch.com/news/researchers-suggest-exercise-may-be-best-treatment-for-anxiety-19704171/

Researchers Suggest Exercise May Be Best Treatment For Anxiety

By Donna Parker • Apr 5th, 2010 • Category: AnxietyHealth News

Healthcare providers to prescribe antidepressants for patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, these medications can sometimes come with harmful side effects. As a result, the drugs can sometimes end up doing more harm than good.

According to findings that were presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety DisorderAssociation of America, more mental health professionals should begin prescribing alternative health resources such as exercise to their patients who suffer from anxiety as multiple reports have shown that it helps treat the condition.

“Individuals who exercise report fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lower levels of stress and anger,” said Jasper Smits, director of the Anxiety Research and Treatment Program at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “Exercise appears to affect, like an antidepressant, particular neurotransmitter systems in the brain, and it helps patients with depression re-establish positive behaviors.”

In addition to treating patients for anxiety, exercise can also keep the body flexible, improve sleeping patterns, keep blood pressure in check and help increase bone strength.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & Anti-Anxiety Pills: Man Accidentally Takes an Overdose: UK

Last three paragraphs read:  “The 59-year-old suffered
from anxiety and depression since his teenage years and was taking
anti-depressants and antianxiety pills, the hearing was told.”

“Terrance Bird, a friend, told the inquest that Mr Smith sometimes
forgot how many pills he had taken.”

“East Lancashire Coroner
Richard Taylor concluded that Mr Smith did not mean to take his own life and
died accidentally on January 7 as a result of
taking two prescribed drugs.”

http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/burnleypendlerossendale/5012043.Rawtenstall_man_died_of_accidental_overdose_of_prescribed_medication/

Rawtenstall man died of accidental overdose of prescribed
medication

10:39am Wednesday 17th February 2010

A
ROSSENDALE man died accidentally after taking a lethal concoction of prescribed
medication, an inquest heard.

Geoffrey Smith, of Holland Avenue,
Rawtenstall, was found dead at his house after failing to measure his medication
properly, Burnley Coroner’s Court heard.

The 59-year-old suffered from

anxiety and depression since his teenage years and was taking anti-depressants
and antianxiety pills, the hearing was told.

Terrance Bird, a friend,
told the inquest that Mr Smith sometimes forgot how many pills he had taken.

East Lancashire Coroner Richard Taylor concluded that Mr Smith did not
mean to take his own life and died accidentally on January 7 as a result of
taking two prescribed drugs.

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ZOLOFT & Geodon: Woman Assaults Another Woman on Golf Course: Drags her …

Paragraph 20 reads:  “Pearce told the psychologist she
had been doing well on a combination of Xanax, (for anxiety) Zoloft
(for depression)
and Geodon (for bipolar disorder and other
problems) but just before the golf cart incident she no longer could get

Geodon , the report states. The medication withdrawal produced agitation,
restlessness and anxiety, as well as depression and social avoidance,
the
report states.”

http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/EastVolusia/evlHEAD04112009.htm

Woman gets probation in golf-cart
attack

By FRANK FERNANDEZ
Staff Writer

BUNNELL — A woman who turned a golf cart into a weapon and
intentionally ran down and dragged another woman for about 15 yards was
sentenced Thursday to three years’ probation.

Pearce
Linda Lee
Pearce, 42, of Daytona Beach entered a plea of no contest to felony battery,
which could have sent her to prison for up to five years.

Circuit Judge
Kim C. Hammond withheld adjudication, meaning the decision won’t appear as a
conviction on Pearce’s record. Hammond also ordered Pearce not to have any
contact with the victim and to pay restitution of $6,299 at $175 per month, said
Chris Kelly, spokesman for the State Attorney’s Office.

The sentence was
part of a negotiated plea made in consultation with the victim, Kelly said.

Pearce, who told a psychologist she had anger problems, declined comment
when reached by phone Thursday.

“I’m not telling you (expletive
deleted),” Pearce said before hanging up.

Pearce was arrested in March
after deputies said she intentionally ran over Verna Boylan, 57, near horseshoe
pits behind the Roadhouse Bar near Flagler Beach, according to a report from the
Flagler County Sheriff’s Office.

Boylan was watching horseshoe games on
St. Patrick’s Day when Pearce, behind the wheel of the golf cart, spotted her.
Pearce told a passenger in the cart, “Oh, there’s the (expletive) . . . I’m
going to run her over, ” according to the report.

Boylan said in a phone
interview Thursday that she heard Pearce.

“I just looked over ’cause I
heard her say that and next thing I know I was already under (the cart),” Boylan
said.

She said she feared her life was over.

“I thought that was
it,” Boylan said. “My head is going under that tire and that’s the end of me.”

She heard people shouting at Pearce.

“I heard everybody
screaming ‘stop, stop, stop,’ but she wouldn’t stop,” Boylan said. “She went
faster.”

After the cart finally stopped, Pearce made her getaway in
another golf cart. Deputies later found Pearce “visibly intoxicated” at her
home, according to the report.

Boylan was left badly bruised and
emotionally battered.

“I couldn’t think,” she said Thursday. “I was
terrified. I still am. But they just told me she can’t come near me.”

Pearce told a psychologist in August she was angry at Boylan because she
had spray-painted Pearce’s girlfriend’s car, according to a psychological
evaluation in the court file.

Boylan denied Thursday, as she has done in
the past, that she had anything to do with spray-painting the car. Boylan said
she has never had a problem with the woman who owns the car and wouldn’t do
anything to her.

Pearce told the psychologist she had been doing well on

a combination of Xanax, (for anxiety) Zoloft (for depression) and Geodon (for
bipolar disorder and other problems) but just before the golf cart incident she
no longer could get Geodon, the report states. The medication withdrawal
produced agitation, restlessness and anxiety, as well as depression and social
avoidance, the report states.

Pearce admitted to having had two or three
beers before the incident, the report states.

frank.fernandez @news-jrnl.com

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PAXIL: Postpartum: Mother Has Worsening Depression with 2nd Baby

PAXIL:   PostpartumMother Has
Worsening Depression with 2nd Baby After Taking Antidepressants:  Had

Postpartum with 1st Baby and Recovered With No Meds:
U.S.A.

Sentences three through seven read:  ” I went through postpartum depression with my first baby eight years ago but at
that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any medication.
And I started getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s
been three months that I am going through this. I have been
taking medications (Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg) and getting counseling but
it’s not helping much. I still don’t feel myself and am having unwanted
thoughts.”

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/expert.q.a/09/08/postpartum.depression.raison/

Expert Q&A

updated 10:03 a.m. EDT, Tue September 8,
2009

How long will my postpartum depression last?

Asked by Sheeza Ashraf, Fremont, California

I have a
4-month-old baby. I am going through postpartum depression with a lot of anxiety
and panic attacks. I went through postpartum depression with my first baby eight
years ago but at that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any
medication. And I started getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s
been three months that I am going through this. I have been taking medications
(Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg) and getting counseling but it’s not helping much. I
still don’t feel myself and am having unwanted thoughts. How long does

postpartum depression last? Is this temporary? Will this anxiety and depression
ever go away? Should I stop the medications and try it on my own? Does exercise
help to get out of the depression? Will I ever be normal like I was
before?

Mental Health Expert Dr.
Charles Raison
Psychiatrist,
Emory University Medical School

Expert answer

Dear Sheeza,

I am sorry to hear of your difficulties —
you are far from alone in your struggles with postpartum depression. Indeed, up
to 20 percent of women become depressed in the six months following delivery,
but company doesn’t help much when it comes to depression — or at least the
company we typically provide in the U.S. Traditional cultures understood the
vulnerability of new mothers and would often surround them with family and
friends to help with the significant emotional and practical burdens of coping

with the newborn.

I am going to make some general recommendations about
what you might want to consider doing, based only on the information you have
provided above. As always, this should not be taken as specific advice for your
actual situation. That kind of advice can come only from a clinician who knows
you and is involved in your care.

First and most important, it is very
important to continue medication when one is still depressed, so given what you
describe, I would counsel against stopping the antidepressant. It is not clear
how long you have been on the Paxil (generic: paroxetine), but let’s assume
you’ve been on it for at least six weeks. You are on a low dose. A reasonable
first step would be to talk with your doctor about raising the dose to 40 mg a
day and trying this dose for at least several weeks.

If you see no
benefit, there are in general two paths your doctor might recommend (and I say
doctor in the generic sense, given that many folks nowadays see physician
assistants or nurse practitioners who often — in my experience — do a better
job diagnosing and treating depression than do MDs). First, your doctor might
add a second antidepressant or an atypical antipsychotic to your Paxil. Although
they are called “antipsychotics,” these agents (for example Seroquel, Abilify,
Zyprexa) are also widely used to help with severe depression and anxiety and are
often quite effective. Second, your doctor might switch you from the Paxil to
another antidepressant. Unfortunately, we have no scientific way of knowing
which agent you should switch to — our best data suggest that they are all
about equal. But one thing is clear: Many people who don’t do well with one
antidepressant will have a great response to a different one.

Anxiety and
panic are quite common when one has a bad depression, and they can be more
miserable to endure than the feeling of depression itself. It is unlikely that
the low dose of Buspar (generic: buspirone) you are taking is of much benefit.
You might want to discuss with your doctor raising the dose to at least 10 mg
three times a day or discontinuing it. The best immediate way to relieve
disabling anxiety is through the use of benzodiazepines (for example lorazepam
or clonazepam). These medications can be lifesavers, but if you take them for
more than three or four weeks your body will become dependent upon them, and
should you want to stop, you will have to reduce them slowly under the
supervision of a doctor.

Let me say a word about exercise. Yes, exercise

has been shown in many studies not only to raise a person’s mood immediately,
but also to work over time as an antidepressant. Therefore, I strongly recommend
adding regular exercise to your treatment regimen. Try to exercise in the
morning, especially when it is sunny. To get the best effect you will need to
work up a sweat. I find that it is even better if you can exercise in a place
with some natural beauty — as being in nature is itself quite comforting for
most of us.

I don’t have an answer to your question about how long the
depression will last and whether it will ever go away. Everyone is different. We
do know, however, that the longer one stays depressed and/or the more episodes
one has had, the harder it is to treat the condition. This is just the
frightening truth of the disease, and it really highlights how important it is
for you to really get aggressive about your treatment. My sincere hope is that
whatever specific treatment route you follow, you will start feeling like
yourself again as quickly as possible.

Finally, whenever I talk about
specific pharmacologic treatments I need to disclose that in addition to my
academic work I have given lectures for two pharmaceutical companies in the last
year: Lilly and Wyeth. I have also served on an advisory board for Lilly in the
last 12 months.
[]

371 total views, no views today

DEPRESSION MED: Rage: Elderly Man Beats & Bites his Doctor: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

I ask you to think of the biting attack by the chimpanzee
as you read this case. Alsothink of the case mentioned in my book of the Sanford
Professor who bit her mother to death while on Prozac. Biting is known to
be produced by high serotonin levels.
One other thing to take note of is the fact that it took three
doctors to hold this elderly man down during the attack. There is another drug
that produces that type of super human strength – PCP, the drug I constantly
remind the world that SSRIs most closely mimic in action.
_________________________________
Paragraphs six through nine read:  “The appeal court
heard Moya suffered from a number of medical conditions, including
anxiety, depression and a personality
disorder.”

After his fit of rage in October 2008, it took three
doctors to hold Moya down,
before police arrived to arrest
him.

Mr Justice Davis, giving his judgement on the appeal, said Moya
claimed not to have taken his medication at the time of the
attack and claimed this had contributed to his loss of control.

But the
judge concluded: “This was a serious matter involving quite a lengthy assault on one doctor and an assault on another

doctor.

http://www.thisissussex.co.uk/crawley/news/Elderlyman-bit-doctor-stay-jail/article-1378968-detail/article.html

Elderly man who bit doctor must stay in jail

Thursday, October 01, 2009, 07:00

1 reader has
commented on this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A PENSIONER who bit his doctor and punched
him in the face in front of “scared” patients will have to serve a year behind
bars.

Gabriel Moya, 69, flew into a rage at a receptionist at Gossops
Green Surgery, when she handed him a prescription he thought was
incomplete.

Moya, who has had heart surgery in the past, was told to calm
down by a doctor but lashed out, punching him twice in the face and biting him
on the arm as he was pinned to the floor.

The pensioner, of Woldhurstlea
Close, Gossops Green, was jailed after admitting an assault charge at a court
hearing earlier this year, but he appealed his sentence.

However, the
Court of Appeal has now ruled that Moya must serve his 12-month jail
term.

The appeal court heard Moya suffered from a number of medical
conditions, including anxiety, depression and a personality
disorder.

After his fit of rage in October 2008, it took three doctors to
hold Moya down, before police arrived to arrest him.

Mr Justice Davis,
giving his judgement on the appeal, said Moya claimed not to have taken his

medication at the time of the attack and claimed this had contributed to his
loss of control.

But the judge concluded: “This was a serious matter
involving quite a lengthy assault on one doctor and an assault on another
doctor.

“The first doctor was bitten as well as punched. Those in the
waiting room were scared.

“Doctors and medical staff need to be protected
from unwarranted attacks of this kind.

“We are not persuaded that it can
be said that this sentence was excessive.”

Moya pleaded guilty to assault
occasioning actual bodily harm and common assault at Lewes Crown Court in April,
where he was handed a 12-month jail term.

The appeal hearing took place
on Monday.

446 total views, no views today

PAXIL: Postpartum Depression Medication Worsens Depression

Sentences three through seven read:  ” I went through
postpartum depression with my first baby eight years ago but at
that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any medication.
And I started getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s
been three months that I am going through this. I have been
taking medications (Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg) and getting counseling but
it’s not helping much. I still don’t feel myself and am having unwanted
thoughts.”

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/expert.q.a/09/08/postpartum.depression.raison/

Expert Q&A

updated 10:03 a.m. EDT, Tue September
8, 2009

How long will my postpartum depression last?

Asked
by Sheeza Ashraf, Fremont, California

I have a 4-month-old baby. I am
going through postpartum depression with a lot of anxiety and panic attacks. I
went through postpartum depression with my first baby eight years ago but at
that time I didn’t have anxiety and I didn’t take any medication. And I started
getting better after 3½ months itself. But now it’s been three months that I am
going through this. I have been taking medications (Paxil 20 mg, Buspar 10 mg)
and getting counseling but it’s not helping much. I still don’t feel myself and
am having unwanted thoughts. How long does postpartum depression last? Is this
temporary? Will this anxiety and depression ever go away? Should I stop the
medications and try it on my own? Does exercise help to get out of the

depression? Will I ever be normal like I was before?

Mental
Health Expert
Dr.
Charles Raison
Psychiatrist,
Emory University Medical School

Expert answer

Dear Sheeza,

I am sorry to hear
of your difficulties — you are far from alone in your struggles with postpartum
depression. Indeed, up to 20 percent of women become depressed in the six months
following delivery, but company doesn’t help much when it comes to depression
or at least the company we typically provide in the U.S. Traditional cultures
understood the vulnerability of new mothers and would often surround them with
family and friends to help with the significant emotional and practical burdens
of coping with the newborn.

I am going to make some general
recommendations about what you might want to consider doing, based only on the
information you have provided above. As always, this should not be taken as
specific advice for your actual situation. That kind of advice can come only
from a clinician who knows you and is involved in your care.

First and
most important, it is very important to continue medication when one is still
depressed, so given what you describe, I would counsel against stopping the
antidepressant. It is not clear how long you have been on the Paxil (generic:
paroxetine), but let’s assume you’ve been on it for at least six weeks. You are
on a low dose. A reasonable first step would be to talk with your doctor about
raising the dose to 40 mg a day and trying this dose for at least several weeks.

If you see no benefit, there are in general two paths your doctor might
recommend (and I say doctor in the generic sense, given that many folks nowadays
see physician assistants or nurse practitioners who often — in my experience —
do a better job diagnosing and treating depression than do MDs). First, your
doctor might add a second antidepressant or an atypical antipsychotic to your
Paxil. Although they are called “antipsychotics,” these agents (for example
Seroquel, Abilify, Zyprexa) are also widely used to help with severe depression
and anxiety and are often quite effective. Second, your doctor might switch you
from the Paxil to another antidepressant. Unfortunately, we have no scientific
way of knowing which agent you should switch to — our best data suggest that
they are all about equal. But one thing is clear: Many people who don’t do well
with one antidepressant will have a great response to a different
one.

Anxiety and panic are quite common when one has a bad depression,
and they can be more miserable to endure than the feeling of depression itself.
It is unlikely that the low dose of Buspar (generic: buspirone) you are taking
is of much benefit. You might want to discuss with your doctor raising the dose
to at least 10 mg three times a day or discontinuing it. The best immediate way
to relieve disabling anxiety is through the use of benzodiazepines (for example
lorazepam or clonazepam). These medications can be lifesavers, but if you take
them for more than three or four weeks your body will become dependent upon
them, and should you want to stop, you will have to reduce them slowly under the
supervision of a doctor.

Let me say a word about exercise. Yes, exercise
has been shown in many studies not only to raise a person’s mood immediately,
but also to work over time as an antidepressant. Therefore, I strongly recommend
adding regular exercise to your treatment regimen. Try to exercise in the
morning, especially when it is sunny. To get the best effect you will need to
work up a sweat. I find that it is even better if you can exercise in a place
with some natural beauty — as being in nature is itself quite comforting for
most of us.

I don’t have an answer to your question about how long the

depression will last and whether it will ever go away. Everyone is different. We
do know, however, that the longer one stays depressed and/or the more episodes
one has had, the harder it is to treat the condition. This is just the
frightening truth of the disease, and it really highlights how important it is
for you to really get aggressive about your treatment. My sincere hope is that
whatever specific treatment route you follow, you will start feeling like
yourself again as quickly as possible.

Finally, whenever I talk about
specific pharmacologic treatments I need to disclose that in addition to my
academic work I have given lectures for two pharmaceutical companies in the last
year: Lilly and Wyeth. I have also served on an advisory board for Lilly in the
last 12 months.
[]

486 total views, 0 views today