BIPOLAR DISORDER: 50 DEAD, 53 WOUNDED IN WORST MASS SHOOTING IN AMERICA

WHERE ARE YOU FDA?!!!

WHY IS IT ACCEPTABLE TO HAVE “MEDICATIONS” ON THE MARKET WITH

HOMICIDAL/SUICIDAL IDEATIONS (COMPULSIONS) & PSYCHOSIS AS SIDE EFFECTS?!!

MY FACEBOOK POST FROM THIS MORNING: Orlando again?! Yet another antidepressant-induced mass killing? DO NOT let any mention of a possible terrorist attack keep you from asking questions. That seems to.be a great diversion tactic anymore. When you keep in mind several considerations you will see why I say that….

#1 The high number of antidepressant – induced cases of sexual preference changes. Serotonin is what determines sexual preference and I have additional new research to share with you on that besides the info from 2000 scientists back in 2000 who released the “canary in the coal mine” warning for mankind that the large amount of antidepressants in the water supply were causing male fish to be born with ovaries: http://www.alternet.org/speakeasy/martharosenberg/drug-store-your-tap-water-and-fish-prozac

Serotonin determines sexual preference: http://www.pnas.org/content/110/24/9968.abstract

Science Can Change The Sexual Orientations Of Micehttp://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/05/study-science-can-change-the-sexual-orientations-of-mice/276311/

[At that point this morning we had no information as to whether the shooter himself might be gay or the other possibility that on antidepressants he was suffering delusions that he might be gay due the the adverse effects of the medications and had become paranoid that he may be becoming gay lashing out because of that.]

#2 The large majority of mass shootings committed by those on antidepressants as documented in this database of cases:www.SSRIstories.NET

#3 The all too common tendency those beginning to go insane on antidepressants often tend to join all kinds of fringe groups

#4 The statement of the Taliban psychiatrist in an interview with an LA Times reporter who told his patients, while standing in an office surrounded by drug company promotional material on antidepressants, that swallowing antidepressants is “like swallowing a little piece of God!” Here is that full article from the LA Times: http://articles.latimes.com/2002/mar/11/news/mn-32224

LATEST REPORT FROM THE DAILY MAIL ON SHOOTER

Keep in mind as you read this that even though antidepressants are absolutely notorious for producing all of the side effects that are associated with the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder (which is actually best described as a sleep/seizure disorder, rather than what they call a mental disorder) few doctors treat the symptoms of what they call Bipolar Disorder without an antidepressant, often combined with an anti-seizure medication. So the mention of this shooter having symptoms of Bipolar Disorder is a very huge indication that he was taking an antidepressant known to cause this type of violence.

“Speaking to reporters on Sunday evening with her fiance beside her, Yusufiy [ex-wife] said she thought the shooting had ‘nothing to do’ with religion and had more to do with mental illness.

“Yusufiy, who said she did not agree with Mateen’s views, revealed her ex-husband was mentally unstable and had bipolar disorder, yet wanted to become a police officer and had applied to the police academy.”

‘After a few months he started to beat me,’ she said. ‘He was mentally unstable… he was obviously disturbed. I know he had a history of [taking] steroids.
‘I was with him for about four months, then my family rescued me….

“Yusufiy said that Mateen owned a gun during their marriage, was ‘short tempered’ and would express ‘hate towards things’. She would not reveal if he had any homophobic views.

“Following a brief romance, the pair tied the knot in March 2009 and moved into a two-bedroom home owned by Mateen’s family in Fort Pierce.

“At the start of their relationship, she told the Washington Post, he was not particularly religious and was not violent. But soon things changed.

‘That’s when I started worrying about my safety and he was abusing me physically very often and not allowing me to speak to my family and he kept me hostage from them,’ she said during her press conference….

“Despite his violence, she said there was no sign he would go on to be a mass murder.

The shooter apparently called 911 and pledged his allegiance to the leader of ISIS. My response as that came out was to me it sounded manic and suicidal. When has ISIS ever called 911 to announce something like that before an attack?

“The shooter’s father Seddique Mateen said that his son got angry when he saw two men kissing in Miami a couple of months ago and thinks that may be related to the shooting.

“He added: ‘We are saying we are apologizing for the whole incident. We weren’t aware of any action he is taking. We are in shock like the whole country.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3637857/My-parents-saved-life-Orlando-gunman-s-ex-wife-reveals-beat-not-doing-household-chores-survived-mother-father-intervened.html#ixzz4BQkPHNQb

 

HOW OFTEN IS BIPOLAR TRIGGERED BY ANTIDEPRESSANTS?

These drugs are producing a massive amount of manic reactions leading many to falsely be labeled Bipolar. You can listen to me explain that to the FDA and the widespread problems it is causing in our society, people’s personal lives, and in families around the world. As I discuss the work of Dr. Malcomb Bowers at Yale and he found in 2000 that a quarter of a million per year were being diagnosed as antidepressant-induced Bipolar every year in America back then. He and his colleagues went on to stress that most doctors do not recognize the antidepressant as being the cause of the Bipolar and, therefore, do not report it as such. The general rule of thumb for figuring the real number of side effects not reported is that less than 10% are reported which would indicate a figure of 2 1/2 million people every year! Is it any wonder the numbers of those diagnosed Bipolar increased by 400%in young people just from 1996 to 2004?! And if those figures are correct what are those numbers now, a decade and a half later?!

http://www.drugawareness.org/dr-ann-blake-tracys-december-13-2006-to-the-fda/

ANTIDEPRESSANT-INDUCED BIPOLAR DISORDER

To learn more about how antidepressants can produce Bipolar Disorder and what it really is I would refer you to an hour long DVD I have on it: https://store.drugawareness.org/product/bipolar-disorder-streaming/

 

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness

DrugAwareness.org & SSRIstories.NET

Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships in the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan. For only a $30 membership for one month you can even get 30 days of access to the withdrawal CD with tips on rebuilding after the meds, all six of my DVDs, hundreds of radio interviews, lectures, TV interviews I have done over the years PLUS access to my book on antidepressants (500 plus pages) with more information than you will find anywhere else (that is only $5 more than the book alone would cost) at www.drugawareness.org. (Definitely the best option to save outrageous postage charges for those out of the country!)

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS??? UTAH MENTALLY UNSTABLE HEIR TO DRUG STORE FORTUNE ARRESTED IN NEIGHBORHOOD BOMB THREAT

 

993582[1]

David Charles Baker

Police say that a mentally unstable apparent heir to a drug store company fortune was arrested after four hour standoff in Salt Lake City Sunday. He calls himself Reverend David Baker, but believes the police think he is Jesus Christ. He is also running for president. He states “If Proctor BAKER is not elected to the white house, this country will know 13 years of HELL – the ultimate BURNING MAN – with Turd Blossom still in charge of World Government.” And in several videos posted on YouTube, he claims God is his vice-presidential running mate and he appears to claim that God’s name is Mike Proctor.

A close friend of David’s has just come forward to say that he just lost it about a year ago & they have been holding their breath to see what happened next. They say just before the bomb threat & police standoff  happened Sunday David had threatened to burn her house down and apparently he was wanting to accomplish a suicide by cop which he hoped would become a murder/suicide as he “took cops out with him.”

“His grand picture was that he was going to have some enormous altercation with police involving massive media, and that he was going to be gunned down by police, hopefully in front of a hospital so he could donate his organs,” Ulmer said. “And my guess is that he probably wanted to take a couple officers with him. I mean, he told us this.”

Anyone seeing any signs of mania here? There is the pyromania, all kinds of delusions of grandeur, mixed with plain old delusions & the manic rage. And where does mania come from when it shows up at this age rather than in the teens or early 20’s? That is right! The biggest cause of Bipolar Disorder on the planet is the use of or abrupt discontinuation of an antidepressant.

Then the signs of elevated levels of serotonin are manifested by the thoughts of suicide, homicide, mania, delusions, violent behavior, etc. Clearly someone needs to be checking medications on this one!!!! Another shattered life! These drugs care not who you are or what your status in life is!

To see the full picture of bizarreness of this case (I did not even mention the sequine dress he was in when arrested!) see the entire articles on this case below:

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865563036/40-homes-evacuated-as-police-surround-man-suspected-of-planting-explosives.html?pg=3

http://m.ksl.com/index/story/sid/22276553

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=22283636&nid=148&title=old-friend-of-millcreek-standoff-suspect-says-she-feared-for-life&s_cid=featured-1

Utah a Microcosm for Antidepressant Adverse Reactions

I have always told people to look at Utah as a microcosm to see what these drugs will do. Utah has led the way in the use of SSRIs from the beginning. Most of the world has caught up with them now though when it comes to the numbers on the meds. But without doubt they led the way. Within seven years of the SSRIs flooding across the state Utah went from the lowest divorce rate in the nation to over the nation average. They became the bankruptcy capitol as so many went manic. I recall one man who told me he went through his entire bank account of $2 Million! (Boy that would be the time you would wish you would have had nothing in the bank to begin with!) Unwed pregnancies climbed drastically as did the numbers of diabetics. I was never able to get statistics on alcohol abuse, but I am sure those numbers climbed drastically as well when considering the overwhelming cravings for alcohol produced by SSRIs.

Of course the tragic cases have been growing since the first one I became aware of which was a mother by the name of Gloria Clements in Pleasant Grove, Utah who on Prozac turned the name of that town into a hypocrisy when she took a sledge hammer & beat her 17 year old son to death while he slept. Then she drank something from the garage in an attempt to kill herself. You can go into our database Rosie & Gene Meysenburg set up at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org to see all the cases Rosie & I gathered out of Utah as they are listed by state.

About the Author: Ann Blake-Tracy is the author of PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA?, and the director of the International Coalition For Drug Awareness [www.drugawareness.org]. She has testified before the FDA and testifies as an expert in legal cases involving serotonergic medications.

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.SSRIstories.com
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Safe Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

 

BOOK: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare! Anything you ever wanted to know about antidepressants is there along with everything drug companies hope you never find out about these drugs. SAFE WITHDRAWAL CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!” on how to safely withdraw from antidepressants & most psychiatric medications is saving lives! Available at www.drugawareness.org

BOOK TESTIMONIALS:

“VERY BOLD AND INFORMATIVE”

“PRICELESS INFORMATION THAT IS GIVING ME BACK TO ME”

“THE ABSOLUTE BEST REFERENCE FOR ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS”

“WELL DOCUMENTED & SCIENTIFICALLY RESEARCHED”

“I was stunned at the amount of research Ann Blake-Tracy has done on this subject. Few researchers go to as much trouble aggressively gathering information on the adverse reactions of Prozac, Zoloft and other SSRIs.”

WITHDRAWAL HELP CD TESTIMONIALS:

“Ann, I just wanted to let you know from the bottom of my heart how grateful I am God placed you in my life. I am now down to less than 2 mg on my Cymbalta and I have never felt better. I am finally getting my life back. I can feel again and colors have never been brighter. Thanks for all that you do!!” … Amber Weber

“Used your method of weaning off of SSRI’s and applied it to Ambien. Took 6 months but had been on 15 mg for years so what was another 6 months. I have been sleeping without it for 2 weeks and it is the first time I have been able to sleep drug free for 15 years. What a relief to be able to lay down and sleep when I need or want to. Ambien may be necessary for people at times but doctors giving a months worth of it at a time with unlimited refills is a prescription for disaster. It is so damn easy to become dependent on. Thanks for your council Ann.”… Mark Hill

“I’m so thankful for Ann Blake-Tracy and all her work. Also for taking the time out to talk to me and educate everyone! She has been a blessing to me during this awful time of antidepressant hell!” … Antoinette Beck

 

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Caught on Video – Student Threatens to Kill Professor

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Caught on Video – Student Threatens to Kill Professor

Posted by: “Ann Blake-Tracy”

Wed Apr 18, 2012 9:34 pm (PDT)

Jona

 

Jonatha Carr

Boca Raton, FL: ANTIDEPRESSANT RAGE:

ANTIDEPRESSANT-INDUCED MANIC RAGE: View firsthand the rage, cursing, & violence that comes from these medications to produce shootings like Columbine, Red Lake & Virginia Tech. See www.drugawareness.org to understand how similar these so called antidepressants are to PCP & see www.ssristories.drugawareness.org for 1000’s more cases like this.
As you view this case firsthand remember just how many people worldwide are “locked & loaded” on these medications! First is a news report on this incident:

Girl goes nuts on her antidepressant and makes viral news

Crazy-Girl-Collage
www.youtube.com
Crazy fau girl loses it and gets on news. Goes viral. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNCAgsepHxg

Mother of Black FAU Student Jonatha Carr want her Expulsion Reversed so she can Graduate http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3gzDhpfsVo

Here are full uncut videos of this incident.

Video #1: Show details http://m.youtube.com/#/watch?desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv% 3DiYDL2I6Vdi8&v=iYDL2I6Vdi8&gl=US

Video #2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDueEzx7pxQ

Below are two articles discussing this young woman’s long history of being medicated off & on with antidepressants, but now currently taking her antidepressant. Luckily a student in her class used his cell to video her manic outburst so we have two YouTube video accounts plus a news reports covering this outburst where she threatens to kill the teacher & a fellow student. Had she had a gun this would have been another school shooting. You can see most of this firsthand as it begins.

The worst of it comes as the police arrive & it takes three officers & others to hold her down as she kicks & punches the police car, officers, etc. They tazered her three times which is something the NEEDS TO STOP! The police are killing people using tazers on those having toxic reactions to these serotonergic medications! We have long known that electric shock treatments mixed with the medications can produce Serotonin Syndrome as ECT too increases serotonin. Serotonin Syndrome can result in multiple organ failure as this same area of Florida witnessed a few years ago when Anna Nicole Smith’s young son Daniel died in her hospital room on multiple serotonergic medications while visiting his new baby sister.

And to see 1000’s more similar cases go to our database of cases posted at www.ssristories.net

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

About the Author: Ann Blake Tracy is the author of PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA? –OUR SEROTONIN NIGHTMARE!, and the director of the International Coalition For Drug Awareness [www.drugawareness.org]. She has testified before the FDA and has testified as an expert in legal cases involving serotonergic medications since 1992.

BOOK: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare! Anything you ever wanted to know about antidepressants is there along with everything drug companies hope you never find out about these drugs. SAFE WITHDRAWAL CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!” on how to safely withdraw from antidepressants & most psychiatric medications is saving lives! Both available at www.drugawareness.org

BOOK TESTIMONIALS:

“Very bold & informative”

“Priceless information that is giving me back to me”

“The absolute best reference for antidepressant drugs”

“Well documented & scientifically researched”

““I was stunned at the amount of research Ann Tracy has done on this subject. Few researchers go to as much trouble aggressively gathering information on the adverse reactions of Prozac, Zoloft and other SSRIs.”

WITHDRAWAL HELP CD TESTIMONIALS:

“Ann, I just wanted to let you know from the bottom of my heart how grateful I am God placed you in my life. I am now down to less than 2 mg on my Cymbalta and I have never felt better. I am finally getting my life back. I can feel again and colors have never been brighter. Thanks for all that you do!!” … Amber Weber

“Used your method of weaning off of SSRI’s and applied it to Ambien. Took 6 months but had been on 15 mg for years so what was another 6 months. I have been sleeping without it for 2 weeks and it is the first time I have been able to sleep drug free for 15 years. What a relief to be able to lay down and sleep when I need or want to. Ambien may be necessary for people at times but doctors giving a months worth of it at a time with unlimited refills is a prescription for disaster. It is so damn easy to become dependent on. Thanks for your council Ann.”… Mark Hill

ORIGINAL ARTICLES:

FAU student Jonatha Carr’s family tells their side of the story
April 16, 2012
By Rachel Chapnick

Jonatha Carr, 24, was diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder when she was 13 years old. Her outburst in GS120 on March 20 landed on YouTube, Reddit, Twitter and Facebook. Photo courtesy of Jonathan Carr.

Jonatha Carr, a 24-year-old FAU student, was two courses shy of graduation when she suffered a nervous breakdown and threatened to kill her professor and classmates.
The university suspended Carr for at least the semester following her outburst on March 20. Carr’s family said her rant was because she suffers from bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The family isn’t convinced FAU handled the situation properly. Since then, Joyce and Nicole Carr say the family has been receiving death threats from strangers and they’re worried about Carr’s safety, as well as her future.
Carr has suffered from mental breakdowns before, three of which required her to be Baker Acted. Carr found out she was mentally ill when she was 13, according to her mother and sister. They say mental disorders run in the family. Carr’s grandmother was bipolar, and her aunt and sister also battle the condition.
Carr’s antidepressant medication masks her disorders and lets her be an active member in FAU’s community. She wanted to be a doctor but a nervous breakdown in 2009 ended her dream. Psychiatric specialists told Carr she couldn’t go through residency, since she needed sleep for her mental disabilities, according to Joyce and Nicole Carr.
When that didn’t work out, Carr decided to be a chemistry teacher. With a 3.8 GPA, her family says she was on her way, until she asked her professor, “How does evolution kill black people?”
“The professor had made a comment. ‘Evolution is final, it’s not up for discussion,’” Joyce Carr said. According to her family, Carr, who is a creationist, had a problem with her evolution class after the comment.
Evolution professor Stephen Kajiura said he doesn’t recall saying this. “She may have misinterpreted me,” Kajiura said. “You can’t ever say anything is absolute and final. We are biologists. We deal in statistics and probability.”
He also claims the class had not yet discussed evolution versus creationism.
An anonymous creationist in the class backed this up. “He doesn’t stop us from asking questions, but he’ll be prepared to argue from what he believes. Otherwise he wouldn’t be teaching the subject,” the student said.
The week before her outburst, Joyce Carr and her daughter grabbed lunch. Carr complained about Kajiura’s class. She had been enrolled in the class once before, but dropped it when her grandmother died. Her mother recommended she drop it again, but Carr needed it to graduate.
Once Carr’s breakdown began, the family thinks Kajiura should have realized something was wrong. “If someone would have acted differently, I wish it would have been the professor,” Joyce Carr said.
Kajiura said he realized the student was having a mental breakdown. “It was clearly a mental issue, which is why I wanted to not confront her,” he said. According to Kajiura, his teaching assistant had left to call police, so he wanted to keep Carr calm.
Joyce Carr mentioned evolution wasn’t the problem, it’s what Kajiura said about it. “When you say it’s been proven, she wanted to challenge it,” she said.
Nicole Carr said her sister researched how the theory of evolution was used to justify the Holocaust. She thinks that’s what led to her question. “She remembers what she said, but she says ‘I couldn’t control it,’” Joyce Carr said.
They say Carr couldn’t control her racist comments because of her condition. “When my sister is in her state, that’s where she goes,” Nicole Carr said.
They insist, however, Carr is not racist. “When she’s at home, her slurs were against black people,” Joyce Carr said “She’s called my mom names, a black b-i-t-c-h, a nigger,” Nicole Carr said.
“When you go in your manic phase, you go off. It may be sex, it may be race, it may be religion,” Nicole Carr said. “On a regular basis she wouldn’t say things like this.”
According to both women, this breakdown was Carr’s worst. “Have I seen it like that? No,” Joyce Carr said.
Nicole Carr, who says her sister has hit her and sworn at her during past breakdowns, agreed, “I hadn’t seen it with that much depth.”
Carr was released on March 23, three days after the breakdown. “We’re having a hard time having her not want to search everything being written about her,” Joyce Carr said.
Nicole added, “We’re trying to get her to watch TV, watch movies, but she’s been reading all this stuff.”
Carr’s family is also worried about the students. “Jonatha has a mental illness. It’s not their fault,” Joyce Carr said.
“We’re in an age when kids pull out their video cameras and their cell phones. It’s like the norm. […] As much as I don’t like [the video] out there, had it not been for it, I would have never known what went on in that classroom.”
The family says Jonatha will not try to receive secondary degrees from FAU. Still, they want to bring in a specialist to train students and faculty on how to deal with students with mental disorders.

http://upressonline.com/2012/04/fau-student-jonatha-carrs-family-tells-their-side-of-the-story/
_________________________________________

Jonatha Carr, FAU Student Who Threatened to Kill Teacher, Got Tasered Three Times, Hit a Cop, and Said Really Racist Stuff, Police Say

By Rich Abdill Thu., Mar. 22 2012 at 4:49 PM

Comments (105)

Categories: Crime, WTF

Update, 3/30: Carr’s family has commented about her history of mental illness.

The Pulp just got hold of the police report in the case of Jonatha Carr, a 24-year-old Florida Atlantic University student who inexplicably started screaming during a biology class Tuesday. Her tirade, in which she threatened to kill the teacher and hit another man in the forehead, was captured on video. In it, you can see her stomping around the classroom yelling things like “I will kill the fuck out of you” before she’s eventually carted out of the room.

After that, according to the report, it got way, way worse.

The first time of three instances in which police used a Taser on Carr was while they were first attempting to apprehend her outside the classroom. Then, on the way to the police station, the report says, “Carr started screaming to let her out and take the handcuffs off of her and kicking the roof of the vehicle, the door and the windows.”

They ultimately decided to bypass processing her at the police station and take her directly to South County Mental Health Center. Before they left, they attempted to restrain her legs. She wouldn’t let them and got hit with the Taser again. She was tasered a third time when she “refused to stop swinging back and forth” in the police car.

When they finally got to South County, Carr refused to get out of the car and had to be carried in. Inside, she refused to walk to a room and was carried there too. There, police say, she fought with the staff and had to be held down by three police officers and medical staff.

On the rest, the report can really speak for itself — it’s not clear what set off Carr, but police say she required multiple officers to restrain her behavior every step of the way. The report’s at the bottom, but here are the big items, in the words of FAU Police Officer William Hernandez:

All of a sudden she just started to yell at the instructor and at the entire class saying things like “white people suck, Jewish people who think this world is theirs which it’s not, I will fucking kill you at the Holocaust events all over the world.
“Evolution kills. Haven’t thought about Asians yet.” Carr kept going on and on about killing people.
Upon my arrival I observed a black female lying face down in the grass area just south of building #2, I also observed two white males holding her down until I arrived. I then held her down with my hands on both of her wrists and I calmly asked her to calm down and she refused. Sergeant Boldin and I attempted to place her in a sitting position at which time she started punching me with a closed fist on my chest.
Once the handcuffs were placed on her wrist, she started kicking and calling everyone “sand niggers”, “white niggers” and “black niggers”. She also stated that she will “kill everyone white people sucks”.
Carr aggressively resisted by lying on the ground and stiffening her body, Sergeant Boldin, Officer Cowart, Corporal Stewart and I had to lift her and place her inside the vehicle. She was not injured at this stage.
While placing her in the vehicle, she started kicking and screaming, then stiffened her body and refused to put her legs inside, I then attempted to grab her legs and place them inside but she kicked me on my right thigh.
She increasingly became more uncontrollable. At this point she gave me no choice but to tase her, after I advised her I would, I then initiated a drive stun on her left thigh at approximately 12:20:11 for approximately 3 seconds, she then placed her legs inside the vehicle.

And here’s the report:

Jonatha Carr Police Report

http://blogs.browardpalmbeach.com/pulp/2012/03/jonatha_carr_fau_kill_teacher_report.php

1,245 total views, 1 views today

LEXAPRO: Judge Experience​s Antidepres​sant-Induc​ed Hypomania

A doctor who is telling the truth about the hypomanic episode this
judge experienced from his antidepressant?!!!!! How refreshing that
the patient is getting the truth rather than being told he had an
“underlying” Bipolar Disorder that was manifest by his antidepressant
use!!!!! Why can’t other doctors be as honest and come right out and
tell the patient that their Bipolar symptoms have been brought on by
their antidepressant?

BUT when a patient experiences mania or hypomania from an
antidepressant, it is ABSOLUTELY INSANE to think they will not
experience it again on a different antidepressant! He and his family
had better hold their breaths!

What a shame when this happened that he did not have a copy of my DVD,
“Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?” If he had, the
DVD would have served as a warning for him about this common reaction
to both antidepressant use and abrupt withdrawal from antidepressants.

Why are these “Bipolar” patients not told they are suffering
continuous mild seizure activity which is what Bipolar Disorder is – a
sleep/seizure disorder brought on by the drugs?! ANTI-depressants are
stimulants, stimulants over stimulate the brain producing seizures.
The one time of day we all are in seizure activity is during REM sleep
– the dream state. So antidepressants are basically chemically
inducing the dream state during wakefulness.

By the way, the names “Mania” and “Hypomania” should be changed to
“Shear Hell on Earth!!!!!!!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of
Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I
Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder. . .

Blanche [Downing’s physician], though, describes the episode as a case
of antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Find this article at:

http://www.2theadvocate.com/features/people/Handling-hypomania.html?showAll=y&c=y

Former Judge Bob Downing explains episode that led to his resignation

By ELLYN COUVILLION
Advocate staff writer
Published: Mar 13, 2011 – Page: 1D

Comments (3)

Bob Downing, former 1st Circuit Court of Appeal judge, whose sudden
resignation from the bench last summer was surrounded by confusion,
can sort  out the events on a kind of timeline.

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder.

During the episode that lasted approximately three months, Downing
spent money wildly, alienated family, friends and employees and
resigned from the judicial bench, about the time he was hospitalized
and treated.

“It was a short period. It seemed like an eternity,” Downing, 61, said
recently from an office at the law firm of Dué, Price, Guidry,
Piedrahita and Andrews, where he’s working in an “of counsel” status.

In that capacity, Downing said that attorneys with the firm will work
with him on cases he brings in, but he is not on salary at the firm.
Downing handles personal injury cases.

Now being treated with medication for what was likely a one-time event
and back to feeling like himself, Downing said he recently decided to
speak out about his experience for several reasons.

“For people who have open heart surgery or stents, watch out for
depression,” Downing said.

One in five people experience an episode of depression after having
heart surgery, according to the website,http://www.psychcentral.com,
an independent mental health and psychology network run by mental
health professionals.

Downing also advises people taking antidepressants to stay in touch
with their doctor.

And, he said, “If you start feeling really wonderful and start
spending a lot of money, you need to see a counselor,” Downing said.

Hypomania is “a condition similar to mania but less severe,” according
to MedicineNet.com, a physician-produced online health-care publishing
company.

“The symptoms are similar, with elevated mood, increased activity,
decreased need for sleep, grandiosity, racing thoughts and the like,”
the company reports at its medical dictionary
website,http://www.medterms.com.

“It is important to diagnose hypomania, because, as an expression of
bipolar disorder, it can cycle into depression and carry an increased
risk of suicide,” the site reports.

Bipolar disorder is marked by periods of elevated or irritable mood —
the mania — alternating with depression, according to the National
Institutes of Health.

The mood swings between mania and depression can be very abrupt, it reports.

“Whether it’s hypomania or mania is a matter of severity,” said local
psychiatrist Dr. Robert Blanche, who is Downing’s physician.

“In general, it’s an elevated or an irritable mood that’s not normal
for the person,” Blanche said.

“In his (Downing’s) case, he was irritable and also, maybe the word is
‘expansive’ in his affects, (showing) euphoria, elation and
excitement,” Blanche said.

“He had never had a history of this before,” Blanche said.

Downing theorizes that his stopping his antidepressant too quickly, on
his own, led to the episode.

Blanche, though, describes the episode as a case of
antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Blanche said the only way to arrest the condition of hypomania is for
the person to go into the hospital so that their medications can be
adjusted.

During his own hospitalization, Downing was prescribed a mood
stabilizer, Depakote, classified as an anti-seizure medicine and the
medicine most commonly prescribed for mania by psychiatrists, Blanche
said.

The medicine acts to bind up what can be described as “excitatory”
chemicals in the brain, Blanche said.

Ultimately, though, that can result in a depletion of those chemicals
and a person can slide into a depression, Blanche said.

“If (a patient) is on a mood stabilizer, you can introduce an
antidepressant,” he said.

Downing said that his current antidepressant, Wellbutrin, is working
well for him.

After living through a hypomanic episode, some patients choose to stay
on the medicine, Blanche said.

“Some people will actually choose to stay on the medicine, just
because they don’t want it to ever happen again,” he said.

Fortunately, the condition “is one of the most treatable conditions in
psychiatry,” added Blanche, who serves as the psychiatrist at the East
Baton Rouge Parish jail and is the medical director of an emergency
psychiatric treatment center affiliated with the Earl K. Long Medical
Center.

Downing’s experiences this summer seem to have had all the markings of
manic episodes of bipolar disorder.

“Around the first of June 2010, I started feeling really good, started
talking a lot more, making big plans,” Downing said.

Around that time, he went to speak at a law conference in Carmel, Calif.

“I went to Yosemite, it was beautiful. I would wake up at 3 o’clock, 4
o’clock, 5 o’clock (thinking) ‘You need to retire, buy some foreclosed
properties, fix them up and make money to help people in India dig
wells,” Downing said.

“I was making grandiose plans,” he said.

Usually frugal, he started spending money, too, he said.

Before the episode was over, he had run up debts of almost $100,000,
buying such things as a 1971 Rolls Royce, three Harley-Davidson
motorcycles and a 1952 police car, he said.

He also bought a $1,000 commercial pressure washer, a large lawn
tractor and expensive new tools to help put a formerly homeless man
into business, he said.

“He just wasn’t himself,” said his wife, Pam Downing.

The couple will have been married 30 years on March 29.

“When the person is in that condition, you really can’t reason with
them,” Blanche said.

“The amazing thing about it is that it robs the person of their
insight,” he said.

In contrast, people are “painfully aware” of the other aspect of
bipolar disorder — depression, Blanche said.

Physicians and employers may miss a condition like hypomania, said
Townsend, because, like most people, “we like happy people, perky
people.”

“There’s a little more-rapid thinking, (rapid) speech, a decreased
need for sleep” in someone with mania, he said.

“When it becomes a condition is when it affects functioning,” Townsend said.

“It’s wonderful that the judge is willing to be an advocate for
bipolar disorder” awareness, Townsend said, referring to Downing.

“It’s very common, and people with it can be very productive members
of our society. It’s all around us,” he said.

Downing’s symptoms brought along misunderstandings among friends and
family members and conflicting ideas on the cause and solution of the
situation, he and family members said
Downing said he refused to seek treatment.

Finally, at one point, his eldest daughter, Kathryne Hart, 27, after
consulting with a physician, sought to have her father committed to a
hospital. Hart’s efforts came after Downing threatened suicide if
there was any more talk about his going to see a doctor.

“She was very brave,” Downing said.

But Downing wasn’t at home as expected when sheriff’s deputies arrived
to bring him to the hospital.

Pam Downing, who supported Hart in the decision, had taken the
couple’s son, Wes Downing, then 24, to visit a relative in Missouri
and to get away from the stressful situation at that time. The
Downings also have another daughter,  Kiera Downing, 26.

Shortly afterward, a group of Downing’s friends brought Downing to see
Blanche, who then admitted Downing into a psychiatric hospital, and
Downing began the recovery process, Kathryne Hart said.

Hart said that the threat of her father taking his life was something
she couldn’t ignore.

When she was in middle school, she said, two fellow students killed
themselves within a week of each other.

“I couldn’t take that chance,” she said. “I was going to do anything
to save him.”

The family said it took about a month after his hospitalization for
Downing to begin seeming like himself again and to understand what had
happened.

Downing said he has struggled with guilt over the debt he accrued
during the manic episode.

He’s taken heart, he said, from something he read in the book “Words
to Lift Your Spirit” by Dale Brown:

“When we do experience failure in our jobs or in our personal lives,
we must not shackle ourselves with guilt, because it can lead to the
silent suffocation of our spirit.”

Downing said that his speaking about his experience is a way to bring
something positive from it.

“He’s 100 percent better,” Hart said. “He’s completely back to normal.
He’s reconciled with all of us.”

“Something like this either tears a family apart or makes it
stronger,” Pam Downing said.

For them, the experience has made the family stronger, she said,
adding that they received a lot of support from the pastors of their
church, First Presbyterian.

Downing, who receives a pension for his years of public service,
served as a district judge for 15 years and as a 1st Circuit Court of
Appeal judge for 10 years.

Over the years, he also worked in various volunteer programs for
prison inmates, such as a Bible study and a program that prepared
inmates for getting jobs when they were released.

He also previously served on the boards of Cenikor, a treatment
community to help people end substance abuse, and the Baton Rouge
Marine Institute, now AMIkids Baton Rouge.

Looking back on the events of last summer, he said, “Twenty-five years
in public service and, then, at the end of my career, people are
going, ‘What’s happening? Something’s wrong.’”

Looking ahead to the future, Downing said, “I’ve been a positive
person most of my life. I can see light at the end of the tunnel.”

Bipolar disorder, classified as a mood disorder, affects about 5.7
million Americans or approximately 2.6 percent of the U.S. population.

The disorder, which affects men and women equally, involves periods of
mania — elevated or irritable mood — alternating with periods of
depression. There are two types. Bipolar disorder type I involves
periods of major depression and was formerly called manic depression.
Bipolar disorder type II involves hypomania, with symptoms that aren’t
as extreme as the symptoms of mania.

In most people with bipolar disorder, there is no clear cause.

The following, though, may trigger a manic episode in people
vulnerable to the illness:

Life changes such as childbirth.
Medication such as antidepressants and steroids.
Periods of sleeplessness.
Recreational drug use.

Symptoms of the manic phase can last from days to months and include:

Agitation or irritation.
Inflated self-esteem.
Noticeably elevated mood.
Poor temper control.
Impaired judgment.
Spending sprees.

Medicines called mood stabilizers are the first line of treatment.
Antidepressant medications can be added to mood-stabilizing drugs.
Other medications used to treat bipolar disorder are anti-psychotic
drugs and anti-anxiety drugs.

Source: The National Institutes of Health

Capitol news bureau writer Michelle Millhollon contributed to this story.

489 total views, no views today

LEXAPRO: Judge Experiences Antidepressant-Induced Hypomania

A doctor who is telling the truth about the hypomanic episode this
judge experienced from his antidepressant?!!!!! How refreshing that
the patient is getting the truth rather than being told he had an
“underlying” Bipolar Disorder that was manifest by his antidepressant
use!!!!! Why can’t other doctors be as honest and come right out and
tell the patient that their Bipolar symptoms have been brought on by
their antidepressant?

BUT when a patient experiences mania or hypomania from an
antidepressant, it is ABSOLUTELY INSANE to think they will not
experience it again on a different antidepressant! He and his family
had better hold their breaths!

What a shame when this happened that he did not have a copy of my DVD,
“Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?” If he had, the
DVD would have served as a warning for him about this common reaction
to both antidepressant use and abrupt withdrawal from antidepressants.

Why are these “Bipolar” patients not told they are suffering
continuous mild seizure activity which is what Bipolar Disorder is – a
sleep/seizure disorder brought on by the drugs?! ANTI-depressants are
stimulants, stimulants over stimulate the brain producing seizures.
The one time of day we all are in seizure activity is during REM sleep
– the dream state. So antidepressants are basically chemically
inducing the dream state during wakefulness.

By the way, the names “Mania” and “Hypomania” should be changed to
“Shear Hell on Earth!!!!!!!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of
Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I
Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder. . .

Blanche [Downing’s physician], though, describes the episode as a case
of antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Find this article at:

http://www.2theadvocate.com/features/people/Handling-hypomania.html?showAll=y&c=y

Former Judge Bob Downing explains episode that led to his resignation

By ELLYN COUVILLION
Advocate staff writer
Published: Mar 13, 2011 – Page: 1D

Comments (3)

Bob Downing, former 1st Circuit Court of Appeal judge, whose sudden
resignation from the bench last summer was surrounded by confusion,
can sort  out the events on a kind of timeline.

First, there was his heart stent surgery in the spring of 2009.

Following surgery, he found himself feeling depressed, a scenario
experienced by some heart patients, he later learned. The depression
was compounded by the death of a good friend, he said.

Next, came a period of his taking an antidepressant, Lexapro,  that he
found helpful. But, he said, he stopped the medicine, on his own, too
quickly.

What happened next, he said, was later diagnosed as an episode of
hypomania, an expression of bipolar disorder.

During the episode that lasted approximately three months, Downing
spent money wildly, alienated family, friends and employees and
resigned from the judicial bench, about the time he was hospitalized
and treated.

“It was a short period. It seemed like an eternity,” Downing, 61, said
recently from an office at the law firm of Dué, Price, Guidry,
Piedrahita and Andrews, where he’s working in an “of counsel” status.

In that capacity, Downing said that attorneys with the firm will work
with him on cases he brings in, but he is not on salary at the firm.
Downing handles personal injury cases.

Now being treated with medication for what was likely a one-time event
and back to feeling like himself, Downing said he recently decided to
speak out about his experience for several reasons.

“For people who have open heart surgery or stents, watch out for
depression,” Downing said.

One in five people experience an episode of depression after having
heart surgery, according to the website,http://www.psychcentral.com,
an independent mental health and psychology network run by mental
health professionals.

Downing also advises people taking antidepressants to stay in touch
with their doctor.

And, he said, “If you start feeling really wonderful and start
spending a lot of money, you need to see a counselor,” Downing said.

Hypomania is “a condition similar to mania but less severe,” according
to MedicineNet.com, a physician-produced online health-care publishing
company.

“The symptoms are similar, with elevated mood, increased activity,
decreased need for sleep, grandiosity, racing thoughts and the like,”
the company reports at its medical dictionary
website,http://www.medterms.com.

“It is important to diagnose hypomania, because, as an expression of
bipolar disorder, it can cycle into depression and carry an increased
risk of suicide,” the site reports.

Bipolar disorder is marked by periods of elevated or irritable mood —
the mania — alternating with depression, according to the National
Institutes of Health.

The mood swings between mania and depression can be very abrupt, it reports.

“Whether it’s hypomania or mania is a matter of severity,” said local
psychiatrist Dr. Robert Blanche, who is Downing’s physician.

“In general, it’s an elevated or an irritable mood that’s not normal
for the person,” Blanche said.

“In his (Downing’s) case, he was irritable and also, maybe the word is
‘expansive’ in his affects, (showing) euphoria, elation and
excitement,” Blanche said.

“He had never had a history of this before,” Blanche said.

Downing theorizes that his stopping his antidepressant too quickly, on
his own, led to the episode.

Blanche, though, describes the episode as a case of
antidepressant-induced hypomania, attributing it to a second
antidepressant that Downing was later prescribed by another physician.

“Medications can commonly cause hypomania, and it’s not really
understood why,” said Dr. Mark Townsend, a professor of psychiatry at
the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans.

Antidepressants can bring on hypomania, as can steroids, he said.

“There’s really not a diagnostic category for antidepressant-induced
hypomania” in the current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental
Disorders, Blanche said, but he predicted there will be one in the
manual’s next edition.

Blanche said the only way to arrest the condition of hypomania is for
the person to go into the hospital so that their medications can be
adjusted.

During his own hospitalization, Downing was prescribed a mood
stabilizer, Depakote, classified as an anti-seizure medicine and the
medicine most commonly prescribed for mania by psychiatrists, Blanche
said.

The medicine acts to bind up what can be described as “excitatory”
chemicals in the brain, Blanche said.

Ultimately, though, that can result in a depletion of those chemicals
and a person can slide into a depression, Blanche said.

“If (a patient) is on a mood stabilizer, you can introduce an
antidepressant,” he said.

Downing said that his current antidepressant, Wellbutrin, is working
well for him.

After living through a hypomanic episode, some patients choose to stay
on the medicine, Blanche said.

“Some people will actually choose to stay on the medicine, just
because they don’t want it to ever happen again,” he said.

Fortunately, the condition “is one of the most treatable conditions in
psychiatry,” added Blanche, who serves as the psychiatrist at the East
Baton Rouge Parish jail and is the medical director of an emergency
psychiatric treatment center affiliated with the Earl K. Long Medical
Center.

Downing’s experiences this summer seem to have had all the markings of
manic episodes of bipolar disorder.

“Around the first of June 2010, I started feeling really good, started
talking a lot more, making big plans,” Downing said.

Around that time, he went to speak at a law conference in Carmel, Calif.

“I went to Yosemite, it was beautiful. I would wake up at 3 o’clock, 4
o’clock, 5 o’clock (thinking) ‘You need to retire, buy some foreclosed
properties, fix them up and make money to help people in India dig
wells,” Downing said.

“I was making grandiose plans,” he said.

Usually frugal, he started spending money, too, he said.

Before the episode was over, he had run up debts of almost $100,000,
buying such things as a 1971 Rolls Royce, three Harley-Davidson
motorcycles and a 1952 police car, he said.

He also bought a $1,000 commercial pressure washer, a large lawn
tractor and expensive new tools to help put a formerly homeless man
into business, he said.

“He just wasn’t himself,” said his wife, Pam Downing.

The couple will have been married 30 years on March 29.

“When the person is in that condition, you really can’t reason with
them,” Blanche said.

“The amazing thing about it is that it robs the person of their
insight,” he said.

In contrast, people are “painfully aware” of the other aspect of
bipolar disorder — depression, Blanche said.

Physicians and employers may miss a condition like hypomania, said
Townsend, because, like most people, “we like happy people, perky
people.”

“There’s a little more-rapid thinking, (rapid) speech, a decreased
need for sleep” in someone with mania, he said.

“When it becomes a condition is when it affects functioning,” Townsend said.

“It’s wonderful that the judge is willing to be an advocate for
bipolar disorder” awareness, Townsend said, referring to Downing.

“It’s very common, and people with it can be very productive members
of our society. It’s all around us,” he said.

Downing’s symptoms brought along misunderstandings among friends and
family members and conflicting ideas on the cause and solution of the
situation, he and family members said
Downing said he refused to seek treatment.

Finally, at one point, his eldest daughter, Kathryne Hart, 27, after
consulting with a physician, sought to have her father committed to a
hospital. Hart’s efforts came after Downing threatened suicide if
there was any more talk about his going to see a doctor.

“She was very brave,” Downing said.

But Downing wasn’t at home as expected when sheriff’s deputies arrived
to bring him to the hospital.

Pam Downing, who supported Hart in the decision, had taken the
couple’s son, Wes Downing, then 24, to visit a relative in Missouri
and to get away from the stressful situation at that time. The
Downings also have another daughter,  Kiera Downing, 26.

Shortly afterward, a group of Downing’s friends brought Downing to see
Blanche, who then admitted Downing into a psychiatric hospital, and
Downing began the recovery process, Kathryne Hart said.

Hart said that the threat of her father taking his life was something
she couldn’t ignore.

When she was in middle school, she said, two fellow students killed
themselves within a week of each other.

“I couldn’t take that chance,” she said. “I was going to do anything
to save him.”

The family said it took about a month after his hospitalization for
Downing to begin seeming like himself again and to understand what had
happened.

Downing said he has struggled with guilt over the debt he accrued
during the manic episode.

He’s taken heart, he said, from something he read in the book “Words
to Lift Your Spirit” by Dale Brown:

“When we do experience failure in our jobs or in our personal lives,
we must not shackle ourselves with guilt, because it can lead to the
silent suffocation of our spirit.”

Downing said that his speaking about his experience is a way to bring
something positive from it.

“He’s 100 percent better,” Hart said. “He’s completely back to normal.
He’s reconciled with all of us.”

“Something like this either tears a family apart or makes it
stronger,” Pam Downing said.

For them, the experience has made the family stronger, she said,
adding that they received a lot of support from the pastors of their
church, First Presbyterian.

Downing, who receives a pension for his years of public service,
served as a district judge for 15 years and as a 1st Circuit Court of
Appeal judge for 10 years.

Over the years, he also worked in various volunteer programs for
prison inmates, such as a Bible study and a program that prepared
inmates for getting jobs when they were released.

He also previously served on the boards of Cenikor, a treatment
community to help people end substance abuse, and the Baton Rouge
Marine Institute, now AMIkids Baton Rouge.

Looking back on the events of last summer, he said, “Twenty-five years
in public service and, then, at the end of my career, people are
going, ‘What’s happening? Something’s wrong.’”

Looking ahead to the future, Downing said, “I’ve been a positive
person most of my life. I can see light at the end of the tunnel.”

Bipolar disorder, classified as a mood disorder, affects about 5.7
million Americans or approximately 2.6 percent of the U.S. population.

The disorder, which affects men and women equally, involves periods of
mania — elevated or irritable mood — alternating with periods of
depression. There are two types. Bipolar disorder type I involves
periods of major depression and was formerly called manic depression.
Bipolar disorder type II involves hypomania, with symptoms that aren’t
as extreme as the symptoms of mania.

In most people with bipolar disorder, there is no clear cause.

The following, though, may trigger a manic episode in people
vulnerable to the illness:

Life changes such as childbirth.
Medication such as antidepressants and steroids.
Periods of sleeplessness.
Recreational drug use.

Symptoms of the manic phase can last from days to months and include:

Agitation or irritation.
Inflated self-esteem.
Noticeably elevated mood.
Poor temper control.
Impaired judgment.
Spending sprees.

Medicines called mood stabilizers are the first line of treatment.
Antidepressant medications can be added to mood-stabilizing drugs.
Other medications used to treat bipolar disorder are anti-psychotic
drugs and anti-anxiety drugs.

Source: The National Institutes of Health

Capitol news bureau writer Michelle Millhollon contributed to this story.

1,184 total views, 1 views today

ZOLOFT & Geodon: Woman Assaults Another Woman on Golf Course: Drags her …

Paragraph 20 reads:  “Pearce told the psychologist she
had been doing well on a combination of Xanax, (for anxiety) Zoloft
(for depression)
and Geodon (for bipolar disorder and other
problems) but just before the golf cart incident she no longer could get

Geodon , the report states. The medication withdrawal produced agitation,
restlessness and anxiety, as well as depression and social avoidance,
the
report states.”

http://www.news-journalonline.com/NewsJournalOnline/News/EastVolusia/evlHEAD04112009.htm

Woman gets probation in golf-cart
attack

By FRANK FERNANDEZ
Staff Writer

BUNNELL — A woman who turned a golf cart into a weapon and
intentionally ran down and dragged another woman for about 15 yards was
sentenced Thursday to three years’ probation.

Pearce
Linda Lee
Pearce, 42, of Daytona Beach entered a plea of no contest to felony battery,
which could have sent her to prison for up to five years.

Circuit Judge
Kim C. Hammond withheld adjudication, meaning the decision won’t appear as a
conviction on Pearce’s record. Hammond also ordered Pearce not to have any
contact with the victim and to pay restitution of $6,299 at $175 per month, said
Chris Kelly, spokesman for the State Attorney’s Office.

The sentence was
part of a negotiated plea made in consultation with the victim, Kelly said.

Pearce, who told a psychologist she had anger problems, declined comment
when reached by phone Thursday.

“I’m not telling you (expletive
deleted),” Pearce said before hanging up.

Pearce was arrested in March
after deputies said she intentionally ran over Verna Boylan, 57, near horseshoe
pits behind the Roadhouse Bar near Flagler Beach, according to a report from the
Flagler County Sheriff’s Office.

Boylan was watching horseshoe games on
St. Patrick’s Day when Pearce, behind the wheel of the golf cart, spotted her.
Pearce told a passenger in the cart, “Oh, there’s the (expletive) . . . I’m
going to run her over, ” according to the report.

Boylan said in a phone
interview Thursday that she heard Pearce.

“I just looked over ’cause I
heard her say that and next thing I know I was already under (the cart),” Boylan
said.

She said she feared her life was over.

“I thought that was
it,” Boylan said. “My head is going under that tire and that’s the end of me.”

She heard people shouting at Pearce.

“I heard everybody
screaming ‘stop, stop, stop,’ but she wouldn’t stop,” Boylan said. “She went
faster.”

After the cart finally stopped, Pearce made her getaway in
another golf cart. Deputies later found Pearce “visibly intoxicated” at her
home, according to the report.

Boylan was left badly bruised and
emotionally battered.

“I couldn’t think,” she said Thursday. “I was
terrified. I still am. But they just told me she can’t come near me.”

Pearce told a psychologist in August she was angry at Boylan because she
had spray-painted Pearce’s girlfriend’s car, according to a psychological
evaluation in the court file.

Boylan denied Thursday, as she has done in
the past, that she had anything to do with spray-painting the car. Boylan said
she has never had a problem with the woman who owns the car and wouldn’t do
anything to her.

Pearce told the psychologist she had been doing well on

a combination of Xanax, (for anxiety) Zoloft (for depression) and Geodon (for
bipolar disorder and other problems) but just before the golf cart incident she
no longer could get Geodon, the report states. The medication withdrawal
produced agitation, restlessness and anxiety, as well as depression and social
avoidance, the report states.

Pearce admitted to having had two or three
beers before the incident, the report states.

frank.fernandez @news-jrnl.com

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PROZAC/SSRIs: Problematic [DEADLY!] For Bipolars: Dr. David Gratzer

NOTE FROM DR. TRACY (www.drugawareness.org):

Problematic???!!!!!” How about using the term DEADLY? How did
we get to the point that using SSRIs is the standard “treatment” for Bipolar
patients when initially doctors would not prescribe them due to their strong
potential to induce Bipolar?! Time has certainly proven the initial fears to be
true when the number of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by a whopping
4000% from 1996 to 2004!! No wonder every third person you meet any more has the
Bipolar label!
The simple truth of the matter is (as I discuss at length in
my DVD “Bipolar, Shmypolar! Are You Really Bipolar or Misdiagnosed Due to the
Use of or Abrupt Discontinuation of an Antidepressant?”) that antidepressants –
especially the SSRI antidepressants – are by far the BIGGEST CAUSE on
this planet of Bipolar Disorder! And doctors prescribing these drugs as
“treatment” for Bipolar is not only unethical, it is downright criminal! Why
wouldn’t the placebo outperform the drug?! Placebos don’t CAUSE Bipolar Disorder
– Antidepressants do!
Paragraph 14 reads:  “As a physician myself, I know a
thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When I was in
residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs
. It turned out that

Prozac intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.”

http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/opinion/columns/Manhattan-Moment/Medicine-isn_t-perfect_-Obamacare-is-even-less-perfect-8582816-72875022.html

Dr. David Gratzer: Medicine isn’t perfect, Obamacare is even less
perfect

By: Dr. David Gratzer
Op-Ed Contributor
November 25, 2009

Pay for the blue pill that works, not the red one that
doesn’t. That’s the president’s simple prescription for improving American
health care, one that relies on government panels and committees to set
guidelines for doctors and patients alike.

At least, that’s the
theory.

The theory met messy reality last week when the U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force recommended that women in their 40s shouldn’t get
mammograms. But the secretary of health and human services — who, incidentally,
oversees this panel — thinks women probably should. And the American Cancer
Society believes that they definitely should; major private insurance companies,

for the record, will continue to fund the tests.

Confused
yet?

Recommendation from a largely unknown government panel hardly seems
like typical material for national headlines. But when it involves breast cancer
and the announcement is made in the heat of debate over health reform, people
are — understandably — concerned.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task
Force, as it turns out, is not part of a larger Obama White House rationing
conspiracy, as some would have it. Task force members were appointed by
President Bush, and they voted on this recommendation before Obama’s
inauguration.

As for cost considerations, the task force had none:
Members are mandated not to weigh dollars and cents when considering the risk
and benefits of recommendations.

That’s not to suggest that their
conclusion isn’t highly controversial. For starters, it seems counterintuitive:
Early screening for cancer makes sense.

No wonder, then, that a full 87
percent of Americans believed that routine scanning was “almost always a good
idea” in a 2004 poll published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

Today, American panels and doctors groups are moving away
from the “scan first, ask questions later” philosophy. We aren’t the only ones
having second thoughts.

In Japan, all newborns were screened for

neuroblastoma starting in 1984, but the program was scrapped a few years ago
when more babies died from unnecessary surgeries than the obscure
cancer.

For many, such reversals are deeply unsettling, a reminder that
medicine is far from an exact science.

“The history of medicine is a
record not only of brilliant success and stunning progress,” Theodore Dalrymple,
a British physician, wrote in 2002. “It is also a litany of mistaken ideas and
discarded treatments, some of which came to appear absurd or downright dangerous
after having once been hailed as unprecedented advances.”

As a physician
myself, I know a thing or two about going by the book and getting it wrong. When
I was in residency, the standard treatment for bipolar patients suffering
depression was Prozac or its sister drugs. It turned out that Prozac
intervention was not only highly problematic, but also bested by
placebo.

For those on the left, the answer to the chaos of medicine is to
establish government panels. With Obamacare, for instance, White House officials
propose a commission to cut hundreds of billions from Medicare by improving the
quality of care.

How? By setting up an Independent Medicare Advisory
Commission that would guide clinical decisions for doctors and patients
alike.

The controversy over breast cancer screening, however, shows the
political and practical limitations of this one-size-fits-all approach: Medical
organizations have difficulty in setting and agreeing upon clinical guidelines,
and patients are apt to resent mandates from bureaucrats.

Leaving health
verdicts in the hands of centralized authorities is a sure way to keep making
mistakes in a field where re-examination and reversal are an unavoidable
reality.

David Gratzer, a physician, is a senior fellow at the
Manhattan Institute and author of “Why Obama’s Government Takeover of Health
Care Will Be a Disaster” (Encounter Books,
2009).

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UPDATE: ANTIDEPRESSANT: GA House Speaker Resigns After Suicide Attempt, Affair

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Yet another government official is destroyed by the use of an
antidepressant. All the signs and symptoms of Antidepressant-Induced Bipolar
Disorder are clear – the infidelity, the lying, the divorce, the suicidal
tendencies, etc.
What a shame that no one involved seems to even have a clue what has
happened to cause this! One man’s use of an antidepressant and look how many
lives have been negatively affected! Another family and another leader
destroyed by the negative effects of these drugs.
Why does no one see these drugs are destroying our country, our
society, our families, our lives? Is profit really worth it? Does that make it
okay to destroy so many just for money and power? I will never understand that
mentality!
_________________________________________
“It has been a dizzying fall for one of Georgia’s most powerful political
figures. Sheriff’s deputies found him Nov. 8, slumped semiconscious on the edge
of the bathtub at his west Georgia home after he called his mother to say he had
swallowed pills. A suicide note and a silver .357 Magnum were on the counter
next to him. The contents of the note have not been released.
“Richardson has also been dogged by messy personal and ethical problems,
including a 2007 ethics complaint by House Democrats over the same alleged

affair ex-wife Susan Richardson accused him of on TV this week. In an interview
Monday with Fox 5 Atlanta, Susan Richardson said she had e-mails between her
ex-husband and the lobbyist for Atlanta Gas Light that prove the affair. The
couple divorced in February 2008.”


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/12/03/glenn-richardson-george-h_n_379093.html

Glenn
Richardson RESIGNS: Georgia House Speaker Out After Attempted Suicide, Alleged
Affair

Glenn Richardson


ATLANTA — Georgia’s powerful House speaker resigned
Thursday after a suiciide attempt and allegations by his ex-wife of an affair
with a lobbyist.

Glenn Richardson, the state’s first GOP speaker since
Reconstruction, had won sympathy from even his political enemies when he
revealed last month that he attempted suicide by swallowing sleeping pills.
But then his ex-wife went on TV and accused him of having “a full-out affair
with a lobbyist while they were still married.

Richardson did not
address that allegation in a brief statement issued through the House
communications office in which he said he will leave both his position as
speaker and his House seat on Jan. 1. He did mention his recent admission,
made in the wake of his suicide attempt, that he has grappled with
depression.

“I fear that the media attention of this week has deflected
this message and done harm to many people who suffer from this condition,” he
said in the statement.

House Republican lawmakers received the news
from an emotional Richardson during a conference call just before the
statement was released.

“It was very painful for those of us on the
listening end,” state Rep. David Ralston said.

The 49-year-old
Richardson, once thought to be a serious contender for governor, had gone
right back to shaking hands at chicken-and-grits fundraisers after trying to
kill himself. But he had been silent since his ex-wife claimed this week that
he slept with a lobbyist pushing a $300 million pipeline bill he was
co-sponsoring.

It has been a dizzying fall for one of Georgia’s most
powerful political figures. Sheriff’s deputies found him Nov. 8, slumped
semiconscious on the edge of the bathtub at his west Georgia home after he
called his mother to say he had swallowed pills. A suicide note and a silver
.357 Magnum were on the counter next to him. The contents of the note have not
been released.

Secretary of State Karen Handel, a leading GOP candidate
for governor in 2010, called Richardson’s personal turmoil “heartbreaking” but
said meetings at the state Capitol were grinding to a halt because he was
missing in action amid the worst state budget crunch in the state
history.

She and the Georgia Christian Coalition were among those who
had called Thursday for Richardson to resign.

Once Richardson steps
down, House Speaker Pro Tem Mark Burkhalter will become interim speaker, and
the Republican caucus will have 120 days to elect a permanent
replacement.

University of Georgia political science professor Charles
Bullock said Richardson is known for comebacks, but the latest round of news
may have finally damaged him beyond repair.

“Heading into an election
year, I think Republicans would rather not still be talking about the life and
loves of Glenn Richardson,” Bullock said.

Richardson was revered among
some conservatives for helping engineer a GOP takeover of the Georgia House in
2004 after decades of Democratic control. But his short temper has often left
him feuding with the state’s other leading Republicans. In 2007, a red-faced
Richardson accused Gov. Sonny Perdue of showing his “backside” after the two
feuded over tax cuts.

On Thursday, Perdue issued a statement saying
Richardson made the right decision, which should give him privacy that will
“enable him to recover fully and completely.”

Richardson has also been
dogged by messy personal and ethical problems, including a 2007 ethics
complaint by House Democrats over the same alleged affair ex-wife Susan
Richardson accused him of on TV this week. In an interview Monday with Fox 5
Atlanta, Susan Richardson said she had e-mails between her ex-husband and the
lobbyist for Atlanta Gas Light that prove the affair. The couple divorced in
February 2008.

In one e-mail, according to Fox 5, the lobbyist worried
that she would be fired if the affair became public. Glenn Richardson
responded by saying he would “bring all hell down” on Atlanta Gas Light if
that happened.

The 2007 Democratic complaint was dismissed by a
legislative ethics panel for lack of evidence, and a defiant Richardson used a
breakfast speech before a room full of Georgia business leaders to threaten
retaliation against those he said he said were trying bring him down with
“poison.”

The bad news, according to Richardson, “is that I survived.”
And, he continued, “I’m looking for those that manufactured that
poison.”

But Susan Richardson’s allegations have spawned a new ethics
complaint by a government watchdog this week, and Georgia Attorney General
Thurbert Baker’s office said Thursday it had begun looking into the
complaint

Glenn Richardson has not responded to the affair allegations
and a spokesman did not return a phone call on Thursday seeking additional
comment.

___

Associated Press Writer Greg Bluestein contributed
to this report.

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Ann Blake-Tracy’s December 13, 2006 to the FDA

Ann Blake-Tracy, head of the International Coalition for Drug Awareness, author of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? & Our Serotonin Nightmare. For 15 years I have testified in court cases involving antidepressants. The last 17 years of my life have been devoted to researching, writing, and lecturing about these drugs.

Two of my nieces in their early 20’s, a decade apart, attempted suicide on antidepressants, the first on Prozac, the second just a month ago on Wellbutrin.

Due to time constraints I refer you to my September, 2004 testimony on the damaging effects of inhibiting serotonin metabolism – the very mode of action of antidepressants. Impairing serotonin metabolism results in a multitude of symptoms including suicide, violent crime, mania and psychosis. Suicidal ideation is, without question, associated with these drugs.

Rosie Meysenburg, Sara Bostock and I have collected and posted 1200 [now 3000] news articles documenting many exaggerated acts of violence against self or others at www.drugawareness.org with a direct link to www.ssristories.drugawareness.org

Beyond suicidal ideation we have mania/bipolar increasing dramatically. Antidepressants have always been known to trigger both.

According to the Pharmaceutical Business Review in the last 11 years alone, the number of people in the U.S. with “bipolar” disorder has increased by 4.8 million. [a 4000% increase]

Dr. Malcolm Bowers of Yale, found in the late 90’s over 200,000 people yearly are hospitalized with antidepressant-induced manic psychosis. They also point out that most go unrecognized as medication-induced, remain un hospitalized, and a threat to themselves and others.

What types of threats from manias?

Pyromania: A compulsion to start fires

Kleptomania: A compulsion to embezzle, shoplift, commit robberies

Dipsomania: An uncontrollable urge to drink alcohol

Nymphomania and erotomania: Sexual compulsions – a pathologic preoccupation with sexual fantasies or activities

Child sex abuse has increased dramatically with even female teachers going manic on these drugs and seducing students. The head of the sex abuse treatment program for Utah estimated 80% of sex crime perpetrators were on antidepressants at the time of the crime. While Karl Von Kleist, an ex-LAPD officer and leading polygraph expert estimated 90% – strong evidence of manic sexual compulsions that demand attention.

Diabetes has skyrocketed, has been linked to antidepressants, and blood sugar imbalances have long been suspected as the cause of mania or bipolar. Anyone who has witnessed someone in insulin shock would see the striking similarity to a violent reaction to an antidepressant.

If there has been any increase in suicide since the black box warning it is due to doctors not knowing how to get patients off these drugs safely.

Clearly far too many lives are being destroyed in various ways by these drugs.

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

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