ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: 27 Year Old Attempts to Commit “Suicide-By-Co…

Paragraphs 19 & 20 read:  “Since being released from

prison, Tokarev had been “suffering with major depression,” Good

said. She said he had been taking antidepressants and anti-anxiety

medication in prison but was unable to find medical assistance upon his release.

“She said he told her, “Olesya, I feel sick. My body feels

so sick, and my brain feels like it’s hurting.”

http://www.twincities.com/ci_13922340

He left a note, stole a truck and fled into a hail of

bullets

Sister says ex-con brother was suicidal and hoping

the police would kill him

By

Nick Ferraro

nferraro@pioneerpress.com

Updated: 12/03/2009 11:34:01

PM CST

The sister of the man wounded by police Wednesday night in

downtown Hastings said she believes he was trying to commitsuicide by cop.

“I’m going all the way out. Once they pull me over or anything I’m

shooting them until I run out of bullets,” Roman Tokarev wrote in a note his

sister Olesya Good’s husband found Wednesday before she alerted police.

Hours later, officers shot Tokarev, 27, after he allegedly pointed a gun

at them and tried to ram their squad cars during a chase.

“After

thinking about everything and seeing everything that happened, I think he was

trying to make the police shoot him to death … kind of commit his own suicide

by them shooting him,” Good, 29, said.

Tokarev, who emigrated from

Estonia with his family in 1996, was hospitalized in critical condition Thursday

after surgery to remove a bullet lodged near his heart, his sister said.

“The way it sounds, he was shot six to eight times,” she said, adding he

was hit twice in the arm and twice in the leg. “His left hand is totally

paralyzed.”

Tokarev had been living at his sister’s home in Elk River

and under intensive supervised release ­ reserved for high-risk offenders

­ through the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

He was released

from the Minnesota Correctional Facility-Stillwater on May 4 after serving time

for a 2005 aggravated robbery conviction in Hennepin County.

Good called

police after her husband found the note at their house about 1 p.m. and

discovered Tokarev had taken the family’s pickup truck.

“We asked them

to help us find him and save his life,” she said.

Within hours, a

warrant was issued for Tokarev’s arrest, according to the Bureau of Criminal

Apprehension.

Authorities were told that Tokarev, who also has

convictions for assault and vehicle theft, could be armed and had threatened

officers in the note, BCA spokesman Andy Skoogman said.

Tokarev was

spotted about 8 p.m. in Hastings, and federal, state, city and Dakota County

officers tried to stop him by boxing in the stolen pickup with their vehicles

near the intersection of Minnesota 55 and U.S. 61, the BCA said.

Tokarev

rammed the squad cars and pointed a gun at officers, Skoogman said.

Shots were fired, and Tokarev drove off, leading a chase through several

residential blocks. At U.S. 61 and Fourth Street, officers finally stopped the

truck. More shots were fired, and Tokarev was struck several times, authorities

said.

Investigators found a weapon in the vehicle, Skoogman said.

Good and Skoogman said it’s unclear why Tokarev went to Hastings.

The three officers who fired the shots have been placed on paid

administrative leave, a standard procedure after a police shooting.

Since being released from prison, Tokarev had been “suffering with major

depression,” Good said. She said he had been taking antidepressants and

anti-anxiety medication in prison but was unable to find medical assistance upon

his release.

She said he told her, “Olesya, I feel sick. My body feels

so sick, and my brain feels like it’s hurting.”

In his note, Tokarev

wrote that he “lost it” after a weekend visit with his parole officer.

“Apparently when (the parole officer) was over here, some things were

said or something that kind of triggered everything,” Good said.

Shari

Burt, communications director for the Department of Corrections, confirmed that

Tokarev was seen by a supervision agent Sunday, but, citing the investigation,

would not respond to Good’s claim.

Burt said Tokarev was on house arrest

but had earned his way off electronic monitoring by obtaining and maintaining

employment.

Tokarev apologized in the note to his family “for all I’ve

done” and wrote, “I will not be back. It’s my time to go. Please kiss everyone

for me. … I will remember you all until eternity.”

Good said he ended

the note by writing, “I got a gun on me that I purchased and I’m not going back

to prison. I love you all. I love you all. I love you all.”

Nick Ferraro

can be reached at 651-228-2173.

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PROZAC: Not Guilty of Assault Using Prozac Defense: Kansas

Paragraphs nine through twelve read:  “However, he
testified he believed
high dosages of Prozac,
an anti-depressant prescribed to him at the prison and jail, influenced
his behavior.”

“It made him feel like he wanted jump out
of his skin
, he said. Housworth told jurors he never intended to hurt
anyone.”

“During the time he’s spent in youth shelters, jails and
prisons, Housworth said he had nothing but “minor write-ups” until
he began taking Prozac in 40-milligram to 90-milligram
dosages at the local prison and jail.”

“He said he never stopped
taking the drug because he was 70 days shy of parole in June 2007, and then he

signed a parole agreement specifying he would take his
prescribed medications.”

Paragraphs fourteen and fifteen read:
“Dr. Mark Goodman, a local clinical psychologist who evaluated Housworth,
testified for the defense he believed the high dosage
of Prozac prescribed to Housworth at the prison and jail caused his aggressive
behavior.”

“Goodman said the recommended Prozac dosage for an
adult was 20 to 80 milligrams, and he believed the high dosages given to
Housworth, combined with Housworth’s “bipolar features” and “anger
history,” rendered him unable to reason
appropriately.”

http://www.hutchnews.com/Todaystop/trial2009-10-23T20-32-29

Saturday, October 24, 2009    4 : 14 PM

Meds defense a success

Former prisoner acquitted in batteries he blames on
Prozac.

By Darcy Gray The Hutchinson News dgray@hutchnews.com

A former Hutchinson Correctional Facility inmate charged with battering
correctional officers and another inmate told jurors this week “Prozac mania,”
from high dosages of the prescribed drug, caused his aggressive, impulsive
behavior.

The jurors agreed.

Andrew Housworth, 31, was found not

guilty Friday of five counts of battery against a correctional officer and two
counts of aggravated battery of a correctional officer and a fellow inmate.

During his trial this week before Reno County District Judge Tim
Chambers, Housworth admitted to spitting on correctional officers at the prison
and the Reno County jail in 2007.

He admitted to attacking a fellow
inmate at the Reno County jail in April 2008, hitting him and biting his cheek.

Although Housworth was charged with aggravated battery of an HCF officer
in September 2007 for allegedly choking the officer with his belly chain, or
restraint, he denied choking the officer. He told jurors he was first
“clotheslined” and pepper-sprayed by the officer before responding in
self-defense.

His attorney, Alice Osburn, noted there was time missing
from the prison surveillance video during the incident, in which Housworth
claimed he had been beaten.

Housworth also admitted during trial his
criminal history included aggravated assault, criminal threat and attempted
robbery.

However, he testified he believed high dosages of Prozac, an
anti-depressant prescribed to him at the prison and jail, influenced his
behavior.

It made him feel like he wanted jump out of his skin, he said.
Housworth told jurors he never intended to hurt anyone.

During the time
he’s spent in youth shelters, jails and prisons, Housworth said he had nothing
but “minor write-ups” until he began taking Prozac in 40-milligram to
90-milligram dosages at the local prison and jail.

He said he never
stopped taking the drug because he was 70 days shy of parole in June 2007, and
then he signed a parole agreement specifying he would take his prescribed
medications.

Housworth said his concerns about Prozac‘s effects on him
were ignored by local prison and jail staff. After an incident in which he
punched Reno County Jail Capt. Scott Powell in September 2008, Housworth said,
he was transferred to Lyons County jail, where they took him off Prozac in March
and he had not had a problem with officers since.

Dr. Mark Goodman, a
local clinical psychologist who evaluated Housworth, testified for the defense

he believed the high dosage of Prozac prescribed to Housworth at the prison and
jail caused his aggressive behavior.

Goodman said the recommended Prozac
dosage for an adult was 20 to 80 milligrams, and he believed the high dosages
given to Housworth, combined with Housworth’s “bipolar features” and “anger
history,” rendered him unable to reason appropriately.

A doctor at the
Larned State Hospital, however, testified for the prosecution that Housworth had
an anti-social personality and did not lack the mental state necessary to commit
the crimes.

Jurors were asked, regarding each charge, whether they
believed Housworth suffered a mental deficiency due to high dosages of Prozac

that “rendered him incapable” of criminal intent, or intending to commit the
crimes.

As the verdict was announced Friday, jurors announced “yes,”
they believed he suffered from the mental deficiency as to all charges except
for the aggravated battery charge in which Housworth was accused of choking the
prison officer.

Friday’s verdict represents the first time since 2003
such a defense has been successful in winning an acquittal.

In 2003,
Dale McCormick, of Sylvia, was acquitted after a jury decided his alleged bomb
threat at the Reno County Law Enforcement Center was the result of mental
defect, brought on by depression and a dosage change in McCormick’s mood
stabilizer.

In Housworth’s case, the jury foreperson told The News
jurors discussed at length all evidence in the case, including the doctors’
contradicting opinions. Jurors requested a read-back of witness testimony
Thursday night, so they took a break and continued deliberating Friday
morning.

Jurors felt Housworth was open and honest in talking about what
had happened, as well as his criminal history, she said. Housworth was willing
to talk about the incident with Powell, even though it was not charged against
him.

Following the verdict, Chambers ordered Housworth be committed to
the Larned State Hospital until he is no longer a danger.

Osburn
confirmed Housworth is also facing charges in Leavenworth County for battery of

a correctional officer.

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