ANTIDEPRESSANTs: Murder: Youth Kills Friend: Oklahoma

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic behavioral reactions.
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Paragraph 16 reads: “While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “’I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them’.”

“Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.”

http://www.chickashanews.com/local/local_story_302093409.html

Published: October 29, 2009 08:34 am

The Express-Star

Ronson Bush’s mother Tina Black took the stand on Wednesday to ask the court to spare her son’s life.

On day two of his trial, Bush admitted killing his friend Billy Harrington but still refuses to say he meant to do it. Because of his refusal, Grady County District Attorney Bret Burns is asking District Judge Richard Van Dyck to hand down a death sentence.

The jury was excused when Bush changed his plea to guilty, and now the decision whether Bush lives or dies in solely in the hands of Van Dyck, who will render his decisiion at 10 a.m. today.

“We had a life before alcohol and drugs, we had laughs and family time and we went to church,” Black said. “If a family has not experienced alcohol and drugs, they had better thank the Lord because they’re an ugly thing that make your child someone you don’t know.”

In her plea to save her son’s life. Black said she is not angry with Ronson for herself, but she is angry for her grandson Brennan, Ronson’s son.

“Brennan loved going out in the truck with his dad,” Black said. “He asked me, ‘If my dad got life, do you think they’d let him go out in the truck one more time?’”

Black said she thinks a person can love their children even if they do not like their actions.

“There was something that fired up that anger, that wasn’t normal,” Black said.

The next witness to testify was Gail Poyner, Ph. D., a licensed psychologist who deals primarily in forensic psychology.

Poyner performed a psychological evaluation of Bush and researched the effects of the medications Bush was taking.

Poyner said members of Bush’s family described him as “flipped out,” “crazy” and “paranoid,” and that Bush experiences anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, severe drug and alcohol problems and says his brain feels “itchy.”

“Likely he was misdiagnosed or not diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder,” Poyner said. “He is severely mentally ill and his involvement with crime is highly correlated with his mental illness.”

Poyner criticized the lack of treatment Bush received after he was admitted to Griffin Memorial Hospital in Norman.

“I very strongly believe at a professional level had Griffin offered a modicum of treatment, this (the murder) could have been possibly avoided,” Poyner said. “They simply did not give him any treatment, no group therapy, no individual therapy. It was documented he was suicidal, yet they did not treat him for that.”

Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.

While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them.”

Dr. David Musick, a full professor of sociology at the University of Northern Colorado, also testified.

Describing Bush’s family as “good folks,” Musick discussed alcoholism as a disease and how the “horrific” drug methamphetamine creates powerful addictions in humans.

“The defendant (Bush) has a serious alcohol problem that is overflowing into violence,” Musick said. “As a child, he was a pawn being pulled back and forth by his family who had different parenting styles which creates unbearable pain so he covers up the pain with alcohol and illicit drugs.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 17 Year Old Attempts Suicide: Charged with Illegal Pos…

First sentence of paragraph 13 reads:  “About a month before the suicide attempt, the teenager was diagnosed with “major depressive disorder” and was taking prescription anti-depressants, court papers say.”

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/article/20090806/NEWS01/908060333/1002/NEWS/Mendon+teen+charged+after+suicide+attempt

Mendon teen charged after suicide attempt

Gary Craig • Staff writer • August 6, 2009

A Mendon teenager’s attempt to commit suicide has led to his prosecution on a weapons charge.

On April 29 the teen carried his father’s .40-caliber firearm into a shed on his family property with the intent of killing himself, court papers allege.

Alerted by a suicide note, his parents called 911. Responding deputies found the 17yearold on his back in the shed with the gun “pointed at his chin,” according to a Sheriff’s Office report. The teenager relinquished the gun, the report states.

With the apparent suicide attempt averted, deputies then charged the teenager with misdemeanor criminal possession of a weapon because, they say, he was not the legal owner of the gun. And now, the District Attorney’s Office is prosecuting the teen for the illegal weapon charge, after what the teen’s lawyer says have been multiple unsuccessful attempts to reach a resolution other than a criminal charge.

“In as inappropriate, unfortunate and misplaced a use of prosecutorial discretion as the Monroe County District Attorney’s Office ever has demonstrated, my client now effectively is being prosecuted for attempting suicide,” attorney Jeffrey Wicks wrote in a motion filed this week.

District Attorney Michael Green said prosecution in such a case can be used to ensure the individual gets treatment. For instance, a sentence of probation could include continued court-ordered treatment, Green said.

“This kind of conduct can pose a threat to himself and other people,” Green said. “I’m certainly sympathetic to him and his family.”

Wicks this week filed a motion asking that the charges against the teenager be dismissed “in the interest of justice,” a part of the penal law that gives judges the discretion to dismiss charges if, for instance, the alleged crime was of questionable seriousness. Also key to requests to dismiss a charge in the interest of justice is the character of the accused and the likelihood the community would be at risk if the accused went free.

The teenager “has no previous arrests or history of violence,” Wicks states in court papers. The Democrat and Chronicle is not identifying the accused because, if found guilty, he would be adjudicated as a youthful offender under the law.
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Wicks said the teenager and his family would not answer questions from the media because of the pending criminal charge.

In his suicide note, the teenager apologized to his parents “for everything,” saying: “I’ve disappointed you guys countless times.”

“You don’t deserve that,” he wrote in the note, which is included in court papers.

About a month before the suicide attempt, the teenager was diagnosed with “major depressive disorder” and was taking prescription anti-depressants, court papers say. After the attempt, he spent 19 days at an adolescent psychiatric unit. He is now on a different regimen of medication and “not only is doing well but is feeling strong, confident and future-oriented,” Wicks writes in court papers.

A conviction and the possibility of incarceration “would be catastrophic” for his continued improvement, Wicks contends.

Green said incarceration is “not the only option available here” and again emphasized that prosecution might ensure continued valuable treatment.

GCRAIG@DemocratandChronicle.com

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