ZOLOFT: Man Fires Shots into Country Club: Goes Manic for First Time: MN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): I am going to
comment on this one statement from this article because I become absolutely
furious when I hear this over and over and over again when AA is in a position
to help and will not. I quote, “He also has been through alcohol treatment
and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous,” So, WHY is AA not more helpful in
teaching those with a problem with alcohol that antidepressants CAUSE
OVERWHELMING CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL?!!! They would certainly not have near as much
business if they did! It just makes me sick to hear over and over again that
they encourage the use of antidepressants among those who already have problems
with alcohol. It makes no sense!!! They seem to be far more
susceptible to the manic effects of antidepressants.

Paragraph six reads:  “If the case had gone to trial,
Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
defense. The claim
: a switch in the fall of 2008
to the antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become
manic-depressive for the first time in his life.”

http://www.startribune.com/local/81151627.html?elr=KArksLckD8EQDUoaEyqyP4O:DW3ckUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUnciaec8O7EyUsl

Man pleads guilty to firing shots at country club

The defendant said that friends had tried to get him help
before the incident at Minikahda Country Club in Minneapolis. Had the case gone
to trial, his attorney had planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
defense.

By ROCHELLE OLSON,

Star Tribune

Last update: January 11, 2010 – 12:07 PM

A 64-year-old Minneapolis man pleaded guilty today to second-degree assault for
shooting at the Minikahda Country Club and said afterward that he hopes
something can be done to make it easier for adults with psychological problems
to get help.

For me to do anything harmful to the club, I had to be
crazy because I loved the club,” Joseph C. Rice said in an interview after his
plea in front of Hennepin County District Court Judge Beryl Nord. “When you’re
out of your mind, the worst thing is you don’t know you’re out of your
mind.”

According to the charges: Police received a call at 2 a.m. from an
employee at the club, 3205 Excelsior Blvd., reporting that he had spotted Rice
outside the building holding a gun, had heard multiple shots, and then had seen
Rice drive away in an older red Ferrari. Police tracked Rice to his nearby home.
In addition to assault, he was charged with drive-by shooting, reckless
discharge of a firearm and two drinking and driving offenses. All but the
assault charge were dropped.

Rice will have to serve about three months
in the county workhouse. He paid $3,091 to the club for the damage. He will pay
more than $100,000 to get his Ferrari back.

“I feel really sorry for what
I did. I really valued my membership in the club,” he said.

If the case
had gone to trial, Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary
intoxication” defense. The claim: a switch in the fall of 2008 to the
antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become manic-depressive

for the first time in his life.

Birrell had filed notice with the court
of plans to call an expert witness, a physician, who would testify that drugs
such as Zoloft can cause mania in a small percentage of the population. He and
Rice acknowledge that the defense would have been complicated by Rice’s heavy
drinking at the time.

But Rice said in the weeks leading up to the
incident, friends were trying to get him into a hospital for help, but were
unsuccessful. “It’s almost like you have to do something bad, but then it’s too
late,” Rice said of his friends’ efforts to get him treatment.

After the
shooting, his 31-year-old son and his psychiatrist succeeded in getting him into

a 30-day in-patient program at Fairview Riverside Hospital. Rice said he was
immediately taken off Zoloft and put back on Wellbutrin. He also has been
through alcohol treatment and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous, he
said.

Rice said he will send the club an apology through Birrell. “The
way to say you’re sorry is to live a better life,” he said.

He is
expected to begin serving his workhouse sentence in February.

Rochelle
Olson • 612-673-1747

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Shooting: Man “snapped” and Shot Wife: Conecticut

Paragraph three reads:  “Braucci told police a
disagreement erupted Tuesday morning
over who
Shelly Lavoie had been calling on her cell phone. Shelly
Lavoie
told police that her husband,
wheelchair bound from injuries suffered in a

motor vehicle crash during his teenage years, had grown
increasingly
paranoid, and was taking anti-depressants.”

SSRI Stories
note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that one of the side-effects of

antidepressants, and this is not listed as rare, is
“paranoia”.

http://www.rep-am.com/articles/2009/11/26/news/local/451726.txt

Thursday, November 26, 2009 3:16 AM EST

Man accused of shooting wifesnapped
BY
BRIGITTE

RUTHMAN
REPUBLICAN-AMERICAN
LITCHFIELD —
John Lavoie told a friend, “I shot
Shelly, I
snapped.”

The 53-year-old handicapped man who held
police
at bay for nearly 10 hours Tuesday
after shooting his wife in the thigh is
now
being held on $500,000 bond on first-degree
assault
charges.

According to the
warrant for his arrest, Lavoie, a native
of
Thomaston, told his friend Vincent Braucci Jr. during a late
afternoon
phone conversation Tuesday that he
didn’t mean to do it. Upset and
remorseful, he
still maintained his wife of 23 years was having
an
affair.

Braucci told police a
disagreement erupted Tuesday morning
over who
Shelly Lavoie had been calling on her cell phone. Shelly
Lavoie
told police that her husband,
wheelchair bound from injuries suffered in a

motor vehicle crash during his teenage years, had grown
increasingly
paranoid, and was taking
anti-depressants.

According to the warrant, at 10:25 a.m. Lavoie
grabbed a long rifle or shotgun, slipped at

least one round in the chamber, and went after his wife. The
couple
struggled — although he is unable to
use his legs, Lavoie’s upper body is
strong
from landscaping the house neighbors said he designed himself

and
maintains with some hired
assistance.

Shelly Lavoie fled to the bathroom in the 16 East Litchfield
Road South home where the couple have
lived
for six years. Her husband fired a bullet that entered her
right
thigh, and passed through into her left
thigh where it became
lodged.

Lavoie
told his wife he was going to shoot her in the
back,
and in the ensuing struggle, Shelly
Lavoie, 47, seized the gun and threw
it out of
reach, then fled through the garage to her car. She grabbed
her
cell phone and phoned her mother to tell
her what was happening as she
drove herself to
Charlotte Hungerford Hospital.

Her mother
phoned
police, who were dispatched to the East
Litchfield home and to the
hospital to
interview Shelly Lavoie. The injured woman told detectives
her
husband was depressed and had talked about
suicide, claiming in recent
months that she
was cheating on him. She was transferred to
Hartford
Hospital, where her condition was
unavailable Wednesday.

To read
the
complete story see Thursday’s Republican-American or our
electronic
edition at: http://republicanamerican.ct.newsmemory.com/

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