Execise: Greatly Helps Anxiety: Anxiety Disorder Association of America

First two paragraphs read:  “Healthcare providers to prescribe antidepressants for patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, these medications can sometimes come with harmful side effects. As a result, the drugs can sometimes end up doing more harm than good.”

“According to findings that were presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety DisorderAssociation of America, more mental health professionals should begin prescribing alternative health resources such as exercise to their patients who suffer from anxiety as multiple reports have shown that it helps treat the condition.”

http://www.betterhealthresearch.com/news/researchers-suggest-exercise-may-be-best-treatment-for-anxiety-19704171/

Researchers Suggest Exercise May Be Best Treatment For Anxiety

By Donna Parker • Apr 5th, 2010 • Category: AnxietyHealth News

Healthcare providers to prescribe antidepressants for patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, these medications can sometimes come with harmful side effects. As a result, the drugs can sometimes end up doing more harm than good.

According to findings that were presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety DisorderAssociation of America, more mental health professionals should begin prescribing alternative health resources such as exercise to their patients who suffer from anxiety as multiple reports have shown that it helps treat the condition.

“Individuals who exercise report fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lower levels of stress and anger,” said Jasper Smits, director of the Anxiety Research and Treatment Program at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “Exercise appears to affect, like an antidepressant, particular neurotransmitter systems in the brain, and it helps patients with depression re-establish positive behaviors.”

In addition to treating patients for anxiety, exercise can also keep the body flexible, improve sleeping patterns, keep blood pressure in check and help increase bone strength.

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Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications & heart risks

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Although there have been concerns voiced and many other
studies released on this issue here is a study that was just released yesterday
morning – the morning after Britney Murphey’s sudden death.
____________________________________
Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may increase the
risk of heart disease, heart attacks and stroke in women, a new study
indicates.

Antidepressants up heart disease risks

[Posted: Mon 21/12/2009 by Olivia Fens]

Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may increase the
risk of heart disease, heart attacks and stroke in women, a new study
indicates.

According to researchers, from Uniformed Services University
in the US, women with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who were taking
antidepressant and anti-anxiety medications had an increased risk of
cardiovascular events, compared to women not taking these
medications.

“It needs to be considered that taking antidepressant and
anti-anxiety medications may not be beneficial, and may in fact be harmful for
some women,” the researchers said.

The authors of the study, however,
said further research was needed to examine whether factors such as underlying
depression and anxiety, and not medications per se, may be responsible for these
results.

Nevertheless, they added that the findings of the study
emphasised the importance of emotional and psychosocial factors in women with
suspected coronary artery disease.

The paper was published in the journal
Heart.

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Jenny McKinney – clinical depression – Paxil

My name is Jenny McKinney. I am 26 and a stay-at-home mother of three boys, ages 5, 4, and 1 year.

I was diagnosed with clinical depression in August of 1995. I was suicidal and depressed when I was prescribed the anti-depressant, Paxil. My mood swings were already out of control, but worsened after taking Paxil. I was told I would not see results for at least three weeks after beginning the drug. Within three days, my sister, whom was pregnant and I roomed with at the time, said if I did not get off the drug immediately, I was to find another place to live, because she would not have that baby with me in the home.

On Paxil, my mood swings increased greatly to the point I was sugar sweet one minute and violently psychotic the next. I was always nauseated, dizzy, and blacking out. To this day I cannot remember everything that went on at that time in my life. I was only on the drug for 2 weeks and quit cold turkey without consulting my psychiatrist.

I tried to handle life without any kind of meds, but over the next few years tried many herbals, including licorice root, St. John’s Wort, and SamE.

I struggled over the next few years with my depression and anxiety, as I married and had children. I tried counseling, different herbs, and much, much prayer. There were even a couple of times when the doctors wanted to institutionalize me. In spite of all my efforts, after having children the rage really set in. I was constantly yelling at my children, then 3
years and 18 months. I knew I was out of control with my depression and anger when my second son splashed in the bathtub and I spanked his bottom, several times, extremely hard, then sat and cried for hours over doing it. I was truly fearful that I would end up seriously hurting my kids if I did not get help.

Later in the week, my boys and I went to visit family out of state. My mother-in-law introduced me to Reliv when I arrived. As soon as she heard about it, she knew it was what I needed to get better. That was all I needed to hear. I began on Reliv Classic and Innergize immediately. I was taking them two times a day. By the third day, the same sister noticed the difference in me when I had not had my product. By the end of my two-week stay, I had not yelled at my children once.

I have since then had another child, and am able to handle life wonderfully, when I am consistent in taking these products. The best part, is knowing that as long as I am taking Reliv, my children are not afraid of me anymore.

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Antidepressant Romance Fuels “Premedicated” Murder

Note From Ann Blake-Tracy: I must say that in the 20 years I have been specializing in adverse reactions to antidepressants and lecturing and writing about these drugs this is possibly the best article I have ever read on the overall problem with antidepressants!! EXCELLENT WORK!!!
The only thing I might have added is that the hypothesis behind the serotonin THEORY (everyone keeps forgetting it is a theory and not a fact) is backwards. According to research serotonin is elevated in depression, anxiety, violence, mania, psychosis, etc. NOT low. What is low is the ability to metabolize serotonin.
Now enjoy the article! As I said, it is excellent!!
Dr. Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness

Website: www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare
& CD or audio tape on safe withdrawal: “Help! I Can’t Get
Off My Antidepressant!”
Order Number:

August 17th, 2009

From The Desk of The People’s Chemist:

Are antidepressant’s a silent killer? Read more to learn how to avoid “Premedicated Murder.” Then visit my blog at http://www.thepeopleschemist.com/blog to leave your comments. I want to hear your voices on this! This is one of the most important articles I’ve ever written. Invest 6 minutes into your health by reading this.

Antidepressant Romance Fuels “Premedicated” Murder

By Shane “The People’s Chemist” Ellison

I wish medicine wasn’t so damn complicated. If it weren’t, people would see how Big Pharma cleverly plays prescription cupid to hook the masses into an antidepressant romance. Fueled by dreamy ads, sexy actors, and medical experts who get paid to give pharmaceutical fellatio, the romance has grown into a full-fledged orgy.

Antidepressants are among the best selling drugs, yet not one single diagnostic test supports their effectiveness. Romance makes for great business. But, are patients getting the love they deserve or are they facing another life threatening disaster akin to the Vioxx fiasco (killing an estimated 30,000 people who could have just used aspirin)? Perhaps the chemical facts behind antidepressants will give way to reality and help Americans sever ties to the deadly affair.

Life can be a bitch at times. Everyone knows it and Big Pharma profits from it. To answer our cries for happiness, they sell us a slew of molecules ripe with supposed happy atoms purported to elicit wanton pleasure. It’s a pipe dream. Like a parent who doesn’t like their daughter dating drug reps or psychiatrists, the FDA started using Black Box Warnings to inform us that, “Antidepressants, compared to placebo, increase the risk of suicidal thinking and behavior in children in short term studies.” Psychiatrists quickly refuted this.

Massaging our fears, Dr. McAllister-Williams of the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University publicly insisted that “I believe they work and have an acceptable risk: benefit ratio for many patients.” Taking his cue, psychiatrists from around the world did what they do best: Ignore scientific ethics and get on their knees for Big Pharma.

In a vulgar display of medical ineptitude, prescribing habits surged. From 1996 to 2006, use of antidepressants increased 50% among children, 73% among adults and a ghastly 100% among the elderly – so much for Black Box Warnings. Why not rename them Profit Warnings? As prescribing habits have surged, so has antidepressant reality.

The so called disease of a “serotonin” chemical imbalance among depressed patients has never been proven. The Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience recently reminded doctors that, “Brain serotonin cannot be directly measured” and that even in the deceased, “Serotonin levels are unstable, within 24 hours of death.” Therefore, “direct evidence that serotonin is low in depressed persons is unavailable.”

Panicked, psychiatry hypothesized yet another cause of a chemical imbalance: Bad genes. Apparently, select people (basically anyone with a heartbeat) have a defective gene that makes them susceptible to depression – and drugs, drugs and more drugs can save them from the scourge of sadness. Bio-babble like “alleles” and “transporter genes” were thrown around like condoms at a high school pep rally. The jargon confused everyone. And in their dizzy stupor, most were convinced that it must mean one thing: antidepressants are the Holy Grail to attaining happiness. Psychiatry was once again renewed with the stench of pharmaceutical pheromones. But it didn’t last.

Thanks to scientific methodology, the industry was slapped with the facts. The New York Times delivered the blow and wrote, “One of the most celebrated findings in modern psychiatry – that a single gene helps determine one’s risk of depression in response to a divorce, a lost job or another serious reversal – has not held up to scientific scrutiny.”

You don’t need science to disprove the antiquated, reductionist propaganda surrounding the chemical imbalance theory. You only need the common sense of a child.

The human brain floats in thousands, billions or maybe even trillions of brain chemicals – all working in orchestra like unison to confer proper brain function. Even serotonin exists not as a single molecule, but instead as an ever changing chemical cascade of 5-htp, niacin, L-tryptophan, quinolinate, kynurenine and more. You’d have to be Paris Hilton or a psychiatrist to miss this logic and adhere to the simplistic serotonin imbalance theory.

With no such thing as a chemical imbalance or “depression inducing genes,” psychiatry did what any organization would do in the face of impending demise: Get the U.S Government to do their dirty work.

Today, an insidious collusion between Big Pharma and Big Government is doling out drugs paid for by our tax dollars to foster children, to our U.S. Troops, and to the elderly at breakneck speeds. With so many being drugged, a harsh reality is emerging: Antidepressant romance fuels “premedicated murder.”

While researching my upcoming book, Over-The-Counter Natural Cures (SourceBooks, October), I uncovered stories of horrific suicide and rage that occurred after being medicated with antidepressants. But none more disturbing than the Chris Wood story. Doped up on his prescribed cocktail of antidepressants – all three of them – he shot his 33 year old wife Francie and their three children – Chandler, 5, Gavin, 4, and Fiona, 2. Shockingly, in his drug damaged mind, they weren’t “dead enough” and gruesome decapitation followed. Afterwards, he picked up a shotgun and killed himself. This isn’t an isolated incident.

Among our US troop, suicide and rage is at an all time high – in direct correlation to mass prescribing. The same trend exists among teens as seen by the ever growing act of spraying classmates with bullets. Psychiatrists don’t seem to be alarmed with these trends, or at all interested in seeing the obvious correlations. In an attempt to “leave no American un-medicated,” they encourage subjective mental screening tests for the rest of us as a means of converting healthy people into psychiatric patients.

Psychiatry wants to position antidepressants as the cure for the premedicated violence. So to counter the growing evidence that their drugs are the cause, they insist that, “The only evidence that would be acceptable is the demonstration in a double blind trial that a difference in suicide rates was consistently seen. There is no evidence at all for a differential suicide attempt rate with antidepressants. Suicidal thoughts are an integral part of depression.” Here comes the backhand.

Writing for the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons, Dr. Joel Kauffman elucidates that combined clinical trials on antidepressants show five times the risk of suicide among the treated compared to placebo.

The suicide/aggression trend is not inexplicable from a chemistry viewpoint. Using the latest cloning techniques and laboratory methods, it’s been shown that antidepressants elicit “neurotransmitter hijacking.” This may be partially responsible for the mental state that causes a person to gruesomely murder their loved ones, then put a shotgun to their chin and pull the trigger.

Once swallowed, antidepressants sail past the blood brain barrier and congregate on top of “neurotransmitter recyclers.” This can prevent the cellular “recycling factories” from activating previously used neurotransmitters like serotonin or any of its chemical cousins. With nowhere to go, the inactive brain compounds get “hijacked” by recycling facilities found in other regions of the brain. This would be similar to a square peg being shoved into a round hole. As shown by Baylor College of Medicine, the recycling facilities of key neurotransmitters, like dopamine (round), begin to retrieve serotonin (square) into dopamine vesicles. A dastardly consequence ensues.

Commenting on the hijacking, CNN publicized that, “Antidepressant drugs actually create a perilous brain imbalance.” And Psychiatric Times hypothesized that blocking transporters on cell bodies could drop neurotransmitter levels in the synapse. Is it true?

To measure if neurotransmitter hijacking leads to an empty synapse, you can simply look for clinical manifestations of poor neurotransmitter function (like Parkinson’s disease, which is due to poor output of dopamine) among antidepressant users. As far back as 1995, the American Journal of Medicine showed that 37% of all prescriptions for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease are due to Psychiatric drug use. Case closed. These antidepressant actions are the exact opposite of the claimed “neurotransmitter boosting” actions purported by most doctors!

Once neurotransmitter hijacking takes place, pharmacopossession (due to poor neurotransmitter function) may also set in. As patients come fully under the spell of antidepressants, the brain can become so scrambled that all normal reality and reason are overwritten by a new confusing and violent agenda. A new personality arises – one with homicidal and suicidal tendencies. And for an ever increasing number of antidepressant users, these tendencies are manifesting as premedicated murder – the deliberate killing as a result of being medicated in advance.

Unbalanced by drugs, the brain of an antidepressant user faces a slew of mind altering outcomes. What kind? What was Chris Wood thinking and feeling prior to committing premedicated murder of his family while pharmacopossessed? To answer these questions just go back to the beginning of this article and read the “profit warning” that comes with every Prozac prescription. It’s all there in black and white.

Even though the FDA “compels” drug companies to warn the public about antidepressant risks, their “death grip” on the medical industry has kept doctors and patients from knowing the real extent of the danger. Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association said that “Pharma’s influence on medicine is so blatant now you’d have to be deaf, blind and dumb not to see it.” I guess psychiatrists are all three since they continue to ignore science and romance the masses with promises of happiness courtesy of antidepressants.

Before your doctor gives you an antidepressant, ask him to read you the Black Box Warning that comes with your prescription. This will ensure that the potential romance quickly gives way to reality and that you don’t succumb to premedicated murder.

About the Author

Shane Ellison’s entire career has been dedicated to the study of molecules – how they give life and how they take from it. He was a two-time recipient of the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Grant for his research in biochemistry and physiology. He is a best selling author, holds a master’s degree in organic chemistry, and has first-hand experience in drug design. Learn to get lean fast like is Mom (photos included) at http://www.ampmfatloss.com

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DEPRESSION MED: 15 Year Old Hangs Himself: Illinois

FDA ‘black-box’ warning – In 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began warning of an increased risk of suicidal thoughts among youths taking anti-depressants. In 2004, the agency required a new, more stringent label when antidepressants were prescribed to those under 18.

Between 2003-04 the youth suicide rate jumped 14 percent
– the steepest increase ever seen – while the number of antidepressant prescriptions for youths dramatically dropped during the same period: 20 percent for children 10 and under, 12 percent for 11-to-14-year-olds and 10 percent for 15-to-19-year-olds.

Paragraphs 29 & 30 read: “He stopped going to school and began attending an outpatient program, seeing a therapist and a psychiatrist and taking medication for depression and anxiety. He tried returning to school on a half-day basis, but soon became overwhelmed with makeup work and inquiries from classmates who heard rumors he had tried to kill himself. After a few days in school, Iain asked to be readmitted to the hospital, where he stayed for a week, his parents said.”

“But as summer approached, he began showing signs of improvement. He was easier to communicate with, did his chores when asked and his doctors believed they had found the right balance in his medication, his father said.”

Paragraph 32 reads: “Lain’s parents and friends say they do not know of any incidents that might have triggered what happened June 3, when his father found him in the basement. His death was ruled a suicide by hanging, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office. He did not leave a note.”

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2009/07/05/20090705bullying.html

Bullied boy’s short life ends in suicide
Jul. 5, 2009 08:20 AM
Associated Press

CHICAGO – The bullying seemed inescapable.

His family and friends say it followed Iain Steele from junior high to high school
– from hallways, where one tormentor shoved him into lockers, to cyberspace, where another posted a video on Facebook making fun of his taste for heavy metal music.

“At one point, (a bully) had told (Iain) he wished he would kill himself,” said Matt Sikora, Iain’s close friend.

Iain’s parents know their son had other problems, but they believe the harassment contributed to a deepening depression that hospitalized the 15-year-old twice this year. On June 3, while his classmates were taking final exams, he went to the basement of his home and hanged himself with a belt.

His death stunned his quiet suburb west of Chicago and unleashed an outpouring of support for his parents, William and Liz, who say greater attention should be paid to bullying and its connection to mental health.

“No kid should be afraid for himself to go to school,” his father said. “It should be a safe environment where they can intellectually thrive. And he was, literally, just frightened to go to school, fearing what he would have to deal with on that day. And it was day after day.”

A school spokeswoman said she did not believe Iain was bullied. Police are investigating the allegations.

Nearly 30 percent of American children are bullied or are bullies themselves, according to the National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center. Bullying can be physical, verbal or psychological and is repetitive, intentional and creates a perceived imbalance of power, said Dr. Joseph Wright, senior vice president at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington.

Soon, the American Academy of Pediatrics will for the first time include a section on bullying in its official policy statement on the pediatrician’s role in preventing youth violence.

Wright, a lead author of the statement, said the decision to address the issue was due to a growing body of research over the last decade linking bullying to youth violence, depression and suicidal thoughts.

Last year, the Yale School of Medicine conducted analysis of the link between childhood bullying and suicide in 37 studies from 13 countries, finding both bullies and their victims were at high risk of contemplating suicide.

In March, the parents of a 17-year-old Ohio boy who committed suicide filed a lawsuit against his school alleging their son was bullied. Instead of seeking compensation, they are asking the school to put in place an anti-bullying program and to recognize their son’s death as a “bullicide.”

Iain Steele enjoyed riding his skateboard, his father said, but after hip surgery in 8th grade limited his mobility, he picked up the guitar and impressed an instructor with his musical talent.

He was revered by younger kids in the neighborhood, often fixing their skateboards, settling their disputes and including them in games. “He was a very gentle, kind kid, compassionate to a fault,” his father said. But Iain’s embrace of heavy metal set him apart from classmates. He let his hair grow to shoulder-length and wore mostly black clothing, including jeans with chains and T-shirts of heavy metal bands with dark, sometimes morbid lyrics.

For this, his classmates at McClure Junior High School often called him “emo” – a slang term for angst-ridden followers of a style of punk music, said Sikora, 15.

The bullying could also be physical, Iain’s friends and parents said. In 8th grade at McClure, one bully pushed Iain into a locker while he was on crutches and accused him of faking an injury to get out of gym class. Iain rarely shied away from his tormentors, however, and in this case, he punched the bully in the jaw, his father said.

“He was mainly bullied only because he was different, or hurt, or stupid things like that,” said Sikora. “He never bothered anybody. … It was all just because he was different and an easy target.”

William Steele said his son had trouble ignoring the bullying because it “was just sort of relentless.” It got to the point where the father sat down with the principal at McClure and with a bully’s mother. But the harassment did not subside.

Steele said, “(Iain) had a real trust issue because he felt like, particularly at McClure, the system let him down, that it didn’t deliver on its promise to protect him from bullying.”

McClure Principal Dan Chick said in an e-mail “the District 101 community is deeply saddened by this recent tragedy of losing one of our children.” Chick said he takes bullying very seriously but declined to discuss details of Iain’s case because of privacy issues.

“As with all situations, I investigated this specific matter and took appropriate actions within the limits of my authority,” Chick said.

After graduating from McClure in 2008, Iain began attending the south campus for freshmen and sophomores at Lyons Township High School, where he found new friends – and new tormentors. A new bully emerged who at first acted friendly but then posted a homemade video on Facebook pretending to be Iain playing heavy metal on guitar.

“It was like a public humiliation to (Iain),” Sikora said.

The family of the student did not respond to requests for comment.

Jennifer Bialobok, a spokeswoman for Lyons Township High School, said “bullying is obviously not tolerated at LT,” but added, “I don’t think we’re naive enough to think that bullying behavior doesn’t exist.”

Two years ago, Lyons Township created a “speak up line” in which students can anonymously report “inappropriate or unsafe behavior,” and the school hangs posters defining bullying and explaining how to report it, Bialobok said. If any student reported being bullied, a thorough investigation would take place, with consequences ranging from parental notification to out-of-school suspension, she said.

Bialobok said she could not discuss Iain’s case because of student privacy laws, but, “we don’t believe that bullying was an issue while Iain was attending LT. Counselors and a host of other support personnel worked routinely to make his experience at LT a positive one.”

Local police have not documented incidents of bullying involving Iain but are still conducting interviews, Deputy Chief Brian Budds said.

By this winter, Iain’s mental health had begun a downward spiral, his parents said. In February, he told them he was having suicidal thoughts and asked to be admitted to the hospital.

He stopped going to school and began attending an outpatient program, seeing a therapist and a psychiatrist and taking medication for depression and anxiety. He tried returning to school on a half-day basis, but soon became overwhelmed with makeup work and inquiries from classmates who heard rumors he had tried to kill himself. After a few days in school, Iain asked to be readmitted to the hospital, where he stayed for a week, his parents said.

But as summer approached, he began showing signs of improvement. He was easier to communicate with, did his chores when asked and his doctors believed they had found the right balance in his medication, his father said.

“He seemed to be in a calm, happy place,” he said.

Iain’s parents and friends say they do not know of any incidents that might have triggered what happened June 3, when his father found him in the basement. His death was ruled a suicide by hanging, according to the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office. He did not leave a note.

Looking back, Iain’s parents wonder what factors besides bullying may have contributed to their son’s depression.

Iain’s favorite heavy metal bands, such as Lamb of God and Children of Bodem and Bullet for My Valentine, often have lyrics with dark messages. One Bullet for My Valentine song is about being bullied, and another song contains the refrain: “The only way out is to die.”

Also, Iain was deeply hurt this spring after a brief relationship with a girl he met in his outpatient program. The two exchanged text messages, but her parents and therapists advised against them dating and about two months ago barred her from having communication with him.

Still, Iain’s parents remain convinced bullying played a significant role in their son’s depression. As Iain’s story spread through the community, many people approached Liz Steele to describe their own experiences with bullying, depression or suicide, she said.

“A lot of people don’t want to talk about mental health or bullying because it’s a difficult thing to talk about, but we need to talk about it,” she said. “It shouldn’t be a stigma.”

Meanwhile, the community has rallied behind the Steeles. In Iain’s memory, his classmates tied white ribbons around hundreds of trees in the neighborhood. On June 10, about 500 people attended a memorial service at First Congregational Church of Western Springs.

Rich Kirchherr, senior minister at the church, said the community has felt a “deep and abiding sadness” since Iain’s death. Kirchherr said few people seemed aware that Iain was bullied.

“There is an acknowledgment now, as people have discovered that Iain might not always have been treated with the respect that every person deserves,” Kirchherr said. “Many people were surprised to hear that.”

Friends have established several Facebook groups in his memory, including the “Iain Steele Remembrance Group,” which has more than 700 members. The commentary on the group’s wall was summed up by a Lyons Township High School student who said she did not know Iain but had learned an important lesson from his death.

“I’m learning to treat everyone with respect, even people who I don’t know well or people who I might not get along with,” she wrote. “If there is anything good that can come out of this tragedy, the responsibility lies with us to live with kindness and be aware that life is fragile.”

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3/30/2001 – LSD to Prozac and back to LSD?!

In the last half century we have witnessed Eli Lilly bring America LSD and
then Prozac. Now that the public has been brainwashed about the “benefits” of
Prozac and its clones, it is time to once again attempt to sell us on LSD.
After admitting in this article the truth of the argument I have made for ten
years against the SSRI antidepressants – they work like LSD in the brain (”
Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.”) they now work to sell us on the
“benefits” of LSD. After all, if we can as a society have given similar drugs
– the SSRIs – such a warm welcome, we must now be ready to accept LSD, the
CIA’s drug of choice for a mind control experimentation, with welcome arms as
well.

Has the world gone completely mad?! Obviously! We now have the National
Institute on Drug Abuse encouraging us to use a drug, already declared
dangerous and of no medical use, when they are suppose to educate us on the
dangers of it. Perhaps the name of the institute should be changed to the
National Institute for Production of Drug Abuse. At this point it would
certainly be more appropriate. Clearly they are counting on their lack of
educating the public about drugs to have produced enough public ignorance of
drugs and their effects so as to allow them to get away with this one. As I
have said repeatedly, the drug companies count on our memory loss. They
expect us to forget within a generation our experience with a drug and then
pull the same drug on us again. They generally give it a new name, or a new
twist, but the more you learn about drugs, the more you realize that the
drugs remain the same.

Obviously on this one they are counting on mass stupidity among the general
population for its acceptance. I would hope that everyone of you is working
as hard as you can to educate all around you to the dangers of these drugs.
Time is of the essence! If you have not yet figured out that we are in a
battle for our lives, you have missed something. Our society as we have known
it and our future is at stake. The Brave New World is here. And with them
feeling so confident as to take such a bold and blatant step as this all that
can be said at this point is, “God help us all!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/hallucinogen010322.html

A computer-generated model of the LSD molecule. (Heffter Institute)

MedicalHallucinogens?

Researchers Studying Possible Medical Use of LSD, Peyote, Psilocybin

By Robin Eisner

N E W Y O R K, March 22 Could shrooms or LSD help the mentally ill?

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs
Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed
Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

At Harvard, a psychiatrist is studying whether the hallucinogenic cactus
peyote creates any long-term memory or attention problems in the American
Indians who take the drug as part of religious rituals.

A University of Arizona psychiatrist is poised to begin researching whether
taking the hallucinogen psilocybin under controlled circumstances may help
people suffering with obsessive compulsive disorder.

And another Harvard psychiatrist is in the beginning phases of designing a
protocol that may employ LSD or another hallucinogen to see if it helps
terminally ill people suffering from depression and pain.

With some support from the private New Mexico-based Heffter Institute, these
researchers, along with others in the United States and abroad, represent a
small movement of scientists looking at the possible medical benefits of
hallucinogens for some psychiatric conditions.

Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs

Hallucinogens are among the oldest known group of drugs that have been used
for their ability to alter human perception and mood, according to the Drug
Enforcement Agency. They have been used for medical, social and religious
practices.

More recently, synthetic hallucinogens have been used recreationally, with
hippies from the ’60s, such as the now deceased ex-Harvard psychology
professor Timothy Leary, first promoting their use with the famous slogan,
Turn on, Tune in, Drop Out.

Today, hallucinogens are deemed drugs of abuse by the DEA, with no known
medical benefit. Approximately 8 percent to 10 percent of high school
seniors tried a hallucinogen in the past year according to a University of
Michigan study of drug use.

It remains unclear how these drugs exert their action in the brain, but
anecdotal evidence and some earlier studies indicate they may help a variety
of psychiatric conditions, says David E. Nichols, founder of the Heffter
Institute, in Santa Fe, and professor of medical chemistry and molecular
pharmacology at Purdue School of Pharmacy in West Lafayette, Ind.

Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.

He founded the institute in 1993 to help give scientific credibility to
medical research on hallucinogens. After years of fund-raising, the
institute now has enough money to help scientists do serious research.

Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed

Since opinions are so strongly held about hallucinogens, it is essential
that any studies in this area be performed with the most rigorous modern
methods and great care to have an impartial approach, says Dr. Harrison
Pope, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who is leading the
four-year peyote study in American Indians.

Funded largely by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and Heffter, Popes
group will be comparing three populations of American Indians peyote users
in religious ceremonies, alcoholics, and local tribespeople to see if
peyote use is associated with cognitive problems.

Pope is also developing a trial to follow up on studies from the ’60s and
’70s suggesting that hallucinogens helped ease anxiety and depression in the
terminally ill and also reduced their need for pain medication.

The challenge is to design the study in such a way that if the drug shows
benefits, skeptics are convinced, and if it doesnt help, proponents of
hallucinogenic use dont challenge the research as inadequate, Pope says.

Psilocybin mushroom

These studies take time to develop to get that scientific imprimatur. They
also need to get review, by local medical institutions and governmental
regulatory authorities. The DEA and the FDA is still reviewing a protocol by
Dr. Francisco Moreno, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University
of Arizona in Tucson, hoping to study a chemically synthesized psilocybin
for obsessive-compulsives. His hospital gave him permission to start the
study.

A protocol of psilocybin and depression in Switzerland also is undergoing
revision before it is submitted to the government authorities there, Nichols
says.

Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

Some scientists, however, question the potential risks of these studies.

The problem with this kind of research is that when average people hear or
read about them in this preliminary stage they might think these drugs could
be good for them now, says Una McCann, associate professor of psychiatry at
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. But it remains unknown until the studies
are finished, McCann says.

Dr. Gregory Collins the director of the Alcohol and Drug Recovery program at
the Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio, believes the risks outweigh any
benefits.

Some of these drugs have been shown to have long-term consequences in
healthy people, Collins says. I would be reluctant to try them in the
mentally ill.

Nichols, however, defends the research. I think we will find some medical
benefit of these drugs, Nichols says. There is no other drug class that
doesnt have some medical utility.

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12/29/2000 – Sarafem Nation – Renamed Prozac Targets Huge Market: Premenstrual W

http://www.villagevoice.com/issues/0049/spartos.shtml

Published December 6 – 12, 2000

Renamed Prozac Targets Huge Market: Premenstrual Women

Sarafem Nation

by Carla Spartos

A visibly irritated woman yanks on a supermarket shopping cart that’s stuck
in its stack while a soothing female voice-over recites a litany of PMS
symptoms. She asks, “Think it’s PMS? Think again. . . . It could be PMDD.”

Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, or PMDD, is a fresh-minted mental illness
that purportedly affects 3 to 10 percent of all menstruating women. Mood
symptoms like depression, anxiety, anger, irritability, or sensitivity to
rejection are said to be so severe the week before a woman’s period that it
impairs her functioning. According to Dr. Jean Endicott, professor of
clinical psychology at Columbia University’s College of Physicians and
Surgeons, “What’s ordinarily irritating becomes enraging.”

To be diagnosed with PMDD, women must keep a daily diary of their symptoms
for the duration of two menstrual cycles. The symptoms must kick in after
ovulation and disappear once menstruation begins. “The timing is exquisite,”
remarks Endicott.

The timing is also exquisite for Eli Lilly and Company to make a financial
killing off of PMDD. Next year, the drug company will lose its patents on the
antidepressant Prozac, and with them its monopoly on the market. To ward off
declining profits, Lilly has found another use for its wonder drug—treating
PMDD.

In July, Lilly got Food and Drug Administration approval to market Prozac
under the new name Sarafem. The company is packaging the drug in pretty pink
and lavender capsules, exclusively for women, most in their late twenties or
early thirties. Says Laura Miller, a spokesperson for Lilly, “Women told us
they wanted treatment that would differentiate PMDD from depression.”

According to Endicott, the symptoms of PMDD primarily interrupt
“interpersonal relationships”—basically, those involving spouses, children,
and coworkers. In one group of women with self-described premenstrual
symptoms, researchers found no increase in absenteeism or decline in work
performance, although the women themselves perceived that to be the case.

“PMDD is unique because there is virtually no other disease that people
insist upon having,” says Dr. Nada Stotland, chair of psychiatry at Illinois
Masonic Medical Center. According to Stotland, the majority of women who go
to PMS clinics have symptoms that aren’t in fact related to their periods.
“Most are depressed everyday. Others have anxiety and personality disorders.
Some are in psychological pain because they are being abused.”

That women might seek help on the pretense their problems are hormonally
based makes PMDD more slippery to recognize and study. Stotland says she’s
particularly concerned that Lilly is targeting almost exclusively OB-GYNs as
Sarafem prescribers, which puts gynecologists in the position of treating
mental illness. She says Lilly’s advertising campaign may convince enough
women they need Sarafem, leading them to pressure their doctors to skip the
two months needed for diagnosis and instead send them straight to the
pharmacy. And since Sarafem will also work for those with chronic depression,
a misdiagnosis can go undetected.

Proponents of Sarafem downplay the potential for misuse. “I doubt that a lot
of people who don’t need the treatment would get it,” argues Endicott.
“First, it’s a prescription drug. Second, women are not big pill poppers.”
Sherry Marts, scientific director of the Society for Women’s Health
Research—a nonprofit organization that promotes research in women’s health
issues—concurs. “This is a real medical condition that requires treatment for
a small percentage of women,” she says.”Not, ‘I’m a little bloated, I’m gonna
pop some Prozac.’ ”

But critics claim that 3 to 10 percent of all menstruating women is no small
number. “That’s a minimum of half a million North American women suffering
from PMDD,” says Paula Caplan, a psychologist and affiliated scholar at Brown
University’s Pembroke Center for Research and Teaching on Women.

Whether PMDD is a real condition is still subject to debate. Although both
sides agree that a certain subset of women may be sensitive to normal
hormonal changes, that’s about all they agree on. The question remains, if
women sometimes snap at their husbands if they don’t pick up after
themselves, or at their kids if they do poorly in school, should they be
branded with a mental disorder? “Women are commonly in situations defined by
stress—responsibility without authority,” says Stotland. ‘That’s almost the
definition of a typical woman’s job.”

Some doctors fear that women who have legitimate reasons to be unhappy will
be silenced by the PMDD diagnosis, and that Sarafem could prove to be the
Valium of the naughts. “Ordinary, healthy changes in mood and emotion are
being pathologized when they happen to women, and since women believe they
shouldn’t feel irritable, angry, or depressed, they are quick to blame
themselves,” says Caplan. For men, “There’s no testosterone-based aggressive
disorder.”

Endicott disagrees. “If men had PMDD, it would have been studied a long time
ago.”

But would it? “To say that a huge proportion of the female population is
disabled represents a potentially horrendous setback for women in the
workplace,” says Stotland. She points to the woman who finally speaks up to
her boss and in return is asked, “Oh, is it that time of the month?” Agreeing
to that kind of put-down might save the woman her job. PMDD could reinforce
the stereotype of the hysterical woman not only to employers, but to women
themselves.

Caplan says that a diagnosis of PMDD will have far-reaching legal
implications as well. Might women who’ve been labeled as mentally ill be
deprived of the right to make their own decisions? Might they lose custody of
their children in divorce cases? In other words, will PMDD sufferers be seen
as the biological equivalent of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde?

That’s already the most common complaint of PMDD sufferers, says Endicott,
who reports women saying over and over, “This isn’t me.” Lilly promotional
literature echoes this sentiment. “The good news is there is treatment
available that can help you feel more like the woman you are every day of the
month,” the brochures say. But who is this woman? And why are we so concerned
with her hormones?

——————————————————————————

One thing is for sure: Eli Lilly and Company has a financial stake in PMDD.
Lilly’s Prozac patents are expiring in 2001 and 2003. This means the market
will open up to cheaper generic competitors. Analysts have estimated that
Prozac sales will decline drastically—from about $2.51 billion in 2000 to
$625 million in 2003. Sarafem will provide a significant new market—women—to
boost profits. That’s a smart move, since women are the primary users of
drugs that alter mood. And, according to documents posted on the FDA’s Web
site, Lilly has proposed a “pilot study of PMDD in adolescents to estimate
its response to treatment with fluoxetine.” Fluoxetine, by the way, is the
generic name for Sarafem (and Prozac).

Another plus for Lilly is that creating a new and separate trademark for
Prozac lessens the stigma associated with antidepressants, and lets the
company dodge some recent bad press, from the publication of Harvard’s Joseph
Glenmullen’s Prozac Backlash to a new study in Brain Research that suggests
the antidepressant may cut off axons of the nerves they target—in effect
causing brain damage.

By 2004, Sarafem sales are expected to climb to $250 million a year,
according to Bear Stearn’s Bottle Report. Lilly would not divulge projected
sales nor the amount of money spent marketing, researching, and developing
Sarafem, but their financial report shows a lot of zeroes. For the first
three quarters of this year, the corporation spent close to $2.3 billion in
marketing and administrative costs, much more than its research and
development, which totalled about $1.5 billion.

But most extraordinary is that the federal government is convinced of the
existence of PMDD, while the psychiatric community isn’t so sure at all. PMDD
is currently listed in the appendix of the DSM-IV—the psychiatrist’s bible of
mental illnesses—as “needing further study.”

The controversy began in 1987, when the compendium first included specific
criteria for Late Luteal Phase Dysphoric Disorder—the former name for
PMDD—in its appendix as a “proposed diagnostic category” needing more
research. In 1993, as the American Psychiatric Association’s task force was
compiling the fourth edition of the manual, the category was revisited.
Should it remain in the appendix, get moved to the body as a recognized
diagnostic category, or be removed altogether?

The committee decided to keep PMDD in the appendix. According to Psychiatric
News, the APA’s professional newsletter, “Members of the task force agreed
there were a number of problems with methodology within the PMDD literature.
The problems included unclear definitions, small sample sizes, lack of
control groups, lack of prospective daily ratings of symptoms, no
documentation of the timing and duration of symptoms, and failure to collect
appropriate hormonal samples.” However, the committee suggested specific
criteria for diagnosing PMDD, including specs for symptoms and timing.

Five years later, the fate of PMDD was still unclear. In October 1998, the
Society for Women’s Health Research organized a discussion, headed by
Endicott, to answer this question: “Is premenstrual dysphoric disorder a
distinct clinical entity?” Once again, experts reviewed the PMDD literature,
this time in the company of FDA and Lilly representatives.

Dr. Sally Severino, a now retired professor of psychiatry at the University
of New Mexico, reiterated flaws in the research. First, just because women
can be identified by PMDD criteria “is not proof that PMDD exists as a valid
diagnosis.” Second, although cross-cultural studies identified physical
complaints related to menstruation, mood symptoms like anger and irritability
were not found worldwide to the same degree as in America. Severino argued
that if PMDD can’t be identified in other populations, then “consideration
must be given to the criticism that PMDD is a culturally bound syndrome or an
unnecessary pathologizing of cyclical changes in women.”

Ignoring these objections, the round table concluded that PMDD was a
“distinct entity with clinical and biologic profiles dissimilar to those seen
in other disorders.” In other words, a mental illness.

What changed between 1993 and 1998? For one thing, Lilly funded a 1995 study
that showed Prozac was effective in treating PMDD. Published in The New
England Journal of Medicine, the study had a large sample size, and was
placebo-controlled and double-blind (meaning neither the doctor nor the
participant knows who’s getting drugs or a sugar pill)—all the makings of a
pristine scientific inquiry. A slate of studies followed suit, all with the
same results: About 60 percent of women diagnosed with PMDD respond to
Prozac.

Yet one 1998 study discussed by Endicott’s roundtable found that 55 percent
of women diagnosed with premenstrual symptoms got significant relief from
increased calcium intake. The group went on to comment that “the area of
calcium is not well explored.” That leads critics to wonder why other
treatment options are getting the cold shoulder. “Why not spend pages and
pages pushing calcium?” asks Caplan, who served on the 1993 DSM committee.
And although there is evidence that people with PMDD can feel better with
only intermittent doses of Prozac—and suffer fewer side effects like sexual
dysfunction—the studies Lilly presented to the FDA looked solely at the
effectiveness of daily doses, or roughly double the amount some researchers
say is needed.

According to Caplan, almost all of the data the roundtable evaluated fell
into two categories: the old problematic studies available to the DSM-IV
group or the new research into using Prozac to treat PMDD. “There was nothing
that looked at the validity of the PMDD construct,” says Caplan.

Did Lilly railroad Sarafem through? Two members of the 16-person roundtable
conducted PMDD research funded by Lilly, and another member has received
honoraria as a speaker for Lilly. Endicott, who hasn’t received research
funds or speaking fees from Lilly, opened the company’s November 1999
presentation to an FDA advisory committee, which voted unanimously in favor
of the new PMDD indication for Prozac. In addition, the Society for Women’s
Health Research trumpets on its Web site an “unrestricted educational grant
from Eli Lilly and Company,” which they’ve used to promote PMDD awareness,
including a national survey conducted in November to gauge women’s awareness
of PMDD and available treatment (i.e., Sarafem). “Lilly had done an
extraordinary job of getting this to the public,” says Stotland.

Researchers taking a ride on the drug-company gravy train is not unique to
those who studied PMDD, but it can have effects on scientific research. “I
don’t think people falsify results. But what kinds of questions do you ask?
Which results do you publish?” asks Stotland. “When I was a resident it was
the departments who had money to bring in speakers. Now, it’s the drug
companies who are flying people around.”

Incidently, at the time of the interview, Stotland was attending a PMDD
conference held at a Palm Springs resort, courtesy of Eli Lilly.

Tell us what you think. editor@…

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