Execise: Greatly Helps Anxiety: Anxiety Disorder Association of America

First two paragraphs read:  “Healthcare providers to prescribe antidepressants for patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, these medications can sometimes come with harmful side effects. As a result, the drugs can sometimes end up doing more harm than good.”

“According to findings that were presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety DisorderAssociation of America, more mental health professionals should begin prescribing alternative health resources such as exercise to their patients who suffer from anxiety as multiple reports have shown that it helps treat the condition.”

http://www.betterhealthresearch.com/news/researchers-suggest-exercise-may-be-best-treatment-for-anxiety-19704171/

Researchers Suggest Exercise May Be Best Treatment For Anxiety

By Donna Parker • Apr 5th, 2010 • Category: AnxietyHealth News

Healthcare providers to prescribe antidepressants for patients who suffer from depression or anxiety, these medications can sometimes come with harmful side effects. As a result, the drugs can sometimes end up doing more harm than good.

According to findings that were presented at the annual conference of the Anxiety DisorderAssociation of America, more mental health professionals should begin prescribing alternative health resources such as exercise to their patients who suffer from anxiety as multiple reports have shown that it helps treat the condition.

“Individuals who exercise report fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression, and lower levels of stress and anger,” said Jasper Smits, director of the Anxiety Research and Treatment Program at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “Exercise appears to affect, like an antidepressant, particular neurotransmitter systems in the brain, and it helps patients with depression re-establish positive behaviors.”

In addition to treating patients for anxiety, exercise can also keep the body flexible, improve sleeping patterns, keep blood pressure in check and help increase bone strength.

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JAMA: Mild to severe depression better treated with alternatives to medications

Last month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients
with very severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild
to severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


From: nandtbearden@yahoo.com
To: ,
ssri-crusaders@yahoogroups.com, atypical_antipsychotics@yahoogroups.com,
atracyphd2@aol.com
Sent: 2/14/2010 8:12:09 A.M. Central Standard
Time
Subj: Even when treated, depression costs employers

http://uk.mobile.reuters.com/mobile/m/FullArticle/eUK/CHLTUK/nhealthNews_uUKTRE6183DO20100209

Even
when treated, depression costs employers
Tue, 09 Feb 20:05 PM
GMT

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Workers with depression stay home
sick more often than healthy colleagues, even when their disease is treated,
according to a Thomson Reuters report released on Tuesday.

The report,
commissioned by drug maker Sanofi Aventis, suggests that employers would
benefit from better treatments of their workers for depression. Depression is
the leading cause of disability among Americans aged 15 to 44, according to
the National Institute of Mental Health.

“Even when depressed patients
are treated with antidepressants, there are substantial productivity losses.
Therapies that can better manage depression may provide opportunities for
savings to employers,” the Thomson Reuters research team wrote in the Journal
of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

“Despite the widely
acknowledged effectiveness of antidepressant therapy, productivity costs
related to depression persist even after patients receive treatment,” Suellen
Curkendall, director of outcomes research at Thomson Reuters, said in a
statement.

“This may be due to the fact that patients often don’t
respond to the first type of antidepressant that they are prescribed. They
also may fail to take their medications on a regular basis,” added Curkendall,
who led the study.

Curkendall and colleagues analyzed insurance claims
and employee health and productivity data for more than 22,000 patients
treated with antidepressants and compared them to people without
depression.

Workers who had been treated for depression were twice as
likely as others to use short-term disability leave, they found.
Disability-related costs for a year, on average, were $1,038 for patients
treated for depression and $325 for the non-depressed workers.

“Over 40
percent of patients with depression were diagnosed with at least one of the
other included psychiatric conditions besides depression,” the researchers at
Thomson Reuters, parent company of Reuters, added.

Most common were
anxiety, dissociative and so-called somatoform disorders — a group of
disorders with physical symptoms but no apparent physical cause.

Last
month, a team at the University of Pennsylvania found only patients with very
severe depression were measurably helped by antidepressant drugs. Mild to
severe depression might be better treated with alternatives to antidepressant
drugs, they wrote in the Journal of the American Medical
Association.

At least 27 million Americans take antidepressants and
more than 164 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written in 2008,
totaling nearly $10 billion in U.S. sales and $20 billion globally, according
to IMS Health.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox, editing by Jackie
Frank)
Sent via BlackBerry by
AT&T

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Two Brothers Commit Suicide One Week Apart: Arkansas

Paragraphs eight and nine read:  ”  ‘One guy last
year locked himself inside a bathroom and shot himself, and this was a
retired military man that was highly decorated
, Bearden said. “Then
come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the week before in
another state.”

“The correlation between the two brothers was

anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm
that the prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden
said it happens too often that prescription drugs change
the mindset of a person.”

Paragraph four reads:  “Bearden
added,  ‘People need to know that we do, in fact, have a problem in Saline
County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here anymore. Every once in
awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
drugs’.”

http://www.bentoncourier.com/content/view/204346/1/

Coroner: Teen Drug Death Rate High

Saturday, 06
February 2010

The hand reaches down as another parent
enters the room fearing the worst. The large black bag slowly unzips and the
worst fear a parent never wants to believe, that moment is here. Inside the
darkness of the body bag lies someone’s son, daughter, nephew, their niece ­
someone’s good friend, and another family is torn apart with grief, confusion,
and a wish it was them instead.

It is a day that
Will Bearden has seen too often in his 13 years as the Saline County Corner, and
18 years previously riding on an ambulance as an EMT. Nearly everyday Bearden
has to tell yet another family what caused the death of a loved one, and
surprising to many, he said nearly 90 percent are due to drugs and
alcohol.


In fact, in 2009 alone, Bearden said that about 60 deaths were related
to drugs and alcohol, and nearly 30 of those deaths involved teenagers living in
Saline County, and state officials say the county leads the state in the number
of fatal drug overdoses.

“When you say it won’t happen to me or my family,
you are about to eat your words, because I have seen it happen time and time
again,” Bearden said. “I work in it every day, and I see a lot of sad families
asking what they could have done to help their son or daughter.”
Bearden added, “People need to know that we do, in fact,
have a problem in Saline County. We don’t really have many ‘hard’ drugs here
anymore. Every once in awhile you’ll see cocaine or marijuana or other street
drugs, but most of the deaths … 90 percent come from prescription
drugs.”
Bearden said even Arkansas Chief Medical Examiner
Charles Kokes believes “Saline County has one of the highest percentages of
deaths caused by drug overdoses.”
But it isn’t just teens that are dying from prescription
drugs or alcohol; everyone is at risk, he said. From fatality accidents to
accidental overdoses to suicides, people “age 85 and down” have deaths related
to the rise in prescription drug abuse.
One guy last year locked himself inside a bathroom and
shot himself, and this was a retired military man that was highly decorated,”
Bearden said. “Then come to find out, his brother had done the same thing the
week before in another state.”
The correlation between the two brothers was
anti-depression medications, Bearden said. While he can’t confirm that the
prescription medication was what led to the brothers’ suicides, Bearden said it
happens too often that prescription drugs change the mindset of a
person.
“Drugs definitely affect a person’s mental state,” he
said. “I also believe that it’s a mental disease when someone gets hooked on
drugs. Many people addicted believe they have pain (whether physical, mental or
emotional) and they take medications for their pain. Some aren’t trying to do
harm; they just take too much and then some just go and take their lives, and
probably wouldn’t have if they wouldn’t have had so much medication affecting
their mental state.”
Bearden said of the nearly 60 deaths in Saline County
last year, around 22 were ruled suicides. After the bodies are sent to the
Arkansas State Crime Lab for toxicology screens, most come back with some type
of drugs in their system, the majority being prescription drugs.
“I’ve had to help out with a lot of those autopsies
because the medical examiner is overloaded with cases all the time, and I’ve
seen where pills aren’t even digested in the stomach yet and sometimes are still
in a person’s mouth,” Beard said. “What makes this job tough is when you have to
approach the loved ones of those that died. I’ve seen a lot of divorces and
hatred with families after a son or daughter’s death because the parents keep
blaming each other … it’s just a real sad thing to see, and I see it too
often.”
Bearden also recalls many trips to the Saline Memorial
Hospital in which a person survived an overdose. But it isn’t in any way
pleasant for anyone, he said.
“Three or four times a night I bet someone overdoses on
drugs, but survives from having their stomachs pumped and they fight with the
doctors and nurses,” Bearden said. “It’s got to be a unbelievable pain to have a
stomach pumped, but they shouldn’t have put themselves in that situation if they
didn’t want that to happen and the medical staff has to do whatever they can to
save their life.”
Then there is the criminal side of people hooked on
drugs. Once, Bearden said he left the home of an older person that had just
died  and later returned to the home to retrieve medications to help with
the death investigation.
“It wasn’t even 30 minutes later that I returned to the
home,” he said. “I found the back door kicked in and inside were two teenagers
going through the medicine cabinets. They were ambulance-listening and chasing
in hopes of finding prescription drugs.”
Bearden said police and others are now even warning
families to not list the addresses of the deceased. He said the prescription
drug abusers do everything from listen to police/fire/ambulance scanners, to
chasing ambulances to even reading obituaries in newspapers.
“It has unfortunately come to that point,” Bearden said.
“Don’t tell people where the family is because they’ll break in and look for
whatever (prescription) drugs they can find.”
However, Bearden believes this can be overcome. He said
people first need to listen and believe there is a problem and then work
together to find solutions.
“We’ve got to get the message to the younger kids and we
can do that by getting the parents and grandparents involved in teaching them
and making them realize that it can happen to them,” Bearden said. “I think we
need more programs in school to recognize and talk about this problem. And the
younger the children we can reach, the better we can be in helping it all end.
But really the best way is by word of mouth.”

One program Bearden said he is
“100 percent behind” is the Operation Medicine Cabinet. (See related
article.)

Most importantly, Bearden said people have to truly
believe there is a problem with prescription drug abuse in Saline County.

Unzipping another body bag and
having to tell parents that their child is gone is a part of the job Bearden
wishes he never has to do again, but it happens ­ much too often.

“ … It will send chills up
your spine,” he said. “ … Letting parents in to identify the body … that’s
real stuff, and I want to change that. If we can all work together, we can end
it.”

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