ANTIDEPRESSANT??? NEW YORK TIMES: JAMES HOLMES-AURORA SHOOTER-BEFORE GUNFIRE, HINTS OF ‘BAD NEWS’ – BIPOLAR QUESTIONS

Keep in mind as you read this article that ANTIDEPRESSANTS ARE NOW THE BIGGEST CAUSE OF BIPOLAR DISORDER ON THE PLANET!!!!!!!!!!

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This week the New York Times had the most in depth article we have seen to date on the accused Aurora movie theater shooter, James Holmes. The article begins with the most critical information yet released …

“The The text message, sent to another graduate student in early July, was cryptic and worrisome. Had she heard of “dysphoric mania,” James Eagan Holmes wanted to know?

“The psychiatric condition, a form of bipolar disorder, combines the frenetic energy of mania with the agitation, dark thoughts and in some cases paranoid delusions of major depression.

“She messaged back, asking him if dysphoric mania could be managed with treatment. Mr. Holmes replied: “It was,” but added that she should stay away from him “because I am bad news.”

Between the years 1996 – 2004 the use of antidepressants sky rocketed in youth & during that same period of time the diagnosis of bipolar disorder in that age group also sky rocketed by a 4000% increase! Note that when his friend texted back to him that dysphoric mania could be managed with treatment James Holmes replied that “It was” treated but that she should stay away from him because he was “bad news.”

From that statement it is quite clear that he had already been “treated” with something for dysphoric mania or at least Bipolar Disorder which continued to progress into what James himself was guessing was dysphoric mania – the type of mania we so often see in antidepressant-induced mania. The thoughts he was having were nightmarish enough that he warned his friend to stay away from him because he was “bad news” … he did not trust himself & knew his thinking was off.

Another quote from the New York Times article: “But he said that in some cases psychiatrists, unaware of the risks, prescribe antidepressants for patients with dysphoric mania — drugs that can make the condition worse.”

Notice that dysphoric mania includes paranoid delusions. This is why I have said from the beginning that the way he had booby trapped his apartment was NOT as a trap for the police, but a trap for anyone coming to harm him. This is why he warned the police to be careful of what was there as they entered his apartment. They booby traps were only a part of his paranoid delusions.

Yet the Times mistakenly reports: “He had apparently planned the attack for months, stockpiling 6,000 rounds of ammunition he purchased online, buying firearms — a shotgun and a semiautomatic rifle in addition to two Glock handguns — and body armor, and lacing his apartment with deadly booby traps, the authorities have said.”

They then go on to point out that: “Studies suggest that a majority of mass killers are in the grip of some type of psychosis at the time of their crimes, said Dr. Meloy, the forensic psychologist, and they often harbor delusions that they are fighting off an enemy who is out to get them.

“Yet despite their severe illness, they are frequently capable of elaborate and meticulous planning, he said.

His stockpiling of weapons, which is so very common in those who suffer this type of mania from antidepressants, was evidence of the level of his paranoia, NOT evidence of his planning for the shooting! After reviewing thousands of these cases the pattern becomes quiet clear of arming themselves with a multitude of weapons in order to protect themselves from this unknown enemy who is out to get them. Although generally they have no idea who they are protecting themselves from since the paranoia is a chemical reaction with no basis in reality at times they do pick someone out to blame their paranoia on so as to have a reason for their feelings of such deep fear.

Once again let me remind you that if you really want to understand how these antidepressants produce these horrific cases of violence in our world by those no one would have ever suspected before read my book Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare! Anything you ever wanted to know about antidepressants is there along with everything drug companies hope you never find out about these drugs. Find the book & the CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!” on how to safely withdraw at www.drugawareness.org

BOOK TESTIMONIALS:

“VERY BOLD AND INFORMATIVE”

“PRICELESS INFORMATION THAT IS GIVING ME BACK TO ME”

“THE ABSOLUTE BEST REFERENCE FOR ANTIDEPRESSANT DRUGS”

“WELL DOCUMENTED & SCIENTIFICALLY RESEARCHED”

“I was stunned at the amount of research Ann Blake-Tracy has done on this subject. Few researchers go to as much trouble aggressively gathering information on the adverse reactions of Prozac, Zoloft and other SSRIs.”

HELP CD TESTIMONIALS:

“Ann, I just wanted to let you know from the bottom of my heart how grateful I am God placed you in my life. I am now down to less than 2 mg on my Cymbalta and I have never felt better. I am finally getting my life back. I can feel again and colors have never been brighter. Thanks for all that you do!!” … Amber Weber

“Used your method of weaning off of SSRI’s and applied it to Ambian. Took 6 months but had been on 15 mg for years so what was another 6 months. I have been sleeping without it for 2 weeks and it is the first time I have been able to sleep drug free for 15 years. What a relief to be able to lay down and sleep when I need or want to. Ambien may be necessary for people at times but doctors giving a months worth of it at a time with unlimited refills is a prescription for disaster. It is so damn easy to become dependent on. Thanks for your council Ann.”… Mark Hill

“I’m so thankful for Dr.Tracy and all her work. Also for taking the time out to talk to me and educate everyone! She has been a blessing to me during this awful time of antidepressant hell!” … Antoinette Beck

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Safe Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

Also be aware that many new cases are posted regularly under breaking news at www.drugawareness.org. There are far too many to send them all to you. So if you have a question about a recent case check the website & feel free to send it to me if it looks like yet another case we might have missed…. Ann Blake-Tracy

______________________________

NEW YORK TIMES: Before Gunfire, Hints of ‘Bad News’


By ERICA GOODE, SERGE F. KOVALESKI, JACK HEALY and DAN FROSCH
Published: August 26, 2012

AURORA, Colo. — The text message, sent to another graduate student in early July, was cryptic and worrisome. Had she heard of “dysphoric mania,” James Eagan Holmes wanted to know?

The psychiatric condition, a form of bipolar disorder, combines the frenetic energy of mania with the agitation, dark thoughts and in some cases paranoid delusions of major depression.

She messaged back, asking him if dysphoric mania could be managed with treatment. Mr. Holmes replied: “It was,” but added that she should stay away from him “because I am bad news.”

It was the last she heard from him.

About two weeks later, minutes into a special midnight screening of “The Dark Knight Rises” on July 20, Mr. Holmes, encased in armor, his hair tinted orange, a gas mask obscuring his face, stepped through the emergency exit of a sold-out movie theater here and opened fire. By the time it was over, there were 12 dead and 58 wounded.

The ferocity of the attack, its setting, its sheer magnitude — more people were killed and injured in the shooting than in any in the country’s history — shocked even a nation largely inured to random outbursts of violence.

But Mr. Holmes, 24, who was arrested outside the theater and has been charged in the shootings, has remained an enigma, his life and his motives cloaked by two court orders that have imposed a virtual blackout on information in the case and by the silence of the University of Colorado, Denver, where Mr. Holmes was until June a graduate student in neuroscience.

Unlike Wade M. Page, who soon after the theater shooting opened fire at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, killing six people, Mr. Holmes left no trail of hate and destruction behind him, no telling imprints in the electronic world, not even a Facebook page.

Yet as time has passed, a clearer picture has begun to surface. Interviews with more than a dozen people who knew or had contact with Mr. Holmes in the months before the attack paint a disturbing portrait of a young man struggling with a severe mental illness who more than once hinted to others that he was losing his footing.

Those who worked side by side with him saw an amiable if intensely shy student with a quick smile and a laconic air, whose quirky sense of humor surfaced in goofy jokes — “Take that to the bank,” he said while giving a presentation about an enzyme known as A.T.M. — and wry one-liners. There was no question that he was intelligent. “James is really smart,” one graduate student whispered to another after a first-semester class. Yet he floated apart, locked inside a private world they could neither share nor penetrate.

He confided little about his outside life to classmates, but told a stranger at a nightclub in Los Angeles last year that he enjoyed taking LSD and other hallucinogenic drugs. He had trouble making eye contact, but could make surprising forays into extroversion, mugging for the camera in a high school video. A former classmate, Sumit Shah, remembers an instance when Mr. Holmes performed Irish folk tunes on the piano — until others took notice of his playing, when he stopped. So uncommunicative that at times he seemed almost mute, he piped up enthusiastically in a hospital cafeteria line when a nearby conversation turned to professional football.

Like many of his generation, he was a devotee of role-playing video games like Diablo III and World of Warcraft — in 2009, he bought Neverwinter Nights II, a game like Dungeons & Dragons, on eBay, using the handle “sherlockbond” (“shipped with alacrity, great seller,” he wrote in his feedback on the sale). Rumored to have had a girlfriend, at least for a time, he appeared lonely enough in the weeks before the shooting to post a personal advertisement seeking companionship on an adult Web site.

Sometime in the spring, he stopped smiling and no longer made jokes during class presentations, his behavior shifting, though the meaning of the changes remained unclear. Packages began arriving at his apartment and at the school, containing thousands of rounds of ammunition bought online, the police say.

Prosecutors said in court filings released last week that Mr. Holmes told a fellow student in March that he wanted to kill people “when his life was over.”

In May, he showed another student a Glock semiautomatic pistol, saying he had bought it “for protection.” At one point, his psychiatrist, Dr. Lynne Fenton, grew concerned enough that she alerted at least one member of the university’s threat assessment team that he might be dangerous, an official with knowledge of the investigation said, and asked the campus police to find out if he had a criminal record. He did not. But the official said that nothing Mr. Holmes disclosed to Dr. Fenton rose to the threshold set by Colorado law to hospitalize someone involuntarily.

Yet Mr. Holmes was descending into a realm of darkness. In early June, he did poorly on his oral exams. Professors told him that he should find another career, prosecutors said at a hearing last week. Soon after, he left campus.

That Mr. Holmes, who is being held in the Arapahoe County jail awaiting arraignment on 142 criminal counts, deteriorated to the point of deadly violence cannot help but raise questions about the adequacy of the treatment he received and about the steps the university took or failed to take in dealing with a deeply troubled student. In court hearings and documents, Mr. Holmes’s lawyers have confirmed that he has a mental disorder and that he was in treatment with Dr. Fenton. They will undoubtedly use any evidence that he was mentally ill in mounting a defense. Colorado is one of only a few states where, in an insanity defense, the burden of proof lies on the prosecution.

J. Reid Meloy, a forensic psychologist and expert on mass killers, has noted that almost without exception, their crimes represent the endpoint of a long and troubled highway that in hindsight was dotted with signs missed or misinterpreted. “These individuals do not snap,” he said, “whatever that means.”

But who could divine the capacity to shoot dozens of people in cold blood? Or the diabolical imagination necessary to devise the booby traps the police said Mr. Holmes carefully set out in his apartment the night of the rampage, devices that could have killed more?

Cool and Detached

A potential for violence was the last thing that came to mind when a graduate student at the university met Mr. Holmes at a recruitment weekend for the neuroscience program in February last year.

“What struck me was that he was kind of nonchalant,” the woman recalled. “He just seemed too cool to be there. He kicked back in his chair and seemed very relaxed in a very stressful situation.”

But his reticence was also apparent, she said.

“I noticed that he was not engaged with people around him. We went around the table to introduce ourselves, and he made a weird, awkward joke,” said the student who, like many of those interviewed, spoke on the condition of anonymity, citing reasons that included not wanting their privacy invaded by other news organizations and hearing from law enforcement or university officials that talking publicly could compromise the investigation. The university, invoking the investigation and the court orders, has refused to release even mundane details about Mr. Holmes, like which professors he worked with.

As the fall term began last year and students plunged into their required coursework, that pairing of laconic ease with an almost crippling social discomfort would become a theme that many students later remembered.

The neuroscience program, which admits six or seven students each year out of 60 or more applicants, sits under the umbrella of the Center for Neuroscience, an interdisciplinary and multicampus enterprise started a little over year ago to bring together basic science and clinical research. More than 150 scientists are affiliated with the center, 60 of them formally involved with the graduate program.

The mix of laboratory scientists and clinicians is “absolutely fundamental” to the center’s goals, said Diego Restrepo, its director. Dr. Restrepo and two other administrators met with The New York Times under the ground rule that no specific questions about Mr. Holmes or the case be asked.

The research interests of the neuroscience faculty are wide-ranging and include the effects of aging on the sense of smell, the repair of spinal cord injuries, promising drugs for Down syndrome, treatments for stroke, and studies of diseases and disorders like Alzheimer’s, schizophrenia and autism. The center is particularly known for its research on the neurobiology of sensory perception.

In the first year of the program, each neuroscience graduate student takes required courses and completes three 12-week laboratory rotations, said Angie Ribera, the program’s director.

“Students might come in with a strong interest in one area, but we feel strongly that they should get broad training,” she said. “It’s an incredibly supportive group of students. There is a bonding there.”

Other students said Mr. Holmes did his rotations in the laboratories of Achim Klug, who studies the auditory system; Mark Dell’Acqua, who does basic research on synaptic signaling; and Dr. Curt Freed, whose work focuses on messenger chemicals in the brain and stem cell transplants in patients with Parkinson’s disease.

But even in a world where students can spend hours in solitary research, Mr. Holmes seemed especially alone.

He volunteered little information about himself, his interests or what he dreamed of doing with his degree, said one graduate student who, touched by Mr. Holmes’s shyness, tried repeatedly to draw him out. Attempts to engage him in small talk were met with an easy smile and a polite reply — if only a soft-spoken “yo” — but little more.

“He would basically communicate with me in one-word sentences,” one member of the neuroscience program said. “He always seemed to be off in his own world, which did not involve other people, as far as I could tell.”

In classes, Mr. Holmes arrived early to grab a good seat, his lanky 5-foot-11 frame in jeans and sometimes a “Star Wars” T-shirt. He hardly ever took notes, often staring into the distance as if daydreaming. Uncomfortable when called on by professors, he almost always began his responses with a weary-sounding “Uhhhhhhh.”

But there was little doubt about his intellect. In a grant-writing class, where students were required to grade each other’s proposals, Mr. Holmes wrote thoughtful and detailed comments, one student recalled, giving each paper he was assigned to review a generous grade.

“This was the only time I saw an assignment of James’s,” the student said. “Frankly, I was very impressed. I thought his comments were much better than anyone else’s.”

In the spring, just months before the shooting, Mr. Holmes turned in a midterm essay that a professor said was “spectacular,” written almost at the level of a professional in the field.

The essay was “beautifully written,” the professor said, and “more than I would have expected from a first-year student.”

In the talks Mr. Holmes gave after his first laboratory rotations, he often resorted to jokes, perhaps in an effort to cover his unease. During one presentation, he stood with one hand in his pocket, a laser pointer in his other hand. With a slight smile, he aimed the pointer at a slide and crowed “Oooooooh!”

“Oh my God, James is so awkward,” a student recalled a classmate whispering.

Yet in a video of scenes from Hemingway’s “A Farewell to Arms,” made when he was a student at Westview High School in San Diego, where he was on the cross-country team and was a standout soccer defender, Mr. Holmes proved a deft comedian with a talent for improvisation, his former classmate Jared Bird remembered.

“He kept making funny faces at the camera and making unexpected comments,” Mr. Bird said. “He was being a goofy bartender. We expected him to play it straight, but he made it more interesting, much more comical. He ad-libbed everything.”

By the end of high school, Mr. Holmes was already pursuing his interest in science, attending a summer internship in 2006 at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, before going to college at the University of California, Riverside. But if he was beginning the process of finding a career, he was also forging a reputation for extreme shyness.

“I frequently had to ask yes-or-no questions to get responses from him,” said John Jacobson, his adviser that summer, adding that he completed virtually none of the work he was assigned, which involved putting visual illusions developed in the laboratory on the Internet. “Communicating with James was difficult.”

Mr. Holmes was more voluble in e-mails. When he discovered that Mr. Jacobson spoke Mandarin, he began one e-mail to him with a greeting in that language: “Ni hao John.”

But he stayed apart from the other interns, often eating alone at his desk and not showing up for the regular afternoon teas. He was the only intern not to keep in touch with the coordinator when the program ended.

“At the end of the day, he would slink upstairs and leave,” Mr. Jacobson said.

A Notable Presence

A smile and the air of one who walked a solitary path — they were enough to attract the attention of shopkeepers in the gritty neighborhood just west of the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, where students could find cheap, if amenity-free, housing.

On many days, Mr. Holmes could be seen cruising home slowly down 17th Avenue on his BMX bicycle toward the red-brick apartment building where he lived on the third floor, his body arched casually, his gangling frame almost too big for the small bike, a Subway sandwich bag dangling from the handlebars.

Waiters and sales clerks recognized him. He washed his clothes at a nearby laundry, took his car for servicing at the Grease Monkey, bought sunglasses at the Mex Mall and stopped in at a pawnshop on East Colfax Avenue, perusing the electronics and other goods for sale.

He favored a Mexican food truck in the mornings, buying three chicken and beef tacos but refusing sauce, and at night he sometimes dropped by Shepes’s Rincon, a Latin club near his apartment, where he sat at the bar and drank three or four beers, a security guard there said. But he spoke no Spanish, and other than placing his order talked to no one.

On several occasions, he was spotted in the company of two other students, one male, one female. Did he date? No one seemed sure. Mostly, he was alone.

“You kind of got that feeling that he was a loner,” said Vivian Andreu, who works at a local liquor store.

“Sometimes,” she said, “I would get a smile out of him.”

Months of Planning

He had apparently planned the attack for months, stockpiling 6,000 rounds of ammunition he purchased online, buying firearms — a shotgun and a semiautomatic rifle in addition to two Glock handguns — and body armor, and lacing his apartment with deadly booby traps, the authorities have said.

But Mr. Holmes’s neighbors did not seem to notice — Narender Dudee, who lived in an apartment next to his, did not even hear the loud techno music that blared from his rooms on the night of the shooting.

“I must have been in a deep sleep,” Mr. Dudee said.

Studies suggest that a majority of mass killers are in the grip of some type of psychosis at the time of their crimes, said Dr. Meloy, the forensic psychologist, and they often harbor delusions that they are fighting off an enemy who is out to get them.

Yet despite their severe illness, they are frequently capable of elaborate and meticulous planning, he said.

As the graduate students reached the end of their second semester, wrapping up coursework, finishing lab rotations and looking toward the oral exam that would cap their first year, some noticed a change in Mr. Holmes. If possible, he seemed more isolated, more alone.

His smile and silly jokes were gone. The companions he had sometimes been seen with earlier in the year had disappeared.

On May 17, he gave his final laboratory presentation on dopamine precursors. The talks typically ran 15 minutes or so, but this time, Mr. Holmes spoke for only half that time. And while in earlier presentations he had made an attempt to entertain, this time he spoke flatly, as if he wanted only to be done with it.

A student with whom Mr. Holmes had flirted clumsily — he once sent her a text message after a class asking “Why are you distracting me with those shorts?” — said that two messages she received from him, one in June and the other in July, were particularly puzzling.

Their electronic exchanges had begun abruptly in February or March, when she was out with stomach flu.

“You still sick, girl?” she remembers Mr. Holmes asking.

“Who is this?” she shot back.

“Jimmy James from neuroscience,” he replied.

After that, she said, he sent her messages sporadically — once he asked her if she would like to go hiking — though he would sometimes walk right past her in the hallway, making no eye contact.

As the oral exams approached, she recalled, Mr. Holmes seemed relaxed about the prospect, telling her, “I will study everything or maybe I will study nothing at all.”

The goal of the one-hour exam, said Dr. Ribera, the neuroscience program director, “is to evaluate how students integrate information from their coursework and lab rotations and to see how they communicate on their feet.” It is not, she said, “to weed out or weed in.”

As is customary in many doctoral programs, three faculty members ask the questions during the exam. If a student does poorly, the orals can be repeated.

Mr. Holmes took his oral exam on June 7. The graduate student sent him a message the next day, asking how it had gone. Not well, he replied, “and I am going to quit.”

“Are you kidding me?” she asked.

“No, I am just being James,” he said.

A few weeks later, another student recalled, Cammie Kennedy, the neuroscience program administrator, accompanied the students to Cedar Creek Pub on campus to celebrate the completion of the first year. All the students except Mr. Holmes attended.

As the group drank beers and waxed nostalgic, Ms. Kennedy suddenly grew serious.

“I want to let you guys know that James has quit the program,” a student remembered her saying. “He wrote us an e-mail. He didn’t say why. That’s all I can really say.”

Mr. Holmes informed the school that he was dropping out at the same time that members of the threat assessment team were discussing Dr. Fenton’s concerns, the official familiar with the investigation said. Prosecutors in the case have said in court documents that Mr. Holmes was barred from the campus after making unspecified threats to a professor. But university administrators have insisted that he was not barred from campus and said his key card was deactivated on June 10 as part of the standard procedure for withdrawing.

In early July, the woman who conducted the text exchange with Mr. Holmes sent him a message to ask if he had left town yet. No, he wrote back, he still had two months remaining on his lease.

Soon he asked her about dysphoric mania.

Whether the diagnosis was his own or had been made by a mental health professional is unclear. Through a lawyer, Mr. Holmes’s parents declined several requests to talk about their son’s life before the shooting or the nature of any illness of his.

Dr. Victor Reus, a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, said dysphoric mania is not uncommon in patients with bipolar disorder, a vast majority of whom never turn to violence.

But in severe cases, he said, patients can become highly agitated and caught up in paranoid delusions, reading meaning into trivial things, “something said on TV, something a passer-by might say, a bird flying by.” Dr. Reus declined to speculate about Mr. Holmes, whom he has never met, and he emphasized that he knew nothing about the psychiatric treatment Mr. Holmes might have received.

But he said that in some cases psychiatrists, unaware of the risks, prescribe antidepressants for patients with dysphoric mania — drugs that can make the condition worse.

Dave Aragon, the director of the low-budget movie “Suffocator of Sins,” a Batman-style story of vigilante justice and dark redemption, remembers receiving two phone calls in late May or early June from a man identifying himself as James Holmes from Denver. The caller had become enraptured with the four-minute online trailer for the movie, Mr. Aragon said — “He told me he’d watched it 100 times” — and had pressed him for more details about the film.

“He came off as articulate, nervous, on the meek side,” he said. “He was obviously interested in the body count.”

Painful Retrospect

In the days after the shooting, faculty members and graduate students, in shock, compared notes on what they knew about Mr. Holmes, what they might have missed, what they could have done. Some said they wished they had tried harder to break through his loneliness, a student recalled. Others wondered if living somewhere besides the dingy apartment on Paris Street might have mitigated his isolation.

At a meeting held at Dr. Ribera’s house, a student said, Barry Shur, the dean of the graduate school, said Mr. Holmes had been seeing a psychiatrist. When the authorities told him the identity of the shooting suspect, Dr. Shur said, his reaction was “I’ve heard his name before.”

But all that came later.

No one saw Mr. Holmes much after he left school in June.

A classmate spotted him once walking past the Subway on campus, his backpack in tow. Mr. Dudee, his neighbor, saw him in mid-July, his hair still its normal brown. Perhaps in a sign of ambivalence, he never took the forms he had filled out to the graduate dean’s office, the final step in withdrawing from the university.

He never replied to the fellow student’s last text message, asking if he wanted to talk about dysphoric mania.

At some point on Thursday, July 19, according to the police, he gathered up the bullets and shotgun shells, the gas mask, an urban assault vest, a ballistic helmet and a groin protector and moved into action at the Century 16 Theater.

He mailed a notebook to Dr. Fenton that the university said arrived on July 23, its contents still under seal by the court. And he bought a ticket for the midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises,” as if he were just another moviegoer, looking forward to the biggest hit of the summer.

Sheelagh McNeill, Kitty Bennett and Jack Styczynski contributed research.
A version of this article appeared in print on August 27, 2012, on page A1 of the New York edition with the headline: Before Gunfire, Hints of ‘Bad News’.

www.nytimes.com/2012/08/27/us/before-gunfire-in-colorado-theater-hints-of-bad-news-about-james-holmes.html?pagewanted=1&_r=3&smid=fb-share&pagewanted=all

 

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Drug Awareness Big News – What We Have Been Putting Together For You!!!!

WE ARE EXCITED TO LET YOU KNOW THAT WE ARE STARTING A DRUG AWARENESS MEMBERSHIP PROGRAM TO BETTER HELP TO SHARE INFORMATION & EDUCATE AS MANY AS POSSIBLE ABOUT THESE DRUGS…WHAT HAS GONE ON IN MEDICINE & IN COURTROOMS, & IN THE MEDIA SINCE THEY WERE FIRST INTRODUCED. WE HAVE PUT TOGETHER AN ENTIRE LIBRARY OF AUDIO & VIDEO TO TAKE YOU THROUGH THE HISTORY OF THE PAST 20+ YEARS SINCE THESE DRUGS WERE INTRODUCED. (YOU MAY SKIP BELOW TO OPPORTUNITY TO SEE WHAT WE HAVE PUT TOGETHER FOR YOU OR SEE OUR HISTORY DETAILED BELOW.)

HISTORY/BACKGROUND: Most of you know that since 1990 I have been researching serotonin & antidepressants & gathering information from the media & court cases on these drugs. You also know that I began gathering cases involving these drugs at the same time. At a local meeting in Salt Lake City of those concerned about Prozac people begged me to become the local director for the Prozac Survivor’s Support Group. I graciously declined explaining that I did not see how I could spend the time researching & writing my book about antidepressants & do that as well. My world turned upside down the following day when the 20 year old son of a local attorney jumped to his death outside my downtown office window. His dying words to the responding officers included the fact that he was on Prozac. That was the day I agreed to become the Utah director for the Prozac Survivor’s Support Group. In September of that year I testified before the first FDA hearing on Prozac & now am the only one who has attended every FDA hearing on SSRI antidepressants ever held.

When Rosie Meysenberg & I met in 1996 we joined forces in gathering & documenting these cases. We began with gathering a group of antidepressant cases of women who were committing very violent murders & murder/suicides – something that stood out in society as a rarity. Rosie & I continued this effort gathering cases of murder/suicide, parents killing children, children killing parents, school shootings, workplace violence, road rage, air rage, False Accusations of Sexual Abuse, soldiers committing suicide, murder & murder/suicides, female school teachers seducing male students, etc. A decade later Rosie & her husband Gene paid me a visit to gather and consolidate as many cases as possible gathered over the years to began putting together a searchable database of these cases to post on the internet. That database is now located at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org & has been the basis for two major medical research studies so far. Sadly Rosie left us a week ago to join those whose battle we have been fighting for two decades before getting a chance to see in action what she knew we were working on.

Then in 1997 Mark Miller, who had recently lost his 13 year old only son, Matt, to a Zoloft-induced suicide, after only one week on the drug, joined Rosie & I to put up our website at www.drugawareness.org . He did a marvelously impressive job taking Drug Awareness quickly to the top of the charts on the net as so many families searched for answers as to what had happened in their families! This was the humble beginnings of the International Coalition for Drug Awareness. Over the years many have joined us in this battle for truth about antidepressants & their impact upon our society.

Also over the years everyone seemed to expect me to gather the media coverage in the newspapers, magazines & television. It seemed that I quickly became the antidepressant library for the planet documenting the peddling of these drugs to our world. That is what we are opening up now to make available to everyone. Since 1991 I have been doing radio & television shows & newspaper & magazine articles/interviews on the SSRI antidepressants. I have lost track of just how many, but they are all safely tucked away to document this antidepressant age & stand as a witness of all that has happened as a result. We are pulling them all out, dusting off the cobwebs & making them available to our members. More & more will be added each & every month.

DRUG AWARENESS MEMORIAL: We also want you to be aware of the memorial area we made available a few years ago. This is for you to place videos or just pictures of your loved one lost to these deadly antidepressant drugs. If you have not yet put together a video collage of your loved one we do have professionals who will do so for you at a discount so that you too may post your own video. I encourage you to go to the memorial area of our website to see how to go about this. Please allow people to see how much our world has lost with the loss of your loved one – their talents & contributions they would have offered to our world that we will now never see because of these drugs. You understand & feel that loss more than anyone because you were blessed to know them so well. Make the world see what you saw in them so that they can understand too what all was lost when we lost them! I refuse to allow them to remain numbers! I want to world to see them for who they were.  Memorial

OPPORTUNITY:
 We are going to offer three membership packages with perks for access to this information & additional educational opportunities. Of course as a member your dues support the many causes and projects of Drug Awareness:

Membership Package #1 SILVER: You receive instant online access to 17 audio/radio shows by Ann Blake-Tracy (Well over $100 worth  of audios with many more to come soon!), instant access to the 1/2 hour long withdrawal CD by Ann Blake-Tracy PLUS FOR THE FIRST 100 WHO SIGN UP THEY WILL RECEIVE: a MP3 download of the CD to share with others PLUS another download of Ann Blake-Tracy’s most favorite of lectures over the past 20 years: a dynamic delivery of information presented to a group of 2000 gathered for a Young Living Oils Convention. Ann Blake-Tracy received a standing ovation for this lecture.

Membership Package #2 GOLD: You receive instant online access to 17 audio/radio shows by Ann Blake-Tracy (Well over $100 worth  of audios with many more to come soon!), instant access to the 1/2 hour long withdrawal CD by Ann Blake-Tracy plus an MP3 download of the CD to share with others AND another download of Ann Blake-Tracy’s most favorite of lectures over the past 20 years: a dynamic delivery of information presented to a group of 2000 gathered for a Young Living Oils Convention. Ann Blake-Tracy received a standing ovation for this lecture. PLUS YOU GET instant access to all DVDs & videos offered through our Drug Awareness Book Store (Well over $100 retail value of audio & over $100 retail value of DVDs!) PLUS FOR THE FIRST 100 WHO SIGN UP THEY WILL RECEIVE FOR THE FIRST THREE MONTHS: a 1/2 hour free either personal withdrawal or legal consultation with Ann Blake-Tracy (a $62.50 – $125 value!! for the first three months of membership then changing to a 1/2 hour long monthly conference call with Ann Blake-Tracy)

Membership Package #3 PLATINUM: You receive instant online access to 17 audio/radio shows by Ann Blake-Tracy (Well over $100 worth  of audios with many more to come soon!), instant access to the 1/2 hour long withdrawal CD by Ann Blake-Tracy plus an MP3 download of the CD to share with others AND another download of Ann Blake-Tracy’s most favorite of lectures over the past 20 years: a dynamic delivery of information presented to a group of 2000 gathered for a Young Living Oils Convention. Ann Blake-Tracy received a standing ovation for this lecture. PLUS YOU GET instant access to all DVDs & videos offered through our Drug Awareness Book Store (Well over $100 retail value of audio & over $100 retail value of DVDs!) PLUS FOR THE FIRST 100 WHO SIGN UP THEY WILL RECEIVE FOR THE FIRST THREE MONTHS: a 1 hour free – either personal withdrawal or legal – consultation with Ann Blake-Tracy (a $125 – $250 value!! for the first three months of membership then changing to an hour long monthly conference call with Ann Blake-Tracy)

Sign up here: http://www.drugawareness.org/book-store/membership

There will be many perks & free CDs & DVDs to share with others as we go along. Education is the only way to stop this nightmare! Without understanding too many are lured right back into the web of deceit woven by the drug makers about these deadly drugs!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: *”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare –
The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon
Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

1,364 total views, 1 views today

FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: WELCOME BACK TO DRUGAWARENESS!!!!!!

Intern’tl Coalition for Drug Awareness Newsletter

Newsletter Posted by: “Ann Blake-Tracy”

Wed Feb 29, 2012 4:44 pm (PST)

It has been a very long time – far too long – since we have sent out newsletters from our Drugawareness site. I am starting them back up again & want to update you on all that is happening. Over the past two weeks I have had three experiences that have made me realize that no matter how overwhelmed I have been over the past couple of years, I MUST find the energy and means by which I can step up the pace of educating the world about antidepressants because I know what is happening in my life is happening in everyone else’s lives as well because antidepressants are EVERYWHERE!!

Besides the school shooting that just happened in Ohio with every earmark of yet another antidepressant induced school shooting, last night a friend called to let me know that her cousin was the teen boy who walked in front of a train in my old neighborhood last week. The grandmother of this boy has now lost two of her grandchildren in a violent suicide induced by antidepressants!!! The first was a teen girl who shot herself about a decade ago. And her son was sent to prison because of false accusations of abuse made by someone on these meds. THAT IS ONE FAMILY!!!!!

Then last week a good friend I have known for 20 years & who has helped set me up for lectures and radio shows to spread the word about antidepressants called to let me know that his 32 year old niece on antidepressants had just committed suicide leaving her husband and three children behind.

Then two weeks ago a friend I have had for 30 years called to let me know that her daughter had given her son-in-law ONE pill of Zoloft after which he made several serious suicide attempts & was now in a psych ward.

Now if I am being hit with this many tragedies this close to me in my life when I know what I know about these drugs, how bad is has it become in everyone else’s lives????!!!!!

So we are gearing up the website to offer more & more info.

We welcome all of you back to our Drugawareness family!!!
You can find us on Facebook under the International Coalition for Drug Awareness. And you can find me on Facebook at Ann Blake Tracy where we have been sharing MUCH new information. Please come and friend us there!

Our Texas Director, Rosie Meysenburg, & I have worked very hard for many years to gather as many antidepressant-induced cases of violence, suicide & other adverse reactions. And Rosie has put all of these plus many more she has gathered from the internet into an incredible database which you can search in so many different ways! You can search by patient name, by state, by what happened (school shooting, teacher seducing students, suicides, child cases, etc.) The website for that is located at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org

We are also gathering your stories on the site. There will be a spot for you to enter yours as well.

We are preparing a membership site as well with several ways of learning more and more about these drugs & how to educate others to prevent these tragedies.

I also have new DVDs available on several subjects:

1: On the subject of Bipolar induced by the use of antidepressants

2: Antidepressants & Mind Control

3. False Memory Syndrome caused by antidepressants

4. The Effects of Antidepressants Upon Spirituality

5. The REM Sleep Behavior Disorder (RBD) (We now know that 86% diagnosed with RBD are taking antidepressants!!!)

I also just learned Leslie Demeniuk’s antidepressant-induced nightmare is going to be on the Bio Channel Friday evening at 8:00 PM Eastern Time. http://www.biography.com/tv/weekly-schedule It is a program called Women Behind Bars. Leslie shot her twin 4 year old boys while in a psychosis produced from going from Zoloft to Paxil. Her fiance, Anthony Ortiz, was one of our Drugawareness group who came to Houston from Florida for the press conference we had on the courthouse steps during Andrea Yate’s second case. Leslie’s case is found on our SSRIstories database of cases athttp://ssristories.drugawareness.org/archive/show.php?item=497

So that you have some background as you watch this program: Leslie was suffering the hypoglycemic reaction that comes from the use of antidepressants coupled with the stronger impact upon blood sugar brought on by the shock to the body of abrupt changes in dose of an antidepressant. This reaction brings on overwhelming cravings for either alcohol or sweets or both. She was therefore drunk also at the time of the shooting. This alcohol craving was the first reaction to Prozac that caught my attention & caused me to begin researching the SSRI antidepressants. I was shocked to see those who had never touched alcohol in their lives become alcoholic almost overnight on these antidepressants!

Of course the cases never end. Just last week a pharmacist in Tampa, FL drowned her baby while on antidepressants. We have just had another school shooting which I am sure involved the drugs & not far from there a young father shot & killed his wife & three children. In Utah last night I learned a friend’s teen cousin walked in front of a train in my old neighborhood to commit suicide after several months on antidepressants. Amazing that as hard as you try & as much evidence as there is when there is so much $$$$$ being made the truth just does not make it out – unless we do it ourselves to save those we love!!!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness, www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? Our Serotonin Nightmare & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

 

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1 dead, 4 injured in NE Ohio school shooting – 2-27-2012

YET ANOTHER SCHOOL SHOOTING!!! How can these continue? Basically non-existant before antidepressants hit the market. Now there is another one every time you turn around & in almost every case there is you will find an antidepressant involved as we will likely find in this one as well. How this can continue to go on right under the noses of everyone and so few “get it” is beyond me!!! Orwell could not have pegged our age any better than he did in his book 1984!

www.wmbfnews.com

Chardon Fire has confirmed they were called to the high school for a shooting. The Fire dispatcher said students are possibly injured.

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Xanax Facts and Whitney Houston

 Whitney-Houston-Drugs
I have to agree with Dr. Peter Breggin on this article & would encourage you to read it & educate yourself about this drug.

But what I would add that was not addressed here is how often Xanax is prescribed in antidepressant withdrawal thereby causing Xanax to take responsibility for what the antidepressant withdrawal actually caused or exacerbated the effects. If that is a possibility in Whitney Houston’s case we do not know because that information has not been shared & is rarely addressed or considered.

Another important issue not addressed here is that Ambien is in this same group of drugs & most are aware of the very serious problems with this Benzo.

Also when Xanax was introduced to the market ~ supposedly to replace its extremely addictive sister drug, Valium ~ it is amazing to see it made it to approval when you consider that 1/3 of those in the clinical trials for Xanax could not withdraw from this drug due to its extremely addictive properties!!!

www.huffingtonpost.com

Reports that Xanax and other benzos are not usually lethal when taken alone are vastly misleading. Xanax is rarely taken alone. Why? Because as much or more than any other prescribed drug, Xanax causes medication spellbinding.

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Wellbutrin destroyed my soul

Wellbutrin destroyed my soul
Matt
I’d like to share my account of the complete and total destruction of my soul as a result of antidepressant withdrawal. I didn’t even think such a thing was possible, but I now know that it is.
I’d been on a high dosage of Wellbutrin (generic: Bupropion) for 5 years for depression. I decided to stop taking it because I felt it was losing its effect and I was becoming apathetic. In the months that followed my withdrawal, I gradually began losing my ability to feel emotions. When a close relative died and I could literally feel nothing towards this event, I knew something was wrong.
That is when I decided to reinstate the drug, as I thought I might have been better while taking it. Strangely, reinstating the drug for a month did not help, but instead made things worse. I felt like I kept losing more and more of myself inside. This confused me, and I didn’t know what to do. When I stopped the drug again and reinstated a second time, I experienced one tremendous day of improvement followed by a seizure while sleeping, and waking up in a confused state. After this I regressed and felt completely dead inside.
This waking up in a confused state happened 2 more times, once in May 2010 and once in September 2010. Both of these were preceded by sudden improvements. But upon waking I felt like I had lost a basic part of my self. Not just feelings, but the core of my being. What I felt to be the complete and final destruction of my inner being happened on September 7th, 2010, and there hasn’t been a change since (it has now been 6 months).
I’ve been in an extremely peculiar state for the past 6 months. I have literally lost everything inside of me and no longer have a sense of ”inner being”. My personality has been completely erased, along with the inner psyche I’ve spent a lifetime building. When I attempt to ”look inside”, it is impossible because there is literally nothing there. Everything that made up my specific sense of personal being is gone, including including my hopes, fears, dreams, goals, opinions, values, morals, likes/dislikes, and most strikingly, all emotions and feelings.
I have no feelings associated with past events, and no emotional connections with anything in the world. Specific emotions that defined my personal sense of being are no longer there. People, places, things and events that I thought were etched in my soul as having significance no longer mean a thing. Absolutely nothing, I can’t stress this enough.
I am unable to look backward or forward, have no sense of past accomplishments and no desire for future ones. The strangest thing is, I cannot feel anything toward being in this state, as that part of me is gone too. It’s like a recursive erasure of everything I ever was, am, and will be.
It doesn’t feel like life is a conscious experience that I am having anymore, as there is no inner construct within me to absorb an experience on any level. I see, hear, touch, and smell, yet each of these is so devoid of emotional content that they don’t coalesce into anything meaningful I can call a human consciousness. My sense of being has been replaced by a constant void of nothingness that is unchanging, 24/7, I feel nothing towards the nothingness. It is not like feeling empty inside, there is no inside to feel empty within.
Obviously, antidepressants affect neurotransmitters. Maybe my neurotransmitters were severely imbalanced by the manner in which I withdrew, along the seizure(s) (there is only one I am sure of). What I don’t understand is how a neurotransmitter imbalance could completely erase me as a human being. What I’m experiencing is not depression, anhedonia, or flat affect, but a permanent change in my consciousness that literally destroyed my humanity. All the parts that made up my being are literally gone. I don’t understand how this is even possible, or what (if anything) I can do to change it. Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

2,517 total views, no views today

Wellbutrin (generic: Bupropion)

Wellbutrin (generic: Bupropion)
Matt
I’d like to share my account of the complete and total destruction of my soul as a result of antidepressant withdrawal. I didn’t even think such a thing was possible, but I now know that it is.
I’d been on a high dosage of Wellbutrin (generic: Bupropion) for 5 years for depression. I decided to stop taking it because I felt it was losing its effect and I was becoming apathetic. In the months that followed my withdrawal, I gradually began losing my ability to feel emotions. When a close relative died and I could literally feel nothing towards this event, I knew something was wrong.
That is when I decided to reinstate the drug, as I thought I might have been better while taking it. Strangely, reinstating the drug for a month did not help, but instead made things worse. I felt like I kept losing more and more of myself inside. This confused me, and I didn’t know what to do. When I stopped the drug again and reinstated a second time, I experienced one tremendous day of improvement followed by a seizure while sleeping, and waking up in a confused state. After this I regressed and felt completely dead inside.
This waking up in a confused state happened 2 more times, once in May 2010 and once in September 2010. Both of these were preceded by sudden improvements. But upon waking I felt like I had lost a basic part of my self. Not just feelings, but the core of my being. What I felt to be the complete and final destruction of my inner being happened on September 7th, 2010, and there hasn’t been a change since (it has now been 6 months).
I’ve been in an extremely peculiar state for the past 6 months. I have literally lost everything inside of me and no longer have a sense of ”inner being”. My personality has been completely erased, along with the inner psyche I’ve spent a lifetime building. When I attempt to ”look inside”, it is impossible because there is literally nothing there. Everything that made up my specific sense of personal being is gone, including including my hopes, fears, dreams, goals, opinions, values, morals, likes/dislikes, and most strikingly, all emotions and feelings.
I have no feelings associated with past events, and no emotional connections with anything in the world. Specific emotions that defined my personal sense of being are no longer there. People, places, things and events that I thought were etched in my soul as having significance no longer mean a thing. Absolutely nothing, I can’t stress this enough.
I am unable to look backward or forward, have no sense of past accomplishments and no desire for future ones. The strangest thing is, I cannot feel anything toward being in this state, as that part of me is gone too. It’s like a recursive erasure of everything I ever was, am, and will be.
It doesn’t feel like life is a conscious experience that I am having anymore, as there is no inner construct within me to absorb an experience on any level. I see, hear, touch, and smell, yet each of these is so devoid of emotional content that they don’t coalesce into anything meaningful I can call a human consciousness. My sense of being has been replaced by a constant void of nothingness that is unchanging, 24/7, I feel nothing towards the nothingness. It is not like feeling empty inside, there is no inside to feel empty within.
Obviously, antidepressants affect neurotransmitters. Maybe my neurotransmitters were severely imbalanced by the manner in which I withdrew, along the seizure(s) (there is only one I am sure of). What I don’t understand is how a neurotransmitter imbalance could completely erase me as a human being. What I’m experiencing is not depression, anhedonia, or flat affect, but a permanent change in my consciousness that literally destroyed my humanity. All the parts that made up my being are literally gone. I don’t understand how this is even possible, or what (if anything) I can do to change it.
Any suggestions or advice would be appreciated.

1,310 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Famous Supermodel Jumps Six Floors to Her Death: Columbia

Paragraph 2 reads: “According to a Colombian newspaper, police are
confirming that Marulanda leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia
apartment. Reports are also indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a
result of a recent separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The
stress of the split and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on
antidepressants to help her cope with her most recent troubles. According to
reports, Lina had only been married to Onate for four months.”

http://www.rightcelebrity.com/?p=8523

Lina Marulanda, a famous and successful supermodel from Columbia has died
at the young age of 29. She was born on May 15th, 1980 in Medellin,
Colombia. Not only was Marulanda a popular television host, but she will be
remembered as one of Columbia’s most successful models. The news came April 22,
2010 that Lina jumped to her death, falling from her sixth floor apartment,
surely to be devastating news to those close to her.

According to a Colombian newspaper, police are confirming that Marulanda
leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia apartment. Reports are also
indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a result of a recent
separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The stress of the split
and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on antidepressants to help her
cope with her most recent troubles. According to reports, Lina had only been
married to Onate for four months.

Lina started modeling at the age of 12 years of age and went on to work as
a television presenter on the Colombian news show, CM&Y Caracol.

There has been no official statement from Lina’s family, friends or
employer. Our thoughts go out to her family and friends. This has to be
devastating news for those close to Lina Marulanda.

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SSRIs: Sharp Drop in Brain Activity + Worsening Depression & Suicidality

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Hopefully if you have followed my work or read my book, “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare,” you know that I have made the argument for a decade and a half that antidepressants are the most similar drugs we have ever seen to dissociative anesthetics like PCP or Ketamine. They just work in a little slower motion is all. This research would confirm that by showing adrop in brain activity within ONLY 48 hours of use! All one needs to do is go to the one color page inmy book with brain wave patterns of a 31 year old male on Prozac for six months. The brain waves show that the patient is in a total anesthetic sleep state and dreaming while talking with those doing the test on him!
_______________________________________
Paragraph five reads:  “Prior research, Hunter said, has shown that between 8 and 14 percent of depressed patients develop thoughts of suicide while taking the most common forms ofdepression drugs, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Although reports have suggested that SSRIs are to blame, no firm link between these drugs and thoughts of suicide has been established.”

Paragraphs seven and eight read:  “The researchers treated 72 people suffering from majordepressive disorder (MDD) with one of two SSRIs, fluoxetine or venlafaxine, or with a placebo. All were evaluated by a clinician using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a standard instrument that assesses the severity of a wide range of depression symptoms. Of the 37 participants on medication,five (13.5 percent) had worsening thoughts of suicide.”

“All of the participants were also examined using QEEG, which evaluates brain function based on thebrain‘s electrical activity. Among the 13.5 percent of participants who got worse, the researchersfound a sharp drop in brain activity within 48 hours of the start of medication. The dropoccurred in the midline and right-frontal sections of the brain, areas known to control emotions.”

SSRI Stories note:  In regard to placebo & suicidality, it should be remembered that the majority of placebo patients are ‘wash-out’ patients from other antidepressants and thus are actually inantidepressant withdrawal which can be extremely dangerous.

http://www.physorg.com/news189972383.html

Simple test can detect signs of suicidal thoughts in people taking antidepressants

April 8, 2010 By Mark Wheeler

(PhysOrg.com) — UCLA researchers have developed a non-invasive biomarker that may serve as a type of early warning system for doctors and patients.

While antidepressant medications have proven to be beneficial in helping people overcome majordepression, it has long been known that a small subset of individuals taking these drugs can actually experience a worsening of mood, and even thoughts of suicide. No clinical test currently exists to make this determination, and only time  usually weeks  can tell before a psychiatrist knows whether a patient is getting better or worse.

Now, UCLA researchers have developed a non-invasive biomarker, or indicator, that may serve as a type of early warning system.

Reporting in the April edition of the peer-reviewed journal Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Aimee Hunter, an assistant research psychologist in the UCLA Department of Psychiatry, and colleagues report that by using quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG), a non-invasive measurement of electrical activity in the brain, they were able to observe a sharp reduction of activity in a specific brainregion in individuals who proved susceptible to thoughts of suicide  within 48 hours of the start of treatment.

Prior research, Hunter said, has shown that between 8 and 14 percent of depressed patients develop thoughts of suicide while taking the most common forms of depression drugs, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI). Although reports have suggested that SSRIs are to blame, no firm link between these drugs and thoughts of suicide has been established.

This study suggests, for the first time, a link between worsening suicidality and specific changes inbrain function while on these medications.

The researchers treated 72 people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD) with one of twoSSRIs, fluoxetine or venlafaxine, or with a placebo. All were evaluated by a clinician using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a standard instrument that assesses the severity of a wide range of depression symptoms. Of the 37 participants on medication, five (13.5 percent) had worseningthoughts of suicide.

All of the participants were also examined using QEEG, which evaluates brain function based on thebrain‘s electrical activity. Among the 13.5 percent of participants who got worse, the researchers found a sharp drop in brain activity within 48 hours of the start of medication. The drop occurred in the midline and right-frontal sections of the brain, areas known to control emotions.

Of note, eight of the 35 participants taking a placebo (22.9 percent) also had increased thoughts of suicide. However, the placebo participants did not show the precipitous drop in brain activity within the first 48 hours.

“This is the first study to show a change in brain function after the start of medication that appears to be linked to the subsequent development of worsening thoughts of suicide during antidepressant treatment,” Hunter said. “Importantly, changes in this biomarker did not predict worsening suicidal thoughts in the placebo-treated subjects, so the results suggest that the biomarker specifically detected medication-related worsening only.”

QEEG is a relatively inexpensive instrument that is non-invasive; measurements are obtained by placing electrodes on the scalp. As a result, Hunter said, further development of this biomarker could potentially lead to a tool that could be used by clinicians to predict, in the early stages of treatment, whether an individual suffering from depression will develop thoughts of suicide.

Provided by University of California Los Angeles

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