ANTIDEPRESSANT-HYDROCODONE-ALCOHOL: Wrong-Way Crash: 4 Dead: Two Injured: TX

Paragraph 15 reads:  “After the wreck, DPS trooper Otto
Cabrera wrote in an arrest affidavit that he “could smell the strong odor of
metabolized alcohol from Looschen.” Looschen told Cabrera that he’d been
drinking and had taken antidepressants as well as
hydrocodone, according to the affidavit. Hydrocodone can be used as a cough
suppressant or a pain reliever.”

http://www.statesman.com/news/local/georgetown-man-pleads-guilty-in-fatal-2009-wreck-248382.html

Georgetown man pleads guilty in fatal 2009 wreck

Luke Anthony Looschen faces up to 100 years in prison for wrongway crash
on Texas 29.

By Miguel
Liscano

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Updated: 12:49 a.m.
Thursday, Feb. 18, 2010

Published: 8:54 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 17,
2010

A Georgetown man pleaded guilty Wednesday morning to four counts of
intoxication manslaughter and two counts of intoxication assault, admitting
guilt in causing a three-vehicle collision last summer that killed four people
and injured two others.

Luke Anthony Looschen, 48, entered his plea
before District Judge Burt Carnes in a Williamson County courtroom. A sentencing
hearing has been set for March 12 . He faces up to 100 years in
prison.

The guilty plea was not part of a plea agreement, Looschen’s
attorney Mike Davis and Williamson County Assistant District Attorney Robert
McCabe said in court.

“Mr. Looschen has acknowledged his guilt from the
get-go on this, and he felt the proper thing to do was to plead guilty,” Davis
said later.

Family members of those killed in the wreck wept in the
courtroom as Looschen entered his plea.

Looschen, who has been in the
Williamson County Jail with bail set at $600,000 since his arrest, showed no
visible emotion during the hearing.

“Did you use your truck as a deadly
weapon in this case?” McCabe asked.

“Yes, sir, I did,” Looschen
replied.

Because of that admission, Looschen must serve at least half of
the sentence he receives, and Carnes cannot sentence him to probation,
Williamson County District Attorney John Bradley said.

Looschen was
arrested Aug. 10 after troopers said he was driving a pickup east in a westbound
lane of Texas 29 near Jonah and collided head-on with a Jeep and a van carrying
seven people. The van slid down an embankment and struck a tree, according to a
Department of Public Safety crash report.

The driver of the Jeep was not
seriously injured, officials said.

In the van, Pete Mendez, 44, and Paula
Martinez, 38 , were pronounced dead at the scene, officials said. Two passengers
died later at University Medical Center Brackenridge: Crystal Martinez , the
16-year-old daughter of Paula Martinez and Clemente Martinez, the driver; and
Stephanie Valadez, 24, who was dating the couple’s son.

Valadez’s
daughter Tristan and son Jacob, who were 3 and 1, respectively, at the time of
the wreck, were treated at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple and
released.

Clemente Martinez was not seriously injured, officials
said.

After the wreck, DPS trooper Otto Cabrera wrote in an arrest
affidavit that he “could smell the strong odor of metabolized alcohol from
Looschen.” Looschen told Cabrera that he’d been drinking and had taken
antidepressants as well as hydrocodone, according to the affidavit. Hydrocodone

can be used as a cough suppressant or a pain reliever.

Blood test results
later revealed that Looschen’s blood alcohol content level was 0.16 , or twice
the legal limit of 0.08 , according to the DPS crash report. Looschen had been
in a previous one-vehicle accident on July 16 in Williamson County, which he
later discussed on his Facebook page. He said on the Web site that he had
totaled his truck and “sustained some scrapes, bruises and lacerations.” On Aug.
3, a few days before the fatal crash, he wrote on Facebook that he was getting a
replacement truck that day.

In 2006, Looschen was in a motorcycle
accident with his ex-wife, 43-year-old Shanan Looschen, in Georgetown, police
said.

Shanan Looschen was thrown from the motorcycle and died a day later
at Brackenridge, police said. Neither was wearing a helmet, police
said.

No charges were filed in either of the two earlier
wrecks.

mliscano@statesman.com;
246-1150

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ANTIDEPRESSANTs: Murder: Youth Kills Friend: Oklahoma

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic behavioral reactions.
________________________

Paragraph 16 reads: “While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “’I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them’.”

“Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.”

http://www.chickashanews.com/local/local_story_302093409.html

Published: October 29, 2009 08:34 am

The Express-Star

Ronson Bush’s mother Tina Black took the stand on Wednesday to ask the court to spare her son’s life.

On day two of his trial, Bush admitted killing his friend Billy Harrington but still refuses to say he meant to do it. Because of his refusal, Grady County District Attorney Bret Burns is asking District Judge Richard Van Dyck to hand down a death sentence.

The jury was excused when Bush changed his plea to guilty, and now the decision whether Bush lives or dies in solely in the hands of Van Dyck, who will render his decisiion at 10 a.m. today.

“We had a life before alcohol and drugs, we had laughs and family time and we went to church,” Black said. “If a family has not experienced alcohol and drugs, they had better thank the Lord because they’re an ugly thing that make your child someone you don’t know.”

In her plea to save her son’s life. Black said she is not angry with Ronson for herself, but she is angry for her grandson Brennan, Ronson’s son.

“Brennan loved going out in the truck with his dad,” Black said. “He asked me, ‘If my dad got life, do you think they’d let him go out in the truck one more time?’”

Black said she thinks a person can love their children even if they do not like their actions.

“There was something that fired up that anger, that wasn’t normal,” Black said.

The next witness to testify was Gail Poyner, Ph. D., a licensed psychologist who deals primarily in forensic psychology.

Poyner performed a psychological evaluation of Bush and researched the effects of the medications Bush was taking.

Poyner said members of Bush’s family described him as “flipped out,” “crazy” and “paranoid,” and that Bush experiences anxiety, sleeplessness, depression, severe drug and alcohol problems and says his brain feels “itchy.”

“Likely he was misdiagnosed or not diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder,” Poyner said. “He is severely mentally ill and his involvement with crime is highly correlated with his mental illness.”

Poyner criticized the lack of treatment Bush received after he was admitted to Griffin Memorial Hospital in Norman.

“I very strongly believe at a professional level had Griffin offered a modicum of treatment, this (the murder) could have been possibly avoided,” Poyner said. “They simply did not give him any treatment, no group therapy, no individual therapy. It was documented he was suicidal, yet they did not treat him for that.”

Bush had previously been placed on antidepressant drugs known as SSRs, a medication Poyner’s research indicates is a “virtual prescription for violence.” The drugs cause serotonin build-up in the brain, causing “terrible things” to occur, and , when combined with alcohol, can lead to violence.

While incarcerated in the Grady County Jail, physician reports indicate Bush was given additional SSRIs, which he refused, saying, “I killed my friend when I took these, I’m not going to take them.”

Dr. David Musick, a full professor of sociology at the University of Northern Colorado, also testified.

Describing Bush’s family as “good folks,” Musick discussed alcoholism as a disease and how the “horrific” drug methamphetamine creates powerful addictions in humans.

“The defendant (Bush) has a serious alcohol problem that is overflowing into violence,” Musick said. “As a child, he was a pawn being pulled back and forth by his family who had different parenting styles which creates unbearable pain so he covers up the pain with alcohol and illicit drugs.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Fleeing from Arraignment: Utah

Paragraphs three & four read:  “Her attorney, Douglas
Baxter, told the judge her client had a
bad reaction
when she stopped taking an antidepressant.  ‘She had a panic attack and
took off,’  he said.”

“Bell did not even tell her family
where she was going. Her husband reported her missing and law enforcement
tracked her down at a casino on the Las Vegas strip. She was extradited back to

Utah County this week.”

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/705350662/April-trial-set-for-former-Mapleton-official-Jeannie-Bell.html

April trial set for former Mapleton official Jeannie Bell

Published: Thursday, Dec. 10, 2009 2:39 p.m. MST
PROVO ­ The
former finance controller of Mapleton accused of embezzling almost $50,000 from
the city has been ordered held on $25,000 cash-only bail.

Fourth District
Judge James Taylor set the bail Thursday and scheduled an April trial for
Jeannie Bell, 48, who skipped her arraignment on the second-degree felony theft
charge last month and fled to Las Vegas.

Her attorney, Douglas Baxter,
told the judge her client had a bad reaction when she stopped taking an

antidepressant. “She had a panic attack and took off,” he said.

Bell did
not even tell her family where she was going. Her husband reported her missing
and law enforcement tracked her down at a casino on the Las Vegas strip. She was
extradited back to Utah County this week.

Prosecutors say Bell used a
city credit card to purchase stamps and gift cards for employee bonuses, then
sold them on eBay.

­ Paul Koepp

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