Study: Australian Doctors Are Both Depressed and Stressed

 

Doctors Ready for Surgery

Australian Doctors Are Depressed, Stressed –

Having A Four Times Greater Rate of Suicidal Thoughts Than the Normal Population!!!

We have already posted months ago that 25% of the Australian Parliament admit to taking antidepressants. But what are their doctors taking? Apparently the same drugs they are doling out to their patients – antidepressants. Look at the following stats from this research:

“Oncologists are the most psychologically distressed specialists, while doctors who do not deal directly with patients think about suicide most often.

“One in five medical students and one in ten doctors have had suicidal thoughts in the previous 12 months, compared with one in 45 people in the wider community, according to the report.

“Based on responses to the survey, more than a quarter of doctors are likely to have a minor psychiatric disorder like mild depression or mild anxiety, which is much more than the broader community.

‘Although many doctors are embarrassed to admit they have a problem, they are more likely to seek help than the general population.” [Of course that means, as I have said before, they are more likely to be “medicated” for these problems than the normal population.]

[And you have to love this line!!!] “Doctors are role models. They lead by example and will encourage other members of the population to seek help early.” In that line you find the reason for this survey and the push by this Australian group to get more doctors “medicated” for their mental illness.” In doing so they know that, just as any drug user in the street, they will recommend the same drugs to others. The group, called Beyond Blue, appears to be a carbon copy of our US counterpart, NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill) – a group almost fully funded by Pharma (75%) to encourage family members to keep their loved ones on the medications they are on.

Just a couple of weeks ago I sent out a post containing many cases of medical professionals or their family members here in the States involved in murders or murder/suicides associated with their use of or possible use of antidepressants. I also stated that in my experience of gathering cases for our database at www.ssristories.drugawareness.org medical and psychological professionals by far make up the largest single group facing serious problems with antidepressants and antipsychotics.

And as shocking as the percentages are out of Australia I would say they are certainly conservative figures next to ours because in 2007 a TV camera crew came from Russia to interview me. At the last minute they let me know that they wanted to film me giving a lecture. So we quickly put out some flyers and decided to have the lecture right at my home. We packed the place with only a days’ notice with about 50 people coming from as far as 7 hours away…I say that only to point out how very many there are facing problems with these drugs.

After my lecture one of the two psych nurses who attended stood to say they never get to hear what I had shared with them that evening but she personally knew it was true because she was on Lexapro and having all the reactions I had mentioned. She then said that 75% of the doctors and nurses she worked with are taking antidepressants!!!!! She explained that the drug reps were telling them they are in a very stressful profession and they need to “nip in the bud” the depression that would surely follow all that stress. An old but successful sales line.

Keep in mind that if stress leads to depression and doctors are in a stressful profession antidepressants would be the last thing they would need since elevated levels of cortisol are what indicate stress while a study done by the makers of Prozac (Petralgia 1984) found that taking one single 30 mg dose of Prozac will DOUBLE cortisol levels thereby DOUBLING stress levels. Although that is the only one we have studies to indicate this increase it can be expected in all SSRI and SNRI antidepressants as the drastic cortisol increase is linked to the increased serotonin.

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

 

 

Original article:

Aussie Doctors Are Depressed, Stressed

More than a quarter of doctors are likely to have a minor psychiatric disorder and one in ten has had suicidal thoughts, according to a major study.
Source AAP

Doctors are far more depressed and stressed than other Australians, with a disproportionate number having suicidal thoughts, according to a major study.

Students and doctors aged under 30, particularly women, are at most risk of suicidal thoughts and mental illness, according to the survey commissioned by mental health charity beyondblue.

Oncologists are the most psychologically distressed specialists, while doctors who do not deal directly with patients think about suicide most often.

One in five medical students and one in ten doctors have had suicidal thoughts in the previous 12 months, compared with one in 45 people in the wider community, according to the report.

Based on responses to the survey, more than a quarter of doctors are likely to have a minor psychiatric disorder like mild depression or mild anxiety, which is much more than the broader community.

Although many doctors are embarrassed to admit they have a problem, they are more likely to seek help than the general population.

This is a good sign, says Dr Mukesh Haikerwal, former Australian Medical Association president and chair of the beyondblue doctors mental health program.

“It is a step towards removing the stigma from mental illness.

“Doctors are role models. They lead by example and will encourage other members of the population to seek help early.

“There is great resilience within the medical profession but doctors do fall into depression and anxiety and must get early treatment and intervention,” he says.

The Roy Morgan survey, which was completed by more than 14,000 doctors and medical students, shows men work longer hours and engage in more risky drinking, but women doctors are more distressed and think about suicide more often.

Perceived stigma is rife, with four in 10 agreeing that many doctors think less of doctors who have experienced depression or anxiety.

Just under five per cent list bullying and 1.7% list racism as a cause of stress.

Kate Carnell, the CEO of beyondblue, says the survey identifies the challenges the medical community faces and outlines how they can be tackled.

“This includes initiatives such as a mental health strategy for the Australian medical community, guidelines around working hours and better mental health education in universities to reduce stigma.

“If doctors do not deal with the mental health issues they are experiencing it can affect their ability to deliver the best care,” she says.

http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2013/10/08/aussie-doctors-are-depressed-stressed

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zoloft

zoloft
George Mooney
I am the father of identical twin boys. The doctors that treated my sons when they were boys warned that if we ever decided to have them placed into care for the handicapped we should not agree to any physcotropic drugs. This is when I became aware of the danger of antidepressant drugs. My wife and I both agreed that this would be the case,
My wife passed away in 1984. I was diagnosed with a ”fatal” melanoma in 1986. My twins were admjtted to a ”care” agency and placed on Prozac for son David, and Zoloft for Douglas. They were placed in homes and ”supervised” which meant that they could not enjoy the freedom they enjoyed at home and were not allowed out of the sight of their caretakers for over twenty years. With the help of anti-drug people I visited a psychotherapist who asked why David was on Prozac, as he opined that David did not have a mental disorder. I then contacted a psychiatrist that asked the same question and agreed to withdraw the Prozac. David has been withdrawn from Prozac for about two years without any ill effects beyond what I precieve as side effect damage.
Douglas’ psychiatrist ignored my certified return reciept letters requesting as legal guardian that he be withdrawn from Zoloft. Douglas developed colon cancer and passed away after fourteen months of terrible suffering. Both my twins were gifted savants.

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Efexor, Seroxat, Remeron

Efexor, Seroxat, Remeron,
octavia
In case of a mild depression, after a surgery operation, I received antidepressants SSRI class. I started trembling, especially every time when I wanted to give up. My doctors thought that I stiil have depression and increased the dose. I was more nervous, with muscle pain, chills, bladder problems, huge weight gain and muscle trembling. After 10 year, I gave up taking antidepressants.
Aftre 8 months i do not have chills , bladder problems but still muscle trembling. Anyone can advice me. It seems that only Lyrica helps a little bit. Every time when I use vitamins, omega 3 fish oil, 5 htp, I tremor more intensivly.

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The Psychiatrist and the Drug Rep

This is GREAT!!!! What is so tragic is that it is so true! Thank heavens for Senator Grassley who is doing such a wonderful job of holding more and more of these doctors accountable for doing exactly this! Are you reading this Senator Grassley? You have saved many lives & obtained some form of justice for many lives that have been lost!

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Patients Report 20 Times More Side Effects Than Doctors Report

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

In answer to the question asked in the title of this article,
“Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?,” I should remind you of the comment made by the psychiatric nurse who
attended one of my lectures a couple of years ago. After listening to me discuss
the potential side effects of SSRI antidepressants she stood and said, “Dr.
Tracy we never get to hear what you have shared with us here tonight, but I know
it is true because I am on Lexapro and have suffered nearly every one of the

side effects you mentioned. But you do not know what is going on out here. At
least 75% of the doctors and nurses I work with are on these drugs! The drug
reps are telling them they are in a stressful profession and will surely end up
suffering depression as a result so they need to get started on these drugs now
in order to help prevent that.”

Of course my first response was, “With these drugs affecting
the memory so strongly as to cause “amnesia” as a frequent side effect, if you
cannot even remember who you are, how do you remember what your patients
need?”
She admitted that they do not remember and have to constantly
remind one another and then they attribute it to old age setting
in.
So perhaps by the time these doctors get around to reporting
the patientsside effects they have forgotten what those side effects were that
they were to report. Of course these drugs also produce much more business
for the doctors by producing side effects and bringing patients back in for
follow up treatment so there is also a financial incentive to not report and
give the drugs a bad record. No matter the reason it is clear that the
situation is causing a very serious situation for patients and public safety in
general.
Paragraph three reads:  “The investigators followed 300
patients who were in ongoing outpatient treatment for depression
over six weeks. The authors compared what the patient reported on a
standardized scale of 31 different side effects (Toronto Side

Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating psychiatrist
on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect between
psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects
reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris.
When the investigators concentrated on
those side effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still

reported 2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/charting-the-depths/201004/why-dont-psychiatrists-notice-when-patients-experience-medication-si

Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?

If side effects fall in the forest, do they make a sound?

Published on April 20, 2010

A rich scientific study raises more

questions than it answers.

This point is exempified by new work conducted
at Rhode Island Hospital and published in the Journal of Clinical
Psychiatry
.

The investigators followed 300 patients who were in
ongoing outpatient treatment for depression over six weeks. The authors compared
what the patient reported on a standardized scale of 31 different side effects
(Toronto Side Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating
psychiatrist on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect
between psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects

reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris. When the investigators concentrated on those side
effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still reported
2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.

The authors summarize their provocative findings in mild
language, “The findings of the present study indicate that clinicians do not
record in their progress notes most side effects reported on a side effects

questionnaire by psychiatric
outpatients receiving ongoing pharmacological treatment for depression.”

Obviously
all is not well in the state of Demark. Although the findings concern the
treatment of depression, they raise broader questions about the doctor-patient
relationship.

Why is there such a massive disconnect between what
psychiatrists and patients report, on something so basic as whether prescribed
medications are having untoward effects? Do psychiatrists not ask enough
questions about side effects? Do psychiatrists not dig deep enough into

patients‘ responses? Are psychiatrists hearing what patients say, but not
documenting it in their notes? Or is the problem more on the patient side? Are
patients reluctant to speak candidly to their doctors about side effects (i.e.,
yes, I am having problems with sexual functioning)? Or do patients freeze up and
forget their experiences when asked in the heat of the moment (it is easier to
respond to a standardized list of side effects using pencil and paper)? Or is it
the situation that is to blame for this disconnect? Are patient-doctor
interactions in this day and age simply too rushed to insure efficient or
effective transfer of information?

Whatever the explanation,
psychiatrists appear to believe that patients are having fewer problems with
medications than they truly are. It is hard to see how psychiatrists can act in
the best interest of their patients if they do not know what their patients are
experiencing!!!!

The researchers recommend the use of a self-administered
patient questionnaire in clinical practice to improve the recognition of side

effects for patients in treatment. This study reveals a chasm of
misunderstanding between doctors and patients. This recommendation is a
sensible, but baby, step towards narrowing
it…

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He Gave me Samples of Zoloft

“I found myself actually considering suicide which I had never done before. It was scary.”

Hi,

I would like to share the story of my experience with the drug Zoloft. At this time, would like to keep my identity private due to the personal nature of what I am revealing. I am a professional musician who is losing my hearing. In 1998, I had several health problems including a lesion on my vestibular nerve, causing chronic, disabling vertigo. I had to wait months in between visits to the “expert” doctors trying to diagnose the problem. I saw a psychiatrist because I was depressed, cried easily, etc..actually, instead of having mental illness, I was sick and having a normal reaction to being sick.

I thought the psychiatrist would want to talk with me. That is what I thought I was there for. I believed in the healing powers of talk therapy. Strangely to me, she did not seem to be interested in my story and after 15 minutes or so of me telling my “story” gave me samples of Zoloft, even after I told her I am very sensitive to medications. I went home that afternoon and took one of the pills. I was 35 years old. I had taken LSD when I was a teenager. There was a very good reason I stopped taking LSD then. About 20 minutes after I took the Zoloft, I began to get shaky and nervous, EXACTLY like the first stage of LSD. I was going very fast, starting to get giddy and laughing. The phone rang, it was my closest friend, I could barely contain myself, until I heard it was her. I burst out laughing and shaking and for all the world felt like I was on LSD. I had never had hallucinations on the drug LSD, but rather, the same shaky, “high”, laughing, intense, experience I was having on Zoloft.

I called the psychiatrist immediately. She told me “that shouldn’t happen”, that Zoloft takes 3 weeks to kick in, and told me to take it again the next day. That night the “high” subsided and I went into a deep dark depression, completely unlike the existential “depression” I had come to the doctor for. I had NEVER felt anything close to this! I found myself actually considering suicide which I had never done before. It was scary.

Mostly because I am a deferential person, the next day as per doctor’s orders, I took the Zoloft again. I had essentially the same reaction after I took the pill the second time, but slightly less intense. I called the psychiatrist again, and told her about the experience of the night time depression including the suicidal feelings that I had not had before, and she again told me that that “shouldn’t happen” and again to continue taking it. I had the depression at night again, but slightly less intense. I knew I could not keep taking it. There was a reason I quit taking LSD as a teenager!

I stopped taking Zoloft, and I never had those symptoms again. I made an appointment to see the psychiatrist again, and in my deferential manner told her I had “self-medicated” by taking myself off the drug. She noted in my records that I was “self-medicating”. And she gave me samples of Wellbutrin in pretty little boxes. Of course I did not take them.

I did not return to the psychiatrist. The “high” experience I had with Zoloft was much like my experience with LSD initially, but the depression at the end of the day was like nothing I had ever experienced before. It was dark. A dark dark place, where I was considering ways to kill myself.

I don’t understand why the psychiatrist would tell me “that shouldn’t happen” when in 1998 the suicidal side-effects were known. Was she just strangely uninformed about the drug she was handing out so casually? Or did she not believe it?

These are very very strong and potentially damaging drugs. I am concerned when I hear about anyone on them. I know it is not just children who may become suicidal. I know it is very possible for an adult to become suicidal out of the blue as a direct result of taking the drug Zoloft, because it happened to me. I stopped taking it, the side effects stopped immediately, and I then simply lived through the experience of the loss of losing my hearing. The lesion on my vestibular nerve healed eventually, and I am essentially fine. Life has pain and trials, yes. I’m not happy all the time and don’t expect to be. I want to have the full experience of being human, which includes pain and trial. To pretend that human “unhappiness” can be cured with a drug, seems ludicrous to me. The dangerousness of the drugs they have settled on is obvious to me. I hope that support for these drugs will stop.

Thank you for your work.

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Misdiagnosis Destroyed My Life

“I went from a young women to an old lady, homebound and sick.”

Hi,

I hope this group will help me, my story is unbelievable, in my eyes, for the very reason that I had trust in doctors and in the system to help me, I was wrong. When all went wrong from a misdiagnosis, and taken a harmful drug that has destroyed my life, my health, my economy. I went from a young women to an old lady, homebound and sick.

This nightmare has been going on for 10 years, and I will not live long, and I will not get help due to organized doctors groups, that has financial interest by big time investments here, around America and the world.

This should not happen in America today, and not to be able to get help, even though I am just skin and bones, with everything going wrong with my system

Due to my experience I KNOW what has to be changed to stop too many people from dying in this country.

If you like to here more, and if there is a doctor out there, let me know.

Thanks for listening,

Yvonne
Ybsmith7@aol.com

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Student's Life Destroyed on Prozac

“(After begging my doctor to put me on Prozac,) I just felt insane. I felt like screaming, tearing my clothes off and running around like a madman.”

I wrote to this site several weeks ago about sending in my story. As I wrote it that night, the anger, fear and trauma built so badly that I ended up ranting and rambling. I needed some time away to think and to collect my thoughts about this nightmare so that I could do it justice on paper. I will try to make it as brief as I can:

In 1991, my parents separated. I was 18 at the time. My mom had been seeing a psychiatrist and was taking Prozac. She turned into a completely different person. She was vengeful, angry and borderline psychotic. My mom told me that my dad was an alcoholic (I since have learned she is as well) and that we have depression in our family. She recommended that I see a psychiatrist as well. I blew her off and went to college the next year. I starting drinking once a week (parties) in college and started becoming depressed. It was harder to get up in the mornings now and I remembered what mom had told me.

I panicked and went to the doctor. Mom went with me to the doctor (right before she left home) and I practically begged him to put me on Prozac if that was “what I needed.” He assured me that the side effects were dry mouth, possible weight gain, nausea, etc. I took the stuff and almost immediately started feeling badly (the doctors told me that that was impossible as it would take two weeks to get into my system.

They have since concluded that some patients are effected in a few days. I just felt insane. I felt like screaming, tearing my clothes off and running around like a madman. I told my doctor that the stuff was making me crazy but he told me that it was me and not the pills (For the record, he was an MD who could prescribe meds. I was referred to him by a psychologist.) So we upped the dose. I had also been taking a benzodiazepine (Klonopin) because I was having trouble sleeping and I immediately became addicted. The doctor never told me that these pills were addictive. I stayed on Klonopin for three years and mixed and matched medications constantly as my condition worsened. I tried to save a drug problem with more drugs and I spiraled completely out of control as I was caught in that vicious cycle we all have heard about.

I tried countless anti-depressants. I was later diagnosed with manic-depression and schizophrenia. The possibility exists that the Prozac helped my depression and left my manic phase alone (or aggravated it.) Medications are constantly evolving and the doctors don’t even know sometimes so I have no real answers. I took Paxil for a day and puked my guts out. I took Luvox and all I thought about was killing people. I took muscle relaxers and other pills while my addiction went unnoticed by doctors in two states. I switched to Atavin in 1995 and drugged myself completely to death for two years. I was taking the near maximum dose. I was later told by other doctors that I should never have been on benzodiazepines for that long. I told one doctor that I needed to quit taking the benzos as they were killing me. He apparently misunderstood me and told me that I would be on them for the rest of my life. I’m assuming he meant the other medications I was taking. I had to go to another doctor to phase down off of the benzos. I had a grand mal seizure by coming off them two days early (I had been phasing down for months.) This was at the Kentucky State Fair in front of my mother and sister and I almost died.

I was a solid B student with an IQ near the upper two percent in HS and I was also a successful athlete. There had been no major disciplinary problems in my schooling life up until I started taking medications. I never partied in HS and probably had only a few drinks of wine in my life before I was 18. Before the medication, I averaged a 3.0 my freshman year in college with the intent to do better. The pills sent my life into a tailspin. I dropped out of college several times after seeing my GPA dip to a 1.0. I bounced from drunk parent to drunk parent and doctor to doctor. I had been on pills until recently, even though I had kicked the Atavin for good seven years ago. I was unable to work during this time as I was addicted.

They tell us that the pills are non-addicting but they don’t understand people with addiction issues. I get addicted to anything. ANY powerful drug will addict me and the anti-depressants and mood stabilizers were no different. After fighting for my right to get clean and free of drugs and doctors (with both parents and doctors), I have made it to some sanity. I ballooned up to 242 pounds on the pills (one social worker asked me once if I would rather be fat or mentally ill.) I have since gotten down to a very healthy and athletic 185 and I feel great. I have also invested in proper nutritional supplementation. Natural supplements, especially fish oils, work and I regret not trying them earlier. In 1998, I had a domestic dispute with my dad and I was arrested and committed. I was abused, bullied and intimidated at the “mental health clinic” where I was committed, where I was put on more pills (after being coerced into signing my rights away.) Most of the rest of the “treatment” was having social workers tell me how to grocery shop (!) and play Scattergories with me and other patients (no joke.) I was also insulted in the clinic and overheard lines like “people think we’re Nazis and criminals.”

One social worker even told me, “There is no such thing as justice.” I may be misquoting exactly how she said it but the message was that justice was a fallacy in the real world. So I knew that I had no rights in this place. They charged me $500 a day (I couldn’t say no as I was a prisoner) and told me about disability and it’s insurance the day that I was to be released five months later. In the meantime, I had been put in a group home, where a miscommunication between the case worker there and the mental health clinic led to me being arrested and put back into the clinic. I was told by the clinic that I could stay as long as it took me to find a job, although the normal period was two weeks. After two weeks I didn’t have a job, so they kicked me out. Terrified, I left and went back to the clinic to talk about what had happened. The police were waiting for me and arrested me as I had “broken the rules of the group home by leaving.” I swear this is the God honest truth.

I now owe these snakes $54,000 for pills that got me addicted and for playing Scattegories while I was a prisoner. I have taken their pills, gotten addicted and have been unable to work. They continued to experiment, make more money and blamed a lot of the problems on me. I called up my original MD in 2001 and confronted him about the issue of medications actually causing the symptoms they are supposed to be treating (since proven my doctors.) I asked him if he knew about these potential problems when he prescribed the first round of meds and didn’t tell me. He said that he did after I continued to press him. I called him a bastard and he hung up (I will also note that he didn’t return any of my calls to talk to him and I had to get him at home.) I tried to report him (symbolically and as a public service) very recently. The woman I was trying to talk to answered me very rudely and in a belittling fashion that I couldn’t report something that long ago. I have since read a lot on this issue and feel that I am just another victim of corporate psychiatry (look it up online.) I am hurt, angry and betrayed by people who took an oath to help me. Some doctors were stooges while others knew the risks and didn’t tell me. These issues put my life at risk and have led to poverty and financial ruin for me.

I have talked to lawyers and they told me that they don’t even touch addiction cases of psyche meds, even if the doctors err. Apparently, these people have dictatorial power to experiment on citizens like me who suffered enough emotional abuse from drunken parents and cruel school children. I also have tried to contact newspapers online with the story but they have not written back to me. I have run from this issue as I feel I have no hope for retribution, satisfaction or justice (they also told me in the clinic that paybacks are bad. Gee I wonder why.) If anyone wants to contact me on this subject, I will be more then happy to talk. I will also be more then happy to fight as I still owe these so-called people $54,000. I don’t even have the money to declare bankruptcy right now. The payments are supposedly ability to pay but I get notices in the mail every month from the clinic.

Again, I swear that this is all the God honest truth. I wouldn’t have believed it myself if it hadn’t happened to me. I am a college graduate with a degree in history and a minor in political science and I am not stupid (I’m studying for the Mensa test now.) I knew what was happening to me the whole way but was too sick to fight it. If anyone has any information on organizations that fight these kinds of things, please let me know as I have tried many things. And, for God’s sake, don’t go to these people if you can help it. Watch your health, take the proper supplements and take care of yourselves. In my experience, if you go to these people and take their pills, you just put a gun in your mouth and pulled the trigger. I also have to live with the pain and shame of this stuff forever.

PS- Sorry it took so long but it’s a long story. I would like my name and E-mail printed as I would like to be a leader in the confrontation of these issues. If you have any questions, please E-mail me.

Jeff Riley
solongsuckers@netzero.net
(Please excuse the E-mail ID. I get angry about past stuff sometimes.)

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Meridia has ruined my life.

“Why is this drug on the market without telling of its possible side effects? I wish I never took Meridia.”

 

I’m writing to you about Meridia ruining my life. I was on Meridia for only 6 weeks and I now have a permanent disability.

I have an unclassical case of rheumatoid arthritis, which is an autoimmune disease. What the doctors are saying (in a round about way) is that Meridia triggered this condition. I have severe swelling of the Rt. wrist that causes pain and the inability to use it. I’m right-handed too. I have severe pain in my shoulders, and swelling in the feet and ankles, which makes it difficult to walk or do anything. I have been in and out of the ER and have seen several doctors. I have been a guinea pig to medications and nothing seems to help the pain.

This happened to me in Feb. 2001. I have gone a year in a disabled condition and I’m feeling like giving up. I am 33 years old and I have my 57-year-old parents taking care of me and my two children 6yrs, and 2yrs. My husband is going to loose his mind. I was extremely healthy before I took Meridia. Just wanted to get 25 lbs. off after having children.

Now I’ve lost my life and every dream I ever had for me as a person and professional, and my family. I was energetic and lively, now I’m miserable and hurt for life. It’s hard to be happy, positive, and hopeful anymore. Why is this drug on the market without telling of its possible side effects? I wish I never took Meridia. I hope something is done to warn people of its possible harm.

Lisa
Buster2005@aol.com

 

2/5/2002

This is Survivor Story number 44.
Total number of stories in current database is 48

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5/01/2001 – World Health Organization – SSRI Addiction

“A league table of withdrawal and dependency side-effects, published by the
WHO, shows that drugs including Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil] have produced far
more complaints from patients than old-fashioned tranquillisers . . . SSRIs
(selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), including Prozac, are more
addictive than tranquillisers such as Valium.”

Yesterday, in several major newspapers Lilly placed full page ads offering a
coupon for a month of free Prozac. Do you think they warned the consumer in
those ads that these free pills were addictive? Because so few doctors are
aware of this withdrawal and do not know how to withdraw patients from SSRIs,
after the month on the “free” pills the patient would have to continue to
purchase the drug until they could find my tape on how to get off Prozac
safely.

If you had told me ten years ago, shortly after I began researching the SSRIs
and dealing with patients going through horrific withdrawal from Prozac, that
it would take TEN years for the World Health Organization to finally see what
I was seeing, I would not have believed it. It was so obvious! But I have
waited and waited and waited as I have warned and warned and warned of this
addiction and withdrawal and finally today we see the WHO admit it.

At least the WHO have warned the public now, but where is the FDA? Will they
finally at least admit this much about SSRIs? All of these organizations that
society thinks are there to protect them – where were they as millions
suffered needlessly? How many times do we need to see this repeated with one
drug after another before we realize that there is no protection to the
consumer via these agencies? Obviously “buyer beware” most definitely applies
in this arena of prescription drug use. This is why I feel it is so important
to educate the public about these drugs.

You can mark my words when I say that this is only one of MANY more
admissions that will continue to come confirming all the warnings that I gave
in my book about the SSRI antidepressants, Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org and author of
Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? ()

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health/story.jsp?story=69366

01 May 2001
Home > News > UK > Health

World health watchdog warns of addiction risk for Prozac users

By Robert Mendick

29 April 2001

Prozac, billed for years as a harmless wonder drug, often creates more
problems than the depression it is supposed to be treating, warns the head of
the World Health Organisation’s unit monitoring drug side-effects.

Professor Ralph Edwards says Prozac and drugs similar to it are
overprescribed. A league table of withdrawal and dependency side-effects,
published by the WHO, shows that drugs including Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil]
have produced far more complaints from patients than old-fashioned
tranquillisers prescribed by doctors in the 1970s. Campaigners say this
proves that the drugs called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors),
including Prozac, are more addictive than tranquillisers such as Valium.

“SSRIs are probably over-used,” says Professor Edwards. “They are used for
relatively minor psychiatric problems, and the issue of dependence and
withdrawal has become much more serious. You risk creating a greater problem.
For serious psychiatric problems, it is worth the risk. But if you are just
tired or going through a bad patch, well, people get over that without
medication.”

A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, makers of Prozac, accepted there are potential
side-effects including head-aches, dizziness, sleeplessness and nausea but
added: “The benefits of Prozac far outweigh the downsides. Extensive
scientific and medical experience has demonstrated that Prozac is a safe,
effective antidepressant that is well-tolerated by most patients.”

Prozac has been taken by an estimated 35 million people worldwide since its
launch a decade ago. But the reputation of SSRIs as wonder drugs is being
questioned. Research by Dr David Healy, at the University of Wales, appeared
to show that two people in a trial group of 20 became violent after taking an
SSRI.

Dr Healy’s research may be presented as evidence in a High Court case being
brought by the family of Reginald Payne, a retired teacher who was taking
Prozac when he killed his wife then jumped off a cliff. The family is suing
Eli Lilly, claiming negligence and saying the pharmaceutical firm failed to
warn Mr Payne of side-effects, which they say include suicidal and violent
behaviour.

The experiences of Ramo Kabbani on Prozac prompted her to set up the Prozac
Survivors Support Group. In two years, it has taken 2,000 calls. Ms Kabbani
claims SSRI withdrawal causes side-effects ranging from flu-like symptoms
such as dizziness and aching muscles to suicidal tendencies. She began taking
Prozac to combat depression after the death of her 27-year-old fiance from a
heart attack.

“The medication stopped me working through the feelings of grief which had
caused the depression.” she says. “When I came off Prozac I became
super-sensitive and very emotional. I found it worse going through withdrawal
than going through the depression.”

Council for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction 0151 949 0102; Prozac
Survivors Support Group 0161 682 3296.

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