PAXIL: Birth Defect Case: Test Case for Over 600 Lawsuit: USA- Pennsylvania

First two paragraphs read:  “GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the
world’s second-biggest drugmaker, begins a trial in Philadelphia next week in
what may be a test case for more than 600
lawsuits
over claims that the company’s antidepressant drug Paxil causes birth defects.”

“Patients and their parents say internal company documents
show Glaxo failed to warn consumers about the risks of Paxil until forced
to do so in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration.
In the trial set
to start Monday, Michelle David blames the drug for causing life-threatening
heart defects in her son, Lyam Kilker, now age 3.”

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/business/20090912_Glaxo_trial_opens_here_Monday_in_what_could_be_Paxil_test_case.html

Posted on Sat, Sep. 12, 2009

Glaxo trial opens here Monday in what could be Paxil test
case

By Sophia Pearson and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Bloomberg News
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the world’s second-biggest
drugmaker, begins a trial in Philadelphia next week in what may be a test case
for more than 600 lawsuits over claims that the company’s antidepressant drug

Paxil causes birth defects.

Patients and their parents say internal
company documents show Glaxo failed to warn consumers about the risks of Paxil
until forced to do so in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration. In the trial
set to start Monday, Michelle David blames the drug for causing life-threatening
heart defects in her son, Lyam Kilker, now age 3.

The company, based in
London and with major operations in Philadelphia and its suburbs, faces two more
such trials each month from October through January in state court in
Philadelphia.

“The early cases set the parameters for any global
settlement negotiations,” said David Logan, dean and professor of law at Roger
Williams University in Bristol, R.I.

Paxil, approved by the FDA in 1992,
generated about $942 million in sales last year, 2.1 percent of the total for

the company.

Glaxo has settled other Paxil-related cases, including a
suit brought by the New York Attorney General’s Office accusing the company of
withholding safety data about the antidepressant.

The drugmaker isn’t
liable for Lyam Kilker’s heart defects, and it acted responsibly in testing
Paxil and updating safety information, Kevin Colgan, a Glaxo spokesman, said in
an e-mail.

“The scientific evidence simply does not establish that
exposure to Paxil during pregnancy caused Lyam Kilker’s condition,” Colgan said.
“Very unfortunately, birth defects occur in 3 to 5 percent of all live births,
whether or not the mother was taking medication during pregnancy.”

The
FDA said in an alert to doctors on Dec. 8, 2005, that preliminary studies
suggested Paxil might contribute to heart defects in infants when taken in the
first three months of pregnancy. The government asked the company to update the
label enclosed with the medicine, changing its birthdefect warning.

The
FDA’s action does not prove any connection between Paxil use and birth defects,
Glaxo said in court filings in July.

“GlaxoSmithKline will show it acted
properly and responsibly in conducting its clinical trial program for Paxil, in
marketing the medicine, in monitoring its safety once it was approved for use
and in updating pregnancy information in the medicine’s label as new information
became available,” Glaxo’s Colgan said.

Lawyers for patients say Glaxo
documents show the company had known since 1980 that Paxil could raise the risk
of birth defects.

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PAXIL: BIRTH DEFECTS – TEST CASE FOR OVER 600 MORE CASES – USA

First two paragraphs read:  “GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the
world’s second-biggest drugmaker, begins a trial in Philadelphia next week in
what may be a test case for more than 600

lawsuits over claims that the company’s antidepressant drug Paxil causes birth defects.”

“Patients and their parents say internal company documents
show Glaxo failed to warn consumers about the risks of Paxil until forced
to do so in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration.
In the trial set
to start Monday, Michelle David blames the drug for causing life-threatening
heart defects in her son, Lyam Kilker, now age 3.”

Glaxo trial opens here Monday in what could be Paxil test case

By Sophia Pearson and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Bloomberg
News
GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C., the world’s second-biggest drugmaker, begins a
trial in Philadelphia next week in what may be a test case for more than 600

lawsuits over claims that the company’s antidepressant drug Paxil causes birth
defects.

Patients and their parents say internal company documents show
Glaxo failed to warn consumers about the risks of Paxil until forced to do so in
2005 by the Food and Drug Administration. In the trial set to start Monday,
Michelle David blames the drug for causing life-threatening heart defects in her
son, Lyam Kilker, now age 3.

The company, based in London and with major
operations in Philadelphia and its suburbs, faces two more such trials each
month from October through January in state court in Philadelphia.

“The
early cases set the parameters for any global settlement negotiations,” said
David Logan, dean and professor of law at Roger Williams University in Bristol,
R.I.

Paxil, approved by the FDA in 1992, generated about $942 million in
sales last year, 2.1 percent of the total for the company.

Glaxo has
settled other Paxil-related cases, including a suit brought by the New York
Attorney General’s Office accusing the company of withholding safety data about
the antidepressant.

The drugmaker isn’t liable for Lyam Kilker’s heart

defects, and it acted responsibly in testing Paxil and updating safety
information, Kevin Colgan, a Glaxo spokesman, said in an e-mail.

“The
scientific evidence simply does not establish that exposure to Paxil during
pregnancy caused Lyam Kilker’s condition,” Colgan said. “Very unfortunately,
birth defects occur in 3 to 5 percent of all live births, whether or not the
mother was taking medication during pregnancy.”

The FDA said in an alert
to doctors on Dec. 8, 2005, that preliminary studies suggested Paxil might
contribute to heart defects in infants when taken in the first three months of
pregnancy. The government asked the company to update the label enclosed with
the medicine, changing its birth-defect warning.

The FDA’s action does
not prove any connection between Paxil use and birth defects, Glaxo said in
court filings in July.

“GlaxoSmithKline will show it acted properly and
responsibly in conducting its clinical trial program for Paxil, in marketing the
medicine, in monitoring its safety once it was approved for use and in updating
pregnancy information in the medicine’s label as new information became
available,” Glaxo’s Colgan said.

Lawyers for patients say Glaxo
documents show the company had known since 1980 that Paxil could raise the risk
of birth defects.

Buzz
up!
Buzz this story.

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PAXIL TRIAL: Glaxo Executive’s Memo Suggested Burying Drug Studies (Update4)

An executive of GlaxoSmithKline Plc, the world’s second-biggest drugmaker, talked about burying negative studies linking its antidepressant drug Paxil to birth defects, according to a company memo introduced at a trial.
“If neg, results can bury,” Glaxo executive Bonnie Rossello wrote in a 1997 memo on what the company would do if forced to conduct animal studies on the drug. The memo was read during opening statements in the trial of a lawsuit brought by the family of a child born with heart defects.

The Philadelphia trial is the first of more than 600 cases alleging that London-based Glaxo knew Paxil caused birth defects and hid those risks to pump up profits.

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): In my small church congregation in Utah (maybe 100 families) there were two cases of SSRIs birth defects that I was aware of. In one case the mother was on Paxil and the other was a mother on Prozac. Both babies had to have heart surgery at birth or not long after. Because of that the number of 600 cases that have been filed is no surprise to me at all other than the number seems small in comparrison.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20670001&sid=ae8Ie3hNoafw

Glaxo Executive’s Memo Suggested Burying Drug Studies (Update4)
Share | Email | Print | A A A

By Jef Feeley and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Sept. 15 (Bloomberg) — An executive of GlaxoSmithKline Plc, the world’s second-biggest drugmaker, talked about burying negative studies linking its antidepressant drug Paxil to birth defects, according to a company memo introduced at a trial.

“If neg, results can bury,” Glaxo executive Bonnie Rossello wrote in a 1997 memo on what the company would do if forced to conduct animal studies on the drug. The memo was read during opening statements in the trial of a lawsuit brought by the family of a child born with heart defects.

The Philadelphia trial is the first of more than 600 cases alleging that London-based Glaxo knew Paxil caused birth defects and hid those risks to pump up profits. The drug, approved for U.S. use in 1992, generated about $942 million in sales last year, 2.1 percent of Glaxo’s total revenue.

The family of Lyam Kilker claims Glaxo withheld information from consumers and regulators about the risk of birth defects and failed to properly test Paxil. Kilker’s mother, Michelle David, blames Paxil for causing life-threatening heart defects in her 3-year-old son.

Glaxo officials urged scientists to withhold information about Paxil’s risks from a paper laying out the company’s “core safety philosophy” for the drug, said Sean Tracey, a lawyer for Kilker and David, in his opening statement in the trial.

“They said if there’s any doubt, take it out,” Tracey told jurors. “They do not want to scare anybody. It’s a very competitive marketplace. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry.”

‘Rare Thing’

Glaxo executives contend that the boy’s heart defect wasn’t caused by Paxil, Chilton Varner, one of the company’s lawyers, told jurors today in her opening statement. In court filings, Glaxo has said it appropriately tested and marketed the antidepressant drug.

“When Lyam Kilker was born in 2005, GSK had not received notice” of his specific type of heart defect in connection with Paxil use, Varner said. “The numbers will tell you the defect is a rare thing.”

The Paxil label at that time reported about animal studies, “including the rate of deaths,” she said.

Glaxo didn’t target pregnant women and its sales force didn’t use strong-arm tactics to push prescriptions, Varner said. “Whatever the marketing was, it played no role in Ms. David’s doctors’ decision to prescribe Paxil or Ms. David’s decision” to take the drug, she said.

Rat Studies

Glaxo officials purchased the compound sold as Paxil from a Danish company that had done animal studies showing young rats died after taking low doses of the drug, Tracey said in his opening statement.

One of the company’s scientists noted in internal documents in 1980 that information in the rat studies suggested Paxil “could be” a cause of birth defects, Tracey said. Still, the drugmaker refused for almost 20 years to do studies on why the young rats died, he added.

Tracey told jurors they would see documents in the trial that the company hadn’t turned over to regulators or congressional investigators. “You are going to see docs that have never seen light of day before,” he said.

For example, Tracey pointed to a 1998 internal review by Glaxo of all reports of side effects tied to Paxil and officials found “an alarmingly high number” of birth-defect reports. Even with those concerns, the report was never turned over to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and “the alarming language” was deleted from it, the lawyer said.

In 2001, the company received a letter from a woman who used Paxil during her pregnancy and decided to abort her fetus after tests showed it had birth defects, Tracey said.

Internal Report

In analyzing the woman’s case, Glaxo officials concluded in an internal report that it was “almost certain” the fetus’s birth defects were caused by his mother’s Paxil use, the family’s lawyer added. Still, the company didn’t turn over its analysis to the FDA or beef up the drug’s warning label, Tracey said.

It wasn’t until after the FDA ordered Glaxo and other makers of antidepressants in 2003 to do more safety studies on their products that Glaxo officials publicly acknowledged that Paxil increased the risk of birth defects, Tracey said.

The lawyer for David, a college nursing student who was a former cheerleader for the National Basketball Association’s Philadelphia 76ers, told jurors that Glaxo hid Paxil’s problems to protect its profits.

Paxil is “the No. 1 asset to this day this company has ever owned,” the attorney said.

‘Quite Different’

Varner said she will present “quite different” evidence on animal tests tied to Paxil.

“The animal testing did not suggest Paxil caused birth defects,” Varner said. The FDA considered the tests when it approved the drug for use by U.S. consumers in 1992, she said.

When Glaxo officials considered offering Paxil for sale in Japan, internal records show executives worried in 1994 they might have to do more safety testing on the antidepressant, said Dr. David Healy, an Irish psychiatrist testifying as an expert for Kilker’s family in the case.

It may be the “type of study we wish to avoid,” Jenny Greenhorn, an official in Glaxo’s international regulatory affairs unit, said in a memo.

Glaxo also is fighting suits in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. over claims that Paxil, also known by the generic name paroxetine, causes homicidal and suicidal behavior. The company has settled some suicide claims, though terms of the settlements haven’t been released.

New York Settlement

In 2004, the drugmaker agreed to pay the state of New York $2.5 million to resolve claims that officials suppressed research showing Paxil may increase suicide risk in young people. The settlement also required Glaxo to publicly disclose the studies.

The company’s provision for legal and other non-tax disputes as of June 30 was 1.7 billion pounds ($2.8 billion), the company said in a July 22 regulatory filing that didn’t mention the Paxil litigation.

“We do not disclose our legal reserves for any specific litigation matter,” Glaxo spokesman Kevin Colgan said earlier this month.

Glaxo American depositary receipts, each representing two ordinary shares, fell 68 cents, or 1.7 percent, to $38.76 in New York Stock Exchange composite trading today. Glaxo fell 14 pence, or 1.2 percent, to 1,175.5 pence in London.

The case is Kilker v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. dba GlaxoSmithKline, 2007-001813, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.

To contact the reporters on this story: Jef Feeley in Philadelphia jfeeley@bloomberg.net; Margaret Cronin Fisk in Southfield, Michigan, at mcfisk@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated: September 15, 2009 17:03 EDT

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Teenager Didn’t Know What He Was Doing on Paxil

He ended his life because of this damn drug.”

 

On Nov.6, 2000, my world was turned upside down. Life as I knew it was changed forever on that day. My beautiful 19 yr old son was put on the drug Paxil for depression. He was never monitored and I was never told of the dangers associated with this mind-altering drug.

He was on this drug for about 3 weeks. Then on Nov. 6,2000, my son took a shotgun and put it in his mouth and pulled the trigger. He ended his life because of this damn drug.

How can they claim that it is safe when all I hear is how dangerous this drug is and that when you are on it, you have to be monitored very closely.

I was told by the doctor that “it wouldn’t hurt him.” Well when I asked my son one day if he was still taking it, and he said yes, but he didn’t like the way it made him feel, I asked him what he meant by that.

He said “like I don’t know who I am or what I am doing”.

Now he is silenced forever and I am living a life of never having to see my son grow into a wonderful person. He will never have a family of his own thanks to that “damn wonder drug” known as PAXIL.

I wish that they would pull that drug from the market so no other family will have to live this nightmare.

Sally Vanwinkle
sallyvanwinkle@hotmail.com

 

5/5/2002

This is Survivor Story number 25.
Total number of stories in current database is 48

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MY NIGHTMARISH EXPERIENCE WHILE TAKING THE ANTIDEPRESSENT DRUG PAXIL

“…the constant nightmares and the stress of what happened to me while on Paxil will never go away.”

 

I have suffered from chronic depression for a number of years, and have tried various antidepressant medications while under the care of psychiatrists, but none of these drugs seemed to have any positive effect on my condition.

However, at the beginning of this year, I thought I would give therapy another try. Unfortunately, my medical insurance would not cover psychiatric visits, so I had to be content with seeing a family practice physician. When I asked for a referral for therapy, he said, “No. How about some pills?” He later confided to me that he didn’t believe that my insurance would cover therapy by a mental healthcare professional.

He first started me on a regimen of Paxil. But after experiencing very uncomfortable side effects, including insomnia, he also prescribed Remeron for sleep. The first time I took Remeron was on a Friday. I slept for at least 12 hours. When I got out of bed and tried to walk, I was wobbly on my feet, and had to brace myself against a wall to prevent falling. I tried calling my doctor, but he was not available that weekend. It took until Sunday evening before the effects of Remeron wore off.

When I finally did get to talk with my doctor, I was ready to quit the Paxil regimen, but he convinced me to stay on the drug, explaining that it takes time for it to build up to a useful level before any benefits could be weighed.

I continued to take the Paxil, but stayed away from Remeron as a sleeping aid. During this time, I experienced bouts of sleep deprivation, increased anxiety, panic attacks, and an unusual level of anger and hostility.

I have been the caretaker of my mother and aunt for about 10 years since the untimely death of my father in 1988. My mother is 81 years old, and suffers from forgetfulness, along with other symptoms associated with her advanced age. We have a rather large piece of property on a dead-end street. It is a full-time job just keeping it neat and clean. The rest of my time is devoted to taking my only two remaining relatives shopping and to medical appointments. I am under a great deal of stress nearly every day.

I have had disputes with neighbors and their children, vandalism, malicious mischief, littering, and very suspicious activity on the dead-end street where we live. I have also found used condoms and parts of hypodermic needles lying on the ground. As I mentioned before, I live on a street with no other houses facing us, so it is very odd to see anyone parking there. I have reported incidences of unusual activity to local police, but they often do not show up to investigate.

On the evening of Easter Sunday, 2001, and just after midnight, I heard unusual noises outside of my home. Since it was not Independence Day or New Year’s Eve, noises on the night of Easter Sunday were not expected –especially after midnight.

By the time I got out of bed to investigate, I saw three cars parked on the street with no one nearby. I went back to bed, but this time heard the screeching of tires. I jumped up and looked out the window just in time to see a car speed away from an accumulation of trash at the end of the street.

I telephone police, but was told that they do not investigate incidents of littering. I hung up, but later called back to report the noise, which was a booming speaker from one of the cars parked outside. The police dispatcher said he would send a patrol car to investigate, but I saw no evidence of any police activity outside of my house.

By this time I, was becoming increasingly agitated. Out of frustration, and the lack of police response, I composed a hand bill on my computer, stating that I did not appreciate anyone disturbing the peace, littering, or any other illegal activity while parked in front of my home, and that I was prepared to make a note of the license plates of any cars that I thought looked suspicious. I then went outside and placed a handbill on the windshield of each of the cars, after which I went back to bed and tried to get some rest.

It wasn’t more than a few minutes later that I once again heard that same booming noise coming from the street in front of the property.. I had a handgun used for home protection in the drawer of my night table, took it out of the drawer and carried it with me to the front door. I opened the door and stood on my front porch. It was very dark outside, and I yelled out, “Would you mind picking up your trash and leaving my street?”

Just then, four people, who I believed to be in their late teens or early 20s, came running at me yelling obscenities. I didn’t have time to retreat into the house, so all I could do was to raise the gun in self-defense.

One of the attackers, who was particularly violent, said that he would come back later and kill me. Three of the individuals backed off, but the fourth one kept antagonizing me. I was finally able to back him down and off of my property. He said, “Go ahead and shoot me. I have nothing to live for anyway.”

One never knows what to expect when picking up a weapon. I could have killed this individual, but fortunately I did have the presence of mind to try to diffuse this very lethal situation before it could become fatal.

When the crowd dispersed, I went back into the house and called 911 to report what had happened. Apparently, some of the others involved in the dispute had called the police and reported that I had a gun. It was at this time that I became panicky. I locked the trigger guard back on the handgun and put it in a drawer. I was very disoriented. The police arrived and wanted me to come outside. I finally persuaded officers that I was not armed and dangerous, and invited them into the house. I was searched and asked to sit down. I told them that I had guns in the house, and described exactly where I kept them. One officer found two guns and confiscated them. They talked with me for a long time, asked me to write out a statement, then left without arresting me.

Four weeks went by before I received a letter from the county district attorney, advising me that I was being charged with California Penal Code Section 417(a), a misdemeanor, stating that I had used a gun in a quarrel or argument. The sentence for this violation is 3 months in jail. I was also told that the “witnesses” identified one of the guns.

During this time, I went from Paxil to Flurazepam, then to Zoloft, then to Effexor, then to Atenolol, and finally to Celexa, along with Klonapin for anxiety. I was prescribed these drugs, one after the other, without any period of detoxification.

I finally made the effort to seek out a therapist (a clinical psychologist with a Ph.D.), who has been very helpful and supportive. I trust her, but unfortunately she believes that I need to be medicated.. And all along, I still could not find a psychiatrist who would be willing to manage my medication. I stopped seeing the original family practitioner, and found a new internist who has been trying to help with these medications..

I would also like to say, for the record, that I have no history of violence or any criminal record. I haven’t even had a traffic ticket in over 3 years. But the prosecution would not let this matter rest. Since I couldn’t afford a high-priced criminal defense attorney, I had to put my trust in a public defender. Unfortunately, they are overworked and understaffed, so the quality of the defense was less than adequate.

My case was postponed for 7 months. When it did finally come to trial, the best deal I could get was to plead “no contest” and the judge would recommend electronic home confinement. A “no contest” plea is essentially a plea of guilty, but I chose to accept it only because I wanted this nightmare to be over.

When I left the courthouse that day, I was under the impression that the electronic home confinement was a sure thing. They give me the wrong paperwork; and since it was late on a Friday, I couldn’t call the probation department until the following Monday. That was when I found out that it up to the discretion of the probation department as to whether or not I will be accepted into the program. The only other alternative is jail.

I did a great deal of my own case preparation. I researched the often-horrible side effects of Paxil and other SSRI drugs using the Internet and the World Wide Web, and found evidence of much worse occurrences connected with the use of these drugs. Dr. Ann Blake Tracy of the International Coalition For Drug Awareness has provided a great service by virtue of her very informative Web page, which is devoted to the horror stories of those of us who were prescribed SSRI medications for depression and anxiety.

In closing, the only comfort I can take from my experience is that no one was fatally injured. But the constant nightmares and the stress of what happened to me while on Paxil will never go away, no matter what method of incarceration I must face.

Comments and inquiries welcome!

Philip Sheridan
addcted2it@msn.com

12/12/2001

This is Survivor Story number 30.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

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Paxil Prescribed for Fatigue

“I can remember it being hard to feel a smile.”

Hello,

My name is Barton Mahoney. Thank you for this forum. It represents an opportunity to know that others understand what I experienced with the drug Paxil.

Bad, bad, bad for Bart! It has been a lonely experience in explaining the affects this intrusive drug has had in my life. I am one of those people that this drug was not designed for, doing it only by a doctor’s order. If I only knew what was in store for me, assuredly it would never have happened. It was prescribed not so much for depression as to help with an extreme case of fatigue. Depression and fatigue can appear hand-in-hand when working 80+ hour workweeks in construction. As an energetic and conscientious building contractor this is now my previous occupation.

Paxil, smaxil, serotonin, shmerotonin. I had no idea of what these were or what they would mean, before it was too late. They prescribed it with Xanax, another wonder drug. Within the first week I was complaining to my doctor about the effect it was having on me. I was told my condition was consistent with the early affects of the drug. It was recommended to continue the medication for the 4-6 week incubation period when the Paxil would then become balanced with my system.

This never happened. I stopped the Xanax within months. My personality and character changed so dramatically that I left the construction trades, lost the respect of my family, along with every ounce of self-esteem that I had within a very short time. I can remember it being hard to feel a smile. It was the major contributing factor to the demise of a life once enjoyed, leading to the perils of a drug user. I wish this on no person. The scary part is that this was considered a legal practice.

I was hospitalized on several occasions during the first year. Each time was the result of collapsing on the floor or when lying down and not being able to get up. I would just lay there not able to move or with a feeling of not wanting to move. It is difficult to explain. If helped by a person and moved very slowly they could get me to my feet, only to immediately collapse again. Three times at home, Twice while at hotels, once on an airplane. That time they had to hold the flight I was on from taking off. It took better than a half an hour to retrieve me from the bathroom. Two very helpful Texas police officers saw our way to a hospital. I was treated in the emergency room but they wanted to take blood. With a phobia about shots plus being through this experience before I felt to have a better answer for my treatment. They did not understand that I just wanted to lie there and that I would be fine in a little while. I tried explaining my condition at the hospital and asked if they would please call my doctor. They did not make the call and released me because I refused treatment by not letting them stick needles in me. I took a later flight home and told myself that this was it. I had to get off this drug.

I was in the care of my doctor this entire period from September 1997 until November 1999. What is interesting was how the medical clinic provided me with prescriptions of Paxil even after I had lost my insurance (I lost everything but that’s not the point). My thinking was that they are giving me the medication because they know something may go wrong if I stopped taking it. Something was adrift for them to give me the medication for free. It appears I am discovering that they did know once this drug had taken its place in my system that it was a very long process to wean a person off the drug. Plus there was a possibility that I may not be stable enough for those around me. There was nothing about this on the drug description at the time, only to say do not stop medication without consulting your doctor. I did and was told to very slowly reduce the dosage until I could handle life without it. It took over a year to free myself from this consummate condition.

It has been a year and a half since my final battle with the drug. The final no-more-Paxil period lasted for about three weeks. No different than any other episode during this treatment, if I stopped or slowed down the medication I would lose my motor skills or would lose my will to use them. Slowly perking-up I am happy to say that now without this drug in my system and because of a very supporting family; I am back to my old self and am finding life enjoyable once again. The further life distances itself from the history of this period the better off I will be. Occasionally, I still have strange twinges at the base of my neck and I now shake when doing something tedious with my hands. I had always prided myself in the steadiness of intricate tasks, but this is no more.

My memories of this period are also quite bothersome. I have spoken with three attorneys, one said his legal counsel doctor said I should have been able to stop cold-turkey with out having any problems. Right! A second said it appeared to be a class-action suit after a 20-20 television show about the anti-affects of anti-depressant medication. A third attorney said it would cost more than his firm could afford just in getting the case to trial.

I left it at that knowing that I was greatly improved and able by nature to fight my way back to a life. My wife and I were married at age 15 & 16 respectively. We have three wonderful adult children. For 31 years we have been through many tough times and this is now just another experience. I don’t want to think of where my life would be if I hadn’t fought through and separated myself from the clutches of Paxil. Even thinking through this letter helps with the healing process. I was compelled to write because it appears the truth is coming out. Previously, I actually thought I was going crazy and that nobody was listening, nor would they believe me. It was the loneliest feeling in the world.

I am saddened by the actions of those people under the influence of this
drug. To have done the things that they have hurts all of us. To an extent I can understand how they felt when performing these horrific acts. My prayers and thoughts go out to all that are affected. These are all very disturbing conditions that to some extent fall on the shoulders of those that offer these treatments and to those who manufacturer the drugs that they prescribe. It is a dangerous business. These drugs which are administered do have an affect. I can claim adverse reactions if the person is not designed for treatment in such a manner. We all deserve more information, especially when it comes to a drug that effects our central nervous system.

For those who have had or are having similar experiences, you are not alone nor are you crazy. If you are thinking about taking an anti-depressant, discuss all possibilities with your doctor. If the medication is helping you, then you are lucky. I might still be enjoying a life once stable. Hopefully I will continue to overcome and in time will be fully restored. As I get older it will be interesting to see whether I will ever chance taking any medication. Never again do I want to go through this experience no matter what my condition may be. I would rather go natural.

Thank you for hearing my voice. Now that I have written this brief letter about my experience, I hope it will help others understand the dangers of drugs not meant for the masses. Still it hurts to the center of my soul when considering these possibilities. I have experienced Paxil. Communication is our strength and it should be critically applied with matters of health. Manufacturers, doctors and patients must have all possible information before making life-altering decisions. I signed no waivers in regards to potential side-affects which excuses my ignorance. Luckily I was strong enough to help myself. Woe to those who are not so lucky, you are at the mercy of questionable practices by those we should be able to trust.

Barton Mahoney

 

8/17/2001

This is Survivor Story number 25.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

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10/19/1999 – Paxil Lawsuit Filed

This article just ran in the Salt Lake Tribune about a lawsuit filed
against the makers of Paxil. Two years ago this young woman and her
boyfriend found my members.aol.com/atracyphd web site. They called me
for help as they came to the realization that what they thought was
“helping” her was actually the problem – her medication. She was very
sensitive to medications. While on the SSRI antidepressants, she became
so suicidal that her boyfriend, a brain chemist, had to handcuff her to
him in order to keep her from hurting herself! Their story will give
you some insight as to what a nightmare these medications can cause for
some people.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
———

Instead of making her well, woman says drug sent her …
Spinning Out of Control

Monday, October 18, 1999

BY SHAWN FOSTER
THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE

Natalia Victorovna Sevastianenko, a Utah college student from the
former Soviet republic of Belarus, had severe stomach pains. But a
doctor and nurse practitioner thought the discomfort might be a symptom
of depression.

After all, their patient was thousands of miles from home and alone in
a foreign country.

The medical staff recommended she take the anti-depressant Prozac.
After a series of phobic episodes and fainting, the staff changed the
prescription to a related drug, Paxil. That was when Sevastianenko said
she began to think about suicide. She made five attempts on her life
and was haunted by obsessive, irrational thoughts about hurting her
boyfriend and others.

Now, Sevastianenko is suing the pharmaceutical company that produces
Paxil for failing to provide “proper, honest [and] candid warnings.”

More at…..

http://www.sltrib.com/1999/oct/10181999/utah/39162.htm

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