Prof in AL Shooting Was On Meds After Killing Her Brother 20 Yrs Ago

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Knowing when she was placed on medication (before or after her

brother‘s shooting) and which kind of medication and how long she took it,
if she was still on it, etc., etc., etc. – her entire history of mind altering
medication use is ABSOLUTELY CRITICAL in understanding what has happened in this
case or any other case of bizarre violent behavior. This is a public safety
issue that needs to be made public in each and every one of these cases. This
type of transparency in these crimes is LONG overdue!

___________________________
Paragraph 31 reads:  “Amy stated that she was not aware
of any additional facts which could assist these officers in their investigation
into the death of her brother, and she reiterated adamantly that the discharge
had been accidental and that she was still having a very difficult time dealing
with what had occurred and was currently
under
medication with a doctor’s care.”

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,585823,00.html

RAW DATA: 1986 Police Report on Shooting Involving Alabama
Professor

Sunday, February 14, 2010 []

March
30, 1987

To: First Assistant District Attorney John P.
Kivlan

From: Trooper Brian L. Howe #1332 BLH

Subject: Accidental
Shooting of Seth Bishop, White Male,

D.O.B. 4/9/68 At 46 Hollis Avenue,
Braintree, Massachusetts on December 6, 1986.

Case: #
86-112-0910-0185

On December 6, 1986, this officer was directed by
Detective Lieutenant James Sharkey to conduct an investigation into the fatal

shooting of Seth Bishop at his residence of 46 Hollis Avenue in the Town of
Braintree.

This officer contacted Captain Theodore Buker of the Braintree
Police Department and was informed by Captain Buker that at approximately 1422
hours on December 6, 1986, the Braintree Police Department had responded to the
report of a shooting a 46 Hollis Avenue in their town.

Upon arriving at
the location, Officers Jordan and Murphy had observed the decedent lying on his
back on the floor in a pool of blood in the kitchen area, with a large chest
wound.

Paramedics responded to the scene and after administering
preliminary first aid, transported the victim to the Quincy City Hospital where
he was subsequently pronounced dead at 1506 hours, by Dr. Thomas Divinigracia.
Initial cause of death of a victim was reported to be a ruptured aorta as a
result of a gunshot wound to the chest.

Captain Buker stated that
preliminary investigation conducted by Officers Jordan and Murphy indicated that
the victim had been shot by his sister, Amy Bishop (age 19), and that apparent
cause of the gunshot discharge into the victim had been accidental in nature.
Captain Buker further stated that indications were that Amy Bishop had been
attempting to manipulate the shotgun and had subsequently brought the gun
downstairs in an attempt to gain assistance from her mother in disarming the
weapon.

During her attempt to disarm the weapon in the kitchen of her

residence, the weapon had apparently accidentally discharged, resulting in the
fatal wound inflicted upon her brother.

Captain Buker further stated that
at the time the discharge occurred, Judy Bishop, the mother of both the victim
and Amy, had been in the kitchen and had witnessed the entire incident. Judy
Bishop had indicated to the responding officers that the discharge had been
accidental in nature and that the discharge had occurred while Amy was

attempting to unload the weapon.

Captain Buker also stated that Amy
Bishop had fled the residence immediately upon discharging the weapon and had
subsequently been located by Braintree Officers and brought to the Braintree
Police Department for questioning.

Captain Buker stated that due to the
highly emotional state of Amy Bishop, it had generally been impossible to
question her while she was at the Braintree Police Department relative to the
circumstances of the firearm discharge, and that as a result of these facts, she
was thereupon released to the custody of her parents with further investigation
to follow at a future time.

This officer therefor determined that due to
the inability to question the witnesses at that time as a result of their highly
emotional state and their inability to recall specifically the facts relating to
this occurrence, as well as the fact that Judy Bishop stated that she had
witnessed the entire affair and the discharge had been accidental in nature, it

was determined that additional interviews would be conducted at a later time,
allowing the witnesses a sufficient time to stabilize their emotions.

On
December 6, 1986, an autopsy was conducted on Seth bishop at the Qyuincy City
Hospital by Dr. George Katsas with Dr. William Riddle in attendance. The autopsy
began at approximately 2000 hours with the cause of death having been determined
to be the result of a shotgun discharge to the left chest area.

It should
also be noted that a check of firearms identification cards at Braintree Police
Department indicated and F.I.D. card issued to Seth bishop, card #H590682, as
well as n F.I.D. card issued to Samuel Bishop father of SEth, card
#H590724.

Captain Buker had also indicated to this officer that numerous
photographs had been taken at the scene of the shooting as well as at the
autopsty coundcted on the victim.

The weapon which had been utilized in

the death of Seth Bishop had been secured by the Braintree Police Department for
firther processing by the State Police Ballistics
Laboratory.

Arrangements were subsequently made to conduct interviews of
all of the members of the Bishop family and thereupon, on December 17, 1986,
this officer, Captian Theodore Buker and Detective Michael Carey of the
Braintree Police Department procdeede to 46 Hollis Avenue in the Town of
Braintree.

Individually, Samuel, Judy, and Amy Bishop were interviewed by
these officers with the resulting statments taken.

Samuel Bishop stated
that he had not been in the residence at the time of the shooting, He said that
he had left the house at approximately 1130 hours to go shopping at the South
Shore Plaza. He stated that at the time he left the residence, his son Seth had
been washing his car, Amy was the house and his wife, Judy, was due to be home
at sometime between 1100 and 1200 hours. Samuel stated that he had a disagrrment
with Amy before he left about a comment that she made, and that she had gone to

her room prior to his departing. He stated that upon his return to the
residence, police and ambulance were at the house and that he was adivsed of the
situation relating to the shooting of his son.

When questioned as to the
actual possession of the shotgun within his residence, he stated that he had
bought the shotgun at Coleman’s Sporting Goods in Canton, approximately one year
previously, and that he and his son, Seth, had belonged to the Braintree Rifle
Club. He stated that the gun had been unloaded, on top of a trunk in a rifle
case in his upstairs bedroom also. He further stated that Amy had not been
trained in the use of the weapon and that the weapon had orginally been
purchased for family protection as a result of a previous housebreak at their
residence.

These officer then interviewed Judy Bishop, the mother of the
victim who stated that on the day of the shooting, she had left the house at
approximately 0700 hours and that ll other family members had been in the house
at the time. She stated that she returned to the residence to see if there was

anything for lunch, and that at this time, Seth was home and stated that he
would go to the store to pick up some food so that they could all have
lunch.

Judy further stated that Seth returned from the grocery store,
went into the livingroom and turned on television. She stated that he was on his
way into the kitchen when Amy came downstairs with the shotgun, and asked Judy
if she could help her unload the gun. Judy state that she told Amy not to point
the gun at anyone, and that Amy then turned, and in doing so, somehow discharged
the weapon which subsequently hit her son Seth who was walking into the kitchen
from the living room.

Judy stated that she screamed and theupon Amy ran
out of the house. Judy state that she then called the police and waited at the
front door fo the arrival of the police, but she further added that she knew
that Seth could not live as the result of the injury which he had
received.

When questioned relative to any prior discharges of the weapon
inside the residence on the day in question, Judy stated that she did not hear
any other shots fired, in particular, and shots fired in the upstairs bedroom,
but she believed that the house was realtively well soundproofed and that such a
discharge would not necessarily be hear on another floor of the
house.

Judy state that she did not feel that she had any knowledge of any
other relvant facts relating to the investigation to convey to these
officers.

These officers then conducted an interview with Amy Bishop who
stated that on the morning of the shooting, her mother had gone out and that her

father had gone shopping. Amy stated that she did not know where her brother was
during the day but thought that it would be a good idea if she learned how to
load the shotgun in the house. Amy stated that she was concerned for her own
safety on occasions as a result of the break which had previously occurred at
their home, and she often read and heard of stories about things that happened
when people break into houses and find other people inside.

Amy stated
that she got the gun from her parents’ room where she found it on the chest and
the bullets were on the bureau. She stated that she put the shells into the gun
and then tried to get them out but was unsuccessful in doing this even though
she attempted to unscrew the bottom casing of the gun. She stated that while she

was attempting to unload the weapon which was on her bed, it discharged into her
room, but that she is unsure as whether or not her bedroom door was open at the
time. She stated that she was beside her bed near the door at the time that the
gun discharged, but that she couldn’t specifically recall seeing anything coming
out of the gun.

Amy further stated that she does not recall putting any
additional bullets into the gun after it discharged, and that she then unscrewed
the bottom of the shaft in an attempt to empty the weapon, and when being unable
to empty the weapon this way, she stated that she then screwed the bottom of the
shaft back on.

Amy stated that she then heard her brother come into the
house downstairs and she went right downstairs to ask Seth to help her unload
the gun. She said apparently her mother had been in the kitchen for awhile and
that Amy went down the front set of stairs, through the dining room, to the door
by the kitchen. She stated that she asked her brother to unload the weapon
because she thought it might still be loaded and she added that her mother said
something to her but she does not specifically recall what it was.

Amy
said that she was carrying the gun pointed beside her leg, and that Seth told

her to point the gun up. Amy stated that Seth was walking across the kitchen
between Amy and her mother and that Amy had the gun in one hand and started to
raise it. Amy further stated that someone said something to her and she turned
and the gun went off. She stated that she remembered her brother saying, “Oh
God,” and her mother screaming, and that Amy though that she had ruined the
kitchen but was not aware of the fact that she had struck her brother with the
shotgun discharge.

Amy stated that she then immediately ran out the rear
door of the kitchen and thought that she had dropped the gun as she ran away.
She stated that at the time the gun went off, she was by the dining room door to
the kitchen. Amy also said that she does not recall putting on a jacket prior to
running out of the house or leaving the house with the gun and that she cannot
recall anything else until she subsequently saw her mother at the police
station.

Amy did tell these officers that her brother Seth had verbally
told her previously how to hold the gun but that she had always previously been
afraid of it. Amy concluded the investigation by saying that she had previously
made no attempt to cover up the hole in her bedroom wall which apparently,
according to her, was the result of the previous discharge in her

bedroom.

Amy stated that she was not aware of any additional facts which
could assist these officers in their investigation into the death of her
brother, and she reiterated adamantly that the discharge had been accidental and
that she was still having a very difficult time dealing with what had occurred
and was currently under medication with a doctor’s care.

As a result of
these foregoing facts, a meeting was conducted between this officer, Captain
Buker and Detective Carey. It was determined that due to the testimony of the
members of the Bishop family and, in particular, to the testimony of Judy Bishop
relevant to the facts concerning the death of Seth Bishop that no further
investigation into the death of Seth Bishop was warranted.

It was

therefore determined that the cause of death of Seth Bishop would be listed as
the accidental discharge of his sister, Amy Bishop, and that the investigation
would be concluded.

398 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS ARE FAR FROM ALONE IN DANGERS! & BEWARE OF DRUG ADVERTIZING!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
The following article on drug advertising, “Side Effects Include Denial” is an
EXCELLENT article on how the public is brainwashed into using drugs without a
thought. This is how we have ended up on all of these new “Designer Drugs” that
seem to be more the norm in our society now than the abnormal. When I was
growing up someone who was ill was out of the ordinary. Most we well. Now it
seems the exact opposite with even the very young discussing their serious
disorders – things we never saw in children before.

Although our site has focused on antidepressants for many
years, that focus has nothing to do with lack of concern over a myriad
of other deadly medications. The focus on antidepressants has been due to
the extremely widespread use of these drugs along with their potential to lead
the user to extreme out of character violence toward themselves or others
coupled with their potential to lead to many other drugs being prescribed for
the antidepressant side effects they suffer (new symptoms such as a
diagnosis for Psychosis or Bipolar Disorder, Panic or Anxiety attacks,
extreme insomnia, sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, Restless Leg Syndrome,
alcohol or nicotine use/abuse, diabetes, Fibromyalgia, thyroid problems,
headaches, IBS, MS, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, ADHD, etc., etc., etc.)
Many of the newer medications out there were designed specifically for the
increase in patients with these “symptoms” that are nothing more than
antidepressant side effects which would subside upon the safe withdrawal of the
individual from the offending medication – the antidepressant. And far too many

of these new drugs are just remakes of antidepressantsfar too similar in
action to these drugs. One example would be Chantix’ similarity to Zoloft.
Sarafem, prescribed for PMS, is nothing more than Prozac with a new name and
different color capsule (pink to give it a feminine touch). Duloxetine
is the chemical name for Lilly’s Cymbalta and the name generally given to a
patient prescribed the drug for urinary incontinence so that they
remain unaware that it is really an antidepressant (antidepressants have LONG
been given to children for bed wetting). Yet another antidepressant is
prescribed for tuberculosis. Then there are all of the headache medications and
too many pain killers which all have serotonergic effects and can cause many of

the same serious adverse reactions that antidepressants cause.

WE URGE YOU TO USE EXTEME CAUTION, NO MATTER THE DRUG PRESCRIBED!!!
PRESCRIPTION DRUGS ARE KILLING FAR MORE NATIONWIDE THAN ILLEGAL DRUGS!! READ
ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING BEFORE EVER PUTTING A DRUG IN YOUR MOUTH!!! INSIST ON A
PACKAGE INSERT RATHER THAN THE SHORT HANDOUT ON THE DRUG PROVIDED BY THE
PHARMACACY WHCIH DOES NOT EVEN SCRATCH THE SURFACE IN GIVING YOU THE TRUE
WARNINGS REFLECTED IN THE PACKAGE INSERTS.
__________________________________________
But last July the Food and Drug Administration, which approved Chantix in
2006, said it had received 4,762 reports of “serious psychiatric events” —
including paranoia, homicidal thoughts, hallucinations, 188 attempted suicides
and 98 suicides — and it ordered Pfizer to put a “black box” warning on the
drug.
Pfizer’s not worried for the same reason that Bristol-Myers Squibb isn’t
worried about its Abilify ad, with piano music under, showing a happy family’s
outing to a pier, accompanied by a voiceover about seizures, thoughts of
suicide, risk of death or stroke. It’s why Sanofi-aventis, the manufacturer of
Ambien, doesn’t mind spending half an ad (sleeping lady, rooster, harp) warning
of side-effects like sleep-driving and sleep-eating. And it’s why
GlaxoSmithKline is unconcerned about undercutting the effectiveness of its Requip ad

for Restless Leg Syndrome (relaxing lady, crossword puzzle, strings) with
warnings about (this is my favorite) compulsive gambling.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marty-kaplan/side-effects-include-deni_b_463996.html

Marty Kaplan

Director, Norman Lear Center and Professor at the USC
Annenberg School
Posted: February 16, 2010 12:31 PM

Side
Effects Include Denial

Why would Pfizer spend $100 million on two-minute TV ads that use a minute of
that time admitting that their drug Chantix can cause “changes in behavior,
hostility, agitation, depressed mood,” “weird, unusual or strange dreams,” and
“suicidal thoughts or actions”?

Because they have to, and because it doesn’t matter.

With the patent on Pfizer’s cash cow Lipitor expiring next year, Chantix, a
smoking cessation pill, had been one of their big hopes for the future. Chantix
sales in 2007 approached $900 million; by 2009, it accounted for 90 percent of
smoking cessation prescriptions. But last July the Food and Drug Administration,
which approved Chantix in 2006, said it had received 4,762 reports of “serious
psychiatric events” — including paranoia, homicidal thoughts, hallucinations,
188 attempted suicides and 98 suicides — and it ordered Pfizer to put a “black
box” warning on the drug.

What to do? One tack Pfizer took was to launch a “help-seeking ad” that’s now running all over cable TV. You might easily mistake it
for a public service ad. As a voiceover reads sentences appearing on a black
screen, a match-flame turns the words to smoke: “You wanted to quit before you
got married… You wanted to quit before you turned thirty-five. You wanted to
quit when you had your first child.”

At the end, you’re invited to go to MyTimeToQuit.com, which takes you not to
the Surgeon-General or to the American Cancer Society, but to a Pfizer site that
in turn leads you to Chantix. There’s no legal requirement to include the
suicide warning on the faux-PSA, because it never mentions Chantix by name.

Pfizer’s other marketing tactic was to air a testimonial. We spend two
minutes getting to know Robin, a real-life success story. In her kitchen, over a
lovely soundtrack, Robin tells us how Ben, one of her boys, asked her to stop
smoking. Her doctor prescribed Chantix. As she and her family walk around a
neighborhood of gracious lawns and fall foliage, we hear what good support and a
good drug can do. Back at home, her husband makes coffee while she slices apples
and cheese for a snack at the kitchen table. Radiant, laughing, she says that
Ben finally tired of counting the days since she quit. At the end, an
announcer’s voiceover invites us to “talk to your doctor to find out if
prescription Chantix is right for you.”

But wait a minute — literally. During half the ad, that same announcer is
also telling us about the mental health problems that can be worsened by
Chantix. Not once, but twice, he says what should be alarming words: agitation,
hostility, depressed mood, suicidal thoughts or actions. The words appear yet a
third time in the same ad, in a boxed text at the bottom of the screen.

Why isn’t Pfizer nuts to spend so much money scaring us to death about their
product? While Robin is slicing that apple, why isn’t Pfizer worried that the
voice warning about suicidal thoughts or actions will make us fret whether it’s
safe to let Robin be around sharp objects?

Pfizer’s not worried for the same reason that Bristol-Myers Squibb isn’t
worried about its Abilify ad, with piano music under, showing a happy family’s
outing to a pier, accompanied by a voiceover about seizures, thoughts of
suicide, risk of death or stroke. It’s why Sanofi-aventis, the manufacturer of

Ambien, doesn’t mind spending half an ad (sleeping lady, rooster, harp) warning
of side-effects like sleep-driving and sleep-eating. And it’s why
GlaxoSmithKline is unconcerned about undercutting the effectiveness of its Requip ad
for Restless Leg Syndrome (relaxing lady, crossword puzzle, strings) with
warnings about (this is my favorite) compulsive gambling.

Pictures are more powerful than words. Language and logic don’t have the kind
of immediate access to our brains that images and instruments do. Feeling comes
before thinking. We can be as skeptical about marketing as we like, but media
literacy isn’t much of a match for music. No wonder Plato banished the poet in

The Republic: he couldn’t think of a curriculum that could protect people from
being enthralled by fiction, spellbound by illusion. The bards who sang the
Homeric epics were the ancestors of today’s Mad Men.

Robin’s harmless kitchen knife brilliantly neuters the suicide warnings, as
does the rest of her happy-ending story. In 2005, Duke University researcher Ruth Day presented a study to the FDA demonstrating how ads
can use distracting images and music to minimize attention to risk warnings. Her
infamous example: the fast-fluttering wings of the Nasonex bee (voiced by
Antonio Banderas) prevented viewers from remembering the side effects
information. Partly as a result, last May the FDA issued draft regulations declaring that ads will be judged by their
net impression as a whole, not just whether they’re technically accurate.

Pfizer denies that increased regulatory oversight led them to
raise the time devoted to safety warnings in its Chantix ads from 14 seconds to
a minute. I suspect they could run a two-minute crawl about suicide risks, and
it still wouldn’t distract from Robin’s heartwarming testimonial. We’re suckers
for mini-movies. No wonder the corporations just unleashed by the Supreme Court
to spend unlimited funds on campaign ads are salivating at the opportunity to
enthrall us.

This is my column from The Jewish Journal of Greater Los Angeles.
You can read more of my columns here, and e-mail me there if you’d
like.

Follow Marty Kaplan on Twitter: www.twitter.com/martykaplan

649 total views, 2 views today

EFFEXOR: Man Smashes 29 TV Sets at Wal-Mart: Georgia

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Just what is it with connection between antidepressant use and
baseball bats?!! Must be the same as it is for antidepressants and AK47’s!
Doctors could have a side business selling both baseball bats and AK47’s with
the prescriptions they write for these drugs because as the users begin to
suffer the adverse reactions they buy one or the other or both! Has anyone
caught on yet? How many more cases will it take?
On another note WHY on earth are they charging this fellow in
one crime with 29 counts of criminal damage to property???? A charge for each of
the TV sets separately when it was one crime?! That is
ridiculous!!!
_____________________________________
Last sentence reads:  “Police found a bottle of
Effexor XR, an anti-depressant
, in Strellis’s
possession.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/11/westley-strellis-walmart_n_458652.html

Westley Strellis, Business
News

A Georgia man went on a rampage yesterday

at a Walmart outside of Atlanta, smashing dozens of flat-screen televisions with
a baseball bat he found in the store.

The man, 23-year-old Westley
Strellis, bashed in 29 flat-screen televisions worth $22,000, reports the

Atlanta Journal Constitution. He was charged
with a whopping 29 counts of criminal damage to property.

Strellis
invoked his Fifth Amendment right to stay mum, so his motive remains a mystery.
According to

the police
report
, when officers arrived on the scene, Strellis was
sitting in an aisle in the store’s electronics department. When approached, he
held out his wrists, signaling for the officer to handcuff him. Police found a
bottle of Effexor XR, an anti-depressant, in Strellis’s
possession.

569 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: School: 14 Yr Old Student Shoots to Death Another 14 Yr Old

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

When I sent this case out to our investigative group I told
them not to dismiss this case as just another “gang shooting” because for two
decades kids weaning off these drugs have told me that they have no
idea why but while on the drugs they had joined gangs and done things they would
have never thought of doing. Of course when you go manic on an antidepressant

what you do is NOT what you would normally choose to do.

_____________________________
Paragraphs eight through thirteen read:  “The shooting
followed the suspect’s decision to get out of the gang, said Huntsville attorney
Bruce Gardner, who is
representing the young suspect
in early legal proceedings.”

“Gardner said they called themselves
Crips, the name of a real nationwide gang started in Los Angeles. It had
“initiation rituals and renunciation rituals,” Gardner said.”


‘Renunciation rituals’ are what gang members go through to leave the gang,
Gardner said.”

“He said his client’s initiation rite required him to

spray-paint  ‘Crips’ on a Discovery bathroom wall. Police confirmed Tuesday
that a bathroom at the school was sprayed with gang graffiti at some point, but
did not say specifically when.”

“After being sent to alternative school
as punishment, Gardner said the boy, who was taking medication for

depression, received counseling that
persuaded him to leave the gang.”

My client had made known his
intention to leave the gang,” Gardner said. ‘When you renounce, you must submit
to a physical beating. It’s called ‘suiciding out.’

http://blog.al.com/breaking/2010/02/madison_police_say_both_suspec.html

Madison police say both suspect, victim belonged to the same would-be
gang

By Lee Roop

February 10, 2010, 7:11AM
MADISON, AL — Both the suspect and victim in Friday’s fatal
Discovery Middle School shooting belonged to the same would-be gang, officials
said Tuesday.

Speaking inside the school in front of a large poster with
Todd Brown’s picture and memorials written by students, authorities gave their
fullest picture so far of the investigation.

Brown, 14, died Friday after
being shot during a class change at the 1,001-student school. The suspect, also

14, has been charged with murder and is being held in a juvenile
facility.

Police have identified fewer than 10 middle school boys,
including the suspect and victim, “who wanted to possibly align themselves with
some sort of national gang,” Police Chief Larry Muncey said.

They didn’t
know how to join a real gang, Muncey said, so they “went online and learned how
to walk and how to talk and how to dress.”

“I’m not saying some weren’t
serious,” Muncey said.

Brown’s family told WHNT-TV Channel 19 in a brief
statement Tuesday that they had never known Brown to be involved in gang
activity.

The shooting followed the suspect’s decision to get out of the
gang, said Huntsville attorney Bruce Gardner, who is representing the young
suspect in early legal proceedings.

Gardner said they called themselves
Crips, the name of a real nationwide gang started in Los Angeles. It had
“initiation rituals and renunciation rituals,” Gardner
said.

“Renunciation rituals” are what gang members go through to leave
the gang, Gardner said.

He said his client’s initiation rite required him

to spray-paint “Crips” on a Discovery bathroom wall. Police confirmed Tuesday
that a bathroom at the school was sprayed with gang graffiti at some point, but
did not say specifically when.

After being sent to alternative school as
punishment, Gardner said the boy, who was taking medication for depression,
received counseling that persuaded him to leave the gang.

“My client had
made known his intention to leave the gang,” Gardner said. “When you renounce,
you must submit to a physical beating. It’s called ‘suiciding out.’

Gardner said the boy was told he wouldn’t be beaten, but he did
voluntarily “burn his bandana” in a sort of symbolic resignation. Gardner was
referring to the blue bandana Crips wear to show affiliation.

“I am not
suggesting for a minute that this kid deserved to be shot,” Gardner said of the
victim, but there is evidence of cyberbullying and threats against his client
after he wanted out.

Gardner said his client’s parents are “devoutly
religious people” who are “mortified” by the slaying.

Gardner also
confirmed that Brown was shot with a .22-caliber pistol but said he did not know
where the gun came from.

Addressing rumors circulating about the case,
Muncey and Madison City Schools Superintendent Dee Fowler also said:


Their investigation did not find gang activity at any other Madison

school.

“They thought it was cool,” Muncey said of the Discovery gang,
“but when their parents came in, I don’t think they thought it was cool
anymore.”

“No parent admitted knowing” anything about the gang, Muncey
said.

• The suspect was a student at Discovery all year, Fowler said,
although he no longer is. His education is now being handled by the juvenile
detention center.

Gardner said the boy did transfer from Liberty to
Discovery during the summer after problems – none of them major – at
Liberty.

• Video cameras were installed when the 9th-grade wing at
Discovery was built. Muncey would not confirm the shooting was caught on camera,
but said he “would be surprised if it was not.”

583 total views, no views today

PROZAC: Young Woman Dreams of Committing Suicide: Illinois

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

This young woman has NO IDEA how lucky she is! What she is
describing here in dreaming about various ways of killing herself after starting
on Prozac is the beginning of the REM Sleep Behavior Disorder or RBD – a
condition that was not very common before Prozac hit the market.
RBD is a condition in which 86% of those being diagnosed with
it are taking an antidepressant. It is a condition in which people act out their
nightmares and 80% of those hurt themselves or someone else in doing
so.
__________________________________
Paragraphs 13 and 14 read:  “One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs
were the answer.
‘They made it seem like my world was falling
apart,’  the 29-year-old said.  ‘They really pushed hard for me to
take drugs, and
I didn’t want to, but they made me think
I really needed it. So I took them’.”

“She said that after a

few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having
dangerous thoughts. ‘I became emotionless.  Like,
things that should’ve made me happy, I was not excited about. Things that should
have made me sad didn’t upset me. I started dreaming about driving my car
into a wall.’
She said that according to her doctor, these were
all symptoms of her depression, but
she thinks it was
the drugs.”

http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=154761

Researchers say that antidepressants are no more effective than placebo
in cases of mild or moderate depression.

Depressing truth about antidepressants

by Tina
Amirkiai

Jan 27, 2010

If you are one of the millions of people taking
antidepressants for mild depression symptoms, you might as well be taking a
placebo.

A study released by a team of researchers led by Jay C.
Fournier, of the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania,
found that the most commonly prescribed antidepressants do little for mild to
moderate symptoms of depression, having the same results as a placebo.

The study, published in the Jan.6 edition of the Journal of the American
Medical Association, combining previous studies with research from new clinical
trials, concluded, “There is little evidence to suggest that [antidepressants]
produce specific pharmacological benefit for the majority of patients with less
severe acute depressions.”

Dr. Paul Dobransky, a Chicago psychiatrist,
believes professionals need to look closely at each individual patient’s
symptoms and carefully diagnose the best treatment. He said there are three
angles that must be looked at when it comes to mood disorders, which he referred
to as the “bio-psycho-social” aspects.

“The biological or physical
symptoms of mood disorders are where medications are often useful,” he said.
“They cannot however, alter one’s character, personality or fix any external or
social stress the patient might be dealing with.”

Researchers used a
severity scale to evaluate the level of depression symptoms in the hundreds of

clinical trial patients, which ultimately helped determine that the
antidepressants were most effective for those with more severe disorders.

Researchers evaluated the 728 men and women, half of them had severe
depression and the other half had more moderate symptoms. They found that
compared to the placebos, the drugs caused a much steeper reduction of symptoms
in people who scored higher on the severity scale.

Researchers concluded
that, “For patients with very severe depression, the benefit of the medications
over placebo is substantial.”

Dobransky and other critics maintain that
the drug companies should be held accountable for all the advertising and sales
hype in recent years, leading directly to the overuse of drugs like
antidepressants.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration loosened the
restrictions on the direct-to-consumer advertising by drug companies. Since
then, pharmaceutical companies have spent billions of dollars advertising their
products to the general public.

Dobransky said a big part of the problem
is patients see advertisements and want to use these drugs as a quick fix.
According to him, patients often assume that mild cases of depression involving
stressful situational causes can be resolved with medicine. But he said quick
fixes like that do not exist.

“Each case needs to be set in its proper
place and in many of these cases, therapy between the patient and their doctor
is the best solution,” Dobransky said.

One antidepressant user, who
asked that her name be withheld, said when she sought help for what she
considered to be minor depression, doctors immediately told her drugs were the
answer. “They made it seem like my world was falling apart,” the 29-year-old
said. “They really pushed hard for me to take drugs, and I didn’t want to, but
they made me think I really needed it. So I took them.”

She said that
after a few weeks on Prozac, she felt numb then started having dangerous
thoughts. “I became emotionless.  Like, things that should’ve made me
happy, I was not excited about. Things that should have made me sad didn’t upset
me. I started dreaming about driving my car into a wall.” She said that
according to her doctor, these were all symptoms of her depression, but she
thinks it was the drugs.

“I just felt like instead of my doctor doing
her job as a therapist, she looked to some drug to cure me, which is
ridiculous,” she said. “It’s basically a quick fix, it solves nothing, and in my
case turned mild symptoms into severe ones.”

A spokesman for
GlaxoSmithKline, who makes paroxetine, sold as Paxil, told Bloomberg News that
“the study used for the analysis in the JAMA paper differ methodologically from
studies used to support the approval of paroxetine for major depressive
disorder, so it is difficult to make direct comparisons between the study
results.”

If you think you might be depressed, the Depression Health
Center on the WebMD Web site advises relying on licensed professionals trained
to treat depression who can help you chose the best course of treatment, which
may or may not include antidepressant drugs.
Dashed line

©2001 – 2009 Medill Reports – Chicago, Northwestern
University.  A publication of the Medill
School
.

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ZOLOFT: Man Fires Shots into Country Club: Goes Manic for First Time: MN

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): I am going to
comment on this one statement from this article because I become absolutely
furious when I hear this over and over and over again when AA is in a position
to help and will not. I quote, “He also has been through alcohol treatment
and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous,” So, WHY is AA not more helpful in
teaching those with a problem with alcohol that antidepressants CAUSE
OVERWHELMING CRAVINGS FOR ALCOHOL?!!! They would certainly not have near as much
business if they did! It just makes me sick to hear over and over again that
they encourage the use of antidepressants among those who already have problems
with alcohol. It makes no sense!!! They seem to be far more
susceptible to the manic effects of antidepressants.

Paragraph six reads:  “If the case had gone to trial,
Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
defense. The claim
: a switch in the fall of 2008
to the antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become
manic-depressive for the first time in his life.”

http://www.startribune.com/local/81151627.html?elr=KArksLckD8EQDUoaEyqyP4O:DW3ckUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aUnciaec8O7EyUsl

Man pleads guilty to firing shots at country club

The defendant said that friends had tried to get him help
before the incident at Minikahda Country Club in Minneapolis. Had the case gone
to trial, his attorney had planned to use an “involuntary intoxication”
defense.

By ROCHELLE OLSON,

Star Tribune

Last update: January 11, 2010 – 12:07 PM

A 64-year-old Minneapolis man pleaded guilty today to second-degree assault for
shooting at the Minikahda Country Club and said afterward that he hopes
something can be done to make it easier for adults with psychological problems
to get help.

For me to do anything harmful to the club, I had to be
crazy because I loved the club,” Joseph C. Rice said in an interview after his
plea in front of Hennepin County District Court Judge Beryl Nord. “When you’re
out of your mind, the worst thing is you don’t know you’re out of your
mind.”

According to the charges: Police received a call at 2 a.m. from an
employee at the club, 3205 Excelsior Blvd., reporting that he had spotted Rice
outside the building holding a gun, had heard multiple shots, and then had seen
Rice drive away in an older red Ferrari. Police tracked Rice to his nearby home.
In addition to assault, he was charged with drive-by shooting, reckless
discharge of a firearm and two drinking and driving offenses. All but the
assault charge were dropped.

Rice will have to serve about three months
in the county workhouse. He paid $3,091 to the club for the damage. He will pay
more than $100,000 to get his Ferrari back.

“I feel really sorry for what
I did. I really valued my membership in the club,” he said.

If the case
had gone to trial, Rice’s lawyer Andrew Birrell planned to use an “involuntary
intoxication” defense. The claim: a switch in the fall of 2008 to the
antidepressant Zoloft from Wellbutrin had caused Rice to become manic-depressive

for the first time in his life.

Birrell had filed notice with the court
of plans to call an expert witness, a physician, who would testify that drugs
such as Zoloft can cause mania in a small percentage of the population. He and
Rice acknowledge that the defense would have been complicated by Rice’s heavy
drinking at the time.

But Rice said in the weeks leading up to the
incident, friends were trying to get him into a hospital for help, but were
unsuccessful. “It’s almost like you have to do something bad, but then it’s too
late,” Rice said of his friends’ efforts to get him treatment.

After the
shooting, his 31-year-old son and his psychiatrist succeeded in getting him into

a 30-day in-patient program at Fairview Riverside Hospital. Rice said he was
immediately taken off Zoloft and put back on Wellbutrin. He also has been
through alcohol treatment and is active in Alcoholics Anonymous, he
said.

Rice said he will send the club an apology through Birrell. “The
way to say you’re sorry is to live a better life,” he said.

He is
expected to begin serving his workhouse sentence in February.

Rochelle
Olson • 612-673-1747

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Makes Teenage Girl Angry All the Time: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How tragic that this poor young woman would have to turn to
the Dear Abby column (or whatever they call it now) for help with this! Why
would her own doctor not know enough to explain to her that this antidepressant
is causing her blood sugar to drop producing adrenalin rushes as the body’s
attempt to normalize sugar? Since adrenalin is your fight or flight hormone it
is no wonder she is angry all the time and no wonder it affects relationships as
the patients become meaner and meaner when they cannot control their blood sugar
levels due to the effects of these drugs.

You ask if she has been screened for diabetes? I may not show
up yet, but soon will with her pancreas experiencing that strong of a negative
effect from the antidepressant. This is a very bright young woman to be able to
notice what effect this drug is having upon her. And her mother may change her
mind about having her daughter take the antidepressant when her daughter
violently attacks her in a rage produced by the drug! What a shame her
mother is not listening to her as she cries out for help knowing what
violence the drugs are causing her to be capable of, yet frightened to verbalize
those horribly violent thoughts previously so completely foreign to
her.
__________________________________
Last part of paragraph two reads:  ” However, the
antidepressant causes me to be uncontrollably angry
all the time.
I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which just adds to
my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect my
relationships with friends and family.”

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20091130/LIFE/911300302/-1/ENTERTAIN

Teen frets taking her antidepressants

By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
November 30, 2009 12:00
AM

Dear Annie: I am a 16-year-old girl who still wets the bed. I have
tried everything from wearing an alarm to taking medication.

I am now on
a prescription that works by telling my kidneys to stop producing urine,
although it doesn’t work all the time. A urologist prescribed an antidepressant

that prevents me from sleeping too deeply. With the combination of these two
medicines, I no longer wet the bed. However, the antidepressant causes me to be
uncontrollably angry all the time. I also don’t sleep well when I take it, which
just adds to my irritability. It has gotten so bad that it has started to affect
my relationships with friends and family.

My mom wants me to keep taking
it because it works. But, Annie, I don’t like being angry all the time, and I
don’t want to be on medication for the rest of my life. What can I
do?

­ At a Loss

Dear At a Loss: Most teens with enuresis are
exceedingly deep sleepers, and many also have a small bladder, exacerbating the

problem. We assume you have been screened for diabetes and a genetic link, and
that you don’t drink alcohol. Many sufferers do well with a moisture-sensor
alarm, and we’re sorry that doesn’t work for you. The other common treatment is
the medication you currently are using. However, since you are having unpleasant
side effects, please discuss this with your doctor. It’s possible your dosage
can be altered so you can still get the benefits without such a big emotional
swing. Also discuss exercises to strengthen and enlarge your bladder. For more
information and to keep abreast of new developments, contact the National Kidney
Foundation (kidney.org) at 1-888-WAKE-DRY
(1-888-925-3379).

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: 22 Year Old Woman: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

When someone has been sickly physically for a period of
time or earlier in life it has been my experience that they do not do well
on antidepressants. They need to rebuild their health, not take a stimulant drug
to force their bodies to perform! Why do we push others as we do? Give them the
time they need to heal!
__________________________________
An inquest on Tuesday heard that Natalie, an animal lover, who
studied at Plumpton College, had suffered ill health as a child, which limited
her sight and held her back at school.
Paragraph seven reads:  “Dr Hunt told the inquest, “She
told me she had been depressed for several years and had been
taking anti-depressants for two
years.”

http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk/news/Animal-lover-took-own-life.5864785.jp

Animal lover took own life after party

Published Date: 27 November 2009

A ‘SENSITIVE
and quiet girl’ who spent years bravely fighting depression took her own life
just days after her 22nd birthday, an inquest heard.


Family and friends joined
popular Natalie McCreanney at her party at Bibendum in Eastbourne town centre on
November 21 last year.

A week later, her body was
found on a secluded part of the beach, near the foot of Beachy Head.

An inquest on Tuesday heard
that Natalie, an animal lover, who studied at Plumpton College, had suffered ill
health as a child, which limited her sight and held her back at school.

Natalie paid for regular
counselling sessions for several years at the Eastbourne Clinic, but these ended
a couple of months before her death as she was thought to be too dependent on
staff.

Her regular GP, Dr Christopher Bedford-Turner, said
Natalie had taken an overdose in 2005 and later self-harmed on occasions.

On November 24 last year, she had a 15-minute chat
with Dr Caroline Hunt, a locum working at Dr Bedford-Turner’s surgery.

Dr Hunt told the inquest, “She told me she had been
depressed for several years and had been taking anti-depressants for two
years.

“She said she had been feeling very low again. I
asked her if she had any suicidal thoughts. She was non-committal and shrugged
her shoulders.”

They discussed the possibility of increasing her
medication, Dr Hunt said, but Natalie hurried out of the surgery before the
consultation was over.

Her counsellor, Julia Ryder, said sessions with
Natalie ended after she had found a flat and a job.

“I felt it was no longer beneficial to consider
counselling indefinitely as it was not treating any specific depressive symptoms
and was more about her reliance on me and some of my colleagues.”

Mum Jackie paid tribute to her daughter, who had
‘struggled to come to terms with her illness’.

She said, “She was a quiet, sensitive girl with a
passion for animals and a group of supportive friends.”

In the last few months of her life, Natalie was
working at Debenhams and shared a flat in Barbuda Quay.

Second cousin Diane Mounir recounted an emotional
phone call Natalie made to her.
“I asked her if it was a good idea her being
there. She said, ‘I like it here’.

“She wanted to carry on talking but I cut her off
to phone 999. When I phoned her back, her phone was dead.”

Coroner Alan Craze said Natalie’s ‘general descent
into crisis’ had led to an ‘enormous tragedy’. He recorded a verdict of suicide,
while the balance of her mind was disturbed.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Young Man Missing – Voices said “eat sugar”: Iowa

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

How bright of this prescribing physician! You have someone who
is disoriented so you give them a drug that
causes “disorientation”! So why would anyone wonder why this
young man got worse and then disappeared into the freezing weather with no
shoes or coat?
It does appear clear to me that the
antidepressant affected his blood sugar rapidly and strongly with the
heart palpitations and the cravings for sugar – both symptoms of a drop in blood

sugar levels. The brain cannot function without normal sugar levels and
immediately begins losing brain cells when the sugar level drops. And the body
pumps adrenalin – the fight or flight hormone – in an attempt to normalize the
sugar levels when they drop.

_______________________________________
Paragraphs three & four read:
Moncada’s mother, Ana Moncada, said he went to work on
Thanksgiving night; and, when he returned home on the morning of Nov. 27, he
seemed disoriented. She took him to see a doctor, who prescribed an
anti-depressant. He continued to feel disoriented and began to hear voices, she
said.”

“ ‘He was hearing voices that saideat sugar,

said Maria Stockton, a friend who served as translator for his mother.  ‘He
felt his heart was beating too hard and thought if he ate sugar, his heart
would not beat so hard’.”

http://www.southwestiowanews.com/articles/2009/12/09/council_bluffs/doc4b1fd2bc0a96e293364639.txt

Bluffs man reported missing

By TIM JOHNSON, Staff Writer
tjohnson@nonpareilonline.com
Published: Wednesday, December 9, 2009 10:59 AM CST
A young
Hispanic man from Council Bluffs has been reported missing.

Larry Ely
Murillo Moncada, 25, was last seen Saturday, Nov. 28, at 6:15 p.m. at his
residence at 719 N. 14th St., according to his family. He was wearing a Navy
blue hooded sweatshirt and light blue seat pants. He was described as 5-feet,
5-inches tall and 140 pounds, with brown eyes.

Moncada’s mother, Ana
Moncada, said he went to work on Thanksgiving night; and, when he returned home
on the morning of Nov. 27, he seemed disoriented. She took him to see a doctor,
who prescribed an anti-depressant. He continued to feel disoriented and began to
hear voices, she said.

“He was hearing voices that saideat sugar,’”

said Maria Stockton, a friend who served as translator for his mother. “He felt
his heart was beating too hard and thought if he ate sugar, his heart would not
beat so hard.”

He did not eat very much sugar, she said, but by Saturday,
he was hallucinating.

“He said somebody was following him, and he was
scared,” she said.

It was apparently this fear that led Murillo Moncada
to run out the door that evening without any shoes on, Stockton said.

The
family has checked with acquaintances and posted flyers at businesses they
frequent, but have heard nothing so far.

Anyone with information on his
whereabouts should contact Detective Shawn Landon of the Council Bluffs Police
Department at (712) 326-2508 or Crime Stoppers at (712)
328-STOP.

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SSRI Antidepressants Linked to Lactation Difficulties

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): The following
statement about the benefits of breastmilk are true. But when you are talking
about the benefits of breastmilk coming from a mother on SSRI antidepressants,
there is no basis for benefit from such contaminated milk. The baby is much
better off gathering milk from a mother who is drug free. The only additional
problem at that point is that if the baby survives and does not die from one of
the many horrific birth defects produced by these drugs they will then be
going cold turkey off one of these very addictive antidepressants. It would be
better to wean the baby slowly down off of the breast milk by giving smaller and
smaller amounts of the mother’s toxic contaminated milk while providing more and
more clean breast milk from a donor mom.

Let me give just one example of why I would say this: Over the weekend I
was able to visit once again with a mother of seven that I helped years ago
as she withdrew from her seven year use of Prozac. After she had been completely
off the drug for a year and a half she gave birth to her last child. When the
baby was three weeks old she was passing more blood than stool. Both the family
physician and the pediatrician agreed that it was the Prozac residue in the
mother’s breast milk that was eating away the baby’s intestinal lining to cause
the bleeding. They confirmed this by having the mother gather clean breast milk

to supplement her milk with. Almost immediately after mixing the milk half and
half the bleeding stopped. So, assisting a mother to breastfeed when her milk is
so contaminated may not be in the best interest of the baby after all.

_______________________________
Breastfeeding benefits both infants and mothers in many ways as breast milk
is easy to digest and contains antibodies that can protect infants from
bacterial and viral infections. The World Health Organization recommends that
infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. This
new study shows that certain common antidepressant drugs may be linked to a
common difficulty experienced by new mothers known as delayed secretory
activation, defined as a delay in the initiation of full milk secretion.
Public release date: 26-Jan-2010

Contact:
Aaron Lohr
alohr@endo-society.org
240-482-1380
The
Endocrine Society

Common antidepressant drugs linked to lactation difficulties in
moms

According to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), women
taking commonly used forms of antidepressant drugs may experience delayed
lactation after giving birth and may need additional support to achieve their
breastfeeding goals.

Breastfeeding benefits both infants and mothers in many ways as breast milk
is easy to digest and contains antibodies that can protect infants from
bacterial and viral infections. The World Health Organization recommends that
infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life. This
new study shows that certain common antidepressant drugs may be linked to a
common difficulty experienced by new mothers known as delayed secretory
activation, defined as a delay in the initiation of full milk secretion.

“The breasts are serotonin-regulated glands, meaning the breasts’ ability to
secrete milk at the right time is closely related to the body’s production and
regulation of the hormone serotonin,” said Nelson Horseman, PhD, of the
University of Cincinnati and co-author of the study. “Common antidepressant
drugs like fluoxetine, sertraline and paroxetine are known as selective
serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs and while they can affect mood,
emotion and sleep they may also impact serotonin regulation in the breast,
placing new mothers at greater risk of a delay in the establishment of a full
milk supply.”

In this study, researchers examined the effects of SSRI drugs on lactation
using laboratory studies of human and animal cell lines and genetically modified
mice. Furthermore, an observational study evaluated the impact of SSRI drugs on
the onset of milk production in postpartum women. In this study of 431
postpartum women, median onset of lactation was 85.8 hours postpartum for the
SSRI-treated mothers and 69.1 hours for mothers not treated with SSRI drugs.
Researchers commonly define delayed secretory activation as occurring later than
72 hours postpartum.

SSRI drugs are very helpful medications for many moms, so understanding and
ameliorating difficulties moms experience can help them achieve their goals for
breastfeeding their babies,” said Horseman. “More human research is needed
before we can make specific recommendations regarding SSRI use during
breastfeeding.”

###

Other researchers working on the study include: Aaron Marshall, Laura
Hernandez and Karen Gregerson of the University of Cincinnati in Ohio; Laurie
Nommsen-Rivers of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio; Kathryn
Dewey of the University of California at Davis; and Caroline Chantry of the
University of California Davis Medical Center in Sacramento.

The article, “Serotonin transport and metabolism in the mammary gland
modulates secretory activation and involution,” will appear in the February 2010
issue of JCEM.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and
most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical
practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of
over 14,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than
100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied, and clinical
interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase,
Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit
our site at www.endo-society.org.

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