PROZAC: Suicide: Woman Set Herself on Fire: England

Paragraph nine reads:  “By this time she was also
taking Prozac
and diazepam and had been given
several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/4749233.Brighton_mum_who_set_herself_on_fire_was_depressed_after_redundancy__inquest_hears/

Brighton mum who set herself on fire was depressed after redundancy,
inquest hears

2:33pm Thursday 19th November 2009

A Brighton mother-of-two committed suicide by dousing herself in barbecue lighter
fluid and setting it alight after battling with a chronic alcohol problem and
depression since being made redundant, an inquest heard today.

Birgit Bartlett’s body was found by her daughter in the garden of her home in
Hollingbury Crescent on August 8.

An inquest at Brighton County Court
heard the 51-year-old died of suffocation after inhaling the flames which
enveloped her body.

Pathologist Mark Taylor, who carried out a
post-mortem examination, said she had an acute thermal injury to her windpipe
and believed she would have died “rapidly”.

Mr Taylor said she had low
levels of alcohol in her blood, equal to having consumed around four units, but
added that he found excess fat around her liver, “in keeping with her history of
chronic alcohol abuse,” although this did not contribute to her death.

Mrs Bartlett’s husband, Michael, said his wife began drinking heavily
when she was made redundant in 2007 and he and his adult son and daughter would
often find empty bottles of wine hidden around the house.

In 2008 she
stopped drinking when she became employed as an admin assistant, but took it up
again when she lost the job in February of this year.

This time her
alcohol abuse was worse, and she took to drinking a bottle of spirits a day. Mr
Bartlett said the family confiscated her credit cards and cheque book in a bid
to stop her.

By this time she was also taking Prozac and diazepam and
had been given several referrals for alcohol treatment programmes.

During a visit to her GP in March she denied thoughts of suicide but
admitted she had been feeling low, before she was admitted to hospital in May
after setting fire to her duvet cover while in bed.

She suffered third
degree burns to her thigh and lower back and was referred to the local community
mental health team.

The inquest heard that German-born Mrs Bartlett had
no previous psychiatric problems but her sister had committed suicide six years
ago.

Psychiatrist Graham Walton said he saw Mrs Bartlett three times in
July but said he felt “she didn’t want to engage” with him.

He said he
did not think she seemed suicidal but “she did admit there was endless
drinking”.

Mr Bartlett said his wife underwent a detoxification
programme to try to stop her from drinking and said she felt “ashamed” of her
condition.

“She was petrified that somebody she knew would see her going
in or out,” he added.

In the days leading up to her death she told him,
“I’ll never find another job” and “I’m no good”, the inquest heard.

On

the day she died Mr Bartlett said he noticed she was missing so thought she
might have gone for a walk and he searched her local haunts. He arrived back at
the house at around 1.30pm to find police, fire engines and ambulances outside.

Detective Sergeant Helen Paine of Sussex
Police
told the inquest that officers were satisfied that there were no
suspicious circumstances surrounding Mrs Bartlett’s death.

Summing up,
Dr Karen Henderson, assistant deputy coroner for Brighton and Hove, said the
inquest had found “little evidence that she seriously wished to stop drinking”.

She added: “She was also offered a lot of help from social services, her
GP, and from substance misuse services. It is quite clear she did not wish to
engage with these services.

“The manner of her death is truly terrible
but we have heard evidence that her death would have been mercifully brief and
mercifully painless.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, she added: “I know
that the family did everything they possibly could to help Birgit,” and offered
them her condolences.

Mr Bartlett declined to comment on the hearing.

405 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Young Man Collapses, Almost Dies: England

Paragraphs 11 and 12 read:  “The court heard the lad, who
is
suffering from depression, had not had his
medication for four days and tried to ‘catch up’ by taking four days
worth in one go.”

“Mr Parsons added:  ‘One of the side
effects was that this young man collapsed on Mr Lane’s floor. He was
unconscious. There was a delay in the ambulance coming to the flat. Mr Lane was
very distressed. He thought this young man who was in his
care was dead’.”

http://www.thisissouthdevon.co.uk/news/Death-threat-paramedic-trying-save-teenager/article-1513118-detail/article.html

Death threat to paramedic trying to save teenager

Friday, November 13, 2009, 09:22

A MAN threatened to kill a
paramedic who was trying to save the life of a teenager after he collapsed at
his house with a heart attack, a court heard.

South Devon magistrates in
Torquay were told Robert Lane became agitated and angry with ambulance staff who
were trying to revive the 19-year-old man.

Following the case, a
spokesman for the ambulance service said: “Any abuse, whether verbal or
physical, will not be tolerated. The trust takes incidents of this nature very
seriously.”

The court heard on Saturday, October 24, the young man, who
had been living with Lane at his Prospect Lane home in Brixham for the past two
years, collapsed with suspected heart failure after ingesting four days’ worth
of anti-depressants in one go.

Lane, 48, called 999 but was angry with
the paramedics when he claimed they turned up 35 minutes later.

Lyndsey
Baker, prosecuting, said: “When ambulance staff arrived, the suspect became
abusive. He grabbed one of the staff and tried to throw a punch at him. Another
paramedic tried to intervene and he again tried to throw a punch at
him.”

In a statement, paramedic Martin Stone said: “I felt the male was
going to assault me and was in fear of violence. It was completely unprovoked
while we were treating someone for a serious condition.”

In his
statement, Mr Stone said: “He (Lane) said to me, ‘If anything happens to him
you’re dead’. I was in fear for my safety and that of my colleagues.”

The
court heard on the day Lane had drunk two pints of lager, was in an agitated
state and was angry at the situation. Lane yesterday pleaded guilty to a charge
of obstructing or hindering an emergency worker.

Lane’s solicitor, Alan
Parsons, said his client had been providing accommodation to the 19-year-old, a
friend of his own 19-year-old son, for two and a half years after he fell out
with his family. Mr Parsons said: “He treated him like a second son.”

The
court heard the lad, who is suffering from depression, had not had his
medication for four days and tried to ‘catch up’ by taking four days worth in
one go.

Mr Parsons added: “One of the side effects was that this young

man collapsed on Mr Lane’s floor. He was unconscious. There was a delay in the
ambulance coming to the flat. Mr Lane was very distressed. He thought this young
man who was in his care was dead.”

Mr Parsons said the 19-year-old man
was successfully resuscitated by paramedics.

He added: “Mr Lane panicked.
He asked the paramedics why the ambulance took so long.

“He accepts he
obstructed their activity but the last thing he wanted was to hinder anything
which could stop them from saving this 19-year-old’s life. It was a regrettable
situation, but the young man has now made a full recovery.”

Sentencing
Lane to an 18-month conditional discharge, £100 compensation and an £85 fine,
Torbay magistrates said: “We understand the stress you were under on the day,
but public sector workers, especially paramedics deserve support not threats.
This was a very serious offence.”

The ambulance service spokesman said
paramedics arrived on the scene within four minutes.

She said: “Every
ambulance clinician should be able to fulfil their life-saving role without fear
of abuse or assault. As this case demonstrates there will be consequences for
people who believe it is acceptable to disrespect ambulance
personnel.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Stabs Wife Muliple Times Killing Her: England

Paragraph 21 reads:  “Supt Slattery said Davidson’s
medical problems started in 2007 and he had been prescribed some
medication but  ‘clearly the
treatment and intervention hadn’t been successful’.”

Paragraph 13
reads:  “During Davidson’s court appearance on Thursday, it emerged that he
had been battling depression for some time and would sit in
bed, not wash and not help around the house. He refused to accept that he had a
problem.”

Paragraph 18 reads:  “Supt Slattery admitted that people
would find it difficult to understand how a placid, withdrawn man

who showed no hint of violence could suddenly commit
such an horrific act.”

http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/cumbrian_woman_who_saw_her_dad_kill_her_mum_still_has_nightmares_a_year_on_1_630860?referrerPath=home

Cumbrian woman who saw her dad kill her mum still has nightmares a year
on

By Victoria Brenan

Last updated at 12:03,
Saturday, 31 October 2009

A daughter who saw her father murder her mother
in a frenzied attack in their Penrith home lives with the brutal images every
day.

Twenty-three-year-old Collette Davidson suffers from nightmares and
sleep problems after witnessing the assault in which her mother was stabbed 50

times on August 21 last year.

She has essentially lost both parents after
her father Robert, 48, was this week ordered to be detained indefinitely in a
mental hospital after admitting manslaughter.

“I become very upset when I
think of what she went through and the horrific end to her life,” Collette said
in a statement.

“After the incident I hardly slept at all and I don’t
like being around knives. I look at them and think about what they can
do.”

Detective Superintendent Andy Slattery, who led the investigation
into the death of 43-year-old Judith Davidson, paid tribute to Collette’s
strength saying she had witnessed “the most unimaginable, horrific
scenes”.

The family had eaten a meal together before Davidson took two
knives upstairs and subjected his wife of 24 years to a sustained, brutal
stabbing in the bedroom of their home in White Ox Way. Collette overheard them
arguing – her mother had earlier asked her father to leave – then heard a scream
and a cry.

She saw her mother – whom she described as her best friend –
cornered and being stabbed by her father. She grabbed one of the knives and went
to a neighbour for help. When they returned, the attack was still
continuing.

“Collette was extremely traumatised,” said Supt Slattery,
head of the public protection unit. “She will never forget what happened but she
has been very strong throughout this, remarkably so. Right from the start she
was able to explain to officers what had happened and give a very detailed
account of what had gone on at the house.”

Supt Slattery was called to
the scene after Davidson had already been arrested.

“It was obvious from
the start that we weren’t looking for anyone else in connection with this,” he
said.

“Something significant happened in the mind of Robert Davidson and
he turned from a quiet and depressed man to being extremely
violent.”

During Davidson’s court appearance on Thursday, it emerged that
he had been battling depression for some time and would sit in bed, not wash and
not help around the house. He refused to accept that he had a
problem.

Supt Slattery described him as “very quiet and unemotional”,
even at the scene. “He didn’t speak. Not at all. In his first interview he
didn’t comment. He said very little but what he did say was that Judith was a
good woman and he loved her.”

Davidson was examined by a doctor and
psychiatrist at the police station and was deemed fit to be interviewed. He was
later assessed by three psychiatrists – one for the defence, the prosecution and
the court. All agreed that he was suffering from an “abnormality of the mind”,
stemming from depression.

“He was suffering from hopelessness and
depression. It was long-term build up of a history of mental depression,” Supt
Slattery said.

When his wife asked him to leave, Davidson was “so
depressed, so anxious” that he viewed it as “a catastrophic event”, the
psychiatrists concluded – although the court heard she had asked him to leave on
previous occasions.

Supt Slattery admitted that people would find it
difficult to understand how a placid, withdrawn man who showed no hint of
violence could suddenly commit such an horrific act.

“There was no
build-up in terms of threats or violence of any sort, no reason to believe that
Judith was afraid in any way,” he added.

“It’s something I don’t think
the family or anyone else will understand. There was clearly a degree of
planning involved and forethought in what he did. He took two kitchen knives
upstairs.”

Supt Slattery said Davidson’s medical problems started in 2007
and he had been prescribed some medication but “clearly the treatment and
intervention hadn’t been successful”.

The psychiatrists’ assessment made
it difficult to pursue a murder charge and the CPS agreed to accept a plea to
manslaughter, meaning Davidson would not have to go to trial, something Mrs
Davidson’s side of the family criticised. “We have no faith in this country’s
justice system,” they said in a statement. “It should be a life for a
life.”

Supt Slattery said Davidson’s children – Collette and Craig, who
was at university at the time of the attack – would never forget what happened.
Neither of them attended court.

They were a close-knit family and the
impact of “having a parent die at the hands of another parent adds another
dimension of difficulty for anybody”.

“They have lost their mother and
got to come to terms with the fact their father killed her in a brutal and
ferocious way,” he said. “They both found it difficult to come to terms with
what happened and to carry on with normal life.

“Collette will never
forget what happened but she has got to find a way to move on.”

Davidson,
who must remain at a secure hospital indefinitely, will be monitored by doctors
and a report produced every year on his condition and progress. His family will
be kept updated and he will be released only when no longer considered a risk to
the public.

The judge said he expected him to spend a “very long” time in
hospital.

First published at 09:11, Saturday, 31 October
2009
Published by http://www.newsandstar.co.uk

667 total views, 2 views today

PROZAC: 25 Year Old Woman Commits Suicide: England

Paragraph 6 reads:  “And she said they put her on a
course of Fluoxetine [Prozac]
an anti-depressant which has been linked in some instances
with side effects which can lead to patients wanting to
commit suicide.”

http://www.birminghampost.net/news/west-midlands-health-news/2009/10/29/redditch-mother-to-take-somerset-nhs-trust-to-court-over-daughter-s-suicide-65233-25039846/

Redditch mother to take Somerset NHS Trust to court over daughter’s
suicide

Oct
29 2009
by John Marsden, Birmingham Post

A mother is set to take legal action against a hospital trust she claims
failed to spot her daughter’s mental illness that resulted in her
death.

Beautician Tracy Thomas was left devastated when her oldest
daughter, Kimberley, hanged herself in her bedroom just two weeks before
Christmas.

She claims Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust failed to
help 25yearold Kimberley after she repeatedly threatened to commit suicide

when she moved to the region in 2004.

Mrs Thomas, who lives in Redditch,
Worcestershire, with her three children, said Kimberely had been suffering from
Bi-Polar Disorder.

Despite Kimberley’s plea for help, Mrs Thomas said
doctors did not see her as a threat to herself.

And she said they put her
on a course of Fluoxetine – an anti-depressant which has been linked in some
instances with side effects which can lead to patients wanting to commit
suicide.

Mrs Thomas said: “If Kim had been in Worcestershire I’m sure she
would have been sectioned and been given 24-hour care.

“But doctors in
Somerset didn’t want to know. They were more concerned with transferring
resources elsewhere.

“They simply failed to see the gravity of her
illness. Of course I want an apology from the hospital but no words or money
will ever bring my daughter back.”

Mrs Thomas has now approached Irwin
Mitchell solicitors and said she intends to sue the Trust for negligence. She
has also set up a Facebook website called Survivors of Family and Friends to
Suicide, in a bid to help people who have been affected by similar
tragedies.

A spokesman for Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
said: “We offer our condolences to Mrs Thomas for the tragic death of her
daughter.

“The Trust would refute any suggestion that we were negligent
or failed to diagnose Kimberley correctly.

“We will defend ourselves
against any legal action taken against us.”

In April, an inquest heard
how former Debenhams employee Ms Thomas, of Winchester Street, Taunton, hanged
herself after a series of relationships broke down. Somerset Partnership NHS
Foundation Trust received an excellent rating from the Care Quality Commission
for its treatment of mentally ill patients last year.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Commits Suicide: England

Paragraph 28 reads;  “Mrs Davis received counselling
and was on anti-depressants,’ he said. ‘Mr Davies said
their marriage had been blissfully happy and he thought the financial problems
had been settled.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1223333/Husband-blames-Lloyds-wifes-suicide-bank-pulls-family-firms-overdraft.html

Husband blames Lloyds for wife’s suicide after bank pulls family firm’s
overdraft


Last updated at 3:05 PM on 27th October 2009

A
husband has claimed Lloyds bank was partly to blame for his wife’s suicide after
it suddenly pulled their overdraft.

Mark Davis says the bank’s actions
helped drive his wife Victoria to throw herself in front of a train earlier this
year.

An inquest into her death heard a £16,000 tax demand was also
hand-delivered to the family home on the morning of her suicide.

The
hearing was told Mrs Davis had battled to juggle her job as company secretary
for the family firm and coping with its debts with being a mother to two young
children.

‘Blissfully happy’: Mark and Victoria Davis. He claims
Lloyds bank was partially to blame for her suicide because it pulled their
overdraft

Her husband, from whom she kept secret the extent of the
family’s chauffeur business’s woe, insisted Lloyds TSB was also partly to
blame.

After the inquest, he told how they had been with the bank for
years and had always had the loan renewed on a yearly basis.

This was
suddenly changed to monthly renewals and then finally withdrawn, cutting adrift
the family chauffeur car business which then went bust, he claimed.

‘We
did everything they asked us to do and then they moved the goal posts and kept
moving them. I am extremely bitter about it,’ Mr Davis said.

‘Lloyds bank
holds some of the responsibility for her death. We banked with Lloyds for many
years and had a very successful business. But at the beginning of this year,
they were themselves in serious financial difficulties.

‘We had an
extremely large overdraft of £30,000 which was secured on our house and other
guarantees. Previously it had been renewed annually but suddenly it was only
renewed monthly and then it was pulled completely.

‘How can we run a
business on that basis? I had a letter from the bank yesterday saying they were
still holding a personal guarantee of mine and they wanted it paid.

‘But
my company has now gone into liquidation and as far as I can, I shall make sure
that Lloyds don’t get a penny.’

Mrs Davis committed suicide on railway
tracks near the couple’s home in Chalford, near Stroud in Gloucestershire in
May.

After her death, some 4,000 letters she had hidden away were found.
Ironically, many contained payments from customers that would have eased their
financial problems.

Following the inquest jury’s verdict of suicide, her
husband said he could not understand why she had kept the extent of their debts
from him.

He said: ‘She must have been frightened to tell me because I
can be a bit fiery but she was a very intelligent woman and after what we had
been through, I can’t believe she kept it all from me.’

The inquest in
Cheltenham heard that Mrs Davis had struggled to cope with handling the
company’s debts with being a mother to their two children, aged six and
four.

Mr Davis said she was a ‘fantastic woman‘ and wonderful mother.

‘We went through a low point but we got through it with the help of
counselling and I thought we had come out the other side. I clearly missed
something. Nothing was as important as us and our family,’  he
said.

The inquest heard Mrs Davis went and knelt in front of a train on
May 13 after receiving the tax demand.

Train driver Ian Green told how he
sounded his horn when he spotted someone on the track and that at first, she had
stepped out of harm’s way.

‘As I approached the first short tunnel around
a bend at about 50 miles an hour, I saw a person standing near the line at the
far end. There was work taking place on the line that day so I was not alarmed,’
he said.

‘I immediately sound a double horn warning and the person
stepped back from the line. But as the train drew closer she stepped forward and
knelt down on the line facing away from me. I applied the brakes but there was
nothing I could do to avoid her.’

An Audi belonging to Mr and Mrs Davis
was found parked in a lay-by nearby. The inquest heard there was a three-page
debt management letter on the front seat referring to the unpaid tax bill.

The family firm, Chauffeurwise Ltd, had succeeded at first but had to
sell half its fleet of eight cars when trade slowed, the hearing was told.

By 2008, it was in ‘deep financial trouble’, John Wilson from the
British Transport Police said.

‘Mrs Davis received counselling and was
on anti-depressants,’ he said. ‘Mr Davies said their marriage had been
blissfully happy and he thought the financial problems had been
settled.

‘But since her death 4,000 letters have been found which had
been secreted around the house, and many contained cheques from customers which
had they been cashed would have helped the company’s situation.’

The
inquest heard the Inland Revenue had contacted Mrs Davis several times about the
outstanding debts and that even on the morning of her death, she had not shown
signs of unusual behaviour on the phone.

Her GP Dr Susie Weir said her
health had been generally good until 2006 when she gave her anti-depressants
because she was struggling to cope with working full time and caring for her
young children.

She saw her again in March 2009 and said she did not
remember her being stressed or in a low mood but that she was back on
anti-depressants at that
point.

465 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Charges for Shoplifting: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that
the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the
antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  which leads to elevated
levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant
in the human body resulting in
toxic reactions.
Keep in mind that antidepressants are notorious for producing
toxic manic reactions. Two types of mania seem apparent in this case:
Dypsomania – an overwhelming craving for alcohol & Kleptomania – compulsion
to take things that are not yours.
Paragraph eleven reads:  “He suffers from
depression and is taking medication for it and on
this day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t
account for why he did it.”


http://www.nwemail.co.uk/news/asda_shoplifter_was_in_severe_financial_straits_1_628597?referrerPath=news/

Asda shoplifter was in ‘severe financial straits’

Published at 13:10, Monday, 26 October 2009

A MAN tried
to flee a supermarket with £270-worth of goods and only enough cash for a taxi
home, a court heard.

Paul Richard Charnley stole the items from the Asda
store in Barrow.

But the 40-year-old was caught.

On Thursday,
Charnley appeared at Furness Magistrates’ Court over the theft.

Mr Andrew
Dodd, prosecuting, told the court: “He went into the store and went round
looking at various items, filling his trolley with various goods.

“Once
it is full, he goes into the cafe area where there is no CCTV coverage and is
observed placing items into carrier bags and into the top of the trolley and
then proceeds to leave without any intention of paying for any goods.”

Mr
Dodd said Charnley was followed by store staff and detained outside.

The
court heard Charnley was in “severe financial straits” and had been out of work

for 15 months.

He was said to be “hungry” and only had £5 on him that he
intended to use to pay for a taxi back to his home in Laburnum Crescent, Barrow.

Miss Karen Templeton, defending, told the court: “He says he is
absolutely ashamed of himself and he has been worried sick about coming here.

“He suffers from depression and is taking medication for it and on this
day he took medication and had a couple of beers and he can’t account for why he
did it.

“He takes this very seriously and is very remorseful about what
he has done.”

Charnley pleaded guilty to stealing items valued at £270.44
belonging to Asda on October 7.

Presiding magistrate Mr Les Johnson gave
Charnley a six-month conditional discharge.

Mr Johnson did not force
Charnley to pay a fine due to his money problems.

Published by http://www.nwemail.co.uk

631 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Stabs & Kills Wife: England

Paragraphs 18 & 19 read:  “In the witness box, Mr
Sinclair also described how he had been depressed at
various times in his life, particularly after the death of his father.”

“He told the court he had been taking medication
and was smoking up to 100 cigarettes a day.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/hampshire/8319055.stm

Page last updated at 17:40 GMT, Wednesday, 21
October 2009 18:40 UK

Phone boss ‘traded knife swipes’

Sally Sinclair was
head of business analysis at Vodafone

A man accused of murdering his
Vodafone executive wife has told a court the pair traded swipes with knives
after she admitted having an affair.

Sally Sinclair, 40, was found
with more than 30 stab wounds at their home in Amport, Hampshire, in August
2008.

At the time, she was head of business analysis at the mobile phone
firm’s world headquarters near Newbury.

Alisdair Sinclair, 48, formerly
of Georgia Lane, Amport, began giving his evidence at Winchester Crown Court.

Mr Sinclair cried several times in court, the BBC’s Steve Humphrey said.

The defendant told the court he had run at his wife of 21 years while
she finally admitted to having an affair, while they argued in the kitchen of
their rented luxury property.

[]
[]

I would give up my life for Sally but I thought I was dying
[]

Alisdair Sinclair

Mr Sinclair, a house husband, told the jury she had
got a knife from a block and stabbed him in the hands while he shielded himself.

He then got a knife himself, he said, and they traded swipes before he
was stabbed in the stomach.

Eventually, he lunged at her neck in a
panic, as he thought he was dying, and she had fallen to the floor “like a
stone”, the court heard.

“All I remember thinking is I’m dying, I’m
dying – Sally’s strong,” he said.

“If I had known what had happened I
would have more than willingly died instead – that’s for sure. I would give up
my life for Sally but I thought I was dying.”

‘100 cigarettes a
day’

He said he remembered nothing after kneeling beside her and
thinking she was dead, including inflicting a massive sawn wound to her neck.

Mr Sinclair admitted in court that he had killed his wife and had
inflicted the “horrible” injuries, but said he had never meant to do it and that
it was self defence up until the point she had fallen.

His defence
counsel Robert Fortune QC asked: “Were all the injuries self-defence or beyond
self-defence?”
The couple rented the secluded detached house in
Amport

Mr Sinclair replied: “I believe it went beyond self-defence.”

In the witness box, Mr Sinclair also described how he had been depressed
at various times in his life, particularly after the death of his father.

He told the court he had been taking medication and was smoking up to
100 cigarettes a day.

Mr Sinclair also gave the jury an insight into his
obsessive behaviour.

He said he often bought dozens of pairs of socks
and trousers and the couple also had a collection of very expensive cars.

He hardly ever drove them, he told the court.

The trial
continues.

599 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder Attempt: Architect Tries to Smother Wife: England

Last paragraph reads:  “The court heard that he had told
police officers that
he was on medication for
depression and had been drinking.”

“SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading

to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.bdonline.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=426&storycode=3151544&channel=783&c=1&encCode=0000000001a5012c #

Architect attempted to smother his wife, court told

21 October, 2009

By Anna Winston

An architect has
been accused of attempting to smother his wife after she asked for a
divorce.

Clive Wille of Croydon based practice PCL, held his wife down on
their bed at the couple’s home in south London and attempted to smother her with
a pillow, jurors at the Old Bailey were told on Monday.

The prosecution
told the jury that Wille had been calm when he came home but became angry and
threatening when his wife told him she wanted a divorce.

Wille has denied
attempted murder but accepted a charge of threats to kill.

The court
heard that he had told police officers that he was on medication for depression
and had been drinking.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide: Woman Leaps From 9th Floor: England

Paragraph three reads:  “St Pancras Coroner’s Court was
told last Thursday how she had been suffering from depression
triggered by changes to her job, which included hotdesking – moving from
one seat to another a number of times – and the responsibility of caring for her
mother following an illness in 2005.”

Paragraph seven reads:  “Mr
Jolliffe focused his questions on whether Ms Calvey should have been
monitored more closely when taking her medication

and whether a lack of continuity of nurses
aggravated the situation.”

http://www.thecnj.co.uk/camden/2009/102209/news102209_09.html

Hotdesking’ led to council worker’s suicide leap

A COUNCIL employee who worked for the Town Hall for nearly 30 years
became depressed after she was asked to “hotdesk” and later killed herself, an
inquest heard.
Geraldine Calvey, 45, died after throwing herself from the
ninth floor of a tower block in the Regent’s Park estate off Euston Road in
July.
St Pancras Coroner’s Court was told last Thursday how she had been
suffering from depression triggered by changes to her job, which included
hotdesking – moving from one seat to another a number of times – and the
responsibility of caring for her mother following an illness in 2005. The death
of Ms Calvey’s father had also added to her anxiety but she felt she was too
busy to grieve.
The inquest heard how she attempted an overdose but
survived. Ms Calvey was released from hospital within four days and referred to
the South Camden Crisis Response and Resolution team, run by the Camden and
Islington NHS FoundationTrust on behalf of the council.
Psychiatrist Leticia
Magana-niebla, the Crisis team leader, said Ms Calvey appeared to be improving
before her death.
She said: “The latest stress was this change on her job and
having to hotdesk, and that was particularly bad for her, for the reasons of her
personality – liking things just so and being methodical.”
Ms Calvey’s
family, who were represented at the hearing by barrister John Jolliffe, believe
she was not properly cared for and have lodged a complaint.
Mr Jolliffe
focused his questions on whether Ms Calvey should have been monitored more
closely when taking her medication and whether a lack of continuity of nurses
aggravated the situation.
“She was seen by no fewer than six nurses from the
Camden team and she had to explain herself again as if starting from scratch and
couldn’t build up a rapport with them,” he said.
Recording a verdict of

suicide, Dr Reid said Ms Calvey impulsively took her own life. He cleared the
Crisis team of any failings, adding: “At no time was there any evidence upon
which the team could be satisfied she was suffering mental illness that would
warrant sectioning, and she declined informal admission.”
A statement from
Camden Council read: “Geraldine was a dedicated, conscientious and popular
member of staff who had worked for the council for 29 years. She is greatly
missed by everyone who worked with her.”
[]

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Robbery: Spits on Policeman: England

Paragraph 12 reads:  “It is thought he has since been
suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder,
depression, panic attacks and some psychotic behaviour.”

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Sam Lamsdale, defending, said Hussain had
no recollection of the assault
because the alcohol had reacted with
his medication.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.berrowsjournal.co.uk/news/4698691.Jailed__councillor_s_son_who_stole_TV_and_spat_at_policeman/

Jailed: councillor’s son who stole TV and spat at policeman

8:10am Friday 23rd October 2009

By Lauren Rogers »

THE son of a Worcester councillor has been jailed for spitting at a
police officer and stealing.

Azad Hussain – whose father is former mayor
of Worcester Coun Allah
Ditta
– stole £499 of electrical goods from a woman who was renting a house
from his family.

Hussain, aged 25, claimed she owed him council tax and
said that he was seizing her belongings, including a high-definition television
and computer screen, until she paid up.

However, Worcester
Magistrates Court
was told that the claim was in fact a lie. The stolen
goods have never been recovered.

Hussain, of Richmond Road, off Wyld’s
Lane, Worcester, was found guilty of the theft at a trial he failed to attend
last month. He was also found guilty of assaulting a police officer by spitting
in his face.

The attack happened in May after Hussain was found by
police lying in a front garden.

Matt Dodson, prosecuting, said he was
intoxicated. He said: “His speech was at times incomprehensible and he was
struggling to stand. He refused to leave the area.

“He was arrested
after he lunged at a passing member of the public.”

Hussain spat in the
officer’s face while on the way to the station.

Sam Lamsdale, defending,
said Hussain had no recollection of the assault because the alcohol had reacted
with his medication.

“Mr Hussain was the victim of an attack four years
ago in which he was attacked with a hammer,” she said.

“It is thought he
has since been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, panic
attacks and some psychotic behaviour.”

She said Hussain worked as an
assistant at a residential care home and was responsible for taking his sister’s
children to and from school.

Sentencing Hussain to six months in prison,
district judge Bruce Morgan said: “Community punishments have been imposed in
the past, but obviously do not work because you carry on offending.

“You
steal, you breach court orders by failing to come to court, then there is the
despicable act of spitting at a police officer.”

l Your Worcester
News
was the only member of the media to attend the hearing


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