ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder : Man Kills Wife with Hammer: England

Paragraph 22 reads:  “Ignatius Hughes, defending, said
that in June 2008 his client was “on the brink” psychologically and had a long
history of depression for which he had been
prescribed medication.”

http://www.thisisbristol.co.uk/homepage/Bristol-mum-bludgeoned-death-lump-hammer/article-1449304-detail/article.html

Bristol mum bludgeoned to death with a lump hammer

Saturday, October 24, 2009, 07:00

A man who bludgeoned his partner
to death with a lump hammer while in the grip of psychosis has been told he may
never be released from jail.

Paul Ford, aged 51, told police he thought
he had hit mother-of-five Debra Ford “hundreds and hundreds and hundreds” of
times in the face at the home they shared in Oldland Common.

He was
jailed indefinitely at Bristol Crown Court yesterday for what a judge described
as a “truly terrible” killing, which left his victim unrecognisable.

The
court heard the couple shared the same surname because Mrs Ford, 45, had
previously been married to the defendant’s brother Geoffrey, with whom she had
two children, and had also been married to his brother Steve.

Her three
other children were by another man.

Ford initially faced a murder charge
but pleaded guilty to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished
responsibility.

Doctors later confirmed a combination of drug use,
post-accident stress disorder and depression all contributed to his psychosis at
the time.

Imposing an indefinite sentence for public protection, Mr
Justice Royce said Ford would serve a minimum of three years before he could be
considered for release. But he stressed that he considered Ford to be dangerous
and, if it was deemed appropriate by the Parole Board, he could face the rest of
his life behind bars.

Ray Tully, prosecuting, told the court the couple’s
relationship, which had started in 2007, was “volatile on both sides”.

In
the 48 hours leading up to the killing they were seen in two pubs; in one Ford
scuffled with a man and in the other Debra was seen “goading” the
defendant.

Mr Tully said Ford attacked his partner in the living room of
their home at The Clamp, Oldland Common, on the evening of September 3 last
year.

“She was battered round the head with such force her facial
features became indiscernible,” said Mr Tully.

“He walked next door,
still carrying the hammer, he spoke to a neighbour and asked her to call the
police.

“He said: ‘I hit her, I killed her, I done it so my boys will be
safe’.”

Mr Tully said Debra Ford had for a long time associated with a
large number of people who led a criminal lifestyle.

He said that, at the
time of her death, she was waiting to be sentenced for dishonesty and drug
supply, and had been a regular user of amphetamine and cannabis.

Mr Tully
said: “There is clear evidence Debra Ford could be argumentative and
manipulative.

“Her daughter said that she also suffered from bad health,
having had surgery in 2003 for an abscess to her back which made her wheelchair
bound. Thereafter she walked with calipers and used walking sticks to get about
and she was considered frail and vulnerable.”

On the day of the killing
Ford ate with his parents and brothers and told Geoffrey: “You know I’m an angry

man. I’m an angry man at the best of times.”

He was then seen to turn up
at The Clamp, and was alone with Debra when he unleashed the fatal
attack.

The court heard Ford told police: “We had a scuffle and I just
did her. I don’t know where I got it (the hammer) from. I just grabbed it from
something. I thought that there were people upstairs; I thought I was being
trapped and cornered. I’m turning into a paranoid wreck. I’ve had so much
hassle; I thought I was being trapped.”

Ignatius Hughes, defending, said
that in June 2008 his client was “on the brink” psychologically and had a long
history of depression for which he had been prescribed medication.

He
said it would be impossible to establish what degree of real threats Ford
experienced as opposed to his perceived threats because of psychosis.

Mr
Hughes said the relationship was the catalyst, which made a re-occurrence most
unlikely.

The majority of psychiatrists who examined Ford did not
conclude it would be appropriate for him to be treated in a psychiatric
institution.

Passing sentence, Mr Justice Royce told Ford: “This was a
truly terrible killing. The lives of those closest to her have been terribly
scarred in consequence.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Compulsions for Alcohol, Violence: Man Stabs Friend: England

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for

alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol

were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Woman Attacks Another Woman & Gets One Year Jail Term: England

Last two paragraphs read:  “He said: “She was on
anti-depressants at the time.
It seems the combination of those
circumstances and difficulties at the time led her to flare up in an
inappropriate, serious manner.”

” ‘There was a conversation and she
reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner’.”

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Mum-jailed-vicious-city-centre-attack/article-1331385-detail/article.html

Mum-of-three jailed after vicious city centre attack

Saturday, September 12, 2009, 07:00

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A MOTHER-OF-THREE has been jailed for a
year after attacking a woman she accused of being a prostitute.

Kerrie
Thomas, 31, of Stotfield Road, Bilborough, repeatedly punched the woman in the
face and kicked her.

The victim, who had been out with a friend on
Valentine’s Night, lost her little fingernails as she defended herself and had
scratches to her jaw and a swollen nose.

Police came to her rescue and
tracked down and arrested Thomas.

At Nottingham Crown Court, Thomas
pleaded guilty to assault causing actual bodily harm.

Judge Dudley
Bennett said she would get credit for her plea, but added: “This was a very
serious assault. It was a gratuitous assault, unprovoked, upon another woman of
a similar sort of age.

“You punched her and kicked her in the face on the
floor, and it has had a profound effect on her. The fact remains you have a
number of prior convictions for violence, house burglary, robbery and wounding
in 2001. This kind of gratuitous violence cannot be tolerated.”

The
victim, aged 36, had been with a friend at 2am on Sunday, February 15, when she
was attacked.

She was eating food in St James’s Street, Nottingham city
centre, when she saw Thomas with an elderly friend and went to check he was OK
as she thought he was vulnerable.

Thomas came over, said, “how dare you”,
and accused the woman of being a prostitute and taking advantage of the man, the
court heard.

Robbie Singh, prosecuting, said after Thomas punched the

woman in the face, she fell to the floor and curled up in a ball. She was then
kicked in the face. Afterwards, the victim had bruising to her head and could
not brush her hair or speak properly for a week.

“In April this year she
said she was nervous, her confidence has gone and she has to be met in town if
she catches a bus on her own,” said Mr Singh.

Andrew Wesley, mitigating,
said Thomas was previously in a long-term relationship that broke up against a
background of domestic violence.

He said: “She was on anti-depressants at
the time. It seems the combination of those circumstances and difficulties at
the time led her to flare up in an inappropriate, serious manner.

“There
was a conversation and she reacted in a completely inappropriate
manner.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: 20 Year Old Hangs Self – England

Paragraph 11 reads: “A doctor in Birmingham prescribed
Mr A’Court with anti-depressants on April 27,
which he had been
taking since April. He did not have a history of
mental health problems.”

http://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/4590785.Flackwell_Heath_student_hanged_himself/

Flackwell Heath student hanged himself

11:13am
Thursday 10th September 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your
say »

By Lawrence Dunhill
»

A POPULAR student from Flackwell Heath hanged himself after the
break-up with his girlfriend left him severely depressed, an inquest heard.

Alexander A’Court killed himself in the garage of his family home The
Beeches, Treadaway Road, on May 25.

Mr A’Court was a pupil at John
Hampden Grammar School
before going to the University of Birmingham to study
Geography.

More than 500 friends have joined a Facebook group dedicated
to him, which says “he was a great friend and will be missed by all.”

The identity of Mr A’Court’s ex-girlfriend was not revealed. The inquest
was shown a “suicide letter” which Mr A’Court had sent to her, but this it was
not read out.

The 20yearold had been unfaithful to the girlfriend, who
ended their relationship on March 15, coroner Richard Hulett told the inquest at
Amersham Law Courts yesterday.

His father Stephen A’Court had to cut his
son down from the roof of the garage. He told the inquest: “Alex was a long way
from his problems in Birmingham, but in this electronic age of Facebook and
mobile phones he was never able to separate himself from those problems.”
Mobile phone records show that Mr A’Court telephoned his ex-girlfriend at
1.03pm. It was estimated that he died soon after this.

The inquest heard
that Mr A’Court had seemed “positive” that morning and was planning a holiday
before sharing some “light-hearted banter” with his brother Sam at around
12.45pm.

Stephen A’Court said he became concerned about his son’s mental
health after the break-up of his relationship and encouraged him to seek medical
help.

A doctor in Birmingham prescribed Mr A’Court with anti-depressants
on April 27, which he had been taking since April. He did not have a history of
mental health problems.

Mr A’Court was referred to a senior professor on
May 14 but was diagnosed as a “low suicide risk”.

Mr Hulett told the
inquest: “The relationship became the be all and end all for Alex. He rapidly
deteriorated into depression and severe mood swings.

“It is dreadful and
tragic that a 20yearold with such obvious prospects has chosen to take his
life quite suddenly.”

He found that Mr A’Court had taken his own life.

Ashleigh Barton from London wrote on the Facebook page: “You were such a
lovely guy and so loved by all. I don’t think it will ever sink in and I’ll
never get my head around why. I just hope you’re happier now than you were when
you were still here.”

Tom Bowers, who also went to John Hampden Grammar,
wrote: “I’ll never forget the way you went out of your way to help me fit in
when I first started at Tesco, it meant so much and always will. You were always
such a laugh and brilliant at putting a smile on anyone’s face.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Woman Threatens Neighbor With Knife: England

Paragraphs 14 through 16 read:  “Charles Maidstone,
defending, said Ireson had been depressed since the death of her
partner in February, this year.”

“This is a very sad case,” he
said.

“She is on medication. She was also drinking. I
understand she finds it helps her sleep.

SSRI Stories Note:  The
Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants

can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the
alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol
and the antidepressant
in the human body.

http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/s/2056972_mum_warned_of_jail_after_knifing_threat

Mum warned of jail after knifing threat

By Anna
Roberts

September 09, 2009

An eight-year-old girl pleaded for
her mum to stop brandishing a knife at her neighbours after the woman threatened
to stab them.

Joanne Ireson wielded the kitchen knife outside her home
in Cardigan Road, East Reading, at about 8pm on Tuesday, June 16.

The
fracas took place after Ireson’s daughter snuck off to play outside on her own
and she shouted at her to come back.

But Ireson’s concerned neighbours
got “the wrong end of the stick” and called police – causing her to threaten
them with the blade.

At Reading Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, August
25, Ireson – of previously good character – admitted one count of possessing the
eight-inch knife in a public place and one of using violence and/or threatening
behaviour towards neighbour Daniel Thiemert.

Lauren Murphy,
prosecuting, explained the emergency services received three phone calls from
concerned people saying a woman was waving a knife about.

She said: “A
neighbour heard a person shouting and screaming. She stated Miss Ireson was
screaming at her children.”

Miss Murphy said at this point Ireson said:
“If you call the police I will stab you.”

She continued: “She [Ireson]
pushed the neighbour and she fell over. She went in the house and came back with

a knife. She said if she could not stab him she would stab herself.

“The
girl [her daughter] said, ‘Will you put the knife down?’

“Another
neighbour [Mr Thiemert] also said he heard shouting. He said he saw a glass
object being thrown at the young girl.

“He [Mr Thiemert] said, ‘I am
going to call the police’. She said, ‘Who the f*** are you?’”

At this
point Ireson punched Mr Thiemert and threw a cigarette lighter at him.

Charles Maidstone, defending, said Ireson had been depressed since the
death of her partner in February, this year.

“This is a very sad case,”
he said.

“She is on medication. She was also drinking. I understand she
finds it helps her sleep.

“This incident arose from a problem with
disciplining the children.”

He suggested neighbours had got “the wrong
end of the stick” and added Ireson was a caring mum.

Ireson, 36, was
released on unconditional bail to reappear at Reading Magistrates’ Court on
Tuesday, September 15.

District Judge Peter Crabtree said: “I take into
account what has been said about your difficult circum-stances and also that you
are a person of good character and pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity.

“Nevertheless, taking a kitchen knife out into the street is a very
serious offence.”

He said she ran the risk of a jail
term.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Agitated Man Runs Around with an Ax: England

Paragraphs three through seven read:  “A previous
hearing, the court heard that police were called to the Bonds Street area to
investigate
reports of a man ‘running round with an
axe in an agitated state.”

“The 40-year-old went into his
brother’s house and family members were able to remove the top of the axe and
give it to police.”

“Millar was arrested and during interview said he
had very little recollection of the incident. He told police the axe was
his and that he owned it for work purposes.”

“During sentencing at the
City’s Magistrate’s Court, defence solicitor Maeliosa Barr said Millar was a
“very vulnerable man” and suffered from

depression.”

“ ‘He realised that by not taking
his medication
he got himself into the difficulty he now
faces’.”

SSRI Stories note:  The Physicians Desk Reference lists
amnesia as a Frequent side-effect of Prozac and other
antidepressants.

http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/Waterside-man-ran-aroundwith.5627956.jp

Thursday, 10th September 2009

Waterside man ran around with axe

Published Date:
09 September 2009
By Staff reporter

A MAN who admitted running
around the Waterside with an axe has been given a three month jail term
suspended for three years.

Gary Keith Millar, 40, pleaded guilty to
possessing an offensive weapon on July 19, 2009.

A previous hearing, the
court heard that police were called to the Bonds Street area to investigate
reports of a man ‘running round with an axe in an agitated state.

The
40-year-old went into his brother’s house and family members were able to remove
the top of the axe and give it to police.

Millar was arrested and during
interview said he had very little recollection of the incident. He told police
the axe was his and that he owned it for work purposes.

During sentencing
at the City’s Magistrate’s Court, defence solicitor Maeliosa Barr said Millar
was a “very vulnerable man” and suffered from depression.

“He realised
that by not taking his medication he got himself into the difficulty he now
faces.”

Handing down the suspended jail term and ordering the destruction
of the axe, Deputy District Judge Bernie Kelly said: “This is a very serious
offence. The arming of oneself with a weapon has to be taken very
seriously.”

Taking into account the fact that Millar had spent six weeks
in custody on remand, the judge said she hopes this “marks a turning point in
any further offending.”

The full article contains 239 words and
appears in Londonderry Sentinel newspaper.
Page 1 of
1

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PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

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A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

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DEPRESSION MED: Rage: Elderly Man Beats & Bites his Doctor: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

I ask you to think of the biting attack by the chimpanzee
as you read this case. Alsothink of the case mentioned in my book of the Sanford
Professor who bit her mother to death while on Prozac. Biting is known to
be produced by high serotonin levels.
One other thing to take note of is the fact that it took three
doctors to hold this elderly man down during the attack. There is another drug
that produces that type of super human strength – PCP, the drug I constantly
remind the world that SSRIs most closely mimic in action.
_________________________________
Paragraphs six through nine read:  “The appeal court
heard Moya suffered from a number of medical conditions, including
anxiety, depression and a personality
disorder.”

After his fit of rage in October 2008, it took three
doctors to hold Moya down,
before police arrived to arrest
him.

Mr Justice Davis, giving his judgement on the appeal, said Moya
claimed not to have taken his medication at the time of the
attack and claimed this had contributed to his loss of control.

But the
judge concluded: “This was a serious matter involving quite a lengthy assault on one doctor and an assault on another

doctor.

http://www.thisissussex.co.uk/crawley/news/Elderlyman-bit-doctor-stay-jail/article-1378968-detail/article.html

Elderly man who bit doctor must stay in jail

Thursday, October 01, 2009, 07:00

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A PENSIONER who bit his doctor and punched
him in the face in front of “scared” patients will have to serve a year behind
bars.

Gabriel Moya, 69, flew into a rage at a receptionist at Gossops
Green Surgery, when she handed him a prescription he thought was
incomplete.

Moya, who has had heart surgery in the past, was told to calm
down by a doctor but lashed out, punching him twice in the face and biting him
on the arm as he was pinned to the floor.

The pensioner, of Woldhurstlea
Close, Gossops Green, was jailed after admitting an assault charge at a court
hearing earlier this year, but he appealed his sentence.

However, the
Court of Appeal has now ruled that Moya must serve his 12-month jail
term.

The appeal court heard Moya suffered from a number of medical
conditions, including anxiety, depression and a personality
disorder.

After his fit of rage in October 2008, it took three doctors to
hold Moya down, before police arrived to arrest him.

Mr Justice Davis,
giving his judgement on the appeal, said Moya claimed not to have taken his

medication at the time of the attack and claimed this had contributed to his
loss of control.

But the judge concluded: “This was a serious matter
involving quite a lengthy assault on one doctor and an assault on another
doctor.

“The first doctor was bitten as well as punched. Those in the
waiting room were scared.

“Doctors and medical staff need to be protected
from unwarranted attacks of this kind.

“We are not persuaded that it can
be said that this sentence was excessive.”

Moya pleaded guilty to assault
occasioning actual bodily harm and common assault at Lewes Crown Court in April,
where he was handed a 12-month jail term.

The appeal hearing took place
on Monday.

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PROZAC: Bizarre Behavior: Member of Parliament: England

Paragraph eight reads:  “Even before the scandal broke,
when he was the frontbench home affairs spokesman, he was regularly taking
antidepressants.
He thinks at least a fifth of MPs have mental problems,
although he says:  ‘Round here it is a taboo subject. Very few will admit
to not coping with the stress. You can’t be vulnerable or weak if you are
waiting for the next promotion’.”

Paragraph 22 reads:  “When the
news broke he fled over the garden wall and drove to Cornwall while Belinda took
the children to Austria skiing. Depression soon took hold.  ‘I was just
drowning. I was totally out of control in my mind. There was no immediate sense
of perspective for months. Each day was about survival with sleeping tablets
and Prozac‘.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article6840288.ece

From The Times
September 19, 2009

Mark Oaten: my dark days should serve as a warning to other
politicians

Rachel Sylvester and Alice Thomson

Mark
Oaten is sitting in his eyrie in Westminster, wearing a blue and white striped
shirt, sipping from a carton of Ribena and ruminating on the mental health of
MPs.

Three years ago this clean-cut Home Counties Liberal Democrat
pin-up was exposed by the News of the World for making regular visits to
rent boys. Overnight he saw his leadership ambitions destroyed and his marriage
almost disintegrate. Now he has written a book, Screwing Up, describing
the emotional pressures and psychological flaws that lead politicians to
self-destruct.

As we talk for more than an hour he is frank about his
battle with depression, his midlife crisis, the sex abuse that he suffered as a
child and the craving for love that he thinks drives people into politics. Since
his exposure, he has been amazed, he says, by how many of his parliamentary
colleagues have opened up about their own problems.

“So many have had
similar experiences in terms of feeling very depressed and struggling with their
marriages. You get any group of MPs together now and they will talk about how
down they get. It’s worse than other professions. One of the reasons for writing
the book was to explain the pressures on MPs.”

From the moment Mr Oaten
won his Winchester seat by two votes in 1997, he was marked out as a rising
star. But he quickly became overwhelmed by the demands on his time.

“I
never stopped getting into a dinner jacket, going to annual dinners, being on
Newsnight, attending Remembrance services. It was relentless,” he says.
“It has a huge impact on you as a human being. I felt that everyone owned me. I
got worn out and grumpy. I was living on adrenalin, fire-fighting the whole
time. I had the constituency and Westminster. The family was always left to
last. I had endless rows with my wife, Belinda.”

For almost a decade, he
found it impossible to stop. “I felt I was on an escalator. The ego element came
into it. I couldn’t say no. It is almost an addiction, a drug. It was as if I
injected myself with an adrenalin burst to get through an hour-long episode of
Question Time and then I would pay the price afterwards with stomach
aches and other pains. I was always ill.”

Even before the scandal broke,
when he was the frontbench home affairs spokesman, he was regularly taking
antidepressants. He thinks at least a fifth of MPs have mental problems,
although he says: “Round here it is a taboo subject. Very few will admit to not
coping with the stress. You can’t be vulnerable or weak if you are waiting for
the next promotion.”

There is, he says, “something in the DNA of
politicians which makes them vulnerable to mood swings and being depressed. They
are likely to be obsessive, risk-taking and slightly depressive”.

His
explanation is that certain character flaws make people want to stand for
Parliament. “My risk-taking makes me a good politician and a bad one. But the
risk element is only one side. It is even more common for MPs to need to be
loved. Ego and needing to be liked are dangerous traits.”

Many MPs are,
he believes, damaged souls. “You seek your parents’ approval, then your
family’s, then the party’s and then the voters’. I see politicians in their
early thirties doing exactly what I was doing ­ running around the
television studios, checking their BlackBerries, taking every opportunity. I
want to say, ‘Calm down, go home to your family’. I wish someone had said that
to me.”

The pressure is, in his view, made worse by the difficulty in
making real friendships at Westminster. “There is a bonding between MPs, but it
can’t be genuine ­ you are always ultimately competing. You are rivals.” He
hopes that his memoirs will serve as a warning to other politicians. “I would
like them to learn from someone who screwed it up and got it wrong.”

Mr
Oaten’s downfall was spectacular. When he saw two journalists outside his front
door one morning in January 2006 he had no idea that they had discovered his
liaisons with male prostitutes. After speaking to them he had to go inside and
tell his wife everything while their two young daughters carried on having
breakfast in the next room. Even now he cannot quite explain it to himself, let
alone to her.

“Everyone is desperate for an easy answer about why I went
to an escort. I had doubts about my sexuality, I wanted to experiment, I was
stressed out, feeling low about getting older. The press kept talking about the
fact I was losing my hair. I was feeling out of love with myself.”

The
rent boy was 23. “I wanted to recapture my youth and be near a young person
­ it was important that he was younger. I had a belly appearing and bags
under my eyes. I wanted to experiment with younger people. It is not uncommon
for 40-year-olds to want to experiment sexually.”

He found the number at
the back of a magazine. “It was very late at night when I went to his flat,
there was an element of risk-taking. I knew it was dangerous, there was an
adrenalin element.”

Over the next six months he visited regularly. The

News of the World said that he enjoyed three-in-a-bed “romps” and
“humiliation”. “We never actually had intercourse. We talked, had a conversation
about where he lived, but I was only there for about half an hour each time. We
didn’t watch TV or relax together. He had a flatmate ­ that was the other
one. He didn’t become a friend. I don’t even know his real name.”

There
were lurid allegations made, which he says are untrue. “There were the most
graphic descriptions on websites about what had happened, which were wrong but I
couldn’t sue. It would drag everything up.” It was almost a relief to him when
the story came out. “I could get counselling, talk to Belinda and try to feel
more comfortable about who I am.”

His wife is a farmer’s daughter from
Hampshire who was stunned by his revelation but eventually agreed to stay with
him. “She knows that I am not some six-foot-four rugby-playing macho guy. I am
comfortable being around gay friends ­ this wasn’t some very heterosexual
guy who went off and did this.”

He had never had any gay experiences in
his teenage years but he reveals in the book that he was sexually abused as a
child. “It was a two-year period when I was 9 and 10. It was clearly
inappropriate and involved me sexually massaging a considerably older man. It
felt perfectly normal; it is so obviously not.”

Psychotherapy has taught
him that people often subconsciously try to re-create their first sexual
experience. “The theory is that if it was shameful and guilty you will try to
re-create that but I’m reluctant to say this explains [what I did] because I
don’t think it’s the whole reason.”

When the news broke he fled over the
garden wall and drove to Cornwall while Belinda took the children to Austria
skiing. Depression soon took hold. “I was just drowning. I was totally out of
control in my mind. There was no immediate sense of perspective for months. Each
day was about survival with sleeping tablets and Prozac.”

After three
years of counselling, his marriage is still together but he says that it has
changed. “We are best friends but there is no doubt in my mind that the marriage
is not how it was. It’s just a different relationship and it always will be.

“What’s happened has changed us fundamentally. There are trust issues.
We’re not the innocent couple that got married in 1992.”

He doesn’t know
whether his gay experimentation was a phase. “It’s part of me. I’m not one thing
or the other on the spectrum. [Belinda and I] haven’t made promises or pledges
to each other. We’re very realistic about how we are doing as a couple.”

So might he do it again?

“I’ve been very blunt with her in terms
of my feelings. I’m comfortable with where I am, with the kids and my home life
but I’m not going to start making some great renewal of marriage vows. It
doesn’t feel right for where we are at the moment.”

At Westminster, and
in the constituency, people were broadly supportive. “They said, ‘You’ve been an
idiot but you’re still a good MP’.”

During the expenses row, MPs sought
him out and asked him how to deal with public vilification.

“A lot of
colleagues came up to me and said, ‘Now we know what you went through’. I gave
them some cuddles and I gave them some tears. There were some very upset people.
I think some were [suicidal]. Politicians have been banned from complaining
about this but I’m happy to say that whatever the wrongs and rights of the
situation there were some MPs who were pushed close to the limit in what they
could take emotionally. It’s the toughest ever time to be an MP.”

He is
leaving the Commons at the next election but has one piece of advice for his old
friend Nick Clegg at the start of the Liberal Democrat conference this weekend.
If there is a hung Parliament, he should not allow the Liberal Democrats to prop
up Gordon Brown.

“What I would say to Nick is that you have to recognise
that some in the Conservative Party might represent the forces of progressive
politics. When I look back on issues to do with ID cards, control orders, terror
suspects ­ our liberal allies were the Conservatives.”

Mr Oaten is
looking for a new career. He has just finished filming a TV documentary about
living in a tower block for Channel 4. Now he is looking for company
directorships and charity jobs. “I said no to going into the jungle for I’m a
Celebrity
… and to taking part in Celebrity Wife Swap because I was
nervous but not because I thought they were beneath me. I don’t think people
should be snotty about things like that because it’s a piece of fun. I look at
Neil and Christine Hamilton and I think, ‘Good for them’. They found themselves in this situation and they coped and got in with it and did their thing.”

Screwing Up by Mark Oaten is published by Biteback, Sept 25;
£18.99

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: VIOLENCE: MAN STABS FRIEND: ENGLAND

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol
were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

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