ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: AGITATED MAN RUNS AROUND WITH AN AX: ENGLAND

Paragraphs three through seven read:  “A previous
hearing, the court heard that police were called to the Bonds Street area to
investigate
reports of a man ‘running round with an
axe in an agitated state.”

“The 40-year-old went into his
brother’s house and family members were able to remove the top of the axe and
give it to police.”

“Millar was arrested and during interview said he
had very little recollection of the incident. He told police the axe was
his and that he owned it for work purposes.”

“During sentencing at the
City’s Magistrate’s Court, defence solicitor Maeliosa Barr said Millar was a
“very vulnerable man” and suffered from

depression.”

“ ‘He realised that by not taking
his medication
he got himself into the difficulty he now
faces’.”

SSRI Stories note:  The Physicians Desk Reference lists
amnesia as a Frequent side-effect of Prozac and other
antidepressants.

http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/Waterside-man-ran-aroundwith.5627956.jp

Thursday, 10th September 2009

Waterside man ran around with axe

Published Date:
09 September 2009
By Staff reporter

A MAN who admitted running
around the Waterside with an axe has been given a three month jail term
suspended for three years.

Gary Keith Millar, 40, pleaded guilty to
possessing an offensive weapon on July 19, 2009.

A previous hearing, the
court heard that police were called to the Bonds Street area to investigate
reports of a man ‘running round with an axe in an agitated state.

The
40-year-old went into his brother’s house and family members were able to remove
the top of the axe and give it to police.

Millar was arrested and during
interview said he had very little recollection of the incident. He told police
the axe was his and that he owned it for work purposes.

During sentencing
at the City’s Magistrate’s Court, defence solicitor Maeliosa Barr said Millar
was a “very vulnerable man” and suffered from depression.

“He realised
that by not taking his medication he got himself into the difficulty he now
faces.”

Handing down the suspended jail term and ordering the destruction
of the axe, Deputy District Judge Bernie Kelly said: “This is a very serious
offence. The arming of oneself with a weapon has to be taken very
seriously.”

Taking into account the fact that Millar had spent six weeks
in custody on remand, the judge said she hopes this “marks a turning point in
any further offending.”

The full article contains 239 words and
appears in Londonderry Sentinel newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

  • Last Updated: 08 September 2009 1:49 PM
  • Source: Londonderry Sentinel
  • Location: Waterside

722 total views, 1 views today

PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

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A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

445 total views, 1 views today

AMITRIPTYLINE: Murder: Mother Kills Baby: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Keep in mind that the tricyclic antidepressants, like Amitriptyline, (the cause
of this child’s death) Imipramine, etc. have been given to small children for
decades now for bed wetting!

These tricyclic antidepressants have an almost identical
effect in increasing serotonin levels. When you interfere with the metabolism of
serotonin you increase the level of serotonin because it then begins to back up
causing serotonin levels to rise. (See the chapter “Serotonin Doubletalk” in the
book “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” to learn the
amazing deception behind the serotonin reuptake theory.
)
In fact Amitriptyline interferes with the
metabolism of serotonin at anywhere from 21% – 37% depending on the study
you refer to. In comparison one of the newest and most powerful SSRI
antidepressants, Celexa, interferes with serotonin metabolism at the
rate of 29%. They are very similar in this respect.
When serotonin metabolism is interfered with, thus producing
increases in serotonin levels, many adverse reactions can occur. As you keep in
mind that the main function of serotonin is constriction of smooth muscle
tissue, such as the bronchial tubes, all the major organs of the body, you can
quickly understand why this little child could no longer breathe. High levels of
Amitriptyline would have interfered with the metabolism of serotonin to the
extent as to shut the lungs down due to the high levels of serotonin
backing up in his system. The condition is known medically as Serotonin
Syndrome. And as you see from this case, Serotonin Syndrome can be
fatal.
Paragraph two reads:  “Laura-Jane Vestuto, 28, crushed
anti-depressant
pills prescribed to her

and
fed them to toddler Renzo.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/crime/article6825876.ece

From Times Online
September 8, 2009

Mother jailed for killing baby with antidepressants

Times Online

A mother was jailed for six years today
for killing her 20-month-old son by doping him to make him sleep.

Laura-Jane Vestuto, 28, crushed anti-depressant pills prescribed to her
and fed them to toddler Renzo.

She had been giving the medication to
Renzo for weeks before he developed breathing problems and died after being
taken to hospital in September 2007.

Tests showed the drug had built up
in his body and he had ten times the safe adult dose in his system, the Old
Bailey heard.

Traces of Amitriptyline were found on baby medicine
feeders but police believe he may have also been given the drug in his juice or
milk.

Judge Peter Thornton told Vestuto she had given Renzo sedatives to
make life easier for herself.

He said: “Instead of bearing the everyday
responsibility of being a parent, caring and loving for your son, you embarked
on a deliberate course of administering adult drugs, knowing that was wrong and
risky.

“You gave him drugs for purely selfish, self-centred reasons,
thinking only of yourself.”

The judge said Vestuto had been prescribed
the drug seven times in the months leading up to the boy’s death, but was not
taking it herself when Renzo died.

Traces of other drugs, including
painkillers, were also found in his system.

Judge Thornton added: “You
repeatedly administered these drugs, calmly and deliberately, knowing it was
wrong and not the way to care for children.”

He said Vestuto had shown
little emotion when her son died after being taken to hospital.

She had
compounded the suffering of her mother and former husband by denying given Renzo
the medication – and trying to throw the blame on them.

Sarah
Whitehouse, prosecuting, said Vestuto had been prescribed the drug for backache
and to make her sleep.

She told a neighbour that Renzo had been given
medicine by her GP to make him sleep while he was teething – but the doctor said
he was never consulted about teething problems.

Miss Whitehouse said it
was not possible to say how long Vestuto had been giving the drug to the boy.

Isabella Forshall, defending, said Vestuto had not intended to harm the
boy.

Miss Forshall said: “She meant it to help Renzo. There were a
number of small doses which suddenly overwhelmed poor Renzo.

“All she
wanted to be was a mum and housewife. Renzo was well-nourished and looked after.

“Like any parent, she was distressed when he was teething and miserable,
and that is why she took the step she did – a desperately reckless one.”

Vestuto, of Clapton, east London, pleaded guilty in July to causing or
allowing Renzo’s death.

An alternative charge of manslaughter was left
to lie on file after she pleaded not guilty.

732 total views, 3 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Businessman Shoots Self Weeks Before Wedding: England

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): PLEASE notice all of the strong warnings of serious reactions to antidepressants noted in this one short paragraph and keep in mind the FDA warning that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. Starting or stopping an antidepressant are two of the most dangerous periods of use of one of these drugs. Obviously once again this man or anyone close to this man had been given that warning.
Paragraph 13 reads:  “In the weeks leading up to his death, he wouldn’t eat properly or get out of bed, and was ignoring his Blackberry as every call seemed to bring more bad news from creditors. When my dad asked him at a family lunch if he had paid for the wedding cars, he hadn’t. He couldn’t afford to even put them on a credit card. I knew then that there was a real problem but he refused to discuss it with me. He told me that he’d been prescribed a course of antidepressants, and I suggested he see a counsellor, but he was dismissive.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-1207612/Abigail-King-describes-dealt-fianc-taking-life.html

My fiancé committed suicide weeks before our wedding after credit crunch caused collapse of his firm

By Abigail King

Last updated at 8:37 PM on 22nd August 2009

Abigail King was making final preparations for her wedding
when her fiancé Mark went missing. Although she was aware that his property business was failing in the credit crunch, she had no idea of the extent of his desperation

‘It was starting my own company that saved my life,’ says Abigail King

On a sunny morning in April 2008 I got up early. My fiancé Mark Sebire and I were getting married in five weeks’ time and I wanted to sort out the final arrangements for our wedding. I dressed up to go for a girls’ lunch and when I came downstairs, Mark hugged me and told me he loved me. As I left the house he was watching GMTV on the sofa, eating cereal.

That was the last time I saw him alive. The next day I had to identify his body at the mortuary.

To the outside world, Mark had everything to live for. He was a handsome 36-year-old property developer, popular with his friends. We were deeply in love, about to get married and shared a £1.7 million London house that Mark had bought for us to renovate.

But behind the scenes I knew that he was depressed. His business was collapsing. He had a huge portfolio of London properties once worth millions on paper but, with the credit crunch looming, he was unable to sell them. He was mortgaged to the hilt and facing financial ruin. I kept telling him that, as long as we were together, we would survive. But I didn’t realise how desperate he was not to lose what he’d built up. He put extraordinary pressure on himself to create an amazing life for us, and I believe it was that pressure that killed him.

Immediately after I left the house that April morning, Mark took a taxi to an isolated spot
and shot himself. In a letter he left for the coroner, he wrote: ‘I took my own life due to extreme financial pressure, and my poor fiancée would have been liable for my debts if we had got married. It is no one’s fault but my own.’

Mark Sebire with his beloved cocker spaniel Iggy

He could see his world falling apart and couldn’t cope with starting again. His pride wouldn’t let him admit that he was in trouble, and he didn’t know how to reach out for help.

Mark and I had met on a blind date in 2005, and from the beginning our relationship just seemed to make sense. My parents had separated when I was eight, then, when I was 14, my mother died of leukaemia at only 42; a year later my older sister Louise had a horrific car crash at 19, suffering brain injuries from which she has struggled to recover. I had always had a fear of abandonment – a fear that the people I loved were not going to stick around. Mark seemed so strong and, instinctively, I felt protected. After six months, I sold my flat and we moved into his house in Wandsworth together.

Mark had high expectations of our life together. He wanted us to be living in the country in a big house, and had the future all mapped out. He talked me into leaving my job as a letting agent as he saw it as his obligation to take care of me. He loved me running the home, and I focused on becoming the perfect housewife.

He proposed in March 2007 and we spent the months after our engagement staying on friends’ sofas while we renovated Mark’s house. It was still unfinished when we moved back in the middle of winter. We were living in one room and there was no heating or electricity. I thought, if we can get through this, we can get through anything. But at the start of the new year the fight seemed to go out of him. When Iggy, our beloved cocker spaniel, died in January, Mark was inconsolable. From that day it was as though the man I loved had disappeared. Instead of being focused, driven and full of ideas for the future, he seemed secretive and distant, and looked haunted.

In the weeks leading up to his death, he wouldn’t eat properly or get out of bed, and was ignoring his Blackberry as every call seemed to bring more bad news from creditors. When my dad asked him at a family lunch if he had paid for the wedding cars, he hadn’t. He couldn’t afford to even put them on a credit card. I knew then that there was a real problem but he refused to discuss it with me. He told me that he’d been prescribed a course of antidepressants, and I suggested he see a counsellor, but he was dismissive.

Mark put extraordinary pressure on himself to create an amazing life for us, and it was that pressure that killed him

For months we had been planning to start a family. Suddenly in February he said that we should stop trying. When I asked him why, he just kept repeating, ‘It’s not a good time’. He had stopped going into the office, and after his death I discovered his work diary. At the beginning of the year it was packed with appointments but as the weeks went on, it became almost empty. One unbearably sad entry on his to-do list just read: go for a walk. It seemed so lonely.

A week before he died, I had the final fitting for my wedding dress. Mark knew I had been exercising and dieting and was really nervous that I wouldn’t get into it, but he showed no interest. I found out later that while I was having the fitting, he was registering me as his next of kin.

Even though the day he died started normally enough, that morning I had a sense of unease. But I didn’t start panicking until I realised his mobile was switched off – that was so unlike him. Unable to get hold of him, I rang all his friends but no one had heard from him. Then he failed to turn up at an afternoon meeting. His best friend Giles came over and we rang everyone who knew him. Finally, in the evening, I rang the police, but they told me they couldn’t file a report until he had been missing for 12 hours.

Abigail and Mark on holiday together in Portugal and the Maldives in 2007

When two uniformed policemen knocked on the door at 1am, I just felt a sense of relief that they had come to register him as missing. Then I saw his business partner Justin standing behind them. He was ashen. They told me that the body of a man had been found at Bisley shooting range in Surrey with a driving licence registered to Mark.

It was completely disorientating. The room where we had been laughing together just hours earlier was now a dark place where people were clinging to each other.

As the news spread, friends and family started arriving at the house. My stepmother Rosemary drove down from Gloucestershire. I remember at about 4am someone telling me to go upstairs and rest, but lying on our bed was unbearable. Everything was as Mark had left it the previous morning and the sheets still smelt of him. The police also told me that he had registered me as his next of kin, which meant that I would have to identify him.

The following day, in a state of shock, I drove 50 miles to see Mark’s mother and then another 50 to his father (they are divorced), to tell them that their son was dead. Then I went to identify his body. When I got to the police station, I was taken to a small waiting room. Two officers came in and took some papers out of a brown envelope. They were the suicide notes Mark had left. When they were put in front of me, I knew he had really gone.

He could see his world falling apart and couldn’t cope with starting again

He turned out to have made careful plans. In the week before his suicide he arranged to meet friends he hadn’t seen for months, as if saying goodbye to them, and some of the letters were dated as much as three weeks earlier. In one addressed to me, he wrote simply: ‘My darling Aby. What can I tell you that you don’t know already? I’m sorry. M.’

It appears that he wrote all the other notes first and left mine until last. It was almost as though he had written it so many times in his head that he couldn’t write it on the page, and it ended up being just one sentence.

Mark was buried in a country churchyard in Surrey, close to both his parents’ homes. On the morning of the funeral I drove out to Bisley shooting range. I felt I had to see the exact spot where he died. The instructors at the range showed me where his body had been found. I sat on the grassy verge in the spring sunshine and laid some roses on the spot. Then I drove to the funeral parlour and put Iggy’s ashes at his feet and a rose on his chest. He was being buried with love from me. That gave me huge comfort.

At the funeral there was a sense of bewilderment that someone so young should have died in this way. His family were on one side of the church and mine were on the other – just like at a wedding.

Our wedding day had been planned for 17 May. I had a gospel choir booked for the church in Gloucestershire, and 300 guests invited to a reception at a country house hotel with four live bands. My wedding dress alone cost £10,000. It was ridiculously grandiose, and incredibly expensive to cancel. My dad and stepmother stepped in and made all the calls. I now see how ludicrous it all was. I remember suggesting to Mark that we should do a low-key wedding, but he wanted the big affair. He was so proud of me.

At a fitting for her Vera Wang wedding dress and the invitation

On what would have been our wedding day, my stepmother Rosemary took me to Cyprus. She is like a second mother to me, and married my dad in 1997. At the time when we would have been saying our vows, I sat on the beach and looked up at the sky, visualising every moment. It was as if I could see it actually happening in a parallel universe.

Suicide is like a bomb exploding, because the person who dies leaves injured people all around them, suffering incredible pain and grief. You naturally look for someone to blame. Mentally I accused everyone – creditors, Mark’s friends, even my own family – for not supporting us both more. Then I blamed myself. I was tortured about why I hadn’t seen that he was in such a state of emotional crisis. But why hadn’t he told me how desperate he felt? I still can’t forgive him for not having faith in us. I was sure we could have made it through together.

His mother blamed me for not looking after him. Four months after the funeral she wrote me a letter in which she said she held me responsible for his death. I don’t judge her; she was in terrible pain. She said she did not want me around the family. We have not been in contact since.

My best friend, whom I have known for 25 years, also withdrew from me. Her brother
had invested heavily in Mark’s business and was hit hard when it collapsed. Even my own family have found his suicide difficult to deal with: today, Mark’s name is barely mentioned.

People are guilt-ridden over what they could have done to stop it, and no one likes to dwell on such negative emotion too long, so they push it away as quickly as possible. Only a handful of close girlfriends helped me through – ringing me when I was too unhappy to get out of bed, forcing me to go out for supper with them, convincing me that I wasn’t a bad person, that this was just a bad thing that had happened to me.

In the end it was starting my own company that saved my life. I had to move out of our home seven weeks after Mark died because his family wanted it back to sell it, so I moved into a rented studio flat in Fulham. The joint bank account was empty, and he left me with hefty debts that I am still trying to resolve.

But I was well trained by Mark to be a wife – organising builders, events and running a home – so why not be a wife for hire? I sold my engagement ring. It was a constant reminder of what had happened – and it was also the only valuable thing I owned. I bought a second-hand Volkswagen Polo with some of the money, and put the rest into a business called My Domestic Goddess – providing a home service that organises people’s lives while they are at work. I collected children from school, picked up parking permits, walked dogs.

Hard work got me on my feet again, and helped me through the rest of the year. As I gradually regained my emotional strength, it occurred to me that Mark wouldn’t have recognised me as the woman he had wanted to protect and provide for – but doing this for myself was an essential part of the grieving process, of helping me deal with the gap he had left.

Everything was as Mark had left it that morning and the sheets still smelt of him

At the beginning of this year, I started to see a Cruse bereavement therapist, to whom I am able to tell the dark thoughts that you can’t reveal to people you love because they would worry so much about you. And one of my first instincts was to get another dog. My new cocker spaniel Lily has brought joy back into my life. I know Mark would have adored her. When it’s a sunny day and I’m walking Lily in the park, I think, yes, I do forgive him. But, ultimately, there is no forgiveness because there is no real closure.

Today I have a new boyfriend, Tim. He’s 43 and is an incredible support, but it’s early days. I’m only 32 so maybe one day I will get married, but I am a very different person now to how I have been in previous relationships. I’m stronger, and I’m also more humble. The old Abigail was self-centred and ungrateful. I see her as a spoilt brat and I don’t recognise her now.

Now, just over a year on, I sometimes see in my mind’s eye how my life might have been – Mark and I walking hand in hand in the countryside with dogs running alongside us. Then I drive back alone to my small flat. It’s pointless to wallow in dreams – I have to look towards the future. I don’t know what it holds, and I like it that way. I have no expectations. Expectations are what killed Mark.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 77 Year Old Man Commits Suicide: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy: Another example of just how truly amazing these antidepressants are! In growing up I do not recall ever hearing of someone this age committing suicide, much less a more violent suicide as we see with SSRI antidepressants! Now we not only have suicides and violent ones, but we have horribly violent murder/suicides in this age group! It is all so very sickening!!
Second paragraph reads:  “Bernard Jeenes, 77, was found dead in his kitchen, in Cayman Close, Popley, Basingstoke, on June 7, after taking an overdose of anti-depressants and hanging himself.”

http://www.basingstokegazette.co.uk/news/4558306.Suicidal_man__let_down__by_system/

Suicidal man ‘let down’ by system

12:30pm Friday 21st August 2009

#show Comments (0) Have your say »

A GRIEVING son said his father should have been cared for at a Basingstoke psychiatric hospital to stop him from killing himself.

Bernard Jeenes, 77, was found dead in his kitchen, in Cayman Close, Popley, Basingstoke, on June 7, after taking an overdose of anti-depressants and hanging himself.

His son Mark, who found his body, told an inquest into his death that his father had begged to be admitted to the mental health unit at Parklands Hospital after a suicide attempt the week before he died.

Now he is calling for changes. Mr Jeenes, a 33-year-old decorator from Barbel Avenue, in Riverdene, told the inquest at Alton magistrates court: “I feel like my father has been let down and if he got the help he wanted he would still be here today.”

He said a week before he died, his father was admitted to Basingstoke hospital after taking an overdose of anti-depressants. He then asked to be transferred to neighbouring Parklands psychiatric hospital.

He told the coroner: “That should have got alarm bells ringing, but the doctor just said he would be better off at home. My father said he wanted to kill himself.”

He said his father had emerged “a new man” after a spell at Parklands in 2002.

However, the dead man’s psychiatric nurse, Chris Dale, told the inquest Mr Jeenes had been referred by a GP after he had phoned Parklands directly.

He said: “I saw him several times before his death and he didn’t tell me about wanting to go to Parklands. He mentioned he had some suicidal thoughts but that he had no plan or intent to take his life. He told me he wanted to avoid Parklands, and do things on his own.

“The last time I saw him, he was more positive.”

Recording a verdict of suicide, North East Hampshire coroner, Andrew Bradley, said: “Clearly what Mr Jeenes was sharing with his son was different from what he was sharing with Chris Dale.

“The concerns were there, the bells were ringing but the assessment pushed him out the Basingstoke hospital door.”

After the inquest, a spokesman for Hampshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, which runs Parklands Hospital, said staff who knew him had been deeply saddened by the death of Mr Jeenes.

An initial review into the circumstances had concluded that the right clinical decisions were made.

The spokesman added: “A further more detailed review is being carried out. It is important to note that the coroner, in full possession of all the facts, did not make any recommendations for the trust to implement.”

He said if a clinician wanted a patient admitted, a bed would be found.

Mr Jeenes’ story has come to light just weeks after The Gazette reported the inquest of Terry Thomas, aged 54, of Kenilworth Road, Winklebury, who died after jumping from a bridge on Ringway West A340 on April 1.

His widow Jane told an inquest he had been turned away from Parklands Hospital the day before his death, despite a failed suicide attempt.

Following that story, Gazette reader Hailey Newton Roast, aged 35, of Kings Furlong Centre, off Wessex Close, Basingstoke, contacted the newsdesk to speak of her experience.

She said: “I have manic depression and have tried to commit suicide a few times. Each time I was told I didn’t meet the criteria to be admitted to Parklands.

“The mental health services here are terrible and I’ve written several times to complain.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Police Stop Man From Committing Suicide: England

Paragraphs two and three read: “The attorney for Coram resident Brandon Hampson says he plans to argue that his client became violent and beat Lisa Essling on Aug. 25, 2006, because he stopped taking the popular antidepressant Zoloft days before the attack.”

“Nassau County District Court Judge Rhonda Fischer said Friday that she will allow a defense witness to testify that withdrawl from the antidepressant can cause a person to become aggressive.”

http://www.newsday.com/ny-judge-to-allow-zoloft-defense-in-assault-case-1.1388026

NY judge to allow “Zoloft defense” in assault case

August 22, 2009 By The Associated Press

HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) A Long Island judge has said she will allow a man accused of punching and kicking his former girlfriend to use the so-called “Zoloft defense.”

The attorney for Coram resident Brandon Hampson says he plans to argue that his client became violent and beat Lisa Essling on Aug. 25, 2006, because he stopped taking the popular antidepressant Zoloft days before the attack.

Nassau County District Court Judge Rhonda Fischer said Friday that she will allow a defense witness to testify that withdrawl from the antidepressant can cause a person to become aggressive.

Prosecutors say they strongly disagree with the court’s decision.

Zoloft manufacturer Pfizer Inc. has said there’s not evidence to suggest that discontinuing the drug can cause violent behavior.

___

Information from: Newsday, http://www.newsday.com

Copyright 2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Assault in Nightclub: England

Last three paragraphs read:  “The victim was hostile to my client inside the nightclub, but he knows that he should have walked away.”

“‘My client is on anti-depressants‘.”

“Warning 40-year-old Belcher that  ‘anti-depressants and alcohol do not mix,‘  magistrates imposed a weekend curfew order for six months and ordered the defendant to pay £35 towards prosecution costs.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.

http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/gloucestershireheadlines/Street-brawl-clubber-court/article-1290414-detail/article.html

Street brawl clubber in court

Friday, August 28, 2009, 07:03

AN UGLY street brawl in the early hours of the morning in Stroud was captured on CCTV.

Two men were filmed rolling about on the ground outside a Stroud nightclub at 2.30am while a distraught woman tried to break them up.

The CCTV footage was shown to city magistrates this week.

Adam Belcher, of Bisley Old Road, Slad, pleaded guilty to assault when he appeared at the court on Wednesday.

The incident occurred outside 13 nightclub in Nelson Street on July 25.

Prosecuting solicitor Sharon Jomaa said: “The defendant can be clearly seen assaulting an unknown male, while his partner is trying to intervene.

“Both men start to grapple and fall to the ground fighting until the police arrive and the defendant is arrested.”

Defending solicitor Matthew Harbison said: “This a prosecution for assault without a complainant as the other man has refused to complain.

“There was a disturbance earlier that night inside the club and it spilled outside.

“The victim was hostile to my client inside the nightclub, but he knows that he should have walked away.

“My client is on anti-depressants.”

Warning 40-year-old Belcher that “anti-depressants and alcohol do not mix,” magistrates imposed a weekend curfew order for six months and ordered the defendant to pay £35 towards prosecution costs.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN MEDS: Death: Former Woman Soldier: England

Paragraphs two and three read:  “Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers andantidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.”

“Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.”

http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=ENOnline&category=News&tBrand=ENOnline&tCategory=news&itemid=NOED27%20Aug%202009%2007%3A35%3A01%3A210

Uncertainty over overdose death

Chanice Ward.
REBECCA GOUGH
27 August 2009 07:35

A coroner has ruled that a young woman who was discharged from the army against her will and who died of an overdose earlier this year may not have deliberately taken her own life.

Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers and antidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.

Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.

The inquest heard how Miss Ward, who was pursuing a case for compensation with the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency, had a history of depression and died as a result of a “self-administered overdose”.

Mr Ward, 57, who served 22 years in the army, said: “I know this inquest could not appoint blame but I’m certainly of the opinion that her time in the military and in active service worsened her state of mind. We have a case going on with the MoD and will be continuing her cause.”

For the last five years Miss Ward, of Barford, near Hethersett, had been working at Norwich Union in Surrey Street, Norwich and was a PA in the pensions department.

Since the age of 18 she had served six years in the Royal Medical Corps as a combat medic and ambulance technician, from 1997 to 2003, and won award medals from Bosnia and Kosovo.

She was found dead in the caravan she rented in Barford on April 3, but speaking at her inquest, her family and friends said they were shocked she had taken an overdose.

Her mother, Donna Holder, said her daughter was diagnosed with depression when she was a teenager but had appeared much happier in recent months.

Ms Holder said: “It was a very great shock because she was so well and had so many future plans and so much to look forward to.”

Mr Ward added that he had taken a phone call from his daughter a few weeks before she died, and said: “She said to me ‘I don’t think I’ve got long left to live’, and I said she was being silly but I knew deep down that she knew it.

“In the last six months she appeared tremendously upbeat but there was something underlying. She always appeared on the surface to be putting on a front but you never knew underneath what was going on.”

Her close friend Stanley Woodhouse was with her the weekend before she died and said: “I think I probably spent more time with her in the last few months of her life than anybody did.

“She thought the medication she was on had solved a lot of her problems but, as her father has said, we didn’t really know what was going on deep down. The feeling she gave to me was that she was upbeat about life.”

In an interview with our sister paper the Evening News earlier this year Ms Ward claimed she twice tried to kill herself but that her bosses would not accept she was suffering from an illness.

A MoD spokesman said: “Our thoughts are with the family of Chanice Ward at this difficult time.

“We take the welfare of all our service personnel and veterans seriously.

“We have made great progress both in the treatment of mental health problems and in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help.

“Treatment for mental health disorders, including post-traumatic stress, is also available for veterans through six community-based mental health pilot schemes the MoD has created with the NHS.”

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Stealing: Woman: England

Paragraph 11 reads:  “He added,  ‘She was going through a lot of difficulties in her personal life at this time.
She was the victim of domestic violence and was on fairly strong anti-depressants’.

http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk/news/Woman-could-face-jail-after.5525458.jp

Woman could face jail after petrol pay fraud

Published Date: 05 August 2009
A 25-YEAR-OLD woman who breached a suspended prison sentence by claiming she couldn’t pay for petrol and then leaving false details at the Langney filling station will be sent to the crown court.
Joanna Marie Hunt appeared before the town’s magistrates court on Friday morning (July 31) and admitted two counts of fraud by false representation.
The court heard Hunt had been to the Esso petrol station, Langney Rise, on May 15 and 18 and filled her vehicle with £20 worth of petrol on both occasions.
She then claimed she was unable to pay and had to fill out a form stating she would return with the money within 24 hours.
On both occasions she gave a false address, number plate and mobile number on the form and on the second occasion she also put a false name.
When Hunt didn’t return to pay for the fuel the manager viewed the CCTV footage of the garage forecourt, took down her vehicle registration plate and phoned the police.
Hunt was later arrested in her vehicle, near Southend.
Prosecutor Heather Salvage told magistrates Hunt had since been back to the Esso station and paid back the money owed.
This offence put Hunt in breach of a three-month prison sentence which was suspended for 18 months and imposed on January 24, 2008.
In mitigation, Christos Christou said Hunt was at the very end of her suspended sentence.
He added, “She was going through a lot of difficulties in her personal life at this time.
“She was the victim of domestic violence and was on fairly strong anti-depressants.”
Magistrates ordered Hunt to be sentenced at the crown court and she will appear on a date to be fixed.
She was granted unconditional bail.

The full article contains 301 words and appears in n/a newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

  • Last Updated: 05 August 2009 12:05 PM
  • Source: n/a
  • Location: Eastbourne

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide: England

Second paragraph reads:  “Steven Rodgers was found dead in his bed after overdosing on prescription drugs for a heart condition and depression.”

http://www.sunderlandecho.com/news/Lovesplit-torment-ended-in-tragedy.5524741.jp

Love-split torment ended in tragedy

Published Date:
05 August 2009
By Lisa Nightingale

A father killed himself after falling into depression contributed to by years of problems with his estranged wife, an inquest heard.

Steven Rodgers was found dead in his bed after overdosing on prescription drugs for a heart condition and depression.

He was discovered on February 3 by new partner Susan Redmayne who had let herself in to his flat in Front Street in East Boldon.

She had become concerned for his safety after he failed to turn up to his job as assistant manager at Morrisons in Seaburn and she was unable to contact him.

Miss Redmayne, said: “I went in and saw the dog and two letters. I looked on the table and his car keys were still there.

“I began searching for him and the last place I went into was the bedroom and that’s where I found him.

“I went up to him and touched him, he was stone cold.”

Yesterday, an inquest into his death heard results from a toxicology report showed Mr Rodgers had levels of propanol, a betablocker, and mirtazapine, an anti-depressant, at levels where either one was “sufficient enough to cause sudden death”.

Coroner Terence Carney was told by Mr Rodgers’ sister, Kathleen, how after the 44-year-old, originally from Sunderland, was diagnosed with angina he had felt more tired but had carried on working.

He was also going through the process of a divorce after 10 years of marriage. The separation had been acrimonious and for the past two years he had endured late-night visits and phonecalls from his estranged wife.

He was also worried about his finances after falling behind with debt payments.

Miss Rodgers, said: “He would stay in a lot as he was frightened Pauline would cause trouble. She had been down to his works recently.

He used to laugh it off as he didn’t want us to worry.

“He wouldn’t go into details but he always said she was hanging around and knocking on his door, sometimes at 4am.”

Miss Redmayne told Mr Carney how the police and bomb squad were called out on two occasions after he found mobile phones taped underneath his vehicle.

A police officer attending the inquest said she had no knowledge of these calls.

Miss Redmayne added: “I just felt he couldn’t take anymore. He had just hit rock bottom.”

Mr Carney, said: “There is no doubt in my mind this was a man who for some considerable time and more recently has been suffering from acute depression.

“It appears that his domestic situation was the factor of much of that depression and I agree with the evidence I have heard from family for some considerable time he was suffering ongoing anxiety and pressure of an unresolved domestic situation.

“Clearly the effects in my view of that ongoing stress have impacted greatly on this man’s decision to ultimately kill himself.”

Speaking after the inquest, Mr Rodgers’ estranged wife, Pauline, of Herrington, said she was too distraught to attend yesterday’s inquest and didn’t want to upset the rest of Steven’s family.

She added: “I was upset when I found out he had a heart attack. I was past myself.

“To find out he had really acute heart problems was upsetting. You can’t be with someone all those years and not feel anything, and I do.”
Mr Carney gave a narrative verdict and recorded his death was as a result of taking propanol and mirtazapine.

He also recorded that he self-administered these drugs, consequently killing himself, and that at the time he was suffering from acute depression.

Speaking after the inquest his family said Steven was “one in a million”.

The full article contains 615 words and appears in Sunderland Echo newspaper.
Page 1 of 1

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