ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Famous Supermodel Jumps Six Floors to Her Death: Columbia

Paragraph 2 reads: “According to a Colombian newspaper, police are
confirming that Marulanda leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia
apartment. Reports are also indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a
result of a recent separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The
stress of the split and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on
antidepressants to help her cope with her most recent troubles. According to
reports, Lina had only been married to Onate for four months.”

http://www.rightcelebrity.com/?p=8523

Lina Marulanda, a famous and successful supermodel from Columbia has died
at the young age of 29. She was born on May 15th, 1980 in Medellin,
Colombia. Not only was Marulanda a popular television host, but she will be
remembered as one of Columbia’s most successful models. The news came April 22,
2010 that Lina jumped to her death, falling from her sixth floor apartment,
surely to be devastating news to those close to her.

According to a Colombian newspaper, police are confirming that Marulanda
leaped out of the window of her Bogota, Colombia apartment. Reports are also
indicating that Lina was experiencing depression as a result of a recent
separation from her second husband, Carlos Onate. The stress of the split
and a rumor also has surfaced that Lina was on antidepressants to help her
cope with her most recent troubles. According to reports, Lina had only been
married to Onate for four months.

Lina started modeling at the age of 12 years of age and went on to work as
a television presenter on the Colombian news show, CM&Y Caracol.

There has been no official statement from Lina’s family, friends or
employer. Our thoughts go out to her family and friends. This has to be
devastating news for those close to Lina Marulanda.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide: 22 Year Old Woman: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

When someone has been sickly physically for a period of
time or earlier in life it has been my experience that they do not do well
on antidepressants. They need to rebuild their health, not take a stimulant drug
to force their bodies to perform! Why do we push others as we do? Give them the
time they need to heal!
__________________________________
An inquest on Tuesday heard that Natalie, an animal lover, who
studied at Plumpton College, had suffered ill health as a child, which limited
her sight and held her back at school.
Paragraph seven reads:  “Dr Hunt told the inquest, “She
told me she had been depressed for several years and had been
taking anti-depressants for two
years.”

http://www.eastbourneherald.co.uk/news/Animal-lover-took-own-life.5864785.jp

Animal lover took own life after party

Published Date: 27 November 2009

A ‘SENSITIVE
and quiet girl’ who spent years bravely fighting depression took her own life
just days after her 22nd birthday, an inquest heard.


Family and friends joined
popular Natalie McCreanney at her party at Bibendum in Eastbourne town centre on
November 21 last year.

A week later, her body was
found on a secluded part of the beach, near the foot of Beachy Head.

An inquest on Tuesday heard
that Natalie, an animal lover, who studied at Plumpton College, had suffered ill
health as a child, which limited her sight and held her back at school.

Natalie paid for regular
counselling sessions for several years at the Eastbourne Clinic, but these ended
a couple of months before her death as she was thought to be too dependent on
staff.

Her regular GP, Dr Christopher Bedford-Turner, said
Natalie had taken an overdose in 2005 and later self-harmed on occasions.

On November 24 last year, she had a 15-minute chat
with Dr Caroline Hunt, a locum working at Dr Bedford-Turner’s surgery.

Dr Hunt told the inquest, “She told me she had been
depressed for several years and had been taking anti-depressants for two
years.

“She said she had been feeling very low again. I
asked her if she had any suicidal thoughts. She was non-committal and shrugged
her shoulders.”

They discussed the possibility of increasing her
medication, Dr Hunt said, but Natalie hurried out of the surgery before the
consultation was over.

Her counsellor, Julia Ryder, said sessions with
Natalie ended after she had found a flat and a job.

“I felt it was no longer beneficial to consider
counselling indefinitely as it was not treating any specific depressive symptoms
and was more about her reliance on me and some of my colleagues.”

Mum Jackie paid tribute to her daughter, who had
‘struggled to come to terms with her illness’.

She said, “She was a quiet, sensitive girl with a
passion for animals and a group of supportive friends.”

In the last few months of her life, Natalie was
working at Debenhams and shared a flat in Barbuda Quay.

Second cousin Diane Mounir recounted an emotional
phone call Natalie made to her.
“I asked her if it was a good idea her being
there. She said, ‘I like it here’.

“She wanted to carry on talking but I cut her off
to phone 999. When I phoned her back, her phone was dead.”

Coroner Alan Craze said Natalie’s ‘general descent
into crisis’ had led to an ‘enormous tragedy’. He recorded a verdict of suicide,
while the balance of her mind was disturbed.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Suicide of Soldier: Iraq/Oklahoma

Paragraphs four & five read:  “”He e-mailed his best friend and told her what to do with all of his stuff, and he said he was going to visit his brother,” Brazil said by telephone from Claremore.  ‘Our brother died five years ago’.

“Hastings had trouble sleeping and had been taking antidepressants, but family members don’t know if the medication played a role, Brazil said.”

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/tx/6582147.html

OKLAHOMA CITY The latest Oklahoma soldier to die in Iraq had become depressed and demoralized by the deaths of friends in combat, and family members suspect he committed suicide, his sister said Friday.

The Defense Department announced Thursday that Spc. Matthew Hastings, 23, of Claremore, died Monday from injuries he received in an incident not related to combat in Baghdad. A cause of death hasn’t been released by military officials, who say an investigation is under way.

Michelle Brazil believes her brother committed suicide based on a recent e-mail his best friend received just before he died.

“He e-mailed his best friend and told her what to do with all of his stuff, and he said he was going to visit his brother,” Brazil said by telephone from Claremore. “Our brother died five years ago.”

Hastings had trouble sleeping and had been taking antidepressants, but family members don’t know if the medication played a role, Brazil said.

His yearlong deployment was scheduled to end in December, she said. Family and friends got to see him during a two-week visit in April.

“He told us his plans for when he got back,” Brazil said. “He recently did some shopping online and ordered some clothing and that package arrived here in July, so he didn’t plan this for very long.”

Hastings was assigned to the 582nd Medical Logistics Company, 1st Medical Brigade, 13th Sustainment Command out of Fort Hood, Texas.

He joined the military in August 2006 as a light-wheel vehicle mechanic and had been stationed at Fort Hood since February 2007. The unit provides basic medical services, said Tyler Broadway, a Fort Hood spokesman.

Hastings, a 2005 graduate from high school in Broken Arrow, liked to hunt and fish and “was just a comic,” Brazil said.

“He had a lot of friends. He always made everybody laugh,” she said.

Although Hastings’ death is still under investigation, the U.S. Army has developed a program to respond to increased suicides among soldiers. Beginning Oct. 1, soldiers will take a test to see how they respond to stress and to assess their resiliency, officials announced this week.

The Army said Aug. 13 that there were 62 confirmed suicides and 34 unconfirmed cases from Jan. 1 through July 31.

As for Hastings, Brazil said an autopsy is being conducted on her brother and his body hadn’t arrived in Oklahoma yet.

“I’m fine right now. I go in and out,” Brazil said. “I wake up in the morning and realize it’s not a nightmare and I cry for hours. After that, it’s just planning for the funeral. I’m sure it will soak in again soon.

“It’s such a shock.”

Hayhurst Funeral Home in Broken Arrow is handling funeral arrangements for Hastings, Brazil said.

Besides his sister, Hastings is survived by his mother and stepfather, Lawanda and Roger Lowry of Coweta; his father, Clark Hastings Jr., of Redfield, Ark.; grandfather Clark Hastings Sr., of Jacksonville, Ark.; and grandparents, Wanda and Vernon Cline of Pryor.

Hastings was going through a divorce and had no children, Brazil said.

An AP database based on Department of Defense news releases indicates Hastings was at least the 75th Oklahoma military serviceman to die in the war in Iraq.

Their brother, Clark Hastings III, preceded him in death.

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EFFEXOR: Death/Possible Suicide: England

Paragraph four reads:  “Post-mortem tests showed the 44-year-old had three times the fatal dose of the anti-depressant venlafaxine [Effexor] in her body.”

Fourth paragraph from the end reads:  “Mr Williams recorded an open verdict.”

Mr Bray said before her death she seemed “happy as a lord”, even though she had been threatened with eviction from her home.

Family and friends said they could not imagine Miss Jeynes taking an overdose to kill herself, although confirmed she had taken overdoses before.

Coroner quizzes boyfriend in overdose inquest

10:17am Friday 7th August 2009

THE boyfriend of a Malvern woman who died of a drug overdose was asked by a coroner if he had pushed the pills down her throat himself.

Elizabeth Jeynes was found in bed by her boyfriend with her eyes “rolling”, an inquest was told.

She was pronounced dead on arrival at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, Worcester, at about 2pm on Thursday, March 26, after ambulance crews had battled to resuscitate her.

Post-mortem tests showed the 44-year-old had three times the fatal dose of the anti-depressant venlafaxine in her body.

Her boyfriend George Bray said he received a call from Miss Jeynes at 1.30am on the day of her death saying that she was bored.

Mr Bray and friend Alan Cooper went to her home in Langland Avenue, Malvern, and took her back to Mr Cooper’s flat where she was put to bed because they believed she was drunk.

Mr Bray said he had not seen the mother-of-three take any pills or alcohol, although he said he could smell drink on her and that she was “stumbling all over the place”.

When Mr Bray got up at 7am, he noticed something was wrong.

“All I could see was just her eyes rolling and that’s when I called the ambulance,” said Mr Bray.

“I tried to talk to her and put a bit of water on her face.”

Mr Bray said before her death she seemed “happy as a lord”, even though she had been threatened with eviction from her home.

Family and friends said they could not imagine Miss Jeynes taking an overdose to kill herself, although confirmed she had taken overdoses before.

Worcestershire coroner Geraint Williams asked Mr Bray: “Did you hold her down and force tablets down her throat? Did you spike her drink with tablets and force it down her secretly?”

Mr Bray answered “no” to both questions.

Mr Williams told family and friends: “You may think this man has murdered Miss Jeynes, that he’s a liar but I can only go on the evidence. I have no evidence to suggest he’s not telling me the truth.”

Mr Cooper was warned he risked facing a criminal charge of perjury after he gave inconsistent answers about how long he had known Miss Jeynes, the time they arrived at her flat and when the ambulance was called.

Mr Williams said Mr Bray was “unconvincing” and that Mr Cooper was “unreliable” and “evasive”.

“I find both of those witnesses to be unsatisfactory and in some regards, dishonest,” he said.

Mr Williams said if Mr Bray had called an ambulance at about 7am and Miss Jeynes was pronounced dead at 2pm, crews must have been working to revive her for four to five hours inside the flat which was “inconceivable”.

But Mr Williams said he was satisfied that Miss Jeynes took the overdose voluntarily and that the postmortem examination showed no physical injuries to suggest she had been held down.

Mr Williams recorded an open verdict.

After the inquest Miss Jeynes’ daughter Katie said: “My mum was a kind person who would help anyone. She can rest in peace now.”

Miss Jeynes’ mother Hannah Passey said: “I lost my son Kenneth Passey more than 20 years ago in a car crash. Now I have lost my daughter.”

Her best friend, Margaret Ives, of Marsh Close, Malvern, said: “That woman had a heart of gold. She was a goodt-hearted lady.”

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DEPRESSION MED: Soldier Commits Suicide: Iraq/New Hampshire

Paragraphs 3 & 4 read: “Last week, 37-year-old Dane took his life in California where he was stationed. His family in Auburn questions if more could have been done to prevent his death.”

“They say he sought help from the military to battle depression and PTSD and was on medication.”

http://www.wmur.com/news/19934903/detail.html

Full Military Honors Planned For Marine

Family Questions Whether He Should Have Been Given More Help
POSTED: 11:19 pm EDT July 2, 2009
UPDATED: 11:43 pm EDT July 2, 2009

AUBURN, N.H. — New Hampshire is preparing to lay a Marine to rest with full military honors.

Staff Sgt. Charles Edward Dane, known as Eddie to family and friends, served six combat tours, dedicating 15 years in service to the country.

Last week, 37-year-old Dane took his life in California where he was stationed. His family in Auburn questions if more could have been done to prevent his death.

They say he sought help from the military to battle depression and PTSD and was on medication.

After two DUIs, Dane was being processed out of the service he loved.

A funeral with full military honors will be held Monday at noon at the New Hampshire State Veterans Cemetery in Boscawen.
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