Senate Hearing: Medical Errors Are Third Leading Cause of Death???

medical errors

Third Leading Cause of Death – Medical Errors

and When You Add In Medications How High Is The Toll Really?

July 17, 2014 the US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions held a hearing on the number of deaths caused by preventable medical errors.

http://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/medical-mistakes

C-SPAN has a video of those Senate hearings posted here… http://www.help.senate.gov/hearings/hearing/

But before going to those links if you will go to our website to read our mission statement at http://www.drugawareness.org/mission/ you will see how long this situation has been going on and find a link to a study done by pharmacists who were tired of seeing patients die from the drugs they were handing out. They found that the Third Leading Cause of Death in America is “properly prescribed prescription drugs” (prescribed according to what the FDA has judged to be “safe and effective”.) This is a study done in 1995 so you can imagine how much worse it would be by now. If you add that together with these deaths plus add in the medication-induced heart attacks and medication-induced cancer and medication-induced suicides you will find medical treatment to be the leading cause of death in America!

To all that add to it the warning from Dr. John Ioannidis, the world’s leading expert on medical research, who says that 90% of medical research is now tainted or just plain bogus and that he fears that medical science will not be able to survive this. http://www.drugawareness.org/recentcasesblog/lies-damned-lies-and-medical-science

From all this information the lesson seems clear…Keep your loved ones away from doctors and nurses and their treatments!!!

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

724 total views, no views today

COLD TURKEY WITHDRAWAL = TRIPOLAR MESS

withdrawal

COLD TURKEY WITHDRAWAL = TRIPOLAR MESS = QUICK TRIP TO HELL

Note: Thank you so very much to Nick Cole for sharing this most important information on the dangers of cold turkey withdrawal from these deadly mind altering medications!!!! As we have warned for two decades coming off these drugs too quickly can even be worse than staying them! (And if you have educated yourself on the effects of these drugs you know how deadly staying on them can be!)

Three years ago today, I checked myself into rehab for prescribed iatrogenic benzodiazepine and psych drug dependence. Not knowing any better and without support to come off of the drugs (that I finally KNEW were the cause of all my years of illness) from my doctor, I allowed them to cold-turkey me from six psychiatric drugs (Klonopin, Xanax, Ambien, Remeron, Seroquel, Adderall). Within months, I was suicidal and psychotic and could no longer cope in that condition.

Going to rehab was the second biggest mistake in my life; the first was ever taking this poison in the first place. They treated me horribly, like a street-junkie and called me an addict, forced me to AA/NA meetings – for medications that my doctor prescribed for me and told me to take regularly for my supposed “mental illness”. What they did to me was criminal, barbaric and medically unsound.

I attempted to reinstate the benzo only (I stayed off of the others) to taper with minimal success, as 4 months had passed in the cold-turkey state and the drugs don’t always work again that far off from a CT. I tapered off of the Valium that I reinstated and have been off for almost 10 months.

Everyday is still a living hell where I’m bed-bound for the majority of the day. I wouldn’t wish this on anyone (except maybe the psychiatrist who is responsible for this inhumane suffering). I am in severe pain, have DP/DR, cognitive dysfunction, a sensation that I’m “on a boat out to sea”, nausea, blurred vision, mood swings, depression and a plethora of other debilitating symptoms with no end in sight. I can barely physically take care of myself and I live alone with no in-person support. I cannot work. I lost my home, my friends, my family and everything that was of any value to me, other than my life which I came scarily close to losing too.

PLEASE DO NOT allow anyone to cold-turkey you from psychiatric drugs. You will be at risk for a severe, protracted withdrawal syndrome that could last for YEARS. Do your research and homework and find someone who has knowledge of tapering these medications to guide you. If your doctor tries to rush you off of your medications- FIND ANOTHER DOCTOR that will support you in a slow taper at a speed your body can tolerate.

I can only hope that with more time I will see more improvements and functionality. Psychiatric drugs are toxic poison which disable the brain and CNS.

The worst part is that I didn’t need ANY of these medications. I allowed a doctor to label me, to drug me and to destroy my life over “work-related stress” which spiraled into polydrugging with multiple psych meds because the more drugs that were added, the more I experienced tolerance and side effects that were MISdiagnosed by a pill-pushing psychiatrist as “mental illness”. It can happen SO easily to anyone who’s vulnerable, trusting and uneducated about the destructive nature of these medications. I thought the same as SO many other psych drug victims- “Surely, my doctor wouldn’t prescribe me something harmful”. I was very terribly WRONG. And when I became sick from the medication, the medical community not only abandoned me as a patient but blamed me for my own suffering.

It is my hope that before I die that we see the “psychiatric drug bubble” burst and the truth revealed about these noxious poisons that are being handed out all over the world to innocent unsuspecting people and children. Until then, I will not give up. I will fight to continue to spread the word about these drugs and the people who prescribe them. And I will continue to fight to reclaim my health that was unfairly stolen from me.

Thank you to everyone in the psych drug withdrawal communities online who have befriended me, supported me and loved me when the rest of the world turned their backs on me, blamed me and wrote me off as “mentally ill” or “not trying hard enough”. Thank you for your validation and for sharing your stories and experiences so candidly so that others can learn from you and not make the same mistakes. All of you are the biggest warriors I have ever met. I wouldn’t be alive today without your support and friendship. You know who you are and I am so grateful for you.

For anyone going through this – keep going. I’m told we all recover and heal with time. As hard as it is, it has to be worth it to be medication-free and healthy; out from underneath the control of doctors and their “medicines”.

Peace and continued healing to each and everyone of you. Much love.

You never know what you’re gonna get…Thank you Psychiatry and Big Pharma. For turning me into a tripolar MESS.

Nick Cole

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants and dangers of cold turkey withdrawal any mind altering medication I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant [or Benzo, or Atypical Antipsychotic]!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs! Done correctly withdrawal does not have to be painful and dangerous.

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these withdrawal reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns due to the rapid withdrawal!

You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

756 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS??? Suicide: Ariel Castro OH Man Guilty of Kidnapping 3 Women

 

Ariel Castro

ARIEL CASTRO FOUND DEAD OF SUICIDE IN JAIL CELL

Is this yet another high profile example of what is going on in jails and prisons with the massive use of antidepressants with no concern about FDA warnings of abrupt changes in dose? Was he or was he not on antidepressants to produce his suicide?

And if so, when did he began taking them? We do know he was on suicide watch after being arrested but had been taken off suicide watch. Was he given antidepressants at that time or had he been on them for years?

We do know that his 19 year old daughter, Emily Castro, was on antidepressants when she slashed her baby’s throat (http://www.drugawareness.org/antidepressant-daughter-of-cleveland-abduction-suspect-found-guilty-of-slashing-her-babys-throat/) and was found guilty … so we know that this is a group of drugs considered helpful by his family.

I know three young women and a little girl as well as the families of all involved who need answers as to when his use of an antidepressant might have begun. He said he had an addition to pornography that led him to do what he did to the three girls he kept in captivity. Was that addiction an aquired addiction or a nymphomanic reaction to an antidepressant?

What many are also not aware of is the practice of so many jails and prisons of taking a patient currently on an antidepressant and switching them to the antidepressant approved by their own particular facility. (What determines their leaning toward a particular antidepressant needs to be investigated for kickbacks in my opinion.) Or often a jail or prison will refuse to give them their prescribed medication for a period of time after their arrest. Yet the FDA has warned that any abrupt change in dose, whether increasing or decreasing a dose can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. Or course the practice of switching antidepressants would magnify the risks because it would involve both the abrupt change of both an abrupt decrease of the current drug as well as an abrupt increase of the new drug.

The withholding of his antidepressant is what happened in the suicide of Don Lapre, the bubbly late night entrepreneur, who was awaiting trial over a vitamin multilevel deal that had gone belly up. But he committed suicide due to the abrupt change in dose by the jail in AZ. (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2045139/Don-Lapre-dead-Shirley-Cleveland-says-son-medication-taken-away-prison-guards.html )

No matter what opinion anyone has of these people who are incarcerated for various crimes or alleged crimes – crimes which may have been caused by toxic reactions to these very medications, what the jails and prisons are doing is wrong and they should be held accountable for wrongful death with the FDA warnings about this as clear as they are. This is a practice that must end.

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have long warned can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs! The FDA warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can come on very rapidly! Find the CD here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

Original article on Ariel Castro’s suicide:

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=26715226&nid=157&title=ohio-man-who-held-3-women-captive-commits-suicide-&fm=home_page&s_cid=featured-1

522 total views, no views today

LEXAPRO: Journalist Has Side-Effects: Not Sure Lexapro is Working: U.S…

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

From the last paragraph in the article below I quote the author: “I will say only this: I no longer count on Lexapro to make me well. Which is to say I no longer fret if I miss a day or two, I no longer rush to the drug store to get my refills, and I place far more importance on getting my life in order: regulating my alcohol consumption, getting a decent night’s sleep, exercising (I’m not the only depressive who’s become an amateur triathlete) and, corny as it sounds, pausing at intervals to ponder my blessings.”

Although there are some good ideas mentioned here that I have been recommending forever for depressives such as the great importance of sleep and exercise and counting one’s blessings, there are other things that could produce life-threatening consequences for both the author who is using an SSRI or those around him. Those areas of grave concern are the consumption of alcohol with an antidepressant and the lack of concern about skipping a pill or picking up a refill for his Lexapro – both all too common with antidepressant users.

Why are they common although dangerous? They are common because of two side effects produced by these drugs:

1, Antidepressants can produce overwhelming cravings for alcohol as well as a tolerance for alcohol and then when mixed can produce toxic effects leading to psychotic breaks.

2. Antidepressants produce what the patients call the “I don’t give a damn” attitude leading one to not care about missing a pill or refilling a prescription. The grave concern with this is the warning put in place by the FDA along with the Black Box warning of suicide. That FDA warning is that ANY ABRUPT CHANGE IN DOSE of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis – generally a manic psychosis. Skipping a pill is an abrupt change in dose as is starting or stopping the use of one of these drugs or switching the brand of antidepressant you are taking. If you survive a manic psychosis instead of being told what caused that psychotic break, you will likely be diagnosed as Bipolar and/or spend the rest of your life in prison for what you did while psychotic. The possibilities can be more than just frightening!

Paragraphs 18 through 22 read:

” ‘How’s the Lexapro working’?”

” ‘I don’t know’.”

‘Agnosticism, I’ve found, is a common refrain among my medicated friends. We’re feeling OK, thanks. Is it the pill? Natural cycles? A good week at work? The fact that the sun is shining? Not always apparent. The only thing we’re really clear on, honestly, is our side effects. Nausea, nightmares, hypomania, agitation, headaches, decreased sex drive, decreased sex performance … the list is exquisite in its variation. My first two nights on Lexapro, I lay for hours on the precipice of unconsciousness, unable to take the last plunge. To fall asleep, I had to get a prescription for Ambien, which I then spent another week weaning myself off. To this day, the prospect of sleep holds a mild terror for me that it never did before.’

‘Oddly enough, the side effects are often the pills’ best advocates. If we’re feeling that crappy, we figure something of great moment is happening inside us. What’s harder to accept is the alternative explanation — that, when it comes to depression, we’re still wandering in the dark. As Charles Barber, author of “Comfortably Numb,” argues, scientists don’t really know how antidepressants work. ‘They change the brain chemistry, but the infinite spiral of what they do from there is very unclear’.”

“So if you don’t know how something works, and you can no longer credibly claim it does work (even some industry spokesmen are beginning to qualify their claims), you’re not left with much of a fallback position. The placebo effect is real — the body actually does heal itself when it believes it is being healed — but it is founded on faith, and in the wake of the JAMA study, it’s becoming harder and harder to maintain that faith except through a rather larger act of denial.”

http://www.salon.com/life/feature/2010/04/05/is_my_lexapro_working/

Monday, Apr 5, 2010 04:01 EDT

My antidepressant gets harder to swallow

As studies shed doubt on certain psychiatric drugs, I wonder: Do I really need my little white pill?

By Louis Bayard

Salon

I take it every morning, right after I brush my teeth. A single white pill, with the letters F and L stamped on one side, the number 10 on the other. It’s so small it nearly disappears into the folds of my palm. You could drop it in my orange juice or my breakfast cereal, and I’d swallow it without a hitch.

And, for the last three years, I have been swallowing my Lexapro — and everything that comes along with it. And, apparently, I’m not alone.

Between 1996 and 2005, the number of Americans taking antidepressants doubled. According to the Centers for Disease Control, antidepressants are now the most commonly prescribed class of drugs in the U.S. — ahead of drugs for cholesterol, blood pressure and asthma. Of the 2.4 billion drugs prescribed in 2005, 118 million were for depression. Whether the pills go by the name of Lexapro or Effexor or Prozac or Wellbutrin, we’re downing them, to the tune of $9.6 billion a year, and we’re doing it for a very good and simple reason. They’re supposed to be making us better.

Which leaves a quite massive shoe waiting to drop. What if these costly, widely marketed, bewitchingly commonplace drugs really aren’t fixing our brains?

The implications are troubling, and not just for the pharmaceutical industry. In a study published last January by the Journal of the American Medical Association, scientists conducting a meta-analysis of existing research found that antidepressants were unquestionably “useful in cases of severe depression” but frankly not much help for the rest of us. “The magnitude of benefit of antidepressant medication compared with placebo,” the study’s authors concluded, “may be minimal or nonexistent, on average, in patients with mild or moderate symptoms.”

In other words, antidepressants work, but only because we believe they’re working. If we’re not seriously depressed and we’re taking a tricyclic or a serotonin reuptake inhibitor or a norepinephrine booster, we’d fare about as well with a sugar pill. Which means that antidepressants are, to borrow the phraseology of Newsweek writer Martha Begley, “basically expensive Tic Tacs.”

And so, like millions of Americans, I’m left with the problem of it: that little white pill that travels down my gullet every morning. What is it really doing down there — up there? What if it’s not doing anything? Is there any good empirical unassailable reason that I should be swallowing it day after day after day? If I stop believing in it, will it stop working?

More than half a century has passed since the first antidepressants were prescribed, but it’s fair to say that the opposition to them coalesced in the 1990s, with the explosive sales growth of Prozac. As critics like David Healy and Ronald W. Dworkin warned that Big Pharma was medicalizing sadness for profit, the widespread usage of ironic terms like “happy pills” conjured up visions of smiling zombies wandering through sinister dreamscapes. Eric G. Wilson, in his overwrought “Against Happiness,” actually envisioned a day when antidepressants would “destroy dejection completely” and “eradicate depression forever.”

Looking back, we can see that both critics and advocates were working from the same premise: that these drugs change us in some fairly profound way. (Even pro-drug Peter Fisher [Kramer], in his bestselling “Listening to Prozac,” worried about the cost of making people “better than well.”) But as researchers like Irving Kirsch and Guy Sapirstein are increasingly finding, the truth may shade more toward the comic end of the spectrum. Far from transforming us, antidepressants are leaving us pretty much as they found us. Emperors in gleaming new clothes.

The more I ponder my experience, the less surprised I am. I turned to medication because I couldn’t stop crying in public places — Starbucks was a popular spot — or imagining my death. (Crucially, I never got around to planning it.) And because I realized that although I was meeting life’s core requirements, I was not always exceeding them. And because, after a couple of years of sessions with an empathetic therapist, I came to believe that my wiring really had shorted out, that some form of grayer matter had fastened itself to my brain and was hard at work, siphoning away my joy.

I remember watching the camcorder footage of my son’s first birthday party and being shocked by the sight of myself, staring back at the camera with sad eyes. Depression had always been a sporadic companion, but in my 43rd year, it began to take up permanent residence. I felt like I was walking around on rotting floorboards. I cried. I lost my temper on the flimsiest of pretexts. I saw myself dead.

At which point medication seemed like a reasonable alternative. Before another week had passed, I had secured a low-dosage prescription for Lexapro, prescribed not by my therapist but by my primary-care physician. (Even that’s not quite true. It was the doctor who was taking my doctor’s patients while she was on vacation.)

“Who’s going to monitor this drug?” my partner asked.

“Um … you? Me?”

When it came to Lexapro, all my responses had the same interrogative lilt. If someone asked me how I was feeling, I’d say, “Better, I guess?” When asked if I would recommend Lexapro to others, I’d say: “Maybe kind of?”

This was the most surprising part of the whole experience: that the transformation or malformation I had expected to feel never quite arrived, that in the course of ramping up my serotonin levels, I should remain so freakishly myself.

It is, in fact, one of the amusing side effects of living in the age of pharmaceuticals that you can always compare your lack of progress with those nearest and dearest to you in this case, my mother. Not a lunch goes by that one of us doesn’t say to the other:

“How’s the Lexapro working?”

“I don’t know.”

Agnosticism, I’ve found, is a common refrain among my medicated friends. We’re feeling OK, thanks. Is it the pill? Natural cycles? A good week at work? The fact that the sun is shining? Not always apparent. The only thing we’re really clear on, honestly, is our side effects. Nausea, nightmares, hypomania, agitation, headaches, decreased sex drive, decreased sex performance … the list is exquisite in its variation. My first two nights on Lexapro, I lay for hours on the precipice of unconsciousness, unable to take the last plunge. To fall asleep, I had to get a prescription for Ambien, which I then spent another week weaning myself off. To this day, the prospect of sleep holds a mild terror for me that it never did before.

Oddly enough, the side effects are often the pills’ best advocates. If we’re feeling that crappy, we figure something of great moment is happening inside us. What’s harder to accept is the alternative explanation — that, when it comes to depression, we’re still wandering in the dark. As Charles Barber, author of “Comfortably Numb,” argues, scientists don’t really know how antidepressants work. “They change the brain chemistry, but the infinite spiral of what they do from there is very unclear.”

So if you don’t know how something works, and you can no longer credibly claim it does work (even some industry spokesmen are beginning to qualify their claims), you’re not left with much of a fallback position. The placebo effect is real — the body actually does heal itself when it believes it is being healed — but it is founded on faith, and in the wake of the JAMA study, it’s becoming harder and harder to maintain that faith except through a rather larger act of denial.

Of course, even the most ardent critics of antidepressants caution strongly against sudden withdrawal. (Those side effects suck, too.) And few scientists will deny that drugs help people with severe unipolar depression. But what of the rest of us? Should we find some way to make ourselves believe in our little white pills again? Or should we find other things to believe in? Should we, in fact, begin to rethink our relationships with our brains?

I don’t bring much in the way of ideology to these questions. I’ve always felt that the rise of Prozac and its ilk at least had the salutary effect of removing the stigma attached to depression. Reconfigured as a chemical condition, it could now be owned and acknowledged and treated. But by translating it from the personal to the pharmacological, we may have left people even less empowered to combat it.

It’s bracing to see how depression is treated in other countries, where the relationship between drug manufacturers and physicians isn’t quite so hand-in-glove. Great Britain’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, for example, recommends that, before taking antidepressants, people with mild or moderate depression should undergo nine to 12 weeks of guided self-help, nine to 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy, and 10 to 14 weeks of exercise classes. They should, in short, work on themselves before they can be worked upon.

Unfortunately, as Barber notes, that’s work, and not always pleasant. If we are to be honest with ourselves, we should admit that the drug companies aren’t the only ones who want that pill. We want it, too. If every last antidepressant were to vanish from the market today and a new one were to appear tomorrow, promising greater benefits than before, which of us would not line up? There is, after all, a strength in numbers, whereas grappling with yourself — your self — is a lonely business.

But it is, finally, a necessary one. The little white pill sits in my palm. In the glare of the bathroom light, I give it a good hard searching look. And then once more I clap it in my mouth and swallow it down.

Maybe, as one team of researchers has suggested, it’s the triumph of marketing over science. Maybe, as Samuel Johnson once said of second marriages, it’s the triumph of hope over experience. Maybe I’m just weak.

I will say only this: I no longer count on Lexapro to make me well. Which is to say I no longer fret if I miss a day or two, I no longer rush to the drug store to get my refills, and I place far more importance on getting my life in order: regulating my alcohol consumption, getting a decent night’s sleep, exercising (I’m not the only depressive who’s become an amateur triathlete) and, corny as it sounds, pausing at intervals to ponder my blessings. And also appreciating the ways in which my brain and body regulate their own climate through such time-honored techniques as the crying jag. Which is no less effective for happening in the middle of a busy Starbucks.

Three years and however many dollars later, can I honestly say Lexapro has made me a happier person? No. Has it usefully complicated my thinking? Maybe. In my pre-pill days, I regarded happiness as a form of grace, descending upon me whether or not I was worthy of it. Now I think of it as something that, however elusive, is there to be sought. Swallowing a pill every morning is not, in my mind, an act of obedience but a tiny spark of volition, a sign that I’m willing to find the light wherever it’s hiding. My Lexapro may be no better than a Tic Tac, but it’s a daily reminder that I won’t take depression’s shit lying down.

395 total views, no views today

Time Released Prozac for Dogs Approved in the UK

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

And who did they pay to “cook the books” on this research?!! Was the same
researcher who just plead guilty to falsifying research for GlaxcoThe initial
studies done by Lilly on dogs and cats demonstrated that the animals given

Prozac began to growl and hiss within days on the drug and the behavior
continued until several days AFTER withdrawal of the medication. Those results
would indicate a contraindication for Prozac being given to dogs as they
have for close to two decades now.

The only thing new with Reconcile, the name of the drug in the US, is
that it is a time release Prozac. All the time released change does is make
it FAR MORE difficult to withdraw from. If your dog happens to be a
rapid metabolizer then he/she will metabolize the drug faster than expected and
go into withdrawal before the next dose is given. And according to FDA warnings
you could have a dog that could be going into a withdrawal reactions
of suicide, hostility, or psychosis. . . . We need to do a survey to see
how many dogs are running in front of mack trucks and trains instead of just
chasing cars once they begin taking this medication. 🙂 🙂
🙂 . . . . Back to the seriousness of this issue, this is an
extremely dangerous way for dogs and humans or any other living creature to take
a drug!

____________________________________

At the time, Steve Connell, Eli Lilly’s manager of consumer services for
companion animal health, said that more than 10million US dogs exhibit strange
symptoms from being left alone too long. [Hmmmmm and how many humans and other
living creatures exhibit strange symptoms from being left alone too
long?!!!]

‘Lilly research shows that 10.7million, or up to 17 per cent, of US dogs
suffer from separation anxiety,’ he said. ‘We’re thrilled that our first product
for dogs can help restore the human-pet bond.’

He said research showed that 73 per cent of dogs taking Reconcile and
undergoing therapy showed better behaviour within eight weeks, compared to dogs

receiving therapy alone.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1252672/A-dogs-life-set-easier-day-pet-Prozac-treat-depression.html

A dog’s life set to get easier with once-a-day pet Prozac to treat
depression

By Daniel Martin
Last updated at 8:58 AM on 22nd February
2010

A dog version of the anti-depressant Prozac has been approved for sale to
British pet owners.

The one-a-day tablet, which tastes of beef, is said to help cure ‘canine
compulsive disorder’ and ‘separation anxiety’ brought on by owners’ long
absences during the day.

Symptoms include poor behaviour, whimpering or tail-chasing.

Spaniel looking sad

Down in the doggy dumps:
Once-a-day chewable tablet, which tastes of beef, has been launched in the US to
help dogs beat depression

The drug, called Reconcile, is also designed to curb the compulsive pacing,
chewing and dribbling which its makers claim is a result of depression brought
on by their owners’ long absences.

The anti-depressant Prozac has been used to cure compulsive behaviour in
humans, and works by increasing the brain’s levels of serotonin, a ‘happiness’
chemical.

Trials involving more than 660 mentally-disturbed pets in Europe and the US
produced improvements in behaviour within eight weeks.

Eli Lilly, the drug’s US manufacturer, said: ‘Treatment for companion animals
is a relatively new area for us.’

They point to research which shows that as many as 8 per cent of dogs suffer
from canine compulsive disorder.

Prozac

Pick me up: Prozac

Critics say dogs are now being diagnosed with ‘lifestyle’ illnesses so that
drugs can be marketed to treat them.

Roger Mugford, an animal psychologist, said: ‘Most breakthroughs in dog
behaviour are achieves by carrying a tidbit and using it wisely, not by
drugs.’

Reconcile has now been granted a license by the UK‘s Veterinary Medicines
Directorate.

However, it was first licensed in the US three years ago for separation
anxiety from being left alone for long periods.

The American Food and Drug Administration said it should be taken with
therapy to modify the dog’s behaviour – and should be taken by puppies as young
as six months.

At the time, Steve Connell, Eli Lilly’s manager of consumer services for
companion animal health, said that more than 10million US dogs exhibit strange
symptoms from being left alone too long.

‘Lilly research shows that 10.7million, or up to 17 per cent, of US dogs
suffer from separation anxiety,’ he said. ‘We’re thrilled that our first product
for dogs can help restore the human-pet bond.’

He said research showed that 73 per cent of dogs taking Reconcile and
undergoing therapy showed better behaviour within eight weeks, compared to dogs
receiving therapy alone.

The drug’s website says: ‘While you may not be familiar with canine
separation anxiety, you are probably familiar with its symptoms.

‘While you are gone, your dog may do one or several of the following: chew
destructively; bark or whine; inappropriate urination and/or defecation; drool;
pace; tremble; vomit – or worse.

‘Separation anxiety is a clinical condition in your dog’s brain. Your pet is
not a bad dog. Your pet’s behaviour is the result of separation
anxiety.’

In Britain, research for Sainsbury’s Bank in 2003 indicated that 632,000 dogs

and cats had suffered from depression in the previous year.

Nearly three times as many had suffered from behavioural problems which could
be linked to depression, such as attacking furniture.

Clare Moyles, Sainsbury’s pet insurance manager, said: ‘People are leading
more stressful lives and unfortunately this can have an adverse effect on the
health of our pets.

‘Cats and dogs can be very susceptible to their owner’s feelings and if they
sense that they are unhappy they can become agitated or depressed.’

Side effects of Reconcile can include lethargy, reduced appetite, vomiting,
shaking, diarrhoea, restlessness, excessive barking, aggression and seizures in
a small number of dogs.

815 total views, no views today

SSRIs: Withdrawal is Sometimes More Severe Than the Original Problem.

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Although this article at least acknowledges the problem with
rebound where the initial problem seems like nothing compared to the withdrawal

effects and rebound effects, it does not address the seriousness of withdrawal.
What is described here sounds like a piece of cake compared to what so many go
through in antidepressant withdrawal!

The FDA warns that abrupt withdrawal can possibly lead to
suicide, hostility or psychosis – generally a manic psychosis. Those are hardly

the milder withdrawal effects mentioned below! ALWAYS withdraw very, very
gradually so that you only have to deal with these milder withdrawal
effects.

________________________________
Paragraph two reads:  “It seems hard to imagine that

stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat.
Sometimes the reaction is actually
more severe than the original problem.

Paragraph nine
reads:  “Another class of medications that can trigger withdrawal

includes antidepressants such as Celexa, Effexor, Paxil and
Pristiq.
Many people who quit these drugs experience  ‘brain
zaps,’  dizziness or the sensation of having their  ‘head in a
blender,’ along with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.”

http://www.sgvtribune.com/living/ci_13913666

Rebound symptoms may keep many on drugs

Posted: 12/02/2009 10:46:51 PM PST

When people take
certain drugs for anxiety, insomnia, heartburn or headache, they are trying to
ease their discomfort. They surely don’t intend to make things worse, yet
sometimes that is what happens when they go off the medication.

It seems
hard to imagine that stopping a medicine could trigger the same symptoms it was
supposed to treat. Sometimes the reaction is actually more severe than the

original problem.

Doctors occasionally have difficulty recognizing this
rebound effect, because they may assume that the patients’ difficulties are
simply the return of the original symptoms.

During the 1970s, Valium and
Librium were two of the most commonly prescribed drugs in America. These popular
tranquilizers eased anxiety and helped people sleep.

When they were
stopped abruptly, however, some people developed withdrawal symptoms that
included severe anxiety, agitation, poor concentration, nightmares and insomnia.
Many doctors just couldn’t imagine that such symptoms might persist for weeks,
since these drugs are gone from the body within several days. Nowadays, the

withdrawal syndrome from benzodiazepines like Ativan (lorazepam), Valium
(diazepam) and Xanax (alprazolam) is well-recognized.

Other drugs also
may cause unexpected withdrawal problems. Quite a few people have trouble
stopping certain heartburn drugs. Here’s an example from one reader: “I have
been taking Protonix for heartburn for about six months. After learning of

potential ill effects from long-term use, I tried to stop taking it. After
about a week, I had to start taking it again due to severe heartburn – the
rebound effect, I suppose. I asked my provider how I should go about
discontinuing its use, but she did not know.”

Many physicians assumed
that severe heartburn upon discontinuation was the reappearance of the

underlying digestive problem. In the case of medications such as Aciphex,
Nexium, Prevacid, Prilosec and Protonix, however, an innovative study
demonstrated that perfectly healthy people suffer significant heartburn symptoms
they’d never had before when they go off one of these drugs after two months of
taking them (Gastroenterology, July 2009).

In addition to
benzodiazepines and heartburn medicines, other drugs can cause this type of
rebound phenomenon. Decongestant nasal sprays are notorious for causing rebound
congestion if used longer than three or four days. We have heard from people who
got hooked and used them several times a day for years.

Another class of
medications that can trigger withdrawal includes antidepressants such as Celexa,
Effexor, Paxil and Pristiq. Many people who quit these drugs experience “brain
zaps,” dizziness or the sensation of having their “head in a blender,” along
with shivers, high blood pressure or rapid heart rate.

All these
medications have two things in common: Stopping suddenly triggers a rebound with
symptoms similar to those of the original problem, and providers have very
little information on how to ease their patients’ withdrawal difficulties.

Patients deserve a warning before starting a drug that may be difficult
to stop. Providers should learn how to help patients stop a medication when they
no longer need it.

Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds
a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert. Write to them in
care of their Web site: www.PeoplesPharmacy.com

599 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Owosso man judged incompetent to stand trial

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Rosie is exactly right on her remarks on this case. Head injury is
contra-indicated when it comes to antidepressant use. The Wellbutrin package
insert spells it out better than any of the others if you would like to
read up on this aspect of antidepressant adverse reactions.
Also note that there is another case involving a head injury documented in
the comment section. I will send that out as a separate case next.
__________________________________________
” A previous article stated that this man was on medication for
depression. Since he suffered a head injury, he should never have been given an
antidepressant since they can exacerbate seizures, head trauma, etc.. Many
experts have said this and testified to this. ”

Rosie wrote on Oct 2, 2009 4:27 PM:

” The sad fact is that the antidepressants probably caused this
terrible violence and these tragic deaths.

The Physicians Desk Reference
states that SSRI antidepressants and all antidepressants can cause mania,
psychosis, abnormal thinking, paranoia, hostility, etc. These side effects can
also appear during withdrawal.

Go to www.SSRIstories.com where there are over
3,300 cases, with the full media article available, involving bizarre murders,
suicides, school shootings [48 of these] and murder-suicides – all of which
involve SSRI antidepressants like Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, etc, . The media
article usually tells which SSRI antidepressant the perpetrator was taking or
had been using. ”

http://www.argus-press.com/articles/2009/10/04/news/news8.txt

News

Owosso man judged incompetent to stand trial

By MICHAEL PETERSON, Argus-Press Staff Writer
Email this
story
| Print this
story

Saturday, October 3, 2009 9:49 PM EDT

CORUNNA –
The 33-year-old Owosso man accused of two Sept. 11 murders was found incompetentto stand trial and will be remanded to the State Department of Mental Health for
treatment.

Sixty-sixth District Court Judge Terrance P. Dignan signed an
order Wednesday afternoon finding Harlan Drake incompetent. However, Dignan, in
his written opinion, said there is a substantial probability Drake will attain
competence with treatment.

Dignan’s decision was based on a report filed
by the Center for Forensic Psychiatry in Ann Arbor, where Drake was
evaluated.

Drake is accused of shooting Jim Pouillon, 63, as the Owosso

resident stood across from Owosso High School with an anti-abortion sign. Drake
also allegedly shot and killed Mike Fuoss, 61, the owner of an Owosso Township
gravel company.

Police say Drake also planned to target area Realtor Jim
Howe, but was arrested before he was able to carry out that portion of the
attack.

Robert Ashley, Drake’s attorney, said there were multiple reasons
for the court’s incompetency decision.

Ashley said Drake’s suicide
attempt Sept. 13, while he was in the Shiawassee County Jail, was a factor.
Drake shattered a television in his cell and cut his arm near the wrist with
glass shards.

Also, Ashley said, Drake was involved in a 2004 crash that
resulted in the death of two teenagers after they failed to yield to Drake’s
semi-truck. Drake’s family previously said Drake has battled depression since
the fatal crash and subsequently takes medication because of the
incident.

“We have fought all along that Mr. Drake’s mental health was
an issue here and this seems to support that,  Ashley said. “We certainly
want him to get well and now he is in a facility where that can occur – as
opposed to the Shiawassee County Jail, which just wasn’t equipped to handle
him.

Drake will receive treatment at the Center for Forensic
Psychiatry for a maximum of 15 months, according to Ashley. Drake’s preliminary
examination on two counts of first-degree murder, felony firearm and carrying a
dangerous weapon with unlawful intent has been postponed until after Drake
undergoes the treatment and is ruled competent.

I have no reason to

believe that it will take the full 15 months, but I cannot speculate on the
length of time, Ashley said.  I cannot say what the course of treatment
will be. That will be up to the Center for Forensic Psychiatry to determine.

Shiawassee County Chief Assistant Prosecutor Sara Edwards said it is
important to note the Center for Forensic Psychiatry is a secure
facility.

Some believe it is like getting out of jail – it is not,
Edwards said.  Although he is not incarcerated in a jail, he is still in
custody. It’s not a type of place were he gets freedom or gets to go on field
trips.

Edwards added the Prosecutor’s Office still plans to move
forward with the case after Drake’s treatment is complete.

Obviously,
it is our hope that he would become competent through treatment,  Edwards
said.

– Contact Michael Peterson at 725-5136 extension 223 or
mpetersonarguspress@gmail.com. Post comments about this story online at www.argus-press.com.

Comment on this Story


Rosieceewrote on Oct 3, 2009 2:20 PM:
” A previous article stated that this man
was on medication for depression. Since he suffered a head injury, he should
never have been given an antidepressant since they can exacerbate seizures, head
trauma, etc.. Many experts have said this and testified to this. ”

Rosiecee wrote on Oct 2, 2009 4:27 PM:

The sad fact is that the antidepressants probably caused this terrible violence
and these tragic deaths.

The Physicians Desk Reference states that SSRI
antidepressants and all antidepressants can cause mania, psychosis, abnormal
thinking, paranoia, hostility, etc. These side effects can also appear during
withdrawal.

Go to www.SSRIstories.com where there are over
3,300 cases, with the full media article available, involving bizarre murders,
suicides, school shootings [48 of these] and murder-suicides – all of which
involve SSRI antidepressants like Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil, etc, . The media
article usually tells which SSRI antidepressant the perpetrator was taking or
had been using. ”

JD wrote on Oct 2, 2009 3:11 PM:

Antidepressents don’t affect everyone the same way. Just cause they might work
for you doesn’t mean they work for everyone. That’s also why there is more than
one type of antidepressant–cause they don’t all work the same. Let the man get
better so he is “in his right mind” when he is tried. It does no good to punish
someone if they really don’t why they’re being punished. ”

adam conley wrote on Oct 2, 2009 11:38 AM:

automatically your guilty in civil servants eyes. they could care less if a
person has mental problems. but if it was a civil servant that commits a crime
they are automatically innocent of the crime. look how colbrys crimes where
handled from the beginning. wasn’t handcuffed didn’t go to jail didn’t get fired
for drinking on the job. do you really think you would get a 200 dollar bond for
drunk driving hit and run fleeing eluding police. i dont think so. ”

wrote on Oct 2, 2009 9:48 AM:

Does anyone know what kind of medication he was on? Not that it is an excuse for
what he did, just curious. ”

S. Lake wrote on Oct 2, 2009 7:25 AM:
” Mr.Drake isn’t competent enough to go to trial at this time, but, he was
competent enough at the time to purchase many rounds of ammunition and a number
of firearms! He was competent enough to drive a vehicle and drop off a relative
at the High School, but, didn’t know what he was doing when he fired one of the
guns that he was competent enough to buy! He was competent enough to drive that
same vehicle and go to the gravel pit and again use a gun that he was competent
enough to purchase.
I’m sure many of the citizens in Owosso are glad not to

see the “sign-man” anymore. But, should you forget, he was MURDERED IN COLD
BLOOD. Mr.Fuoss was also MURDERED IN COLD BLOOD. They have family members that
MISS them. There are laws somewhere to protect the victims. I believe that there
is a law regarding felons and mentally ill person from purchasing firearms.
Maybe that should be checked out! Hopefully the system will seek them and use
them. By the way, does Mr.Drake get visition with his family and friends? Jim
and Mike do, just at a very different place. Don’t let the “system” sweep this
under the rug. By the way, I didn’t realize that individual cells had TV’s. I
thought that there was a central area provided outside of individual cells for
that. (just wondering) ”

dan
holman wrote on Oct 2, 2009 6:16
AM:
” II was in the Oakland County Jail these past 4 months. My bunkee is in
jail for destroying his home with a hammer. This frightened his poor wife who
arrived home during his rampage. Though his wife was not verbally or physically
threatened or harmed, my bunkee was charged with Felony Assault.

My
bunkee was on meds for depression as a result of a motorcycle accident. His meds
were the reason he went on his rampage. The doctor prescribed something he
should not have been taking, this contributed to his mental state.

It is
possible that Harlan Drake’s situation is similar. It is reported that in 2004
Drake was in a severe motor vehicle accident, and has not been the same since.
Perhaps prescribed drugs contributed to his homicidal rampage.

However,
one thing is very strange; my bunkee had to wait 4 months to get into the Ann
Arbor forensic lab, and he still has not received word from the court regarding
the lab’s prognosis. Harlan Drake seems to get preferential treatment and a
clement court decision within weeks of his shooting rampage.

This is all
too typical of pro-abortion violence against pro-lifers.

When pro-lifers
are attacked at the death camps, and we call for the police, and guess who gets
arrested? Usually nothing happens to the person committing the assault. Others
could say much more. I have heard many, many stories besides my own
experiences.

I am presently in custody in Michigan as a result of road
rage. I was driving a vehicle which displays the same aborted babies Jim
Poullion was displaying not 40 miles from where Jim was shot and killed by
Harlan Drake.

I am accused of the road rage the other person was doing
(I have nothing against bland mini-vans).

I am presently tempted to

plead to a misdemeanor just to get this ordeal over with. My chances of getting
a fair minded jury in this country are very slim. Most people believe that in
any altercation, people who display aborted baby pictures are at fault. They
believe we are deliberately provoking people to fight us. I am sure that is in
the back of most people’s minds when it comes to the shooting death of Jim
Poullion. Though unsaid, they believe he got what he deserved.

But
provoking a fight is not the reason we display the pictures. We display the
brutality of abortion because we want baby-killing to end. We want people to see
and to understand how outrageous it is for a mother to kill her child.
Displaying the pictures saves lives and stirs up repentance. It also brings
about outrage to the unrepentant. Baby-murder is permitted, protected, and
promoted in our nation for 37 years with no end in sight. Displaying the carnage
is the most direct and powerful means we have to combat it’s acceptance.

Those who kill their children have few inhibitions about inflicting harm
on strangers. There is but a thin layer of civility which prevents many from
doing so. Drugs can strip away that thin layer. But even those considered sane,
empowered as of a pastor, judge, juror, prosecutor, politician, or voter
participate in the homicides of 4000 innocent Americans per day.

How
shall those who protect the unborn get fair treatment from those who participate
in their killings? It will not happen this side of glory. ”

JH wrote on Oct 2, 2009 2:43 AM:

Good for him, I know a thing or two about the local mental health care and let
me just say it’s “lacking”. If he needs help I hope he gets it. ”

Ashamedoflaw wrote on Oct 1, 2009 11:07 PM:

Why not do the decent thing, and put him out of his misery. Give him the needle
and end it now!!! Too bad he didin’t cut himself deep enough to end it in jail,
Shame on the jailers for for saving his life. Now we have to pay for him to rot
in jail the rest of our natural lives ”

4pets wrote on Oct 1, 2009 9:39 PM:


” OMG. I cannot believe how “blind” some people are! This murderer is not
sane- no murderer is sane! This does not mean that I think he should not be
tried for the murders he committed. He should be punished to the full extent of
the law!I am so sick of “criminals” blaming their frickin “depression” or their
“anti-depressant” medication for their crimes! I am depressed and have taken
these types of medications and I did not kill anyone! Perhaps the lawmakers
should consider a persons “mental” health before allowing them a gun permit!!!!

Interesting wrote on Oct
1, 2009 4:29 PM:
” You know this is unbelieveable to say the least. I work
in the County, a man had called on Wed. before the murders and requested Howe’s
address, he did plan these murders, he did know what he was doing. I am sure he
is depressed because he went on the rant rage and was going to be in prison for
the rest of his life!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! He is never get was is
do———him!!!!!!!!! ”

698 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: 42% of suicides in One Indiana County Were on Antidepressants

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Note the title of this article and how they are blaming increased
suicide with the economy. The economy does increase suicide in several ways but
the two most common denominators in the economy doing this is that these drugs
are more often prescribed due to depression being more common with a poor
economy and people already on antidepressants not being able to keep up their
insurance so that they can afford the drugs thus forcing people into abrupt
withdrawal. The FDA has already warned that abrupt withdrawal from an
antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis.
How, how, how can there be such a high rate of suicide
associated with the use of antidepressants and the article STILL complain that
people have a stigma about “getting help” which in their terms means getting
drugged with an antidepressant?! Oh yes, and we are suppose to believe that
counseling is supposed to help that be less fatal.
These drugs have been shown over and over again to increase
the rate of suicide. But as Hitler said, if you tell a lie often enough people
will believe it. Drug companies have that practice perfected. They will tell you
that black is white and day is night all day long.
Although the report shows a high rate of suicide (42%)
associated with antidepressant use, what is NOT addressed is how many had
recently been taking antidepressants and were in withdrawal which can cause
additional suicidal risks.
___________________________________
Second paragraph from the end reads:  “Of the 17
deaths in the first half of 2009, seven people were taking antidepressant
medication
, but only one was seeing a counselor. Chappell and Groves
said studies show doing both works best.”

SSRI Stories note:  So

forty-two percent of the people who committed suicide were taking
an antidepressant.  This is an exceedingly high
number.

http://www.courierpress.com/news/2009/sep/07/economy-related-suicides-up/

Economy-related suicides up

Groves: Overall numbers consistent with 2008

  • By Gavin
    Lesnick

  • Posted September 7, 2009 at 11:40 p.m. , updated September 8, 2009 at 9:35
    a.m.
Source: Vanderburgh County Coroner’s Office

EVANSVILLE ­
Vanderburgh County had the same number of suicides through the first half of

this year as it did in the first six months of 2008, though officials say there
has been a marked increase in self-inflicted deaths tied to the faltering
economy.

Of the 17 suicides reported through June 30, six of them
occurred after the person lost his job.

That compares with only one

job-related suicide in the first half of 2008.

Coroner Annie Groves
called it a big concern, especially given the recent news that Whirlpool will
shut down next year, taking 1,100 jobs with it. “When you lose your job, you
lose your home, you lose hope,” Groves said. “That worries me with this
economy.”

The coroner’s office recently released data on suicides in
advance of Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week, which continues through
Saturday in Evansville. It ends with the LifeSavers Walk, an annual event that
raises awareness and funds for addressing the suicide problem. Registration
starts at 8 a.m. Saturday at the Evansville State Hospital, 3400 Lincoln
Ave.

Local efforts toward combating suicides grew in 2007, when
Vanderburgh County ended the year with a record 40 self-inflicted deaths.

The numbers went down slightly in 2008, when 38 were reported by year’s
end, and are on pace this year to finish down again.

In addition to the
increase in job-related suicides, Groves said there also has been a steady
increase in self-inflicted deaths by people ages 20 to 39. There were 11 such
deaths in the first six months of the year compared with just five during that
span last year, 14 in all of 2008 and 16 in all of 2007.

“That’s an area
I’m very concerned about,” Groves said. “… It used to be 50 to 59 was our
higher ones.”

The 17 deaths recorded through the end of June include only
confirmed suicides.

Groves said there likely are six more suicides among
14 cases officially ruled accidental overdoses, but that a lack of hard evidence
prevents her from ruling those deaths intentional.

But on another front,
the numbers could be construed as artificially high: The 17 self-inflicted
deaths include seven people who committed a suicidal act in another county but
died here after being airlifted to an Evansville hospital.

In any event,
Groves said seeing the numbers come down from the record-setting 2007 figures is
a good sign.

She credits the dip with multiple prevention efforts: the
walk, frequent classes that teach the signs and symptoms of suicide and
brochures and billboards that increase awareness.

“We’re so busy focusing

on how many we’ve lost, we sometimes forget to focus on how many we’ve saved,”
Groves said.

Janie Chappell, chairwoman of the Southwestern Indiana
Suicide Prevention Coalition, said awareness efforts increasingly will focus on
encouraging people suffering from depression to seek medication and
counseling.

Of the 17 deaths in the first half of 2009, seven people were

taking antidepressant medication, but only one was seeing a counselor. Chappell
and Groves said studies show doing both works best.

“But there’s still so
much stigma surrounding mental health, people are reluctant to get help,”
Chappell said.

465 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Businessman Shoots Self Weeks Before Wedding: England

NOTE BY Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): PLEASE notice all of the strong warnings of serious reactions to antidepressants noted in this one short paragraph and keep in mind the FDA warning that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. Starting or stopping an antidepressant are two of the most dangerous periods of use of one of these drugs. Obviously once again this man or anyone close to this man had been given that warning.
Paragraph 13 reads:  “In the weeks leading up to his death, he wouldn’t eat properly or get out of bed, and was ignoring his Blackberry as every call seemed to bring more bad news from creditors. When my dad asked him at a family lunch if he had paid for the wedding cars, he hadn’t. He couldn’t afford to even put them on a credit card. I knew then that there was a real problem but he refused to discuss it with me. He told me that he’d been prescribed a course of antidepressants, and I suggested he see a counsellor, but he was dismissive.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-1207612/Abigail-King-describes-dealt-fianc-taking-life.html

My fiancé committed suicide weeks before our wedding after credit crunch caused collapse of his firm

By Abigail King

Last updated at 8:37 PM on 22nd August 2009

Abigail King was making final preparations for her wedding
when her fiancé Mark went missing. Although she was aware that his property business was failing in the credit crunch, she had no idea of the extent of his desperation

‘It was starting my own company that saved my life,’ says Abigail King

On a sunny morning in April 2008 I got up early. My fiancé Mark Sebire and I were getting married in five weeks’ time and I wanted to sort out the final arrangements for our wedding. I dressed up to go for a girls’ lunch and when I came downstairs, Mark hugged me and told me he loved me. As I left the house he was watching GMTV on the sofa, eating cereal.

That was the last time I saw him alive. The next day I had to identify his body at the mortuary.

To the outside world, Mark had everything to live for. He was a handsome 36-year-old property developer, popular with his friends. We were deeply in love, about to get married and shared a £1.7 million London house that Mark had bought for us to renovate.

But behind the scenes I knew that he was depressed. His business was collapsing. He had a huge portfolio of London properties once worth millions on paper but, with the credit crunch looming, he was unable to sell them. He was mortgaged to the hilt and facing financial ruin. I kept telling him that, as long as we were together, we would survive. But I didn’t realise how desperate he was not to lose what he’d built up. He put extraordinary pressure on himself to create an amazing life for us, and I believe it was that pressure that killed him.

Immediately after I left the house that April morning, Mark took a taxi to an isolated spot
and shot himself. In a letter he left for the coroner, he wrote: ‘I took my own life due to extreme financial pressure, and my poor fiancée would have been liable for my debts if we had got married. It is no one’s fault but my own.’

Mark Sebire with his beloved cocker spaniel Iggy

He could see his world falling apart and couldn’t cope with starting again. His pride wouldn’t let him admit that he was in trouble, and he didn’t know how to reach out for help.

Mark and I had met on a blind date in 2005, and from the beginning our relationship just seemed to make sense. My parents had separated when I was eight, then, when I was 14, my mother died of leukaemia at only 42; a year later my older sister Louise had a horrific car crash at 19, suffering brain injuries from which she has struggled to recover. I had always had a fear of abandonment – a fear that the people I loved were not going to stick around. Mark seemed so strong and, instinctively, I felt protected. After six months, I sold my flat and we moved into his house in Wandsworth together.

Mark had high expectations of our life together. He wanted us to be living in the country in a big house, and had the future all mapped out. He talked me into leaving my job as a letting agent as he saw it as his obligation to take care of me. He loved me running the home, and I focused on becoming the perfect housewife.

He proposed in March 2007 and we spent the months after our engagement staying on friends’ sofas while we renovated Mark’s house. It was still unfinished when we moved back in the middle of winter. We were living in one room and there was no heating or electricity. I thought, if we can get through this, we can get through anything. But at the start of the new year the fight seemed to go out of him. When Iggy, our beloved cocker spaniel, died in January, Mark was inconsolable. From that day it was as though the man I loved had disappeared. Instead of being focused, driven and full of ideas for the future, he seemed secretive and distant, and looked haunted.

In the weeks leading up to his death, he wouldn’t eat properly or get out of bed, and was ignoring his Blackberry as every call seemed to bring more bad news from creditors. When my dad asked him at a family lunch if he had paid for the wedding cars, he hadn’t. He couldn’t afford to even put them on a credit card. I knew then that there was a real problem but he refused to discuss it with me. He told me that he’d been prescribed a course of antidepressants, and I suggested he see a counsellor, but he was dismissive.

Mark put extraordinary pressure on himself to create an amazing life for us, and it was that pressure that killed him

For months we had been planning to start a family. Suddenly in February he said that we should stop trying. When I asked him why, he just kept repeating, ‘It’s not a good time’. He had stopped going into the office, and after his death I discovered his work diary. At the beginning of the year it was packed with appointments but as the weeks went on, it became almost empty. One unbearably sad entry on his to-do list just read: go for a walk. It seemed so lonely.

A week before he died, I had the final fitting for my wedding dress. Mark knew I had been exercising and dieting and was really nervous that I wouldn’t get into it, but he showed no interest. I found out later that while I was having the fitting, he was registering me as his next of kin.

Even though the day he died started normally enough, that morning I had a sense of unease. But I didn’t start panicking until I realised his mobile was switched off – that was so unlike him. Unable to get hold of him, I rang all his friends but no one had heard from him. Then he failed to turn up at an afternoon meeting. His best friend Giles came over and we rang everyone who knew him. Finally, in the evening, I rang the police, but they told me they couldn’t file a report until he had been missing for 12 hours.

Abigail and Mark on holiday together in Portugal and the Maldives in 2007

When two uniformed policemen knocked on the door at 1am, I just felt a sense of relief that they had come to register him as missing. Then I saw his business partner Justin standing behind them. He was ashen. They told me that the body of a man had been found at Bisley shooting range in Surrey with a driving licence registered to Mark.

It was completely disorientating. The room where we had been laughing together just hours earlier was now a dark place where people were clinging to each other.

As the news spread, friends and family started arriving at the house. My stepmother Rosemary drove down from Gloucestershire. I remember at about 4am someone telling me to go upstairs and rest, but lying on our bed was unbearable. Everything was as Mark had left it the previous morning and the sheets still smelt of him. The police also told me that he had registered me as his next of kin, which meant that I would have to identify him.

The following day, in a state of shock, I drove 50 miles to see Mark’s mother and then another 50 to his father (they are divorced), to tell them that their son was dead. Then I went to identify his body. When I got to the police station, I was taken to a small waiting room. Two officers came in and took some papers out of a brown envelope. They were the suicide notes Mark had left. When they were put in front of me, I knew he had really gone.

He could see his world falling apart and couldn’t cope with starting again

He turned out to have made careful plans. In the week before his suicide he arranged to meet friends he hadn’t seen for months, as if saying goodbye to them, and some of the letters were dated as much as three weeks earlier. In one addressed to me, he wrote simply: ‘My darling Aby. What can I tell you that you don’t know already? I’m sorry. M.’

It appears that he wrote all the other notes first and left mine until last. It was almost as though he had written it so many times in his head that he couldn’t write it on the page, and it ended up being just one sentence.

Mark was buried in a country churchyard in Surrey, close to both his parents’ homes. On the morning of the funeral I drove out to Bisley shooting range. I felt I had to see the exact spot where he died. The instructors at the range showed me where his body had been found. I sat on the grassy verge in the spring sunshine and laid some roses on the spot. Then I drove to the funeral parlour and put Iggy’s ashes at his feet and a rose on his chest. He was being buried with love from me. That gave me huge comfort.

At the funeral there was a sense of bewilderment that someone so young should have died in this way. His family were on one side of the church and mine were on the other – just like at a wedding.

Our wedding day had been planned for 17 May. I had a gospel choir booked for the church in Gloucestershire, and 300 guests invited to a reception at a country house hotel with four live bands. My wedding dress alone cost £10,000. It was ridiculously grandiose, and incredibly expensive to cancel. My dad and stepmother stepped in and made all the calls. I now see how ludicrous it all was. I remember suggesting to Mark that we should do a low-key wedding, but he wanted the big affair. He was so proud of me.

At a fitting for her Vera Wang wedding dress and the invitation

On what would have been our wedding day, my stepmother Rosemary took me to Cyprus. She is like a second mother to me, and married my dad in 1997. At the time when we would have been saying our vows, I sat on the beach and looked up at the sky, visualising every moment. It was as if I could see it actually happening in a parallel universe.

Suicide is like a bomb exploding, because the person who dies leaves injured people all around them, suffering incredible pain and grief. You naturally look for someone to blame. Mentally I accused everyone – creditors, Mark’s friends, even my own family – for not supporting us both more. Then I blamed myself. I was tortured about why I hadn’t seen that he was in such a state of emotional crisis. But why hadn’t he told me how desperate he felt? I still can’t forgive him for not having faith in us. I was sure we could have made it through together.

His mother blamed me for not looking after him. Four months after the funeral she wrote me a letter in which she said she held me responsible for his death. I don’t judge her; she was in terrible pain. She said she did not want me around the family. We have not been in contact since.

My best friend, whom I have known for 25 years, also withdrew from me. Her brother
had invested heavily in Mark’s business and was hit hard when it collapsed. Even my own family have found his suicide difficult to deal with: today, Mark’s name is barely mentioned.

People are guilt-ridden over what they could have done to stop it, and no one likes to dwell on such negative emotion too long, so they push it away as quickly as possible. Only a handful of close girlfriends helped me through – ringing me when I was too unhappy to get out of bed, forcing me to go out for supper with them, convincing me that I wasn’t a bad person, that this was just a bad thing that had happened to me.

In the end it was starting my own company that saved my life. I had to move out of our home seven weeks after Mark died because his family wanted it back to sell it, so I moved into a rented studio flat in Fulham. The joint bank account was empty, and he left me with hefty debts that I am still trying to resolve.

But I was well trained by Mark to be a wife – organising builders, events and running a home – so why not be a wife for hire? I sold my engagement ring. It was a constant reminder of what had happened – and it was also the only valuable thing I owned. I bought a second-hand Volkswagen Polo with some of the money, and put the rest into a business called My Domestic Goddess – providing a home service that organises people’s lives while they are at work. I collected children from school, picked up parking permits, walked dogs.

Hard work got me on my feet again, and helped me through the rest of the year. As I gradually regained my emotional strength, it occurred to me that Mark wouldn’t have recognised me as the woman he had wanted to protect and provide for – but doing this for myself was an essential part of the grieving process, of helping me deal with the gap he had left.

Everything was as Mark had left it that morning and the sheets still smelt of him

At the beginning of this year, I started to see a Cruse bereavement therapist, to whom I am able to tell the dark thoughts that you can’t reveal to people you love because they would worry so much about you. And one of my first instincts was to get another dog. My new cocker spaniel Lily has brought joy back into my life. I know Mark would have adored her. When it’s a sunny day and I’m walking Lily in the park, I think, yes, I do forgive him. But, ultimately, there is no forgiveness because there is no real closure.

Today I have a new boyfriend, Tim. He’s 43 and is an incredible support, but it’s early days. I’m only 32 so maybe one day I will get married, but I am a very different person now to how I have been in previous relationships. I’m stronger, and I’m also more humble. The old Abigail was self-centred and ungrateful. I see her as a spoilt brat and I don’t recognise her now.

Now, just over a year on, I sometimes see in my mind’s eye how my life might have been – Mark and I walking hand in hand in the countryside with dogs running alongside us. Then I drive back alone to my small flat. It’s pointless to wallow in dreams – I have to look towards the future. I don’t know what it holds, and I like it that way. I have no expectations. Expectations are what killed Mark.

485 total views, 1 views today

PROZAC: Woman Threatens State Patrolman: Missouri

HOW SAD!!! Reminds me of a talk I had with parents in Louisiana just last week who are completely overwhelmed dealing with a daughter with similar problems – ALL BECAUSE OF THE WIDESPREAD PRESCRIBING OF THESE DEADLY AND VERY ADDICTIVE PRESCRIPTION DRUGS!!!! They know she can get them from just about any doctor around.
Doctors have truly become our biggest drug pushers in this country! What on earth are we doing to our children?!!! How can so many families be left alone to deal with this – never knowing from one minute to the next if they are going to find their child unresponsive and dying due to yet another overdose of these drugs?
This country is in SO MUCH trouble and it has NOTHING to do with any outside threat to our nation – it is within.
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac (ETC): Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare! & Audio: Help! I Can’t Get Off
My Antidepressant/Antipsychotic, ect. ()
Paragraphs three & four read:  “According to the criminal complaint, when Parsley made contact with West  ‘her speech was slurred and her eyes were bloodshot and glassy.’  He adds that he did not notice an odor of intoxicants on her.”SSRI Stories note:  “

 

“West reportedly admitted she had taken Xanax and Prozac at 6 a.m. After failing sobriety tests, West was placed under arrest.”

Hostility”  is listed as an Infrequent, but not Rare, reaction to Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

389 total views, 1 views today