ANTIDEPRESSANT & ALCOHOL: Assault: Man Attacks Kidney Transplant Patient: UK

Paragraph nine reads: “Steve Collins, defending, said his client had
expressed “considerable remorse” and added: “He accepts it was completely out
of order. Alcohol played its part and, perhaps, anti-depressants.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that
antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and can cause alcohol abuse. Also, the
liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,
thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.newburytoday.co.uk/News/Article.aspx?articleID=13103

Man banned from Thatcham for attacking kidney transplant patient
Sun, April 25 2010

By John Garvey, Reporter
Email: newburytoday@newburynews.co.uk
Phone: 01635 564632

A MAN who savagely attacked a frail, Thatcham kidney transplant patient
has been handed a jail term and banned from the town.

Forty-one-year-old Anthony Coles battered his terrified girlfriend Donna
Morrison as she cowered in the bedroom of her Thatcham home, demanding
hundreds of pounds in cash and threatening to stab her pet dog, Newbury
magistrates heard.

But they suspended the prison sentence last Thursday, April 22, ruling
that Mr Coles would not get the help he needed in jail.

Lauren Murphy, prosecuting, said: “The victim, who was subsequently rated
as being a high risk domestic violence victim, is a petite lady who has
health problems and has had two kidney transplants.

“The pair had been in a six-year relationship and he had recently moved
into her home. One evening he came in and had been drinking. She made his tea
but he didn’t want any. He became insulting, saying she wasn’t really ill
and that he didn’t want to be in the relationship any more.

“He asked for £10, which she gave him and she went to bed at 7.30pm, not
wanting to have an argument.”

Mr Coles went out and, upon his return, the court heard, began making
increasing demands for cash until he wanted £500.

Miss Murphy went on: “When she said she wouldn’t be able to get the money
he knocked her to the floor, grabbed her hair and dragged her along the
bedroom floor saying that, if she didn’t get him the money he would take her
dog Barney to the woods and stab him.

“She was petrified and afraid that if she called out she would suffer
serious harm. She told him she would get his money and he warned that if she
called the police he would kill her sister and make her life a misery.”

Miss Morrison made a show of going to the Thatcham Co-Op with her bank
card but then called police, the court heard.

Miss Murphy said: “Officers found her tearful and trembling and she kept
repeating: ‘He is going to kill me.’ She showed officers a large clump of
hair that had ben torn out by being dragged. Mr Coles told officers that he
had just flipped.”

Mr Coles, who now lives in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, admitted assault
causing actual bodily harm on March 4 this year.

Steve Collins, defending, said his client had expressed “considerable
remorse” and added: “He accepts it was completely out of order. Alcohol played
its part and, perhaps, anti-depressants.

“He had no money because his money was paid into her bank account – hence,
he wanted money to get away.”

Mr Collins asked magistrates to read pre-sentence reports and alluded to
on-going problems his client had with regard to relationships, adding: “He
knows you may send him to prison today and he has no problem with that. But
one day he is going to have to address these problems and he won’t be able
to do that in jail.”

Magistrates imposed a four-month jail term, but agreed to suspend it for
two years and ordered Mr Coles to undertake a domestic violence programme.

He was also banned from entering Thatcham for two years and ordered to pay
Miss Morrison £100 compensation.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Suicide: Woman Leaps From 9th Floor: England

Paragraph three reads:  “St Pancras Coroner’s Court was
told last Thursday how she had been suffering from depression
triggered by changes to her job, which included hotdesking – moving from
one seat to another a number of times – and the responsibility of caring for her
mother following an illness in 2005.”

Paragraph seven reads:  “Mr
Jolliffe focused his questions on whether Ms Calvey should have been
monitored more closely when taking her medication

and whether a lack of continuity of nurses
aggravated the situation.”

http://www.thecnj.co.uk/camden/2009/102209/news102209_09.html

Hotdesking’ led to council worker’s suicide leap

A COUNCIL employee who worked for the Town Hall for nearly 30 years
became depressed after she was asked to “hotdesk” and later killed herself, an
inquest heard.
Geraldine Calvey, 45, died after throwing herself from the
ninth floor of a tower block in the Regent’s Park estate off Euston Road in
July.
St Pancras Coroner’s Court was told last Thursday how she had been
suffering from depression triggered by changes to her job, which included
hotdesking – moving from one seat to another a number of times – and the
responsibility of caring for her mother following an illness in 2005. The death
of Ms Calvey’s father had also added to her anxiety but she felt she was too
busy to grieve.
The inquest heard how she attempted an overdose but
survived. Ms Calvey was released from hospital within four days and referred to
the South Camden Crisis Response and Resolution team, run by the Camden and
Islington NHS FoundationTrust on behalf of the council.
Psychiatrist Leticia
Magana-niebla, the Crisis team leader, said Ms Calvey appeared to be improving
before her death.
She said: “The latest stress was this change on her job and
having to hotdesk, and that was particularly bad for her, for the reasons of her
personality – liking things just so and being methodical.”
Ms Calvey’s
family, who were represented at the hearing by barrister John Jolliffe, believe
she was not properly cared for and have lodged a complaint.
Mr Jolliffe
focused his questions on whether Ms Calvey should have been monitored more
closely when taking her medication and whether a lack of continuity of nurses
aggravated the situation.
“She was seen by no fewer than six nurses from the
Camden team and she had to explain herself again as if starting from scratch and
couldn’t build up a rapport with them,” he said.
Recording a verdict of

suicide, Dr Reid said Ms Calvey impulsively took her own life. He cleared the
Crisis team of any failings, adding: “At no time was there any evidence upon
which the team could be satisfied she was suffering mental illness that would
warrant sectioning, and she declined informal admission.”
A statement from
Camden Council read: “Geraldine was a dedicated, conscientious and popular
member of staff who had worked for the council for 29 years. She is greatly
missed by everyone who worked with her.”
[]

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