Effexor & Alcohol: Female teacher found not criminally responsible for sex with male teen student

Paragraphs six through nine read:  “According to a statement of facts agreed upon by the Crown and defence, during the summer of 2008 Francoeur was mistakenly diagnosed with major depression and prescribed an anti-depressant drug known as Effexor. During the next few months, she underwent a radical change.”

“Francoeur actually has bipolar disorder rather than depression ­ and Effexor is known to escalate the  ‘manic’ phase experienced by people with bipolarism, which is characterized by extreme feelings of elation, euphoria, racing thoughts, inability to sleep and difficulty appreciating consequences, court heard.”

“Although she had previously been a very light drinker, Francoeur started using alcohol excessively, Piche told court. She spent money in careless ways, went days without sleep and ate irregularly, losing significant amounts of weight. She talked excessively and tookuncharacteristic shortcuts in caring for her daughters, who were five and seven years old.”

“The changes concerned her family members, who sent a letter to Francoeur’s doctor about the situation.”
———————–

SSRIStories.com & Drugawareness.org note:  There are now 15 cases on SSRI Stories of women school teachers molesting their minor male students.  Bill O’Reilly of the TV talk show, “The Factor” said they are receiving one case report every week. SSRI Stories does not have the resources to investigate these reports in regard to antidepressant use.

SSRIStories.com & Drugawareness.org note: Another additional note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and can cause alcohol abuse. (Check out the SSRIs & Alcohol article at www.drugawareness.org for additional information on alcohol cravings.) Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressantin the human body. 
http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Teacher+found+criminally+responsible+with+teen+student/4227894/story.html
Effexor & Alcohol: Female teacher found not criminally responsible for sex with male teen student
 
By Lori Coolican, Postmedia News February 4, 2011
 
A Saskatchewan teacher has been found not criminally responsible for having sex with a 15-year-old former student.

Photograph by: Joe Raedle, Getty Images
SASKATOON ­ Family and supporters of a teacher from Shell Lake, Sask., sighed with relief in a Saskatoon courtroom Friday after a judge declared her not criminally responsible, due to mental illness, for a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old former student.

Michelle Francoeur was in an extreme “manic state” and lacked the capacity to make rational decisions when she agreed to have sex with the teen boy on several occasions between Sept. 1 and Nov. 20, 2008, Queen’s Bench Justice Duane Koch found.

“The criminal law does not want to punish people who were suffering a mental disorder at the time of the act,” Crown prosecutor Mitch Piche said outside court.

Francoeur was charged with sexual touching, sexual exploitation and sexual assault against the teen, whose identity is protected by a publication ban, after RCMP received a complaint in December 2008.

She was suspended from her job at the Shell Lake school while the case was before the court.

According to a statement of facts agreed upon by the Crown and defence, during the summer of 2008 Francoeur was mistakenly diagnosed with major depression and prescribed an anti-depressant drug known as Effexor. During the next few months, she underwent a radical change.

Francoeur actually has bipolar disorder rather than depression ­ and Effexor is known to escalate the “manic” phase experienced by people with bipolarism, which is characterized by extreme feelings of elation, euphoria, racing thoughts, inability to sleep and difficulty appreciating consequences, court heard.

Although she had previously been a very light drinker, Francoeur started using alcohol excessively, Piche told court. She spent money in careless ways, went days without sleep and ate irregularly, losing significant amounts of weight. She talked excessively and took uncharacteristic shortcuts in caring for her daughters, who were five and seven years old.

The changes concerned her family members, who sent a letter to Francoeur’s doctor about the situation.

The boy had been in Francoeur’s class the previous school year, but no longer attended the school where she taught. They had exchanged text messages once that summer and one night in October he sent her a flirtatious text that resulted in their first sexual encounter, Piche said.

Several more incidents followed, until the boy’s mother discovered the situation.

Defence lawyer Aaron Fox noted Franceour would likely not have been charged with a crime had the incidents happened six months earlier, before changes to the Criminal Code raised the legal age of consent for sexual activity from 14 to 16.

Shell Lake is 175 kilometres north of Saskatoon.

lcoolican@thestarphoenix.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Doctor Murders his 9 Year Old Son: Oklahoma

Last thee paragraphs read:  “He wrote he continued
psychotherapy until his graduation from medical school in June 1988.”

“He told the board in 1996 that he was hospitalized again for three days
in 1995 for acute depression.”

” ‘I suffered this as a
result of all of the stress in my busy practice of internal medicine and all the
demands in making the final arrangements for my marriage,’  Wolf wrote in a
letter to the board. ‘I returned to work after my hospitalization on
adjusted dosages of
antidepressants
‘.”

Paragraph 19 reads:  “Wolf was seeing
a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication,

The Oklahoman has learned. His mental issues
date back to his first year of medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized
for major depression, his medical records show.”

http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten

Affidavit, calls detail brutal death of Nichols Hills boy, 9
Doctor,
arrested in son’s stabbing, battled mental problems, records show

BY NOLAN CLAY
Published: November 18,
2009

NICHOLS
HILLS
­ A doctor who has battled mental issues for years said his son

was the devil as he stabbed the boy to death Monday morning at their home,
according to a police affidavit and a 911 recording.
[]
Stephen
Paul Wolf The 51-yearold is being held in the Oklahoma County jail on a murder
complaint.

What the affidavit states …
Here is a description
from a police affidavit of events Monday morning when police officer Michael
Puckett arrived at Dr. Stephen P. Wolf’s Nichols Hills home:

The officer
was dispatched at 3:52 a.m. Monday to the house of a neighbor who called police
after Mary Wolf banged on the neighbor’s front door. The officer heard screaming
from Wolf’s house and met Mary Wolf at the open front door. She told the
officer, “He’s killing my son. He’s killing my son.”

The officer drew

his gun and went through the house, finding the doctor on his knees “wrestling
with something up against a cabinet door and a dishwasher.”

The officer
ordered Wolf to put his hands up. “At that time Mr. Wolf raised his hands to
about head level and looked back at Officer Puckett and said, ‘He’s got the
devil in him and you know it’ several times.”

The officer ordered Wolf,
who was covered in blood, to get on his stomach. Wolf complied. The officer then
saw the victim, Tommy, with a knife in his head and a knife in his chest.

“Mr. Wolf again started saying, ‘You know he’s got the devil in him’
several times over.”

The boy then began to convulse and “Mr. Wolf leapt
up off the floor and said, ‘He’s not dead’ and tried (to) grab a knife from the
body to continue the assault.” The police officer pulled Wolf by the neck and
shirt and Wolf fell and dropped a knife.

The officer kicked Wolf in the
head as Wolf tried to reach for the knife and punched him in the jaw when Wolf
tried to reach for the knife again. The officer then was able to toss the knife
away.

Another officer arrived and handcuffed the doctor.

Slain boy remembered
Tommy Wolf, 9, was remembered Tuesday as
a sweet boy.

“He was always creative and feisty,” said Kristin Moyer,
26, of Oklahoma City, who was a counselor at an after-school program at Casady
School when Tommy was a student in 2006.

“He was a little feisty kid,
but he wasn’t bad. Just a typical boy. He loved having fun with the rest of his

friends,” she said.

“He was a real sweet kid. He did have his share of
timeouts, just like the rest of them. But I really enjoyed him.”

Others
who knew the boy made similar comments online at NewsOK.com.

“I knew
Tommy through Cub Scouts,” wrote Cheldrea Mollett of Oklahoma City. “He was a
lovely, sweet and wonderful boy. God has him now, and he is at peace.”

NewsOK Related Articles

Stephen
Paul Wolf
, 51, is in the Oklahoma
County
jail on a murder complaint. His son, Tommy, was 9.

Wolf was
seeing a psychiatrist this year before the attack and was on medication, The
Oklahoman
has learned. His mental issues date back to his first year of
medical school in 1984 when he was hospitalized for major depression, his

medical records show.

He repeatedly told the police officer who broke up
the attack on his son, “He’s got the devil in him and you know it,” according to
the police arrest affidavit.

His wife, Mary
Wolf
, was making a 911 call during the attack. Police officer Michael
Puckett
can be heard on the recording telling the doctor, “Put your hands
behind your ——- back now!”

The doctor can be heard saying, “Mary,
he’s the devil.” Mary Wolf replies, “He’s not the devil.” She then says,
“Tommy.”

The doctor tried to stab his son again when the boy began
convulsing, even though the officer had his gun drawn, police reported. The
officer pulled the doctor away and then had to kick and strike the doctor in the
head to keep the doctor from getting a knife again.

The doctor attacked

his son in the kitchen of their $500,000 house at 1715 Elmhurst Ave., police
reported.

Wolf ­ covered in blood ­ was on top of his son when
the officer arrived shortly before 4 a.m. Monday, police reported. The victim
had “a knife lodged in the left upper section of his head and a knife stuck in
the upper right part of the chest,” police reported. The boy died at the home.
Mary Wolf was treated for cuts on her hands and face.

A neighbor, Douglas
Woodson
, told police the doctor “was under review at his hospital for anger
issues,” police reported in the affidavit. The neighbor also told police the

doctor “was supposed to go to a rehab facility for the anger plus drug and
alcohol abuse.”

Tommy was in the third grade at Christ the King
Catholic School
. His funeral is tentatively planned for Friday.

History of depression
The doctor specialized in internal medicine. St.
Anthony Hospital
said arrangements have been made with other doctors to
provide medical care to his patients.

The doctor’s attorney, Mack
Martin
, declined comment.

The doctor in 1991 told the medical
licensure board that he began psychotherapy when he was hospitalized for
depression during his first year of medical school at the University
of Oklahoma
. He said he took a year off from medical school.

“Through continuing psychotherapy unresolved conflicts from my early
childhood and adolescence were discovered,” he wrote in 1991. “I grieved for my
father for the first time. He died in an airplane crash three weeks before my
third birthday in 1961. I experienced the pain and loss of failed relationships
in high school. I felt anger toward my mother and stepfather because of problems
in our relationship.”

He wrote he continued psychotherapy until his
graduation from medical school in June 1988.

He told the board in 1996
that he was hospitalized again for three days in 1995 for acute depression.

“I suffered this as a result of all of the stress in my busy practice of
internal medicine and all the demands in making the final arrangements for my
marriage,” Wolf wrote in a letter to the board. “I returned to work after my
hospitalization on adjusted dosages of antidepressants.”

Read more:
http://www.newsok.com/affidavit-calls-detail-brutal-death-of-nichols-hills-boy-9/article/3418357?custom_click=masthead_topten#ixzz0XEj9aNVs

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PROZAC: Woman Develops Hypomania: Later Diagnosed as Bipolar as They All Are!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org): This little piece on antidepressant-induced bipolar disorder ends with the following questions: “What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?”

When you consider that the rate of diagnosis for Bipolar Disorder increased by 4000% in a recent 10 year period that the numbers of those answering a resounding YES to those questions is VERY HIGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I have publicly stated over and over again and will say it once again, “Antidepressants are the biggest CAUSE of Bipolar Disorder on the planet!”

1. Mania is a continuous series of mild seizures in the brain.

2. Seizures come from over stimulation of the brain.

3. ANTI – depressants, or the opposite of a depressant – a stimulant.

4. The over stimulation of the brain (especially from the shock of abrupt withdrawal from an antidepressant) leads to mania and the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder.

Fourth sentence reads: “. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania.”

http://bipolar.about.com/b/2009/08/31/bipolar-depression-and-antidepressants.htm

Bipolar Depression and Antidepressants

Monday August 31, 2009

My first psychiatric diagnosis was major depression, and my first psychiatric medication was Prozac. It was prescribed by my GP, not by a psychiatrist. I had a one-week follow-up visit, and then I was turned loose. It takes hindsight to see that what I thought was “normal” behavior in response to Prozac was in fact at least mild hypomania. Someone even called me “the poster child for Prozac.” This was in 1994, and I wasn’t diagnosed with bipolar disorder until 1999, after another antidepressant did a similar thing.

What about you? If you went to the doctor for depression, were you prescribed an antidepressant alone? Were you asked if you’d ever had “high” moods? Did the antidepressant bring on mania or hypomania?

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My Experience with Zoloft

“While on theses meds, I drove off the highway from the effects of Seroquel.“

Hi,

My name if Regina Jones. I am a 55 year old white female.

I started taking Zoloft in 1995 when my husband got ill. He was diagnosed with Major Depression, which had affected me.

My Psychiatrist first prescribed Prozac. I was on it for about 4-5 months, with no side effects. My doctor took me off the drug because of the fear of the side effects of
Prozac that hit the news. He started me on Paxil, a fairly new drug. I started to have blood sugar problems. I went to the pharmacy and asked for the information sheet on Paxil. The Pharmacist was hesitant. He thought I would not be able to understand the information. He didn’t know that I had worked in a hospital for 15 years and understood medical terminology quite well.

Near the end of the information, in very small print, it said that a rare side effect was Diabetes. I told my doctor and he took me off Paxil and started me on Zoloft.

My husband’s depression lasted over two years. I remained on Zoloft.

He was forced into retirement at age 47, with 30 years with the telephone company. The same year his mother died.

He retired, and we moved. In those 2 1/2 years, my husband was on 18 different meds.
Within a month after moving, I noticed that something was very wrong with him, but his therapist and Psychiatrist did not believe me.

Nine months later after a numerous list of events regarding my husband, he became Psychotic. Our family doctor recognized Bipolar Disorder in my husband, as he said, “it took me 30 seconds.”

He has been on Depakote since 1999. His whole nature has changed. The doctors still don’t believe me. My husband is a stranger to me and it has broken our 26 year marriage apart.

I truly believe that my husband has become a totally different, non-functioning man, because of all the drugs he has been on.

Me, on the other hand, remained on Zoloft since 1995. After the breakup of our marriage in 2002, I collapsed. I was diagnosed with Adrenal Fatigue, PTSD, Hyperglycemic, Major Depression and Suicidal. My therapist had me committed to the hospital. I was seeing a Psychiatrist. I told him that I am very sensitive to all drugs and to please start me slowly on any new drugs. The doctors always know best! They want you at a “therapeutic level” almost immediately!

He started me on Effexor and Seroquel. While on theses meds, I drove off the highway from the effects of Seroquel. I don’t remember anything until I woke up in the hospital ER. I called my doctor and told him that I was not going to take Seroquel any longer. This upset him. As my body was adjusting to the higher levels of Effexor, I grew more agitated and irritable each day. One night I felt that I was going out of my mind, that I was losing control of my thought processes, which scared me, and I felt like pulling my hair out of my head. I called my doctor, screaming at him about this drug. He said to go off the drug. I did, but a week later, my therapist suggested that I go back in the hospital voluntarily. I did. My doctor in the hospital put me back on Zoloft and Xanax, because the two drugs agreed with my body. I was clearly depressed, but they didn’t want to wait for me to grieve all my losses for the previous 7 years. So one doctor was telling me that I needed ECT. He used intimidation to force me to sign the papers. Only because I was not on the previous drugs, I was not a zombie and able to discern what was best for me. I did not sign. My roommate did. She ended up in ICU and another patient stopped breathing and had to go to another hospital.

1) I was finally discharged. I reported the doctor and hospital to Patient’s Advocacy Rights. They have had an investigation going on since 10/02. I called that hospital an “ECT” farm because the patients end up there for ECT.

2) I went back to my Psychiatrist for follow-up, back on Zoloft and Xanax. He dismissed me as his patient. He told me that I was an abusive and dangerous patient. I did not report him, but I wrote him a letter of my thoughts about him and drugs.

3) My concern for my husband and myself is important now. My husband is so drug induced, he has become comfortable, following Dr.’s orders. I am aware that my long-term use of Zoloft and Xanax is frightening. My body is so dependent. I take 1 Zoloft (100 mg) in the AM and 1 Xanax (1 mg) at night. I now have Diabetes and take Glucophage 500 mg/2 at night and Starlix 120 mg/1 three times a day.

My sister and I believe in Alternative Medicine. We currently both work for Enzymatic Therapy, PhytoPharmica, and Integrative Therapeutics as Sales Reps.

She doesn’t take any prescription drugs. She uses herbal supplements.

I use herbal supplements carefully, and still trying to reduce slowly my prescription drugs. Hopefully soon, I’ll be able to take herbal supplements in place of prescription drugs.
Our boss is Bipolar. She is strictly on herbal supplements and functions quite well, no like my husband who gave up at age 50.

I also joined NAMI – Sacramento, CA for two years. I am a certified teacher and facilitator. The subject that I had trouble teaching was the lecture on drugs. We always tell the family to follow up with their doctors with any questions. We are not allowed to give any opinions. We are allowed to share our experiences. But I have not been able to teach anymore. I can’t teach anything that I don’t believe in.

I believe that there is a place for drugs for a short period only. If the MDs would join with the NDs, there could be a balance that is very beneficial to everyone. Our company has two NMDs, so our formulas are at a professional level.

Any questions, anytime, I am willing to share my experiences.

Go after the drug manufacturers!
My healthy 10 yr old dog died taking “Revolution.” I reported this incident also.

Regina Jones
13712 Endicot Circle
Magalia, CA 95954
530-873-3411 (phone and fax)
reggiej@infostations.com

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My SSRI Experience

“When I held a knife, I could see in my mind me killing my family and then killing myself.”

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share my experience. It all starts back to December, 2003, in which my life started to take a change. I am only thirteen years old, I was only twelve then, when I started to experience mild depression. If anyone has heard the Stacie Orrico song “There’s Gotta Be More To Life” that’s exactly how I felt. I’ve had a pretty decent childhood, I mean, yeah, there’s been some hard times, but not nearly as bad as others had it.

Anyways, I got this feeling like there was something missing. It could’ve just been me being a young teenager dealing with her raging hormones. But whatever it was, it was causing a disruption in my life. I had always made extremely good grades, (All A’s and one B in math) and I usually got along with everyone. I went to a psychiatrist because I couldn’t sleep at night and I was feeling sad a lot. He diagnosed me with Social Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Major Depression Disorder.

I had been obsessed with mental health a few months before, so I knew all about these disorders already. In fact, I had printed out maybe 300 pages on different psychiatric disorders. I was convinced I was in the prodigal stages of Schizophrenia, but my doctor laughed it off and said “No way.” He prescribed Lexapro, an alleged “miracle drug” because it had few, mild side effects and it would supposedly help with all three of my disorders. It was a miracle drug, for a while. For about three weeks I was feeling on top of the world. My grades picked up, I was making more friends, and I wasn’t arguing with my steady boyfriend like usual. Then, it all went downhill. I started to feel like something was watching me, and I would have out of body experiences. When I got especially tired, I would feel like I didn’t really exist and it was all a dream. I became obsessed with gothic and dark things.

My whole personality changed. I began by gothic clothing and! I was crying every night for no apparent reason. Even more, I started having heated arguments with my mother, worse than usual. I began to get defiant, cussing, getting interested in alcohol, and thinking getting in trouble was fun. Two months into taking the medication, (going from 10mg to 15 mg) I was in a counselor’s office when I had a panic attack. I really felt like a demon was possessing me. I was crying wildly, saying that I would find a way to kill myself even if my family took all the dangerous objects away. I was that desperate to die. I even began talking to a seventeen year old boy, sending him suggestive pictures of myself over the internet and meeting with him behind my parents’ back.

In the counselor’s office, she suggested my mother take me to the hospital to be put in a crisis unit. When I got there, I was completely numb to all emotion. The psychiatrist there was a complete crackpot. He had no idea what he was doing and diagnosed me with Bipolar Disorder just because my grandmother was Bipolar. To make things worse, HE ASKED FOR A LIST OF WHAT MY GRANDMOTHER TOOK.

He gave me the exact same medication, same dose. What an idiot! So I was on 800mg of Depakote and some number of Ambien. Ambien totally knocked me out. I turned into a loaf and slept all day. The Depakote made me have extremely bad cramps and feelings of paranoia. When I got out of the crisis unit four days later, my psychiatrist took me off Depakote and put me back on Lexapro.

I went home thinking everything was going to be okay. Hah! A few days later, while blasting a gothic rock CD, I had my first self-mutilating experience. It wasn’t much, but I cut myself with a blunt kitchen knife. I did enough damage to bleed a little, but it wasn’t that big of a deal. From then on, it became a habit. Now, my step dad collects daggers and swords and hangs them on the wall. I always looked, but I never touched. Around that time, 8th grade started up and I was nervous as hell. For around three days, I had no friends and no one wanted to talk to me because I was so out of it. I finally made some friends with Gothic’s like me, and I felt a little better.

But most nights, I went home crying and sitting in my closet. I would sit there in my walk in closet, with lights out and cry. And sometimes when my parents weren’t home, I’d take a pencil eraser and erase the skin on my thighs until it bled. I had about 15 incidents in which I erased my skin. I completely shut myself out from my parents and ignored them. I was rude and mean to my stepsisters. Then the time came that I built up the nerve to actually do some damage. I took a sharp dagger off the wall, blasted Evanescence as loud as it could go, and sliced my thighs 11 times, and watched myself bleed. I allowed myself to lay there and bleed, and it brought me great pleasure to know that I was dying inside. I started to laugh manically, so enthralled with my loss of blood. I wanted to cry until I laughed so hard it kill! ed me. I wanted to scream and release everything inside of me. I wanted to binge and throw up my guts. All these violent images flooded my head. When I held a knife, I could see in my mind me killing my family and then killing myself.

That brought me intense fear because I loved my family very much. In church, I would cuss God out in my head and see disturbing images of people being dismembered. My moods were swinging so badly, that my doctor put me on the antipsychotic, Risperdal. In just three months, it went from 0.5mg to 1.5 mg. (3.0 mg is a fairly high dosage) In February of 2004, I attempted suicide. I was at the ultimate rock bottom. I hated myself, I was lost in these violent thoughts, and I wanted to burn in Hell. I had no other pills, so I overdosed on pamprin.

Yes, it sounds stupid, but I was desperate. My mother found out and called the ambulance. They were not compassionate at all, and the nurse gladly shoved a tube up my nose. My stomach was pumped for six hours through a tube in my nose, and I threw up charcoal four times, not to mention it came out the other end twice. (Both times I asked for a bed pan and they took their sweet time and made me stain the sheets)

I was then Baker Acted and sent back to the crisis unit of the hospital. Four days later, I was out. Then my mother told me she was sending me to a residential. I stayed at the residential for 6 weeks, begging to come home each night. They discharged me, hoping I was better. I threw out my gothic CD’s, clothes, and stuff like that. Right now, I’m trying to repair my relationships with family and friends. But still, I feel like I have to chase down each temporary high. I truly feel that these medications did not help me whatsoever, if not made me worse. I will be hopefully taken off medications tomorrow, and I will have to go through the withdrawal process.

I strongly advise using natural remedies for depression. I feel that these antidepressants and antipsychotics do nothing for you at all, they just turn into another addictive drug like heroine or LSD. If you’re having the same problem I am, hang in there. I know we can make it through.

Holly Easter
rikuina@yahoo.com

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I Lost my Mother to Paxil

“Paxil has made our lives a nightmare.”

Here is the sad story of our mother’s sad untimely death. My sister who was living with her was on Paxil. Both were on Paxil…my mother for OCD, and my sister for severe, major depression. She was in withdrawal, when the tragic event occurred. Neither had ever been violent in their entire lives. She has few memories, describing it as being like a dream. It has made our lives a nightmare. We will never get over the horrible tragedy.

Mercy For Cindy – Justice Deniedhttp://www.freewebs.com/mercy_for_cindy/

Nomra (Nomi)Draper
NrDrp@aol.com

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3/29/2001 – Celexa recommended for elderly

This is beyond sickening! Celexa has the strongest effect upon serotonin
reuptake as any of the other SSRIs and is therefore, the most dangerous in
this group of serotonergic drugs. To encourage it for use in the elderly,
some of the most vulnerable in our society, for minor depression is
unconscionable!

Now that the ad has run in Medscape encouraging doctors to prescribe it (as
if they needed any encouragement in their mass drugging of America!) you may
want to begin checking the obituaries for large numbers of the elderly dying.
Of course it will save the government lots of $$$ in Social Security payments!

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org
_
Subject: Psychiatry MedPulse 02-Mar-01 — MEDSCAPE
______________________________________________________________________
MEDSCAPE’s Psychiatry MedPulse(R) <<<
http://psychiatry.medscape.com
_______________________________________________________________________

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Celexa Treatment of Minor Depression in the Elderly

More elderly express symptoms of minor depression than
major depression. Data presented at the American Association
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well-tolerated, and safe treatment for minor depression in
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For complete prescribing information about Celexa
(citalopram HBr) TM, visit http://www.celexa.com

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9/22/2000 – Exercise better than Zoloft.

Seems like exercise works better than SSRI’s!

What a surprise. After 16 weeks, patients who exercised
showed statistically significant and comparable improvement
relative to those who took Zoloft, or those who took the Zoloft and
exercised.

Be sure to look at the wide disparity in the percentage on drugs
who relapse into depression after eight weeks vs. those not on
drugs!

Here’s the complete story out of Duke University.

Mark
—————–
Effect of exercise on reducing major depression appears to be
long-lasting

DURHAM, N.C. After demonstrating that 30 minutes of brisk
exercise three times a week is just as effective as drug therapy
in relieving the symptoms of major depression in the short term,
Duke University Medical Center researchers have now shown
that continued exercise greatly reduces the chances of the
depression returning.

Last year, the Duke researchers reported on their study of 156
older patients diagnosed with major depression which, to their
surprise, found that after 16 weeks, patients who exercised
showed statistically significant and comparable improvement
relative to those who took anti-depression medication, or those
who took the medication and exercised.

The new study, which followed the same participants for an
additional six months, found that patients who continued to
exercise after completing the initial trial were much less likely to
see their depression return than the other patients. Only 8
percent of patients in the exercise group had their depression
return, while 38 percent of the drug-only group and 31 percent of
the exercise-plus-drug group relapsed.

“The important conclusion is that the effectiveness of exercise
seems to persist over time, and that patients who respond well
to exercise and maintain their exercise have a much smaller risk
of relapsing,” said lead researcher, Duke psychologist James
Blumenthal, who published the results of his team’s study in the
October issue of the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

The research was supported by grants from the National
Institutes of Health (NIH). The Duke researchers are now using
a new $3 million NIH grant to better understand the subtle
factors that may explain the positive effects of exercise in a new
trial that begins enrolling patients this month.

“We found that there was an inverse relationship between
exercise and the risk of relapsing the more one exercised, the
less likely one would see their depressive symptoms return,”
Blumenthal explained. “For each 50-minute increment of
exercise, there was an accompanying 50 percent reduction in
relapse risk. “Findings from these studies indicate that a modest
exercise program is an effective and robust treatment for
patients with major depression,” he continued. “And if these
motivated patients continue with their exercise, they have a much
better chance of not seeing their depression return.”

Researchers were surprised that the group of patients who took
the medication and exercised did not respond as well as those
who only exercised.

“We had assumed that exercise and medication together would
have had an additive effect, but this turned out not to be the
case,” Blumenthal said. “While we don’t know the reasons for
this, some of the participants were disappointed when they
found out they were randomized to the exercise and medication
group. To some extent, this `anti-medication’ sentiment may
have played a role by making patients less excited or enthused
about their combined exercise and medication program.”

He suggested that exercise may be beneficial because patients
are actually taking an active role in trying to get better. “Simply
taking a pill is very passive,” he said. “Patients who exercised
may have felt a greater sense of mastery over their condition and
gained a greater sense of accomplishment. They may have felt
more self-confident and competent because they were able to
do it themselves, and attributed their improvement to their ability
to exercise.”

Once patients start feeling better, they tend to exercise more,
which makes them feel even better, Blumenthal said. The
greatest risk for these patients, since they are older, would be to
suffer an injury or illness that would interrupt their exercise
routine, he added.

While the researchers enrolled middle-aged and elderly people
in their study, Blumenthal said it is logical to assume that the
results would hold true for the general population, since older
people tend to have additional medical problems or infirmities
that might make regular exercise more difficult than for younger
patients.

Researchers used the anti-depressant sertraline (trade name
Zoloft), which is a member of a class of commonly used
anti-depressants known as selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitors (SSRI).

Blumenthal cautioned that the study did not include patients who
were acutely suicidal or had what is termed psychotic
depression. Also, since patients were recruited by
advertisements, these patients were motivated to get better and
interested in exercise.

###

The research team included, from Duke, Michael Babyak, Steve
Herman, Parinda Khatri, Dr. Murali Doraiswamy, Kathleen
Moore, Teri Baldewicz and Dr. Ranga Krishnan. Edward
Craighead, from the University of Colorado at Boulder also
participated.

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4/15/1993 • Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in fluoxetine-treated patients with major depression and in healthy volunteers.

4/15/1993 • Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in fluoxetine-treated patients with major depression and in healthy volunteers.

De Bellis MD, Geracioti TD Jr, Altemus M, Kling MA
Clinical Neuroendocrinology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health,National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Biol Psychiatry 1993 Apr 15-May 1; 33 (8-9); 636-41

CSF 5-HIAA and MHPG decreased significantly… following fluoxetine treatment.
Cerebrospinal fluid monoamine metabolites in fluoxetine-treated patients with major depression and in healthy volunteers.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=7687151&dopt=Abstract

De Bellis MD, Geracioti TD Jr, Altemus M, Kling MA
Clinical Neuroendocrinology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health,National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.

Biol Psychiatry 1993 Apr 15-May 1; 33 (8-9); 636-41

CSF 5-HIAA and MHPG decreased significantly… following fluoxetine treatment.

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of the monoamine metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), and homovanillic acid (HVA) were measured in three groups: 46 healthy volunteers; 9 medication-free patients with DSM III-R major depressive disorder, recurrent; and these same 9 patients following at least 4 weeks of fluoxetine treatment at 20 mg/day. CSF monoamine metabolite levels in medication-free patients did not differ from healthy volunteers; however, CSF 5-HIAA and MHPG decreased significantly from 95.9 +/- 24.6 (all values +/- SD) to 64.2 +/- 26.1 pmol/ml and from 46.7 +/- 14.2 to 42.6 +/- 11.6 pmol/ml, respectively, following fluoxetine treatment. Fluoxetine also significantly decreased mean Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores from 23.2 +/- 6.5 to 17.4 +/- 5.0 and significantly increased the CSF HVA/5-HIAA ratio.
PMID: 7687151, UI: 93320172

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