ANTIDEPRESSANTS & ALCOHOL: Murder Attempt: Man Stabs Police Officer: Malta

Paragraph seven reads: “Supt Martin Sammut, who was an inspector at the
time, testified that in his statement to the police, Mr Attard acknowledged
stabbing the officer and expressed regret. Mr Attard also said that he was
drunk – even though he was not supposed to drink because he was on
anti-depressants – and that he had no intention of hurting the constable. At the
time, Mr Attard said that he was very nervous, as his underage daughter was
pregnant.”

SSRI Stories Note: The Physicians Desk Reference states that
antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and can cause alcohol abuse. Also, the
liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol

http://www.di-ve.com/Default.aspx?ID=72&Action=1&NewsId=71642&newscategory=3
4

by John Paul Cordina – editorial@di-ve.com

Court — 19 April 2010 — 12:45CEST

A man charged with the attempted murder of a policeman told police that he
was drunk and on medication when the incident occurred, and did not intend
to hurt the officer, a jury heard on Monday.

Kevin Attard, a 39-year-old Kalkara resident, started undergoing trial by
jury after being charged with the attempted murder of PC Jonathan Farrugia
in the small hours of April 26, 2003, at the St Julians police station.

According to the prosecution, Mr Attard reacted violently when he was
refused entry at the Fuego nightclub in Paceville at around 0320h. Security
guards called the police for assistance, but Mr Attard punched PC Andrew St
John when he intervened, leading to his arrest.

He was taken to the police station, where PC Farrugia was on his own since
his colleagues were out on assignment.

Mr Attard asked for permission to smoke, permission that was granted on
condition that he remained at the station, but he nevertheless attempted to
leave twice. On the second attempt, PC Farrugia ordered Mr Attard to get
back inside, leading to an altercation in which the accused brought out a
3-inch pen knife and stabbed the police officer in the belly.

Two police officers entered the station soon after, and apprehended Mr
Attard. Mr Farrugia was taken to St Luke’s Hospital, where his injury was
certified not to be life-threatening, and was released on the following day.

Supt Martin Sammut, who was an inspector at the time, testified that in
his statement to the police, Mr Attard acknowledged stabbing the officer and
expressed regret. Mr Attard also said that he was drunk – even though he
was not supposed to drink because he was on anti-depressants – and that he
had no intention of hurting the constable. At the time, Mr Attard said that
he was very nervous, as his underage daughter was pregnant.

The accused insisted that PC Farrugia was not alone in the station at the
time, and said that he had just purchased the knife in his home town.

Mr Farrugia testified that when the accused arrived at the station, he
appeared calm, but suddenly attacked him. He said that he was not aware that
he had been stabbed, and thought the accused had grabbed a set of keys and
punched him.

He said that he started shouting for help, and a police officer soon
arrived to help him escort Mr Attard to the station cell. It was this police
officer who informed him that he had been attacked with a knife, the constable
said in Court.

Mr Attard was also charged with slightly injuring PC St John, damaging PC
Farrugia’s uniform, the unlawful possession of a knife and with assaulting
police officers with the aim of preventing them from carrying out their
duty.

The uniform and the knife were presented as evidence to the jury, as was a
blood-stained shirt.

Lawyer Lara Lanfranco is prosecuting on behalf of the Attorney General’s
Office, while lawyers José Herrera and Veronique Dalli are representing Mr
Attard.

The trial is being presided over by Judge Joseph Galea Debono.

Email to a friend

681 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Amnesia & Murder: Man Stabs Wife to Death: Nebraska

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side
effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect
for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.  It is no uncommon to be
unaware of what one has done on these drugs.
Also paranoia is listed as an “Infrequent” side-effect
[but not listed as Rare] in the Physicians Desk Reference for medications for
depression.  A person with paranoia should almost never be given an
antidepressant.
_____________________________
Paragraphs 12 through 16 read:  “The report says
Hollister began experiencing  ‘depressive symptoms,’ including
severe insomnia, in the summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a
relative’s purported involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the
report says.”

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom
he believed were ‘plotting’ against him
,” the report says.  ‘He also
experienced suicidal ideation during that time period’.”

“Hollister
sought help from several medical professionals and was
prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.”

“On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was
dead and a knife was beside her.”


http://www.omaha.com/article/20091031/NEWS01/710319900/-1/FRONTPAGE

Published Saturday October 31,
2009

Man competent for trial in wife’s death

By Todd Cooper
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

His mental
state now stabilized through medication, Robert T. Hollister has been ruled
competent to stand trial in the stabbing death of his wife, Jeanie “Ellie”
Hollister.

What doctors haven’t determined is whether the Omaha man was
sane at the time of his wife’s death on Nov. 3, 2008.

In a recent court
document, Lincoln Regional Center doctors said they needed more time to make
that determination. Hollister has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to

first-degree murder.

“Mr. Hollister is competent to stand trial,” the
regional center report says. “Further evaluation is necessary before an opinion
can be offered regarding Mr. Hollister’s mental status at the time of the
offense.”

Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine acknowledged the rarity of
regional center doctors requesting more time for evaluation because they haven’t
reached a consensus regarding a defendant’s mental state at the time of a
crime.

He said a defendant isn’t necessarily insane just because he has
been battling mental illness. However, he said, attorneys will have to wait for
the further evaluation before deciding how to proceed.

With insanity
defenses, the burden shifts to defense attorneys to prove that their client was
insane at the time of the killing. It will be up to Douglas County District
Judge Marlon Polk to weigh any testimony about Hollister’s mental
state.

If the judge concludes that Hollister was insane, he most likely
would be committed indefinitely to the regional center. If the judge determines
that Hollister was sane, he would proceed to trial and, if convicted, face life
in prison.

The initial regional center report by psychiatrist Klaus
Hartmann and psychologist Mario Scalora shows that Hollister, 59, had been
battling depression for several months before the death of his

wife.

Hollister, who has no criminal record, has a master’s degree in
human resources and was employed at Omaha Bedding Co. from 1994 to
2007.

He then worked at his wife’s vintage clothing store, “Weird Wild
Stuff,” from 2007 until the time of her death.

The report says Hollister
began experiencing “depressive symptoms,” including severe insomnia, in the
summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a relative’s purported
involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the report
says.

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom he
believed were ‘plotting’ against him,” the report says. “He also experienced
suicidal ideation during that time period.”

Hollister sought help from
several medical professionals and was prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.

On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was dead and a
knife was beside her.

Police found Ellie Hollister dead in the couple’s
home at 4705 N. 111th Circle.

Detectives found evidence that Ellie
Hollister, 52, tried to fight off her husband, including scratch marks on Robert
Hollister’s face. Hollister told regional center doctors he had “memory lapses
related to the alleged offense.”

“Hollister demonstrated a desire for
justice,” the report says, “rather than undeserved punishment.”

Contact
the writer:

444-1275,

todd.cooper@owh.com

670 total views, 1 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Stabs Wife Muliple Times Killing Her: England

Paragraph 21 reads:  “Supt Slattery said Davidson’s
medical problems started in 2007 and he had been prescribed some
medication but  ‘clearly the
treatment and intervention hadn’t been successful’.”

Paragraph 13
reads:  “During Davidson’s court appearance on Thursday, it emerged that he
had been battling depression for some time and would sit in
bed, not wash and not help around the house. He refused to accept that he had a
problem.”

Paragraph 18 reads:  “Supt Slattery admitted that people
would find it difficult to understand how a placid, withdrawn man

who showed no hint of violence could suddenly commit
such an horrific act.”

http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/cumbrian_woman_who_saw_her_dad_kill_her_mum_still_has_nightmares_a_year_on_1_630860?referrerPath=home

Cumbrian woman who saw her dad kill her mum still has nightmares a year
on

By Victoria Brenan

Last updated at 12:03,
Saturday, 31 October 2009

A daughter who saw her father murder her mother
in a frenzied attack in their Penrith home lives with the brutal images every
day.

Twenty-three-year-old Collette Davidson suffers from nightmares and
sleep problems after witnessing the assault in which her mother was stabbed 50

times on August 21 last year.

She has essentially lost both parents after
her father Robert, 48, was this week ordered to be detained indefinitely in a
mental hospital after admitting manslaughter.

“I become very upset when I
think of what she went through and the horrific end to her life,” Collette said
in a statement.

“After the incident I hardly slept at all and I don’t
like being around knives. I look at them and think about what they can
do.”

Detective Superintendent Andy Slattery, who led the investigation
into the death of 43-year-old Judith Davidson, paid tribute to Collette’s
strength saying she had witnessed “the most unimaginable, horrific
scenes”.

The family had eaten a meal together before Davidson took two
knives upstairs and subjected his wife of 24 years to a sustained, brutal
stabbing in the bedroom of their home in White Ox Way. Collette overheard them
arguing – her mother had earlier asked her father to leave – then heard a scream
and a cry.

She saw her mother – whom she described as her best friend –
cornered and being stabbed by her father. She grabbed one of the knives and went
to a neighbour for help. When they returned, the attack was still
continuing.

“Collette was extremely traumatised,” said Supt Slattery,
head of the public protection unit. “She will never forget what happened but she
has been very strong throughout this, remarkably so. Right from the start she
was able to explain to officers what had happened and give a very detailed
account of what had gone on at the house.”

Supt Slattery was called to
the scene after Davidson had already been arrested.

“It was obvious from
the start that we weren’t looking for anyone else in connection with this,” he
said.

“Something significant happened in the mind of Robert Davidson and
he turned from a quiet and depressed man to being extremely
violent.”

During Davidson’s court appearance on Thursday, it emerged that
he had been battling depression for some time and would sit in bed, not wash and
not help around the house. He refused to accept that he had a
problem.

Supt Slattery described him as “very quiet and unemotional”,
even at the scene. “He didn’t speak. Not at all. In his first interview he
didn’t comment. He said very little but what he did say was that Judith was a
good woman and he loved her.”

Davidson was examined by a doctor and
psychiatrist at the police station and was deemed fit to be interviewed. He was
later assessed by three psychiatrists – one for the defence, the prosecution and
the court. All agreed that he was suffering from an “abnormality of the mind”,
stemming from depression.

“He was suffering from hopelessness and
depression. It was long-term build up of a history of mental depression,” Supt
Slattery said.

When his wife asked him to leave, Davidson was “so
depressed, so anxious” that he viewed it as “a catastrophic event”, the
psychiatrists concluded – although the court heard she had asked him to leave on
previous occasions.

Supt Slattery admitted that people would find it
difficult to understand how a placid, withdrawn man who showed no hint of
violence could suddenly commit such an horrific act.

“There was no
build-up in terms of threats or violence of any sort, no reason to believe that
Judith was afraid in any way,” he added.

“It’s something I don’t think
the family or anyone else will understand. There was clearly a degree of
planning involved and forethought in what he did. He took two kitchen knives
upstairs.”

Supt Slattery said Davidson’s medical problems started in 2007
and he had been prescribed some medication but “clearly the treatment and
intervention hadn’t been successful”.

The psychiatrists’ assessment made
it difficult to pursue a murder charge and the CPS agreed to accept a plea to
manslaughter, meaning Davidson would not have to go to trial, something Mrs
Davidson’s side of the family criticised. “We have no faith in this country’s
justice system,” they said in a statement. “It should be a life for a
life.”

Supt Slattery said Davidson’s children – Collette and Craig, who
was at university at the time of the attack – would never forget what happened.
Neither of them attended court.

They were a close-knit family and the
impact of “having a parent die at the hands of another parent adds another
dimension of difficulty for anybody”.

“They have lost their mother and
got to come to terms with the fact their father killed her in a brutal and
ferocious way,” he said. “They both found it difficult to come to terms with
what happened and to carry on with normal life.

“Collette will never
forget what happened but she has got to find a way to move on.”

Davidson,
who must remain at a secure hospital indefinitely, will be monitored by doctors
and a report produced every year on his condition and progress. His family will
be kept updated and he will be released only when no longer considered a risk to
the public.

The judge said he expected him to spend a “very long” time in
hospital.

First published at 09:11, Saturday, 31 October
2009
Published by http://www.newsandstar.co.uk

643 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Stabs & Kills Wife: England

Paragraphs 18 & 19 read:  “In the witness box, Mr
Sinclair also described how he had been depressed at
various times in his life, particularly after the death of his father.”

“He told the court he had been taking medication
and was smoking up to 100 cigarettes a day.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/hampshire/8319055.stm

Page last updated at 17:40 GMT, Wednesday, 21
October 2009 18:40 UK

Phone boss ‘traded knife swipes’

Sally Sinclair was
head of business analysis at Vodafone

A man accused of murdering his
Vodafone executive wife has told a court the pair traded swipes with knives
after she admitted having an affair.

Sally Sinclair, 40, was found
with more than 30 stab wounds at their home in Amport, Hampshire, in August
2008.

At the time, she was head of business analysis at the mobile phone
firm’s world headquarters near Newbury.

Alisdair Sinclair, 48, formerly
of Georgia Lane, Amport, began giving his evidence at Winchester Crown Court.

Mr Sinclair cried several times in court, the BBC’s Steve Humphrey said.

The defendant told the court he had run at his wife of 21 years while
she finally admitted to having an affair, while they argued in the kitchen of
their rented luxury property.

[]
[]

I would give up my life for Sally but I thought I was dying
[]

Alisdair Sinclair

Mr Sinclair, a house husband, told the jury she had
got a knife from a block and stabbed him in the hands while he shielded himself.

He then got a knife himself, he said, and they traded swipes before he
was stabbed in the stomach.

Eventually, he lunged at her neck in a
panic, as he thought he was dying, and she had fallen to the floor “like a
stone”, the court heard.

“All I remember thinking is I’m dying, I’m
dying – Sally’s strong,” he said.

“If I had known what had happened I
would have more than willingly died instead – that’s for sure. I would give up
my life for Sally but I thought I was dying.”

‘100 cigarettes a
day’

He said he remembered nothing after kneeling beside her and
thinking she was dead, including inflicting a massive sawn wound to her neck.

Mr Sinclair admitted in court that he had killed his wife and had
inflicted the “horrible” injuries, but said he had never meant to do it and that
it was self defence up until the point she had fallen.

His defence
counsel Robert Fortune QC asked: “Were all the injuries self-defence or beyond
self-defence?”
The couple rented the secluded detached house in
Amport

Mr Sinclair replied: “I believe it went beyond self-defence.”

In the witness box, Mr Sinclair also described how he had been depressed
at various times in his life, particularly after the death of his father.

He told the court he had been taking medication and was smoking up to
100 cigarettes a day.

Mr Sinclair also gave the jury an insight into his
obsessive behaviour.

He said he often bought dozens of pairs of socks
and trousers and the couple also had a collection of very expensive cars.

He hardly ever drove them, he told the court.

The trial
continues.

577 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Compulsions for Alcohol, Violence: Man Stabs Friend: England

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for

alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol

were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

392 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: VIOLENCE: MAN STABS FRIEND: ENGLAND

Last paragraph reads:  “He said:  ‘He
was
prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.”

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance
levels for alcohol were greatly diminished.
It explains, in part, he has
very little recollection of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and
unsteady on his feet, and he was taken to hospital because of the condition he
was in.”

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states
that antidepressants can cause a craving for
alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver
cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus
leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the
human body.

http://www.thisisnottingham.co.uk/homenews/Clifton-house-guest-strangled-threatened/article-1334903-detail/article.html

Clifton house guest strangled and threatened

Monday,
September 14, 2009, 07:00

A WOMAN was told she would be disfigured and
killed by a knife-wielding friend who got drunk at a family party.

Marcus
Musson held a blade to Karen Savage and strangled her until she lost
consciousness.

When he fell asleep, she escaped to the safety of her
mum’s home and called police.

After Musson was arrested, he said he could
not remember what happened.

At Nottingham Crown Court, he pleaded guilty
to assault causing actual bodily harm, and received two years and three months
in prison.

Three months of the sentence was because he breached a 180-day
sentence, suspended for 12 months, for battery on another woman previously
sharing his home.

Judge Dudley Bennett said: “For a decade now you have
been using violence in one away or another on anyone who stands in your
way.

“You grabbed hold of this woman by her hair and pulled her through
from one room to another by her hair. If that stood alone, it is a pretty
horrible thing to do. Then you got a knife and held it to her chin and
threatened to disfigure her.

“Knives kill, I keep saying this.
Mercifully, she did not suffer any injuries as a result of that. You then cut
her hair off in great clumps. That is a disfigurement. It’s dreadful. There you
are using that knife on her. Then you strangle her to the point she loses
consciousness. Then you head-butt her and cut her skin.”

Miss Savage had
known 37-year-old Musson for years and stayed on and off with him in the weeks
leading up to the attack because of problems with her
accommodation.

After a family party in Clifton on Valentine’s Day, Musson
accused her of trying to make advances towards one of her guests.

Miss
Savage, who was not in a relationship with Musson, told him it had nothing to do
with him.

“He reached over, grabbed her hair and twisted it around his
hand and pulled her by her hair into the kitchen and pushed her into a corner,”
said Jon Fountain, prosecuting.

“He got a knife, put it to her chin, then
against her cheek and said, ‘I’m going to kill you. No-one will look at you when
I have finished’.”

Closing her eyes and fearing the worst, Musson hacked
at her hair and threw large clumps to the floor.

He tried to choke her
and said “it’s because I love you” before head-butting her.

Musson, now
of HMP Nottingham, threw down the knife and went to sleep on the
sofa.

Miss Savage fled barefoot from the house to her mother’s home. She
had cuts to her scalp and pain to her ribs.

Musson’s previous convictions
include assaulting police, using threatening words and behaviour, affray and
common assault.

Mitigating, Adrian Langdale told the court Musson had
been drinking 10 to 15 cans of alcohol a day, but had stopped before this
assault.

He said: “He was prescribed anti-depressants following the
break-up of his relationship. All of these matters came to a head on the night
of this offence. For the first time in six to eight months, he started drinking
again.

“It was a jovial affair, a party. His tolerance levels for alcohol
were greatly diminished. It explains, in part, he has very little recollection
of events. Police on arrival found him incoherent and unsteady on his feet, and
he was taken to hospital because of the condition he was
in.”

rebecca.sherdley@nottinghameveningpost.co.uk

312 total views, 1 views today