DEPRESSION MED: Murder-Suicide: Man Shoots three Deputies: Kills One

Paragraph five reads:  “Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer
said Friday that Liles
had been taking medication
for depression and probably took his own life with a gunshot to the
head.”

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-minkler27-2010feb27,0,2450243,full.story

A slow burn suddenly turns deadly in Minkler, Calif.

First there was a series of fires in the small town east of Fresno. Then
came the shootings. On Thursday, a shootout left a sheriff’s deputy dead and two
other law enforcement officers injured.

(Paul Sakuma /
Associated Press / February 26, 2010)

By Diana Marcum

February
27, 2010

Reporting from Minkler ­ Trouble had been brewing in tiny
Minkler, a Sierra foothills community about 20 miles east of Fresno, for months.
But residents never envisioned that it would end with two people — one a
sheriff’s deputy — dead and two other law enforcement officers
wounded.

Joel Wahlenmaier, 49, a veteran with the Fresno County Sheriff’s
Department who investigated homicides and other violent crimes, was killed in
Thursday’s gunfire. Deputy Mark Harris, 48, was injured.

Javier Bejar, a
Reedley police officer who responded to the call for backup in the minutes after
Wahlenmaier was shot, is on life support at Community Regional Medical Center in
Fresno and is not expected to survive.

The suspect, Ricky Ray Liles, 51,
died during the gun battle that erupted when authorities attempted to serve him
with a search warrant.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said Friday that
Liles had been taking medication for depression and probably took his own life
with a gunshot to the head.

Liles had told his wife “that he would not go
to prison,” Dyer said at a news conference. “He would take the lives of several
officers before taking his own life.”

On Friday, what there is of Minkler
was cordoned off as a crime scene, helicopters buzzing overhead.

But
Minkler’s worries began about five months ago with small fires. A bunch of
leaves here, a patch of grass there.

“You’d come out and say, ‘How did
that tractor seat catch on fire?’ ” said rancher Jeff Rodenbeck,
51.

Eventually, a shed and a trailer burned. Then the shootings started.
Someone shot up the Minkler Cash Store six times since January. On Monday,
someone fired four bullets into Sally Minkler’s mobile home.

“Sally said
she bent over to get her cellphone and the bullet went right where her torso had
been,” said Mary Novack, who runs the Minkler Cash Store, the nerve-center and
commercial entirety of Minkler, a town so small it once was listed for sale on
EBay.

Residents were convinced the culprit was Liles, a former security
guard renting a mobile home on Minkler family property across from the
store.

“He was just your average pasty white guy with a bad back,” said
Jeff Butts, who grows grapes and plums along the Kings River.

“But when
you know all your neighbors, you look around and say, ‘Well, I know it’s not
Mary, and it’s not Charlie and it’s not Sally’ . . . and pretty soon everyone
came up with Liles,” Butts said. “He wasn’t friends with anyone. But no one ever
actually saw anything they could prove. Things were getting tense out
here.”

On Thursday morning, Novack was relieved when she saw law
enforcement vehicles pull up to Liles’ place. She called Butts and told him cops
were about to knock on Liles’ door.

“Hey, this guy is finally going down,
let’s go to the store and watch,” Butts said he told one of his
workers.

A small crowd gathered on the front porch of the general store,
which has held court in Minkler since 1920. They watched as a deputy kicked in
the door, shots were fired, an officer slumped, more law enforcement came and a
prolonged gun battle raged.

“I was stunned. I didn’t even get down,”
Butts said. “I kept thinking, ‘What are they doing? Those can’t be real
bullets.’ The cops are saying hundreds of rounds were fired, but it had to be
thousands.”

He was incredulous when a woman, later identified as Liles’
wife, Diane, and a dog emerged from the trailer. “I don’t see how anyone came
out of that alive,” Butts said.

Half a mile down the road, Rodenbeck
heard the first volley of shots. He loaded a pistol and rifle, and got his wife
and teenage daughter away from the house in case gunmen emerged from the woods
behind their home. Then he went to see what was going on.

When the bigger
gun battle began, he crouched inside his truck’s tire well.

“Look, this
is the country, gunfire is not a big deal, you hear it all the time. Someone’s
shooting at coyotes. Or skeet,” he said. “But this was a war zone. It sounded
like the cops had automatic rifles and they kept shooting. If you’d been here,
you would have hit the ground. It rocked this place. He killed a cop right in
front of them, and they don’t take lightly to that and I can’t say I blame
them.”

Rodenbeck moved to Minkler from Huntington Beach to raise his
family away from the city. He likes the beauty — “this is river bottom, green
all the time” — the quiet, and the fact that men such as Charles Minkler, the
great-grandson of Orzo Minkler, who founded the town in 1892, can still load
1,000 bales of hay. Minkler is in his 70s.

“Out here, men don’t get old.
They get beat up and wrinkled, but they don’t use canes,” Rodenbeck said. “They
have chores to do.”

But he was never under any illusion that violence
couldn’t touch this place.

“They say they used to hang people from that
tree over there,” he said. “Charlie can tell you about the bandits that used to
hide out in these hills. Different people have different reasons for wanting to
be out somewhere quiet.”

Novack, 54, recalls drug-dealing motorcycle
gangs in the 1970s. As a teenager, she glimpsed white-robed Ku Klux Klan members
burning crosses at the river’s edge.

“That’s a sight you never forget,”
Novack said. “It’s chilling.”

She looked around at the orchards in bloom,
snow-dusted peaks and sheepdogs trying to make friends with the
police.

“People are saying, ‘In Minkler? It’s so beautiful and quiet
there.’ But good and evil are everywhere,” she said. “Right in front of you.
Right next to each other all the time.”

metrodesk@latimes.com

Marcum is a
special correspondent for The Times.

The Associated Press contributed to
this report.

Copyright © 2010, The Los Angeles
Times

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DEPRESSION MED: Well-Known Businessman, 52, Dies in Fall Down Stairs: UK

Paragraph one reads:  “A wellknown Suffolk businessman
fell to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed
after the collapse of his company, an inquest heard.”

Paragraph 11
reads:  “After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the
medication her husband was taking before his death had
made him  ‘
dozy’.”

http://www.eadt.co.uk/content/eadt/news/story.aspx?brand=EADOnline&category=News&tBrand=EADOnline&tCategory=xDefault&itemid=IPED17%20Feb%202010%2023%3A34%3A21%3A990

Businessman‘s stairs fall death remains a mystery

LAURENCE CAWLEY

Last
updated: 2/18/2010 11:56:00 AM

A WELLKNOWN Suffolk businessman fell
to his death while on anti-depressives prescribed after the collapse of his
company, an inquest heard.

Clive Thomas, 52, the former managing director
of Anglia Recruitment Group, was reported dead by his wife Jan at their home in

Coddenham Road, Needham Market, in May last year after she found him lying at
the bottom of the stairs.

During an inquest held in Bury St Edmunds
yesterday, it emerged the businessman, who was also a past chairman of the
Suffolk branch of the Institute of Directors and raised tens of thousands of
pounds for a range of charities, had suffered “severe” depression after his firm
went into liquidation.

It was heard that two separate post mortem
examinations to determine the cause of death had proved
inconclusive.

Chief Inspector Nick Bennett said Mr Thomas had suffered a
“nasty injury” to the back of his head during the fall but this had not caused
his death.

He said during the police investigation it emerged Mr Thomas
had endured “quite a severe episode of stress” when his business went into
liquidation earlier in the year for which he was prescribed
medication.

Ch Insp Bennett told how toxicology tests revealed Mr Thomas,
who had an enlarged heart, had consumed alcohol prior to his death and would
have been “unsteady on his feet” at the time of fall.

He also said foul
play had been ruled out.

Greater Suffolk Coroner Dr Peter Dean attributed
cause of death to “postural asphyxiation”, which meant Mr Thomas was unable to
breathe because of the way he was lying at the foot of the stairs.

“We
are not exactly sure how the fall actually occurred,” he said before recording a
narrative verdict that Mr Thomas had died from consequences of a fall down the

stairs.

After the hearing, Mr Thomas’s widow Jan Thomas thanked the staff
at the coroner’s office for their support and help and told how the medication
her husband was taking before his death had made him “dozy”.

Mr Thomas’s mother Cathy Meadows added: “We still don’t know
what happened. There are lots of questions in my mind – but what can you do?”
she asked. “He did lots of things for charities. I am very proud of him. He was
such a good and kindly man and he was always trying to help other people. I
still really cannot believe he has gone. He was such a lovely son to me. I just
can’t believe it – it was such a shock. I just can’t get over this – he was my
only son.”

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DEPRESSION MED: 14 Year Old Girl Attempts Suicide in School During Class…

Paragraph four reads:  “The victim’s mother said her
daughter
takes medication for ADHD and
depression.”

http://chronicle.augusta.com/stories/latest/lat_703887.shtml?v=1642

Middle school student attempts suicide during class
Stephanie
Toone | South Carolina Bureau Chief
Thursday, Dec. 10, 2009 4:42
p.m.

GRANITEVILLE – A Leavelle McCampbell Middle School student tried
to commit suicide in a classroom Wednesday by overdosing on prescription drugs.


An art teacher at the middle school on Canal Street said the 14yearold
took close to 50 pills during class around 8:15 a.m. in an attempt to kill
herself, according to an Aiken County Sheriff’s Office report. The student was
transported to Aiken Regional Medical Center’s emergency room, but there were no
details on her condition.

Two students told investigators that the
student said she was going to take her “death pills,” then swallowed the
cocktail of prescription drugs, according to the report.

The victim’s
mother said her daughter takes medication for ADHD and depression.


Cecelia Davidson, associate superintendent for administration, said she
was not aware of the incident, but said the guidance and principal staff has
protocol for suicide threats or attempts.

From the Thursday, Dec. 10,
2009 online edition of The Augusta Chronicle

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DEPRESSION MED: Rage: Elderly Man Beats & Bites his Doctor: England

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

I ask you to think of the biting attack by the chimpanzee
as you read this case. Alsothink of the case mentioned in my book of the Sanford
Professor who bit her mother to death while on Prozac. Biting is known to
be produced by high serotonin levels.
One other thing to take note of is the fact that it took three
doctors to hold this elderly man down during the attack. There is another drug
that produces that type of super human strength – PCP, the drug I constantly
remind the world that SSRIs most closely mimic in action.
_________________________________
Paragraphs six through nine read:  “The appeal court
heard Moya suffered from a number of medical conditions, including
anxiety, depression and a personality
disorder.”

After his fit of rage in October 2008, it took three
doctors to hold Moya down,
before police arrived to arrest
him.

Mr Justice Davis, giving his judgement on the appeal, said Moya
claimed not to have taken his medication at the time of the
attack and claimed this had contributed to his loss of control.

But the
judge concluded: “This was a serious matter involving quite a lengthy assault on one doctor and an assault on another

doctor.

http://www.thisissussex.co.uk/crawley/news/Elderlyman-bit-doctor-stay-jail/article-1378968-detail/article.html

Elderly man who bit doctor must stay in jail

Thursday, October 01, 2009, 07:00

1 reader has
commented on this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A PENSIONER who bit his doctor and punched
him in the face in front of “scared” patients will have to serve a year behind
bars.

Gabriel Moya, 69, flew into a rage at a receptionist at Gossops
Green Surgery, when she handed him a prescription he thought was
incomplete.

Moya, who has had heart surgery in the past, was told to calm
down by a doctor but lashed out, punching him twice in the face and biting him
on the arm as he was pinned to the floor.

The pensioner, of Woldhurstlea
Close, Gossops Green, was jailed after admitting an assault charge at a court
hearing earlier this year, but he appealed his sentence.

However, the
Court of Appeal has now ruled that Moya must serve his 12-month jail
term.

The appeal court heard Moya suffered from a number of medical
conditions, including anxiety, depression and a personality
disorder.

After his fit of rage in October 2008, it took three doctors to
hold Moya down, before police arrived to arrest him.

Mr Justice Davis,
giving his judgement on the appeal, said Moya claimed not to have taken his

medication at the time of the attack and claimed this had contributed to his
loss of control.

But the judge concluded: “This was a serious matter
involving quite a lengthy assault on one doctor and an assault on another
doctor.

“The first doctor was bitten as well as punched. Those in the
waiting room were scared.

“Doctors and medical staff need to be protected
from unwarranted attacks of this kind.

“We are not persuaded that it can
be said that this sentence was excessive.”

Moya pleaded guilty to assault
occasioning actual bodily harm and common assault at Lewes Crown Court in April,
where he was handed a 12-month jail term.

The appeal hearing took place
on Monday.

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DEPRESSION MED: Fireman Holds Daughter’s Fiance at Gunpoint: New Jersey

Paragraph six reads:  “Humphrey takes
medication for migraines, depression
and ADD, and he had a migraine on the night of the offense,
Luther added.”

http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20090924/NEWS01/909240347/1002/Hebron-man-gets-probation-for-abduction

Hebron man gets probation for abduction

Columbus firefighter held daughter’s fiancé at gunpoint in August
’08

BY JESSIE BALMERT • Advocate Reporter • September 24,
2009

NEWARK — A Columbus firefighter from Hebron was sentenced to a
maximum of five years of community control Wednesday morning after pleading
guilty to driving his stepdaughter’s fiancé around town at gunpoint.

Mark
E. Humphrey, 53, last known address 7589 Lancaster Road, Hebron, pleaded guilty
to one count each of abduction, a third-degree felony; improperly handling
firearms in a motor vehicle, a fourth-degree felony; and domestic violence, a
first-degree misdemeanor. A three-year firearm specification was
dismissed.

Licking County Common Pleas Judge Jon Spahr also required
Humphrey to complete a mental health program, surrender all firearms and have no
contact with his stepdaughter’s fiancé. The maximum sentence Humphrey could have
faced for the charges was six years and six months in prison for the felony
charges served consecutively and six months in jail for the domestic violence
charge.

Licking County Assistant Prosecutor Dan Huston recommended
community control because that was the suggestion of law enforcement and the
victims. Humphrey had no previous felony offenses.

“My concern, your
honor, is the character that Mark presented on Aug. 20 is not who Mark is,” said
George Luther, Humphrey’s attorney.

Humphrey takes medication for
migraines, depression and ADD, and he had a migraine on the night of the
offense, Luther added.

On Aug. 20, 2008, Humphrey found his
stepdaughter’s fiancé in his home, awakened his wife with screams and threatened
her, his stepdaughter and her fiancé with a loaded .45-caliber handgun,
according to court documents.

Humphrey followed his wife and stepdaughter
into the bedroom, where he backhanded the stepdaughter, causing injury, court
documents said.

When the fiancé left the house, Humphrey pursued him and
threatened to burn down the home with the people inside, court documents
said.

He then caught the fiancé and told him to get into his pickup
truck, in which he was keeping a handgun, according to court documents. Humphrey
and the man, whom he was holding at gunpoint, drove around until Humphrey was
arrested by Hebron police, according to court documents.

“The night was a
snowball of hysteria and confusion that resulted in many poor choices,” Luther
said.

Humphrey, who has served as a Columbus firefighter for 21 years,
said he has been a law-abiding citizen for most of his life and would like to
return to being a productive resident of Licking County. Several family members
rely on Humphrey’s salary and health insurance to treat their illnesses,
including his stepdaughter’s child, who was born with birth defects, Luther
said.

“He is so remorseful for that,” Luther said. “I just don’t see that
type of action repeating itself.”

Several Columbus firefighters, along
with his family, were in attendance to support Humphrey, who resupplies the tool
room for the fire department, Luther said. Humphrey’s job as a firefighter is in
jeopardy because of the conviction, Luther said.

Jessie Balmert can be
reached at (740) 328-8548 or jbalmert@newarkadvocate.com.

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DEPRESSION MED: ANOTHER MILITARY SUICIDE!!: IRAQ/VIRGINIA

Paragraph 11 reads:  “Starr attempted suicide last
summer. Medication and counseling followed. He returned to work a month later.”

Paragraph 16
reads: “Scott had shot himself hours earlier, at home in Virginia Beach.
He died within a few miles of base – yet word of his death came
to Greene from someone thousands of miles away.”

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/09/walk-brings-light-dark-subject-suicidemilitary

http://hamptonroads.com/2009/09/walk-brings-light-dark-subject-suicidemilitary

Walk brings light to dark subject of suicide in the
military

Posted to: Military

The Virginian-Pilot
© September 11, 2009

Jon Greene
knows  he might choke up when he reads aloud a certain name Saturday at
Mount Trashmore.

He lost Scott Alan Starr, a friend and colleague, to
suicide in August 2008. Greene was the commander of the Naval Surface Warfare
Center at Dam Neck; Starr worked closely with him.

Greene and other
volunteers will read the names of more than 100 people who took their own lives
in the past year as part of the Out of the Darkness Community Walk.

The
walk, in its fourth year, brings together scores of people – more than 900 have
registered so far – and is one of the largest of its kind in the United States.
It’s sponsored by the Hampton Roads Survivors of Suicide Support
Group.

Some walk in memory of a friend or loved one. Others come because
they know what it’s like to suffer from depression.

“I can’t save Scott,
but I think there are lots and lots of folks in the military with lots and lots
to offer the world… who don’t realize that depression can be treated,” Greene
said.

Diagnosable depression is a factor in 90 percent of all suicides,
according to Chris Gilchrist, a Chesapeake social worker and one of the event’s
organizers.

Starr was the model Navy chief petty officer, Greene said:
strong, intelligent, well-respected, caring. A father figure to hundreds of
young sailors.

He first worked for Greene as senior enlisted adviser at
the surface warfare center. After retiring in 2007, Starr returned to Dam Neck
as a civilian employee.

“He was very proud,” Greene said. “And very
private.”

Starr attempted suicide last summer. Medication and counseling
followed. He returned to work a month later.

When Greene checked on him,
Starr’s response was always the same: “I’m doing great,” he would
say.

“He was the master chief. He was in charge; he was in control. There
were no cracks in his facade,” Greene said.

Greene set up automatic
reminders on his computer so he wouldn’t forget to check in with Starr. One of
them popped up on Aug. 17. But the day got busy, and Greene didn’t get to
it.

In his office early the next morning, Greene’s phone rang. It was a
friend of Starr’s calling from Iraq.

Scott had shot himself hours
earlier, at home in Virginia Beach. He died within a few miles of base – yet
word of his death came to Greene from someone thousands of miles away.

“I
really didn’t believe it,” Greene said in a recent interview, pausing and
looking up at the ceiling, trying to remember the moment. “It was absolutely
surreal.”

After getting the news, Greene shifted into “commanding officer
mode.” There were arrangements to deal with, colleagues to tell, a memorial
service to plan. The rituals helped. But Greene was unsettled. He couldn’t help
feeling that the military standard of suffering without complaint might have
doomed his friend.

Gilchrist and Greene’s wife, also a social worker,
helped him understand that suicide is a medical matter, not a moral
one.

Gilchrist noted that suicide is a major medical issue – 32,000
people take their own lives annually, she said. It is the 11th leading cause of
the death in the United States.

After years of war, the military has
gotten better at teaching service members about post-traumatic stress disorder
and mental health.

Generals and admirals talk about the spike in suicides
and are trying to address it. Earlier this year, the Army ordered a massive
safety stand-down to reach out to soldiers. The Navy has its own program for
spreading the message that it’s OK to ask for help.

But Greene, who’s now
retired from the Navy, knows that rank-and-file sailors don’t always buy the
message mouthed by military brass at the Pentagon.

“There are a lot of
good things going on in the military. I think there’s a willingness to do
something,” Greene said. “But fundamentally, it comes to the
culture.”

And that culture is action-oriented, goal-driven and full of
people who think “I’ll just power through this. I can hack it,” he
said.

“There are a lot of folks in the military – including some
relatively senior folks – who still see suicide and depression as a shameful
choice. I think there needs to be recognition by a lot of folks, specifically
the leadership, that you can’t hack it. Sometimes you need a little
help.”

Starr expected himself to be perfect. “He felt he had to live at
this ideal, this standard he’d set for himself,” Greene said.

That’s part
of the reason Greene invited Gilchrist to talk about suicide with leaders at the
surface warfare center. And it’s part of the reason he put up a large sign on
base, publicizing Saturday’s walk.

“There are so many people worried
about the damage that will be done to their career if they get help from

military medicine,” Greene said.

He acknowledged that there are
obstacles, but even within the military‘s constraints, there are resources, like
special hot lines for service members and their families where they can get
immediate help.

“People in the military are put in extremely stressful
and dangerous positions,” he said. “That’s not going to change, and we don’t
want it to change. It’s the responsibility of leadership to listen and beware
when their sailors are having trouble.”

Kate Wiltrout, (757) 446-2629,
kate.wiltrout@pilotonline.com

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DEPRESSION MED: WOMAN – JAIL WARNING AFTER THREATING NEIGHBORS W/KNIFE: UK

Paragraphs 14 through 16 read:  “Charles Maidstone, defending, said Ireson had been depressed since the death of her partner in February, this year.”

“This is a very sad case,” he said.

“She is on medication. She was also drinking. I understand she finds it helps her sleep.

SSRI Stories Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body.

http://www.getreading.co.uk/news/s/2056972_mum_warned_of_jail_after_knifing_threat

Mum warned of jail after knifing threat

By Anna Roberts
September 09, 2009

An eight-year-old girl pleaded for her mum to stop brandishing a knife at her neighbours after the womanthreatened to stab them.

Joanne Ireson wielded the kitchen knife outside her home in Cardigan Road, East Reading, at about 8pm on Tuesday, June 16.

The fracas took place after Ireson’s daughter snuck off to play outside on her own and she shouted at her to come back.

But Ireson’s concerned neighbours got “the wrong end of the stick” and called police – causing her to threaten them with the blade.

At Reading Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, August 25, Ireson – of previously good character – admitted one count of possessing the eight-inch knife in a public place and one of using violence and/or threatening behaviour towards neighbour Daniel Thiemert.

Lauren Murphy, prosecuting, explained the emergency services received three phone calls from concerned people saying a woman was waving a knife about.

She said: “A neighbour heard a person shouting and screaming. She stated Miss Ireson was screaming at her children.”

Miss Murphy said at this point Ireson said: “If you call the police I will stab you.”

She continued: “She [Ireson] pushed the neighbour and she fell over. She went in the house and came back with aknife. She said if she could not stab him she would stab herself.

“The girl [her daughter] said, ‘Will you put the knife down?’

“Another neighbour [Mr Thiemert] also said he heard shouting. He said he saw a glass object being thrown at the young girl.

“He [Mr Thiemert] said, ‘I am going to call the police’. She said, ‘Who the f*** are you?’”

At this point Ireson punched Mr Thiemert and threw a cigarette lighter at him.

Charles Maidstone, defending, said Ireson had been depressed since the death of her partner in February, this year.

“This is a very sad case,” he said.

“She is on medication. She was also drinking. I understand she finds it helps her sleep.

“This incident arose from a problem with disciplining the children.”

He suggested neighbours had got “the wrong end of the stick” and added Ireson was a caring mum.

Ireson, 36, was released on unconditional bail to reappear at Reading Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday, September 15.

District Judge Peter Crabtree said: “I take into account what has been said about your difficult circum-stances and also that you are a person of good character and pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity.

“Nevertheless, taking a kitchen knife out into the street is a very serious offence.”

He said she ran the risk of a jail term.

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DEPRESSION MED: Suicide Attempt: Unexpected: Permanent Brain Damage: Ne…

Paragraph 3 reads:  “Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain
damage
and severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead
Park Nursing Home and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his
daughter said.”

Paragraph 14 reads:  “According to Ms. Schortemeyer,
her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic car
aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his
children, and would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on
monthly visits when they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However,
Mr. Schortemeyer suffered from loneliness and was on medication for

depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=232464&town=Sag%20Harbor&n=Sag%20Harbor%20woman%20advocates%20for%20suicide%20prevention%20awareness

Sag Harbor woman advocates for suicide prevention awareness

By Bryan Finlayson
Sep 7, 09 10:32 AM

Two years ago in June, Ann Marie Schortemeyer, 25, was
driving home from work when Karen Mayer, her aunt, phoned with
news.

After an attempted suicide, Edwin Schortemeyer, Ann Marie’s father,
a veteran union plumber from Manorville, was in critical condition at John T.
Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.

Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain damage and
severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead Park Nursing Home
and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his daughter
said.

Now, Ms. Schortemeyer, who lives in Sag Harbor, is on a quiet
mission to spread awareness about suicide prevention on Long Island. She and her
fund-raising group, Eddie’s Angels, which has five members, collect donations
for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention [AFSP], a nationwide
organization that advocates research into the causes of suicide. To date, they
have collected $2,208 for the foundation.

Ms. Schortemeyer is also
participating in a suicide awareness walk at the Old Westbury Gardens in Old
Westbury on October 4, about a month after September 10, which is World Suicide

Prevention Day.

“I don’t think people realize how big a problem
depression and mental illness can be,” Ms. Schortemeyer said last week. “It can
affect anyone. I thought my dad was a happy man, and it turns out he had his own
battle with depression.”

The suicide or attempted suicide of a loved one
touches the lives of thousands of Americans each year, AFSC Executive Director
Bob Gebbia said. More than 33,000 people in the United States commit suicide a
year and close to a million attempt suicide, he said.

“If you take the
suicides and the attempted suicides and put them together, you can see that this
is a serious problem,” Mr. Gebbia said.

The Old Westbury Gardens walk is
expected to raise $125,000 for the AFSP to help fund education and research
grants for suicide prevention, Mr. Gebbia said. The money goes toward research
grants for institutions such as Columbia University, and will help fund
investigations into brain chemistry, psychosocial behavior and other symptoms
that can lead to suicide.

The walk in Old Westbury Gardens is one of 190
walks that will occur throughout the country this fall to raise awareness about

suicide prevention. Mr. Gebbia said more than 50,000 people are expected to
participate overall.

One of the foundation’s goals is to break the social
stigma that keeps people from discussing suicide and mental illness with
others.

Suicide is something that is not talked about, it is kept in the
shadows,” said Mr. Gebbia, noting that symptoms relating to suicide can be
treated with medication and therapy. “Suicide is the result of illness, not the
result of character flaws or a personal weakness.”

In Ms. Schortemeyer’s
experience, her father attempted suicide without giving any clear forewarning to
his family and friends. Neither Ms. Schortemeyer or her sister, Sharon, 23, of
Lindenhurst saw any warning signs leading up to the tragedy, Ms. Schortemeyer
said. But in retrospect, Ms. Schortemeyer said, there were “1,000 warning signs”
that her father was battling depression, yet “me and my sister didn’t even
notice it. It just seemed like a funny phase.”

According to Ms.
Schortemeyer, her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic
car aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his children, and
would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on monthly visits when
they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However, Mr. Schortemeyer
suffered from loneliness and was on medication for depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

His second marriage­he married about two weeks before he
attempted suicide­was tumultuous, by Ms. Schortemeyer’s account. “He married
a woman he didn’t know too well,” Ms. Schortemeyer said.

In
conversations, Mr. Schortemeyer often complained of money problems and of his
daughters being so far away from home. In 2007, Sharon was attending college in
Florida and Ann Marie was working as an administrative assistant for a
construction company in Wisconsin.

“He just seemed to be complaining a
lot about credit card bills and the cost of maintaining a home,” Ms.
Schortemeyer said. “I thought it wasn’t anything that big.”

The night
before Mr. Schortemeyer hung himself, he called Ms. Schortemeyer in Wisconsin
and left a voice message to thank her for a Father’s Day card. “He said he
misses me and to please call him soon,” said Ms. Schortemeyer, who reached the
message the following day.

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DEPRESSION MED: Man Allegedly Deliberately Drives Into Cyclist: Australia

Paragraphs four and five read:  “The court heard that Armstrong suffered an acquired brain injury as a teenager from a high-speed motocross accident leaving him unable to work and on medication for depression.”

“Police prosecutors alleged Armstrong was deliberately trying to harm himself on the night of the incident by driving into a vehicle.”

http://caboolture-shire-herald.whereilive.com.au/news/story/court-grants-bail/

BAIL was granted on Friday for a man accused of the manslaughter of Deception Bay roadworker Murray Goodrich.

Gavin Armstrong, 27, of Burpengary, appeared in Caboolture Magistrates Court charged with the manslaughter of the father-of-three, and for a second charge of unlicensed driving
Armstrong’s car allegedly struck Goodrich on the night of August 3 near the Uhlmann Rd off-ramp on the Bruce Highway at Burpengary.
Goodrich was working at roadworks at the time of the incident.
The court heard that Armstrong suffered an acquired brain injury as a teenager from a high-speed motocross accident leaving him unable to work and on medication for depression.
Police prosecutors alleged Armstrong was deliberately trying to harm himself on the night of the incident by driving into a vehicle.
The defence argued Armstrong was of sound mind and a doctor’s assessment after the crash found him to have no mental illness.
The case will come before the Caboolture Magistrates Court for a committal mention on November 4.
Goodrich is survived by his wife, Joanne, and triplet daughters, Teryn, Lauren and Emily, 16.

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