ANTIDEPRESSANT: Amnesia & Murder: Man Stabs Wife to Death: Nebraska

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side
effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect
for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.  It is no uncommon to be
unaware of what one has done on these drugs.
Also paranoia is listed as an “Infrequent” side-effect
[but not listed as Rare] in the Physicians Desk Reference for medications for
depression.  A person with paranoia should almost never be given an
antidepressant.
_____________________________
Paragraphs 12 through 16 read:  “The report says
Hollister began experiencing  ‘depressive symptoms,’ including
severe insomnia, in the summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a
relative’s purported involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the
report says.”

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom
he believed were ‘plotting’ against him
,” the report says.  ‘He also
experienced suicidal ideation during that time period’.”

“Hollister
sought help from several medical professionals and was
prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.”

“On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was
dead and a knife was beside her.”


http://www.omaha.com/article/20091031/NEWS01/710319900/-1/FRONTPAGE

Published Saturday October 31,
2009

Man competent for trial in wife’s death

By Todd Cooper
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

His mental
state now stabilized through medication, Robert T. Hollister has been ruled
competent to stand trial in the stabbing death of his wife, Jeanie “Ellie”
Hollister.

What doctors haven’t determined is whether the Omaha man was
sane at the time of his wife’s death on Nov. 3, 2008.

In a recent court
document, Lincoln Regional Center doctors said they needed more time to make
that determination. Hollister has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to

first-degree murder.

“Mr. Hollister is competent to stand trial,” the
regional center report says. “Further evaluation is necessary before an opinion
can be offered regarding Mr. Hollister’s mental status at the time of the
offense.”

Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine acknowledged the rarity of
regional center doctors requesting more time for evaluation because they haven’t
reached a consensus regarding a defendant’s mental state at the time of a
crime.

He said a defendant isn’t necessarily insane just because he has
been battling mental illness. However, he said, attorneys will have to wait for
the further evaluation before deciding how to proceed.

With insanity
defenses, the burden shifts to defense attorneys to prove that their client was
insane at the time of the killing. It will be up to Douglas County District
Judge Marlon Polk to weigh any testimony about Hollister’s mental
state.

If the judge concludes that Hollister was insane, he most likely
would be committed indefinitely to the regional center. If the judge determines
that Hollister was sane, he would proceed to trial and, if convicted, face life
in prison.

The initial regional center report by psychiatrist Klaus
Hartmann and psychologist Mario Scalora shows that Hollister, 59, had been
battling depression for several months before the death of his

wife.

Hollister, who has no criminal record, has a master’s degree in
human resources and was employed at Omaha Bedding Co. from 1994 to
2007.

He then worked at his wife’s vintage clothing store, “Weird Wild
Stuff,” from 2007 until the time of her death.

The report says Hollister
began experiencing “depressive symptoms,” including severe insomnia, in the
summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a relative’s purported
involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the report
says.

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom he
believed were ‘plotting’ against him,” the report says. “He also experienced
suicidal ideation during that time period.”

Hollister sought help from
several medical professionals and was prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.

On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was dead and a
knife was beside her.

Police found Ellie Hollister dead in the couple’s
home at 4705 N. 111th Circle.

Detectives found evidence that Ellie
Hollister, 52, tried to fight off her husband, including scratch marks on Robert
Hollister’s face. Hollister told regional center doctors he had “memory lapses
related to the alleged offense.”

“Hollister demonstrated a desire for
justice,” the report says, “rather than undeserved punishment.”

Contact
the writer:

444-1275,

todd.cooper@owh.com

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Medications for Depression & OCD: Thanksgiving-Man Shoots & Kill 4 Relatives: FL

Paragraph six reads:  “Merhige’s troubled mental history
­ which included severe depression and
obsessive-compulsive disorder ­ dated back to a nervous breakdown
while he was an honors student at the University of Miami, said his mother,
Carole Merhige.”

Paragraph 15 reads:  “He
was supposed to be on medication when Thursday’s shooting happened, but
she said he had been self-medicating. She did not know whether he was doing so
correctly.”

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime/man-accused-of-killing-four-relatives-in-jupiter-91027.html

Man accused of killing four relatives in Jupiter had long history of
mental illness, threats against

By Andrew
Marra
and John
Lantigua

Palm Beach Post Staff WriterPalm Beach Post Staff
Writer
Updated: 4:55 p.m. Monday, Nov. 30, 2009

MIAMI ­ Paul
Michael Merhige, accused of killing four relatives at a Thanksgiving dinner in
Jupiter, had threatened to kill family members before and often refused to take
medication prescribed to treat his longtime mental illness, according to court
records and Merhige’s mother.

In April 2006, during a fight with his
sister at their parents’ house outside Miami, Merhige told the sister “I’m going
to slit your throat,” according to a domestic violence complaint filed by the
sister, Carla Merhige.

He added that “this time I’m not going to go by
myself,” referring to an earlier suicide attempt he had made, according to his
sister’s complaint.

Seeking a restraining order, Carla Merhige wrote that
her brother’s threat to slit her throat was just the latest of many that “occur
on a regular basis since (Merhige) suffers from mental illness but refuses to
take his medication.”

Carla was among the four people killed Thursday in
what police say was a murderous rampage by her 35-year-old brother at their
cousin’s Jupiter home. He is still on the loose and being hunted by law
enforcement officials.

Merhige’s troubled mental history ­ which
included severe depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder ­ dated back to
a nervous breakdown while he was an honors student at the University of Miami,
said his mother, Carole Merhige.

“Everything was perfect until he was
19,” she said in an interview today.

But since graduating, his mental
illness had barred him from holding down a job, and he had an often-violent
relationship with his family, one that his mother characterized as “16 years of
problems.”

Merhige appeared to have made preparations before Thursday’s
massacre, during which a witness recalled him saying: “I’ve been waiting 20
years to do this.”

Last month, Merhige bought at least two firearms, his
mother said, and last week he asked his parents for his passport, which they had
kept at their home in the Miami area.

Unable to hold down a job, he had
been financially supported by his parents since his mental troubles
began.

Those troubles culminated when gunshots flashed Thursday night at
his cousin’s home on Via Veracruz in Jupiter. Police say Merhige killed Carla
and her twin sister, Lisa Knight, both 33; his aunt, Raymonde Joseph, 76; and
his cousin’s 6-year-old daughter, Makayla Sitton.

A candlelight vigil is
planned for the twin sisters, Carla and Lisa, tonight in Miami.

In recent
years Paul Merhige had become more independent and was living by himself in an
apartment in the Coral Gables area, his mother said.

He was supposed to
be on medication when Thursday’s shooting happened, but she said he had been
self-medicating. She did not know whether he was doing so correctly.

She
said she hopes her son is captured soon, adding that she has no idea where he
is. When Paul Merhige asked his parents for his passport, she said, he didn’t
mention travel plans.

Most upsetting to her, Carole Merhige said, was the
ease with which he was able to purchase handguns.

“A person with a
history of mental problems should not be able to get a gun,” she said. “This is
such a big country. Why isn’t there a database of mentally ill
people?”

She and her husband, who lost two daughters to their troubled
son, do not plan to attend tonight’s vigil.

“We’re devastated,” she said.
“We’re just taking it day by day.”

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