Hurricane Alert & Prescription Medication Concerns

One of the strongest Atlantic storms ever recorded has caused damage on several islands, including Barbuda, Anguilla and St. Martin

 

FOR ALL THOSE ON MEDICATIONS & HOW THIS STORM MAY IMPACT YOU

For years I have warned about the issues that could arise due to any type of emergency that could lead to patients not being able to get their medications for a period thus being forced into abrupt withdrawal. When the FDA has warned that any abrupt change in dose, whether increasing or decreasing the dose can cause suicide, hostility or psychosis this is a serious concern. And when you know how many pharmaceutical company manufacturing plants are based in Puerto Rico, North Carolina and New Jersey which may all be in the wake of this storm it could cause even some longer term problems with availability.

 

FOR ALL THOSE IN THE WAY OF THE STORM ON MEDICATIONS

Florida officials began ordering evacuations as Hurricane Irma intensifies to a Category 5 storm. Anyone in the target zone of Irma please be safe and don’t forget your medical directives and medication. See if it’s possible to get early refills due to the storm. People were forced into cold turkey withdrawal in recent hurricanes from their prescription medications because they didn’t anticipate the damage and the difficulties in getting refills after the storms.

Latest Alert from Florida: The state of Florida has ordered all prescriptions to be refilled even if it is not time yet. Basically they said “get all your prescriptions now because the pharmacies have been told to fill them, then get out of harm’s way.”

 

FLORIDA LAW CONCERNING ADVANCED SCRIPTS 

(1) In the event a pharmacist receives a request for a prescription refill and the pharmacist is unable to readily obtain refill authorization from the prescriber, the pharmacist may dispense:
(a) A one-time emergency refill of up to a 72-hour supply of the prescribed medication; or
(b) A one-time emergency refill of one vial of insulin to treat diabetes mellitus.
(2) If the Governor issues an emergency order or proclamation of a state of emergency, the pharmacist may dispense up to a 30-day supply in the areas or counties affected by the order or proclamation, provided that:
(a) The prescription is not for a medicinal drug listed in Schedule II appearing in chapter 893.
(b) The medication is essential to the maintenance of life or to the continuation of therapy in a chronic condition.
(c) In the pharmacist’s professional judgment, the interruption of therapy might reasonably produce undesirable health consequences or may cause physical or mental discomfort.
(d) The dispensing pharmacist creates a written order containing all of the prescription information required by this chapter and chapters 499 and 893 and signs that order.
(e) The dispensing pharmacist notifies the prescriber of the emergency dispensing within a reasonable time after such dispensing.
History.—ss. 19, 27, ch. 86-256; s. 3, ch. 89-77; s. 59, ch. 91-137; s. 6, ch. 91-156; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 30, ch. 93-211; s. 24, ch. 2016-230.

IF NARCOTIC- Pharmacist MUST get oral RX and permission from doctor for 3 day supply.

(f) A prescription for a controlled substance listed in Schedule II may be dispensed only upon a written prescription of a practitioner, except that in an emergency situation, as defined by regulation of the Department of Health, such controlled substance may be dispensed upon oral prescription but is limited to a 72-hour supply. A prescription for a controlled substance listed in Schedule II may not be refilled.
http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0400-0499/0465/Sections/0465.0275.html

The 2017 Florida Statutes

Title XVII
MILITARY AFFAIRS AND RELATED MATTERS
Chapter 252
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
View Entire Chapter
252.358 Emergency-preparedness prescription medication refills.—All health insurers, managed care organizations, and other entities that are licensed by the Office of Insurance Regulation and provide prescription medication coverage as part of a policy or contract shall waive time restrictions on prescription medication refills, which include suspension of electronic “refill too soon” edits to pharmacies, to enable insureds or subscribers to refill prescriptions in advance, if there are authorized refills remaining, and shall authorize payment to pharmacies for at least a 30-day supply of any prescription medication, regardless of the date upon which the prescription had most recently been filled by a pharmacist, when the following conditions occur:
(1) The person seeking the prescription medication refill resides in a county that:
(a) Is under a hurricane warning issued by the National Weather Service;
(b) Is declared to be under a state of emergency in an executive order issued by the Governor; or
(c) Has activated its emergency operations center and its emergency management plan.
(2) The prescription medication refill is requested within 30 days after the origination date of the conditions stated in this section or until such conditions are terminated by the issuing authority or no longer exist. The time period for the waiver of prescription medication refills may be extended in 15- or 30-day increments by emergency orders issued by the Office of Insurance Regulation.
This section does not excuse or exempt an insured or subscriber from compliance with all other terms of the policy or contract providing prescription medication coverage. This section takes effect July 1, 2006.
History.—s. 29, ch. 2006-71.

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Senate Hearing: Medical Errors Are Third Leading Cause of Death???

medical errors

Third Leading Cause of Death – Medical Errors

and When You Add In Medications How High Is The Toll Really?

July 17, 2014 the US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions held a hearing on the number of deaths caused by preventable medical errors.

http://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/medical-mistakes

C-SPAN has a video of those Senate hearings posted here… http://www.help.senate.gov/hearings/hearing/

But before going to those links if you will go to our website to read our mission statement at http://www.drugawareness.org/mission/ you will see how long this situation has been going on and find a link to a study done by pharmacists who were tired of seeing patients die from the drugs they were handing out. They found that the Third Leading Cause of Death in America is “properly prescribed prescription drugs” (prescribed according to what the FDA has judged to be “safe and effective”.) This is a study done in 1995 so you can imagine how much worse it would be by now. If you add that together with these deaths plus add in the medication-induced heart attacks and medication-induced cancer and medication-induced suicides you will find medical treatment to be the leading cause of death in America!

To all that add to it the warning from Dr. John Ioannidis, the world’s leading expert on medical research, who says that 90% of medical research is now tainted or just plain bogus and that he fears that medical science will not be able to survive this. http://www.drugawareness.org/recentcasesblog/lies-damned-lies-and-medical-science

From all this information the lesson seems clear…Keep your loved ones away from doctors and nurses and their treatments!!!

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

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MEDICATIONS: Yet Another So Called “Terrorist” on Meds!

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

Take away these serotonergic medications on both sides of this war and
there would be no war, and likely never would have been a war – except for those
determined to have one for profits only!
From the LA Times report just three months after 9/11 we learned
that the Taliban psychiatrist had posters of antidepressants all over his
office and he was reported as saying that what the Taliban needed was not more
guns, but more Prozac. Of course it follows that if they needed
more, he already had them on antidepressants. He then made this
chilling statement that clearly says anyone he saw would be prescribed
one of these drugs: “Allah has given these drugs great power. Taking them
is like swallowing a little piece of God.”
We now have so many of our US military on these drugs that for several
years now we have lost more soldiers to suicide than we have in combat.
Even those that make it back home are lucky to wake up in the mornings because
so many of them are dying in their sleep from the drug combos they are
being prescribed by the VA.
On top of all that we have those like this fellow being arrested as a
terrorist” because of his reactions to his medications‘ It reminds me of the
young man I attempted to help in Israel several years ago. He was so painfully
shy that his doctor gave him Paxil to treat his Social Anxiety Disorder. His
family read my book and were alarmed and very concerned, but the young man
“seemed to be doing okay” on the drug and they thought that if they just
watched him carefully he would be okay. So they watched carefully, they thought,
until he got up in the middle of the night, blew up an Army jeep, and began
ranting and raving about wanting to be a suicide bomber! (Keep in mind that he
went on this drug because he was shy!) Needless to say no one was more
embarrassed and shocked by his behavior than he was!
_________________________________________
Speaking out in her son’s defense, Nadia Alessa admitted he suffered from
severe anger management issues, but insisted he does not pose a threat to the
country where he was born to Palestinian immigrants.

“Anything makes him
angry,” Nadia Alessa, told CNN of her son. “But he’s not a terrorist; he’s a
stupid kid.”

In interviews with CNN and The New York Times, Alessa said her
son was so full of rage, he began seeing psychiatrists and taking medications to
control his moods at age 6. The boy known for screaming at his mother and
roughing up his father’s car changed schools no less than 10 times, the Times
reported.

Who Are the Alleged New Jersey Jihadists?

Updated: 1 hour 15 minutes ago

Michelle Ruiz

Michelle Ruiz Contributor

AOL
News

(June 13) — The two New
Jersey men arrested at New York’s John F.
Kennedy Airport and charged with conspiring to kill U.S. troops overseas were
troubled, rebellious teens, according to reports. The pair’s brushes with the
law and extreme anti-American sentiments eventually sparked an elaborate
take-down by the FBI.

Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, 20, of North Bergen, N.J.,
and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, 24, of Elmwood Park, N.J., were reportedly nabbed
with help from an undercover rookie New York policeman of Egyptian descent, The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J.,
reported
. Alessa’s mother, Nadia Alessa, told CNN she thought the man Alessa
and Almonte called “Bassim” recorded provocative remarks the pair made and built
a case against them.

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Marshals on Wednesday June 9, 2010 shows Mohamed Mahmoud Alessa (left) and Carlos Eduardo Almonte (right).

U.S. Marshals/AP
Family and friends of the alleged New Jersey jihadists,
Mohamed Mahmood Alessa, left, and Carlos Eduardo Almonte, say the pair were
rebellious teens. Alessa and Almonte were arrested June 5 at New York’s JFK
airport, where they planned to fly separately to Somalia by way of Egypt to join
a terrorist organization, the FBI said.

In November 2009, the
officer’s wire captured potentially damning conversations between Alessa and
Almonte.

“A lot of people need to get killed, bro. Swear to God. I have
to get an assault rifle and just kill anyone that even looks at me the wrong
way, bro,” Alessa said, according to transcripts included in the criminal
complaint. “My soul cannot rest until I shed blood. I wanna, like, be the
world’s known terrorist. I swear to God.”

Speaking out in her son’s
defense, Nadia Alessa admitted he suffered from severe anger management issues,
but insisted he does not pose a threat to the country where he was born to
Palestinian immigrants.

“Anything makes him angry,” Nadia Alessa, told
CNN of her son. “But he’s not a terrorist; he’s a stupid kid.”

In
interviews with CNN and The New York Times, Alessa said her
son was so full of rage, he began seeing psychiatrists and taking medications to
control his moods at age 6. The boy known for screaming at his mother and
roughing up his father’s car changed schools no less than 10 times, the Times
reported.
Alessa alarmed students and
staffers at two public high schools — North Bergen and KAS Prep in 2005 and
2006, after threatening to “blow up the school, mutilate gays and punish women
who were not subordinate to men,” school officials told the Times.

The
Department of Homeland Security was alerted and North Bergen relegated Alessa to
a public library to receive his lessons under the watchful eye of a security
guard, a school spokesman said, because “administrators felt that his presence
in school posed a safety threat to other students and staff.”

Despite his
behavioral issues, Alessa’s mother said she gave her son new clothes and cell
phones.

“He was a spoiled kid,” she told the Times. “He acted like a
teenager. He thought he was a king.”

In 2005, Alessa reportedly met
Almonte, a naturalized citizen of Dominican descent who in the previous year had
converted from Catholicism to Islam. Almonte, who had been arrested for bringing
a knife to school and drinking beer in a public park, reportedly visited local
mosques and called himself Omar.

A year later, the FBI received a tip
that the two men discussed holy war and killing non-Muslims, prompting
authorities to begin to “keep a watch” on them, according to the Times. The men
traveled to Jordan in February 2007 hoping to be recruited by a militant
jihadist group, the FBI said. By 2008, Almonte was posting quotations from
jihadist clerics on his Facebook page and searches of his computer revealed he
was following teachings from al-Qaida leaders, including Osama bin
Laden.

The undercover New York policeman infiltrated their inner circle
in 2009, The Star-Ledger reported. Nadia Alessa told CNN she told her son she
was suspicious of his new friend.

“Since I saw him, I warned my son and
Carlos,” she said. “But my son say, ‘Always you say about my friends they are
undercover.’ ”

Authorities allege that Alessa and Almonte’s separate
flights to Egypt on June 5 were part of their plot to go to Somalia to join
al-Shabaab, which in 2008 was designated a terrorist organization by the U.S.
government. The men were arrested and charged with conspiring to kill, maim and
kidnap persons outside the country. They were denied bail last week by a federal
judge who called them a flight risk and a potential danger to the
public.

A Swedish woman claiming to be Alessa’s fiancee, 19-year-old
Siham Abedar, 19, told New Jersey’s The Record she broke
down in tears after learning of his arrest. She said she was waiting for him in
Egypt, where they planned to marry. She denied Alessa wanted to “do jihad or
whatever.”

“I know it’s not true,” she said. “I know he wanted to get
married. He wanted to have kids. He wanted to do a lot of things.”

Filed under: Nation, Crime, Top
Stories

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DEPT. of DEFENSE: Link Between Vet Suicides & Medications

Paragraph six of main article reads:  “Quality data
collection and analysis are critical components behind effective prevention
efforts. The Department made great strides over the last 12 months on gathering
critical information to understand the complexity of factors leading to suicide
and ways to prevent such tragedies from occurring within our communities. Data
collected by the DoD Suicide Event Report (DoDSER) tell us that we must continue
to educate our population and build programs, as there continue to be multiple
opportunities to intervene. For example, we are learning that 30% of individuals
who died by suicide communicated their potential self harm; 49% had been
seen in a medical/support clinic/program within 30 days of suicide;
and
26% sought broadly defined mental health resources.”

Paragraph 34 of main
article reads:  “In recent years, antidepressant medications,
particularly the use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) have
been closely evaluated for the increased risk of suicide-related behaviors in
adolescents and young adults associated with their use
. In recognition

of this risk, the FDA’s requires a “black box” warning in the product labeling
of all antidepressant medications that advises clinicians to closely monitor any
worsening in depression, emergence of suicidal thinking or behavior, or unusual
changes in behavior, such as sleeplessness, agitation, or withdrawal from social
situations. Close monitoring is especially important during the first four weeks
of treatment. The FDA also recognizes that depression and other psychiatric
disorders are themselves associated with increased risks for
suicide.”

http://www.pennlive.com/newsflash/index.ssf?/base/national-15/12670299869190.xml&storylist=health

Link Between Medication And Veteran Suicide

2/24/2010, 10:27 a.m. EST
The Associated Press

(AP) ­ xfdte MEDICATION-AND-SUICIDE sked

TESTIMONY February
24, 2010 LOREE K. SUTTON, M.D. DIRECTOR U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HOUSE
VETERANS AFFAIRS LINK BETWEEN MEDICATION AND VETERAN SUICIDE Roll Call, Inc.
1255 22nd Street N.W. Washington, D.C. 20037 Transcript/Programming: Tel.
301-731-1728 Sales: Tel. 202-419-8500 ext 599 sales@cqrollcall.com www.cqrollcall.com Roll Call, Inc. is a private firm not
affiliated with the U.S. Government. Copyright 2010 by Roll Call, Inc.
Washington, D.C. U.S.A. All materials herein are protected by United States
copyright law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed,
published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Roll Call, Inc.
You may not alter or remove any trademark, copyright or other notice from copies

of the content.Statement of Loree K. Sutton, M.D. Director, Defense Centers of
Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Special Assistant
to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs U.S. Department of

Defense

February 24, 2010

Introduction

Chairman Filner, Mr.
Buyer, distinguished Members of the Committee; thank you for the opportunity to
appear here today to talk to you about the Department of Defense‘s (DoD) efforts
to reduce the number of suicides across our force.

On behalf of DoD, I
want to take this opportunity to thank you for your continued, strong support
and demonstrated commitment to our service members, veterans, and their
families.

Over the last nine years, a new era of combat emerged, where
counterinsurgency and asymmetric warfare are the norm. This shift continues to
place a great amount of strain on our most important resource, our service
members. Despite the operational challenges facing them and their families, they
remain incredibly resilient, motivated, and well-trained. The Department
recognizes the need to provide the resources and programs necessary to maintain
their resilience and motivation. Our core messages tell our service members and
their families that they are not alone; treatment works; the earlier the
intervention the better; and reaching out is an act of courage and
strength.

The Department also recognizes that the total number and rate

of suicides continue to rise and this is of deep concern at all leadership
levels. Today, I will share with the Committee our current efforts to reduce the
number of suicides across the Force, and the role of medication and
suicides.

Suicide has a multitude of causes, and no simple solution.
There are many potential areas for intervention, and it is difficult to pinpoint
the best approach because each suicide is unique. Recognizing this, DoD is
tackling the challenge using a multi- pronged strategy involving comprehensive
prevention education, research, and outreach. We believe in fostering a holistic
approach to treatment, leveraging primary care for early recognition and
intervention, and when needed, providing innovative specialty care. The areas of

focus to reduce risk include: (1) conducting data collection and analysis to
detect contributing risk factors; (2) facilitating partnerships across DoD,
federal agencies, and civilian organizations to increase collaboration and
communication; (3) reducing stigma and increasing access to resources to provide
needed care; and (4) using research to close gaps and identify best practices.
Data Surveillance

Quality data collection and analysis are critical
components behind effective prevention efforts. The Department made great
strides over the last 12 months on gathering critical information to understand
the complexity of factors leading to suicide and ways to prevent such tragedies
from occurring within our communities. Data collected by the DoD Suicide Event
Report (DoDSER) tell us that we must continue to educate our population and
build programs, as there continue to be multiple opportunities to intervene. For
example, we are learning that 30% of individuals who died by suicide
communicated their potential self harm; 49% had been seen in a medical/support
clinic/program within 30 days of suicide; and 26% sought broadly defined mental
health resources.

Historically, the Services used unique suicide
surveillance systems. In January 2008, the National Center for Telehealth and
Technology (T2), a Defense Centers of Excellence (DCoE) component center,
launched the DoDSER Annual Report. The DoDSER Annual Report was developed to
standardize data collection and reporting. Pulling data from all branches of the
military, it captures over 250 data-points per suicide with details, summaries,
and analyses of a wide range of potential contributing factors. DoDSER Annual
Report data include specific demographics, suicide event details, treatment, and
military history, among others. The variables are designed to map directly to
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Violent Death
Reporting System to support direct comparisons between military and civilian
populations.

By standardizing data and reporting,
DoD tracks and analyzes suicide data and contributing risk factors proactively
to inform and improve future prevention, intervention, and treatment services.
The DoDSER Annual Report is revised annually based on input from the Services.
The data facilitate the review and evaluation of the effectiveness of suicide
prevention initiatives and their execution over time. DoDSER represents the
strides DoD has taken to better understand what some of the
underlying factors are for suicide. The Department uses this tool to inform
current efforts and initiatives. []

According to the Armed Forces
Medical Examiner System (AFMES), in January 2010 there were 24 confirmed

suicides, all in Regular Components within the DoD. In calendar year 2009, AFMES
reported that there were 312 confirmed suicides, with 286 confirmed in Regular
Components and 26 confirmed in the Reserve Components. Demographic risk factors
include: male, Caucasian, E-1 to E-4, younger than 25 years old, GED or less
than high school education, divorced, and in the Active Duty Component. Other
factors associated with suicide, which are consistent with data from civilian
populations, are: substance abuse, relationship issues, and legal,
administrative (Article 15), and financial problems. Although the impact of
deployment is still under investigation, a majority of suicides do not occur in
the theaters of operation. 16% of suicides occurred in Iraq or Afghanistan.
Despite the knowledge gained and data collected, it is important to resist
oversimplifying or generalizing statistics. Each suicide is as different as a
person is unique.

According to AFMES, there were 26 confirmed suicides in
calendar year 2009 among the Reserve Components, which include all Active Guard
and Reserves. Due to the unique nature of their service, there are challenges
associated with capturing all suicide completions, preparatory behavior and self
harm without intent to die among National Guard and Reserve populations when
they are not on active or activated status. To address this issue, DoD is
examining ways to utilize information gathered from existing tracking and
reporting systems including, but not limited to, insurance and benefit data. The
DoD continues to support National Guard and Reserve populations through numerous
initiatives to increase outreach, care, and resources on all fronts.

The
numbers also tell us that prevention is not enough, as 36% of military suicides

had a history of a mental disorder. The integrated efforts of prevention,
intervention, and treatment are essential to DoD’s approach to tackle the
challenge of suicide.

Facilitating Partnerships

Continued
collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and other federal,
private, and academic organizations is a key part of DoD’s overall
strategy.

Conferences serve as dissemination and outreach platforms by
providing local and regional coordinators with innovative ideas to implement
within their communities and providing DoD and VA with the opportunity to gather
feedback on communities’ needs. The annual DoD/VA Suicide Prevention Conference
provides such a forum. With over 900 attendees, the 2010 conference shared
practical applications, results from research and pilot studies, guidance from
senior DoD and VA leaders on the way forward, and testimonies emphasizing the
importance of seeking help.

We work closely with our partners at the VA
to ensure that the transition out of service and into VA care is seamless and
that service members, veterans, and families receive the care they deserve. The
DCoE coordinates information and resources with VA’s National Suicide Prevention
Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK), and National Resource Directory. As part of this
partnership, DCoE worked with VA and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health
Services Administration (SAMHSA) in December of 2009 to modify the introductory
message on the Lifeline, so that callers are instructed to press “1” if they
are a United States military veteran or Active Duty Service Member (ADSM) or are
calling about one. This expansion increases the scope of services that are
available to ADSMs who may be in crisis.

Collaborative care is an example

of an immediate solution that DoD is aggressively implementing. According to
DoDSER data, 36 percent of completed suicides had a history of a mental health
condition. Providing mental health services in conjunction with primary care is
an important part of our prevention strategy because early detection and
intervention is a key to preventing suicide behaviors. Each Service is
developing collaborative care models based on recommendations from a National
Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) study. The DCoE collaborates with the Services
to integrate the best practices from these models to develop consistent
standards across DoD. DCoE is currently implementing a controlled trial study at
six sites and 18 clinics of collaborative primary care to inform future
efforts.

In August 2009, the DoD Suicide Prevention Task Force was
established under the purview of the Defense Health Board. The goal of the task
force is to provide recommendations to legislative and administrative bodies on
suicide prevention within the military.

The Department recognizes the
importance of eliminating the toxic threat of stigma by transforming its culture
from reactionary to a more proactive environment by engaging leadership to
encourage transparency, accountability, candor, and respect. The DoD is
promoting awareness among leaders and urging them to lead by example in matters
related to health and well-being. In addition, changes in policies and messages
to all levels help create a safe culture to seek help. One significant change
was the revision of question 21 on the questionnaire for security clearances on
whether a service member has sought mental or behavioral help in the past year.
DoD believes that service members should not have to deny themselves the care
they need and deserve out of fear of repercussions. Our efforts to combat stigma
will continue alongside our efforts to provide the best prevention, intervention
and treatment options.

Additionally, DoD is undergoing a cultural
transformation to push care closer to the service members and their families. An
emphasis on early intervention for antecedent issues such as post- traumatic
stress, depression, and substance abuse can help address needs before they
develop into bigger issues that could contribute to suicides. This population
based approach enables DoD to engage multiple audiences including peers,
families, units, and communities to support suicide prevention, risk reduction,
and overall health promotion. The Services also have programs to address needs
before they develop into issues that must be addressed in a specialty care
setting.

DCoE helps combat stigma through the Real Warriors Campaign, a
public education initiative that reinforces the notion that reaching out is a
sign of strength. Under the theme of “Real Warriors, Real Battles, Real
Strengths,” this effort provides concrete examples of service members who sought
care for psychological health issues and are maintaining a successful military
career. While primarily focused on stigma, the Real Warriors Campaign is
actively engaged in the fight against military suicide in a number of

ways:

The website prominently displays the National Suicide Prevention
Lifeline on every page;-Two video profiles of service members involved in the
campaign openly discuss their struggles with suicidal ideation from a position
of strength and optimism having reached out for care that is working; and-The
site allows service members, veterans, families and health professionals to
confidentially reach out to health consultants around the clock through the Real
Warriors Live Chat feature or by calling the DCoE Outreach Center.

The
Campaign’s message boards include numerous posts from service members who share
their coping strategies for dealing with suicidal ideation. The site includes
content that focuses on suicide prevention and substance abuse. Short,
documentary-style videos illustrate the resilience exhibited by service members,
their families, and caregivers.

Since the Real Warriors Campaign launched
in May 2009, the website, www.realwarriors.net,
saw more than 45,500 unique visitors from 127 countries, with more than 69,128
visits and 450,000 page views. The DoD believes that stigma can be defeated by
encouraging and supporting service members to reach out when help is
needed.

critical component of DoD’s strategy is advancing research. As
part of DoD’s research portfolio, the RAND Center for Military Health Policy
Research is reviewing and cataloguing suicide prevention programs across the
Services with recommendations for enhancements of current programs. The results
will be released March 2010 and disseminated to inform future program
development.

A pilot study that showed promise in the civilian sector is
the Caring Letters Program. In a randomized clinical trial, sending brief
letters of concern and reminders of treatment to patients admitted for suicide
attempt, ideation, or for a psychiatric condition was shown to dramatically
reduce the risk of death by suicide. In an effort to determine the applicability
to military populations, the National Center for TeleHealth and Technology (T2)
is piloting a program at Ft Lewis, Washington. The goals of the Caring Letters
Pilot are to (1) test the feasibility of expanding the program to other military
treatment facilities, (2) collect preliminary outcome data, and (3) evaluate the
method of letter transmittal (email vs. postal mail). Since its inception in
July 2009, 81 letters have been sent. Efforts are currently underway to plan a
multi-site randomized control trial.

Many programs are currently in place
to raise awareness among service members, train civilian providers supporting
our service members and communities, and increase leadership involvement in
behavioral health efforts. The programs are on all levels, from the national
level down into local communities. These initiatives, including programs that
provide face-to-face support or online support, demonstrate DoD’s multi-pronged
approach and commitment to ensuring service members and families have access to
the best resources. Some examples of these efforts are detailed
below:

Each Service has its own suicide prevention initiatives tailored
to its culture. In November 2007, DoD established the DCoE to offer a central
coordinating point for activities related to psychological health concerns and
traumatic brain injuries. DCoE focuses on the full continuum of care and
prevention to enhance coordination among the Services, federal agencies, and
civilian organizations. DCoE works to identify best practices and disseminate
practical resources to affected communities. In this effort, emphasis is placed
on building resilience, supporting recovery, and promoting reintegration to
ensure a comprehensive, multi-faceted, and proactive approach in promoting
health and wellbeing.

The Suicide Prevention and Risk Reduction Committee
(SPARRC), chaired by DCoE, provides a forum for inter-Service and VA partnership
and coordination. Members include Suicide Prevention Program Managers from the
Services and representatives from the National Guard Bureau, Reserve Affairs,
VA, Office of Armed Forces Medical Examiner, T2, Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration, and others. This committee is the main venue for
ensuring collaboration and consistency in system-wide communication related to
suicide, risk reduction policy initiatives, and suicide surveillance metrics
across the military. A SPARRC website is currently in development to serve as a
“clearinghouse” for suicide prevention information, contacts, innovative
approaches, and tools.

Additionally, the DCoE Outreach Center coordinates
with Military OneSource, accessible by phone at 1-800-342-9647. Licensed mental
health consultants are available to listen, answer questions, and refer callers
to a wide range of services 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
Military OneSource provides services on a range of other topics including
education, relocation, and parenting.

Another DoD program that encourages
seeking care is inTransition, which provides a bridge of support for service
members while they are transitioning between health care systems or providers.
The program assigns credentialed “Supercoaches” on a one-on-one basis to service
members in transition. These “Supercoaches” provide support, encouragement, and
promote continued use of behavioral health services.

In an effort to
increase access to resources and align with modern communication platforms, DoD
is harnessing technology and social media tools. Afterdeployment.org, an
interactive website developed by T2, provides service members and families
behavioral health information using an anonymous platform. This mental wellness
resource is designed to help service members and families manage the challenges
faced after a deployment. In addition, Afterdeployment.org launched a series of

free podcasts, available on iTunes, discussing a variety of mental health issues
affecting service members and families. Since the rollout in August 2008,
Afterdeployment.org has seen 86,083 visits to its website. Afterdeployment.org
is currently developing both a mobile version of the site and a mobile
application. The portability will allow access to resources regardless of
location.

Telebehavioral health refers to use of telecommunications and
information technology for clinical and non-clinical behavioral health care
services. Telebehavioral health may include the use of videoconferencing,
web-based cameras, email and telephone. T2 is exploring ways to supply timely
telebehavioral health services to service members in theater and during health
screenings immediately upon return to the continental United States. The use of

technology provides service members and their families access to psychological
health care even in the most extreme and/or remote circumstances. Medication and
Suicide Risk

The Department supports the use of psychopharmacological
treatments as a key component of mental health care. Scientific evidence over
the past several decades points to the role of medications in limiting the
severity and duration of illness as well as for preventing relapses and
recurrences. These findings have been translated into recommendations for
clinicians in the VA-DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines for Major Depressive
Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, Psychoses and Substance Use Disorder.
These guidelines are updated periodically as required to reflect the most
current knowledge concerning each of these conditions. Recognizing that all

medications carry potential risks as well as benefits, clinicians must exercise
their judgment in applying these guidelines and determining the most effective
use of medications, other therapies which include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy,
Cognitive Processing Therapy and/or Prolonged Exposure treatment, or a
combination of medication and therapy. Therapy must be monitored, with careful
attention to diagnosis, dosing, clinical response and potential adverse
events.

In recent years, antidepressant medications, particularly the use
of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) have been closely evaluated
for the increased risk of suicide-related behaviors in adolescents and young
adults associated with their use. In recognition of this risk, the FDA’s
requires a “black box” warning in the product labeling of all antidepressant

medications that advises clinicians to closely monitor any worsening in
depression, emergence of suicidal thinking or behavior, or unusual changes in
behavior, such as sleeplessness, agitation, or withdrawal from social
situations. Close monitoring is especially important during the first four weeks
of treatment. The FDA also recognizes that depression and other psychiatric
disorders are themselves associated with increased risks for
suicide.

Accordingly, the Department uses multiple tools to address the
identified risk for antidepressant as well as other medications, as scientific
evidence reaches the threshold for action. These methods include dissemination
of safety alerts to clinicians, patient information sheets, pharmacy monitoring
for harmful combinations of prescribed medications, adherence to The Joint
Commission standards governing medication reconciliation, compliance with the
reporting of adverse events, increasingly sophisticated use pharmacotherapeutic
analysis as well as training and education programs in evidence-based modalities
reflecting the most current clinical practice guidelines.

The DoDSER data
base, while still maturing, provides an unprecedented repository of Service
suicide surveillance data that will continue to inform our efforts. Further, we
look forward to the payoff from continued research investments.

Way
Forward

Suicide is a problem that needs solutions now. DoD is focused on
rapidly translating best practices into applicable tools for service members and
families. At the same time, DoD continues to improve on collaborative
relationships across the Services and with national experts, collecting data,
and in research efforts that will accelerate improvements in current services
and programs as well as spur new innovations. In addition, DoD will also
continue to evolve and leverage our population-based system to push innovations
in prevention and care toward the service member and family.

DoD’s
current initiatives to address the challenges placed on service members and
their families are progressing, but we recognize that there is still much to be
done. In order to build on our current efforts and successfully shift to a model

of population-based care, we identified the following areas of additional
focus.

An issue of increasing concern is suicides of military family
members and how to support surviving families. At this point in time, DoD does
not track suicides of military family members. However, DoD recognizes the
importance of engaging and supporting this population, as their sacrifices
deserve our recognition. The DoD Suicide Prevention Task Force met this year
with surviving families at the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS)
Seminar. The DoD Task Force will provide recommendations to the Secretary of

Defense and Congress. Efforts will be focused on increasing outreach to
families; providing families with more education and training to recognize the
signs of suicidal behavior and where to seek help; and supporting families after
a suicide event. In addition, for calendar year 2010, SPARRC partnered with TAPS
to form a sub-committee to identify additional needs of families and to
recommend concrete solutions.

Postvention, which refers to all activities
and response after a suicide event, is another area of growing attention. The
goals of postvention include: (1) promote healing, (2) reduce risk of contagion,
and (3) identify those at risk and connect them to help. Postvention is also
viewed as a form of prevention for survivors. This year, DoD will work with the
Services to promote consistent postvention protocols across
programs.

Connect/Frameworks Suicide Postvention Program is a civilian
program that utilizes evidenced supported protocols to promote an integrated
community based response to suicides. Postvention protocols and guidelines
include topics such as discussing cause and method of death; how to address
needs of families; memorial service activities; and media coverage and
messaging.

In addition to prevention, intervention, and treatment, DoD is
shifting attention to increasing resilience. DoD promotes a holistic approach
that optimizes the physical, psychological, and spiritual components of the
human condition. The DoD is also piloting resilience programs in military
settings to determine applicability and effectiveness within military
populations. While the impact of deployment on suicide is still under
investigation, it cannot be denied that an era of high operational tempo and
persistent conflict increases pressure on our warriors. A comprehensive approach
to enhancing resilience actively confronts the increasing stressors service
members face in this environment.

2010 will also provide DoD further
opportunities to demonstrate a public health model of prevention, by supporting
peer-to-peer programs in the Services and continuing to increase the number of

mental health providers in communities. DoD is actively engaged in hiring more
mental health providers and providing them with quality and continued training.
Conclusion

Through our united and concerted efforts, we can continue
making a change for the better. DoD recognizes the need to provide the resources
and programs necessary to maintain the resilience and motivation of our service
members and families. We will continue to emphasize education as we deliver our
core messages. “You are not alone; treatment works; the earlier the intervention
the better; and reaching out is an act of courage and strength.”

We are
devoted to this effort and will continue to work aggressively to prevent the
unnecessary loss of life.

With the Committee’s continued assistance and
support, we will ensure our brave men and women in uniform and their families
have access to the resources they require.

On behalf of the DoD, thank
you for the opportunity to highlight these vital issues. I look forward to your
questions.

397 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Mother’s Baby Missing: Arizona

Paragraphs four through six read:  “”She should have
sought professional help. She did seek help for post partum
depression and she was on medication and during that
time she seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she
hopped in Bob Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old
mother, who allegedly told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

SSRI Stories note:  Withdrawal, especially abrupt withdrawal, from any of these
medications can cause severe neuropsychiatric and physical symptoms. It is
important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs, often over a period of
a year or more, under the supervision of a qualified and experienced specialist,
if available.
Withdrawal is sometimes more severe than the original
symptoms or problems.

http://www.kpho.com/news/22168065/detail.html

Johnson’s Grandfather Thinks She’s Lying

Bob Johnson Still Believes Baby Gabriel Is Alive

Pat McReynolds
Reporter,
KPHO.com

POSTED: 10:26 pm MST January 6, 2010
UPDATED: 6:43 am MST
January 7, 2010

TEMPE, Ariz. — Bob Johnson said his
granddaughter, Elizabeth, has always been secretive.

“If she didn’t want
you to know something, you ain’t gonna find out,” Johnson said.

He said
moving in and out of five foster homes as a child made her that way. But he said
the straight “A” student also developed an irrational temper that led to bouts
of rage.

“She should have sought professional help. She did seek help
for post partum depression and she was on medication and during that time she
seemed a lot more mellow and everything was better,” Bob Johnson said.

But she stopped taking that medication shortly before she hopped in Bob
Johnson’s car with 8-month-old Gabriel and headed to Texas.

The baby was
last seen in San Antonio in December with his 23-year-old mother, who allegedly
told Loagn McQueary, her ex-boyfriend, that she’d killed their baby.

Elizabeth Johnson was arrested last week in Florida on suspicion of
custodial interference after she didn’t show up for a custodial hearing.

“She had this cockamamie idea that she was going to change her Social
Security number and name and his Social Security number and name and run
forever,” Bob Johnson said.

Instead, in an exclusive interview with CBS
5, Elizabeth Johnson said she simply gave Gabriel to a couple she met in a park.

“I trusted them. I believe in my heart they’re good people,” said
Elizabeth Johnson on the phone from jail.

But her grandfather doesn’t
buy it. He tried to envision her scenario.

‘Oh by the way, how would you
like to have a baby, oh it’s free, yeah it’s free,’ Bob Johnson said. “That’s
hard. That’s hard to really believe, but it’s a simple story. It’s a story that
you can repeat without stumbling.”

The last time Bob Johnson saw Gabriel
was when the whole family got together for Thanksgiving. He has pictures of
Elizabeth Johnson posing with the boy’s father, Logan McQueary.

“She’s
the sweet Elizabeth,” Bob Johnson said when pointing to a picture of her
smiling.

He thinks she gave Gabriel to a family in Texas, and is lying
now so the boy will never be found. But she has threatened to harm the child,
and Bob Johnson wonders if her past and her struggles with self control
eventually got the best of her.

“It’s possible that in a moment of
anger, depression, whatever, that she carried out her threat. I don’t even want
to think about it because, what a waste. What a waste,” said Bob Johnson.

Copyright 2010 by KPHO.com. All rights
reserved.

638 total views, 2 views today

ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Senator Asks How Many Soldiers are On Antidepressants

Paragraph two reads:  “Citing the rising number of suicides among active-duty
soldiers in the U.S. Army,
a senator wrote to the
secretary of defense this week asking for the ‘estimated number and percentage
of troops since June 2005 who have been prescribed antidepressant

medications while serving in Iraq and
Afghanistan’.”

http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2009/11/12/senatoraskshowmany-troops-areonantidepressants/

  • November 12, 2009, 10:11 AM ET

Senator Asks How Many Troops Are on

Antidepressants

By Jacob Goldstein

For people in their late teens
and early 20s, taking an antidepressant may actually increase
the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors
, at least during initial
treatment. So it’s important that those patients are carefully
monitored.

Citing the rising number of
suicides
among active-duty soldiers in the U.S. Army, a senator wrote to the
secretary of defense this week asking for the “estimated number and percentage
of troops since June 2005 who have been prescribed antidepressant medications
while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

The  letter is from
Ben Cardin, a Maryland Democrat. He said Congress must:

examine the extent to which DoD is prescribing antidepressants to its
service members, especially those deployed in-theatre, and the methods it is
employing to ensure that sufficient observation periods are conducted by
properly trained mental health providers. In short, my concern is how DoD is
managing the sheer volume and manner by which antidepressant drugs are being
administered to our service men and women overseas.

We called
and emailed the Department of Defense to ask for a reply, but they didn’t
immediately respond to our request. We’ll update this post when we hear
back.

Hat Tip: Pharmalot;
Photo: iStockphoto

424 total views, no views today

PROZAC WITHDRAWAL: Woman Runs Away From Home: Kentucky

Paragraphs six and seven  read:  “Kelsey had been depressed and was taking
several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey,
particularly Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.”

“The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only $80
in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her medication
with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard from her.”

http://www.cadizrecord.com/articles/stories/public/200909/10/04SG_news.html

BREAKING NEWS: Authorities looking
for missing Trigg County woman

Franklin Clark, Reporter — fclark@cadizrecord.com

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Authorities are looking for Trigg
County woman who has been missing since the night of Wednesday, Sept. 2, and
they are asking for the public’s help.

Betty Kelsey, 61, was last seen
driving a 2002 red Chevrolet Avalanche pickup truck, according to Trigg County
Sheriff Randy Clark.

Her husband Larry Kelsey reported on Wednesday,
Sept. 2, at about 8 p.m. that he couldn’t locate her, and a BOLO (Be On the Look
Out) was put out nationwide, Clark said, adding that she was placed on the NCIC
around the state and country with her description the next night.

“We
are very concerned about her well-being,” Clark said.

Larry Kelsey said
she is about five and a half feet tall and about 185 pounds, and added that she
had been talking about driving to Land Between the Lake. He also she had been
talking about seeing a friend in Michigan, but went on to say that her friend
hasn’t seen her, either.

Kelsey had been depressed and was taking
several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey, particularly

Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.

The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only
$80 in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her
medication with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard
from her.

Clark said that both the U.S. Forest Service and the Kentucky
State Police have chased down leads, but none of them have lead to Kelsey.
“Hopefully we can turn something up,” the sheriff said.

Clark said
anyone with information that may help find Kelsey is asked to call the Trigg
County Sheriff’s Department at 522-6014.

(For the full, updated story,
check out the Wednesday, Sept. 16, edition of the Cadiz Record.)

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Paxil Survivor – Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil

Paxil Survivor – Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil
Ellen Heath
An Open Letter to Anyone Seeking Information About the Harmful Effects of Psychiatric Drugs:

I am writing my story because I want to do something to help inform people about the harmful effects of antidepressant drugs. It took me several years, after using antidepressant medications for more than ten, to become clear headed enough to figure out what happened to me. I wound up having a minor stroke or a seizure according to the MRI. Now I’m trying to get my life back together.

Here’s what happened:

I went to a Psychiatrist in 1990 because I couldn’t control crying jags at work. I had been sad over a horrible accident that left my 19-year-old son permanently brain injured.

The lady psychiatrist saw me for less than five minutes, announced I was clinically depressed and prescribed Prozac. When I asked, she said it was not habit forming.

I remember feeling almost immediate relief after the first dose (surprising, since she said it would take 3 weeks to take effect). All of the sudden life became wonderful! I sang to myself all day long. I was the life of every party (or so I thought). I began drinking too much and running around like I was on speed. I just had so much fun at everything I did. The world was at my feet and I was setting it on fire! Wow…why didn’t I find these drugs sooner?

But really, as the years went by, I became unattached to the world emotionally. I became very self-centered. I lost a lot of friends. I missed major life occurrences, like the death of my father. I was not there for him during his illness nor was I emotionally present at his funeral. I was absolutely giddy all of the time. My most radical act was to sue my employer. I know now that it’s better not to sue your local government! As I look back at bad life decisions and embarrassing behavior, I can only be grateful that it was not worse. I read daily of cases describing people committing crimes and displaying truly bizarre behavior on these drugs, some turning into homicidal monsters when they try to withdraw. There are people spending the rest of their lives in prison because of these drugs. I realize I am one of the lucky ones to have come out of the fog and be able to tell my story. I have an insecure (shy), reserved personality by nature, and I come from a conservative family. I know now that the ‘drug fog’ kept me from seeing what was really happening in my life for many years. I know now that I would not have made all those bad decisions had I not been on those drugs. These pharmaceuticals that I so trusted to ‘cure’ my disease of depression have altered my entire life.

I realized I wanted off the drugs in the fall of 2001. It was nothing noble on my part that I finally decided to get off (an entirely different and very long story that I am not proud of…we’ll just say I wanted to be clear headed and leave it at that). It took from the fall of 2001 until the fall of 2003. And guess what? By December 2003 I was experiencing severe brain fogginess, mental confusion and panic attacks! I was deathly afraid of what was wrong with me and just as afraid to take any kind of medication to treat the crying jags. At this point, I did not know that I was experiencing was drug withdrawal.

I began to seek help. I had an MRI done because of the terrible brain fog.(1) They found ‘non-specific white focal matter’, which the doctor said could have been caused by a minor stroke or seizure. I searched for answers for an entire year from: three PHD therapists, one medical doctor of internal medicine, one general practitioner MD and one gastroenterologist MD. None of these professionals would discuss withdrawal effects of psych drugs! One guy curtly said in a very harsh tone, “if you want to talk about antidepressant drugs, you have to go to a psychiatrist!” Another, the PHD Psychologist lady, was giddy and scatter-brained. She left me sitting in her waiting room a half hour, then sashayed in laughing hilariously, saying she was so sorry she forgot about our appointment…then she proceeded to prop her feet up on her chair with her keyboard in her lap and and pounded in my name address and insurance information, saying “you know this drill, right?” I told her that I did not want to take antipressant drugs. She quickly explained to me that “our brains need help” and gave me some websites that supported her position. I finished the session with her and asked her not to file a claim on my insurance. I gave her a check. And guess what? The next day there was a claim on my insurance website! The woman obviously was in a world of her own. I suppose I should have written her a thank-you note for yet another example of the bizarre behavior caused by drugs that claim to “help” our brains!

Well, in fairness to these professionals, I was an emotional wreck, and probably presented a scary dilemma to them. While, all doctors may not know about the devastating physical effects these drugs have on our bodies and brains, most of them have heard about suicidal tendencies associated with them, and the well documented stories of people committing horrendous acts either on or while trying to quit these drugs. I’m sure when I mentioned I had recently quit them, I was quite the pariah.

I finally found a psychologist here in Austin, Texas, Dr. John Breeding, that lent me a copy of Ann Blake-Tracy’s tape, ‘Help, I Can’t Get Off My Anti-depressants’. And wow…what a relief! I wasn’t crazy after all. It really was the drugs, as I suspected. I began reading and researching, and discovered that everything that had been happening to me was directly related to the years of antidepressant drug use.

It took a personal crisis for me to wake up. And that’s exactly what happened. The details of the crisis are not important. What’s important is that things had to get pretty bad before I realized that the antidepressant drugs were wrecking my life and absolutely destroying my soul. Author and Psychiatrist Peter Breggin writes about a spellbinding effect these drugs have on people. Believe me, I was spellbound for a long time. I absolutely accepted as truth that these drugs were helping me. Even when I got off of them it took awhile for me to ‘come back’ and fully realize how duped I had been. This year will be the 6th year I am free from those mind captivating drugs, and never have I been tempted to get back on. Each week that goes by I still continue to gain memories and mental clarity.

It’s hard to get over the fact that more than 10 years of my life were lost in a fog because of drugs that doctors said would help me. It feels like my life has been turned totally upside down because of these drugs.

There must be a reason my mind was spared. I am now supporting an effort to enhance public awareness about the harmful effects of SSRI drugs in any way I can. That is the reason for this open letter. Please people …wake up! How many more lives must be ruined before you will see the truth?

I am asking that the medical community embrace the concept of ‘informed consent’. I went to three psychiatrists. None of them were willing to discuss the negative side effects of the SSRI drugs they prescribed for me. I went to professional counselors and psychologists who said ‘our brains need help’ and ‘the drugs help so many people’. Now after extensive reading and researching, I am absolutely disappointed in the prevailing viewpoint by the mental health community that mind-altering drugs are the answer. There is clear scientific evidence that they are not. When I see the giddy, drunken behavior of people on these drugs today, I am simply appalled that they continue to be touted as helpful by professionals who take an oath do ‘do no harm’!

I have started a support group for families, friends and bio-psychiatric drug survivors as a means of helping one another to heal. The lack of support from the medical community made me feel alone and isolated much of the time as I was coming off these drugs. By forming a community support group I hope to be able to help people avoid what I went through by sharing some of the information that is not readily available to the general public. I want to do something to spare people the anguish I went through. The information that I know now that I did not know when I went through all this should be readily available. My question to the medical community is why isn’t it?

It is my opinion that SSRI drug use today is epidemic, and that our society is being adversely affected because of it. It is my belief that those of us who have been on the drugs and successfully withdrawn have a responsibility to spread the truth that we have so painfully learned. We can change the world. We must share our stories and get the truth out there. If you are in a position to spread the word about how harmful psychiatric drugs are, do so…don’t hesitate. If you touch one life, you have made a difference.

Sincerely,
Ellen Heath
Transformers Support Group

P. S. Please feel free to contact me at 512-626-7986 or e-mail me at MHEATH3@AUSTIN.RR
(1) Brain fog means: I could not think straight. I felt confused about day to day activities at work (I am a financial analyst), my short term memory was so bad that I could barely put a sentence together, and I just found myself in a state of mental confusion, not knowing if this was my fault or the rest of the world that was askew. Mental confusion is hard to describe because you don’t really recognize it until you have begun to regain your clarity. You get lost on the way to a location that you’ve travelled many times before. You forget names of people that you’ve known for years… you turn the wrong way down a familiar hallway.

710 total views, 1 views today

PROZAC WITHDRAWAL: Woman Runs Away From Home: Kentucky

Paragraphs six and seven  read:  “Kelsey had been depressed and was taking several medications but decided to quit some of them cold turkey, particularly Prozac, Larry Kelsey said.”

“The sheriff said that Kelsey left with only $80 in cash, and although she has diabetes, she didn’t take any of her medication with her. He added that as of Thursday morning, no one had yet heard from her.”

399 total views, no views today

ZOLOFT WITHDRAWAL: Nervous Breakdown & Woman Runs Away: Arizona

Second paragraph reads: “Chandler police said Carol Roby, 62, suffered a nervous breakdown after going off her Zoloft, an anti-depressant medication. Her family noticed her missing Saturday when she didn’t meet them for a 2 p.m. meeting. She also didn’t make an 8 a.m. work appointment, police said.”

FROM THE WARNING ON OUR www.drugawareness.org WEBSITE FROM ITS INCEPTIONIN 1997:
Withdrawal can often be more dangerous than continuing on a medication. It is important to withdraw extremely slowly from these drugs (usually over a period of a year or more depending upon the length of use of antidepressant medications).

http://www.azcentral.com/community/chandler/articles/2009/08/10/20090810cr-adultfound0810.html

Chandler woman reported missing calls family from Tucson

8 commentsby Megan Boehnke – Aug. 10, 2009 10:01 AM
The Arizona Republic

A Chandler woman who was missing over the weekend called her family late Sunday from a hotel in Tucson.

Chandler police said Carol Roby, 62, suffered a nervous breakdown after going off her Zoloft, an anti-depressant medication. Her family noticed her missing Saturday when she didn’t meet them for a 2 p.m. meeting. She also didn’t make an 8 a.m. work appointment, police said.

She left behind her medication and insulin kit.

Roby drove to Tucson and checked herself into a hotel before eventually calling her family.

514 total views, 1 views today