Roseanne Barr: Was her comment medication-induced?

Roseanne was on Prozac for years & had very serious reactions to it. She was estranged from her parents because she thought they molested her when she was 6 months old! (And her parents are the sweetest people you would ever want to meet!!!) As dreams  on antidepressants  are so extremely vivid  patients begin having problems  discerning  between dreams and reality so the to begin to mix with one another making the patient believe that they are actually remembering something that has happened to them. Once finally off the antidepressants she was able to realize it was all drug-induced by her medication. (See our group on that all too common reaction to these drugs:

Antidepressant-induced False Accusations of Abuse – m.facebook.com/groups/878496472235198?)

She then went on Oprah with her mother to apologize & state publicly that it was all caused by the drugs & the biggest mistake she has ever made in her life. Sadly her father had already passed away before she got off all her meds. He knew from my book, Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare!, that it was all being caused by the drugs, but he still never got to see their “Real Rosanne,” as they called her, once again before he died. 😢😢 It was really hard on him & it would not surprise me to learn it contributed to his death because they had been such a close knit family BEFORE these drugs entered their world.

What most do not know about Roseanne is that when she was only 16 she was hit by a car & the hood ornament was actually embedded in her forhead. Someone who has had a head injury, especially one as serious as that, should never, ever, ever, ever be given one of these drugs! They seem guaranteed to have the very worst side effects! Remember her grabbing her crotch while singing national anthem and calling it a “Prozac moment”?

But obviously she needs to be warned about not being able to take other mind-altering drugs after the serious reactions she had to antidepressants! And that would certainly include Ambien which is so notorious for also causing the REM Sleep Disorder, even though antidepressants are the very worst for causing this very deadly sleep , long known to induce both murder and suicide, where the patient acts out nightmares in a dream state!

A few listed side effects of Ambien

(Considering how many there are there is not room for them all)

Serious Ambien Side Effects: Memory, Depression, and More

Leave it to USA Today!

Of course USA Today had to carry the following article stating that the Ambien manufacturer said that racism is not a side effect of their drug! https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/05/30/roseanne-barr-blames-ambien-zolpidem-drug-real-side-effects/654683002/

All anyone needs to do is read the .medication side effects of argumentative behaviour and impaired judgement to see a connection! And I would strongly urge you to keep in mind that this is the same newspaper who apparently had no problems in taking some big advertising contract or obviously receiving compensation in some way for running a big feature article on the 10th anniversary Columbine titled “The Myths of Columbine” Of course the leading “myth” of Columbine was that Eric and Dylan, the shooters, were taking anti-depressants!

The minute the article hit the Press I contacted the reporter asking how he missed one of the biggest lawsuits of the past decade where the antidepressant manufacturer of the antidepressant Luvox was sued by Mark Taylor for their antidepressant causing Eric Harris to shoot Mark during the Columbine massacre. His reply was, “Oh yes I forgot Luvox. I will have to change that in the article!”

Of course the change was never made and was allowed to remain in the paper so that a week later it went out in there nation-wide Edition leading the country to believe bad indeed Eric and Dylan were not taking antidepressants at the time they shot up Columbine!

This is how Pharma rewrites history for us all! You now find people all the time who believe it is not true that Eric and Dylan were medicated at the time of that most notorious of all school shootings! And that is why I never pay any attention     to one word that comes from USA Today!

Mark Dice Making it Clear Rosanne’s Comment Was Not Racist

 

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness

www.drugawareness.org & www.SSRIstories.net

Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare!

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Antidepressant-Induced Alzheimer’s and Memory Loss

sandy bem

Scientist Sandy Bem

According to the following NY Times Magazine article had been on a low dose of antidepressants for years before being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. She determined upon learning about the diagnosis that she would take her own life before her brain function became so compromised that she no longer could tell who she was.

Is there a connection? Certainly we know there is a connection to the suicidal thoughts with antidepressants, but what about the Alzheimer’s?

Antidepressant-Induced Alzheimer’s and Memory Loss

See the information below and you should easily be able to answer that question. [Also keep in mind that I have heard of a “low dose” of an antidepressant used to describe the maximum dose of the drug…that is a key phrase doctors use to pacifiy a patient’s concerns.]

I think you will see why one of the Facebook groups I just opened is titled Antidepressant-Induced Alzheimer’s and Memory Loss and can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1448649102099201/

The drug would have produced the symptoms of Alzheimers and suicide. PS It was included in my book on these drugs back in 1994 when it first came out. Remember the elevated serotonin which produced the mitral valve prolapse with the serotonergic diet pills Fen-Phen and Redux. The researcher who found the heart damage with Fen-Phen and Redux, Dr. Heidi Connoly from Mayo, said she found that it was the elevated serotonin produced by the drugs that produced the gummy gooey glossey substance that builds up on the valve to keep it from closing properly.

Well since Alzheimers has long been known to be a state of elevated serotonin as well should we not also expect elevated serotonin produced by any serotonergic medication to produce the same gummy, gooey, glossy substance to build up in the brain as they explain happens in Alzheimers? Of course we should!!!

In fact the real reason the serotonergic diet pills were pulled from the market was brain damage rather than the heart valve damage. A year before Wyeth had been told by the FDA of their concerns about possible brain damage with Redux and even though they approved Redux they wanted further research on possible brain damage with the drug. When concerns were brought to light on the heart valve problems the spotlight was also shown on the brain damage issue since it was learned that Wyeth had never followed through with doing that additional research on that. Plus Una McCann from the National Institutes of Health had just published new research demonstrating some of the most shocking brain damage ever with these drugs.

Please see this 2009 post on Utah, long leading the way in America in the use of antidepressants, was found to be #2 in the nation in the incidence of Alzheimers’ as I discuss the case of my dear friends, Robert Redford’s ex-inlaws:

http://www.drugawareness.org/antidepressants-memory-loss-utah-no-2-in-nation-for-alzheimers/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness

www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/ And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

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Breathing Rosemary Oil Enhances Memory, Fights Alzheimer’s

Rosemary

Rosemary Boosts Memory

Old Superstitions Were on to Something
When It Comes to This Memory Herb

Antidepressant medications have extreme adverse effects upon memory. So adverse are those effects upon memory that amnesia was listed as a frequent side effect to the first SSRI antidepressant Prozac and should follow for all subsequent SSRI and SNRI antidepressants released since then. Memory loss is one of the most common long term effects of antidepressants making this information on Rosemary oil just out so important to those taking or who have taken antidepressants.

Ancient Greek scholars wore this herb around their heads to help them remember their studies. The ancient Egyptians put it in tombs and early Europeans threw it into graves to help them remember the dead.

It’s been given to wedding guests to remember the occasion and also to the happy couple to remind them of their sacred vows. It’s been placed under pillows to enhance recall during sleep.

All these old superstitions are fun, but does the herb have any real memory-boosting power? Surprisingly, yes!

Rosemary is proving to have real merit in preserving and enhancing memory and cognition.

15% Improvement in Long-Term Memory

The first tests on this herb for memory were published in 2003. Researchers studied 132 volunteers for the effects of rosemary in the form of an essential oil (a very strong concentrate extracted from the whole herb). Those exposed to the aroma had a 15% improvement in long-term memory.

This can occur because molecules in the oils are extremely small and can be absorbed into the bloodstream through the olfactory nerve in the nose and via the lungs. They can also cross the blood-brain barrier to have direct effects on the brain.

NPR Radio Show on Oils

I did a radio show on National Public Radio with Kathy Farmer, who is now an expert on the oils and teaches doctors about the oils after using these oils to help her daughter come off Zoloft. This was done right after we got the 2005 warning from the FDA on increased suicide in children using antidepressants. But Kathy does a wonderful job of explaining the science behind how the oils work upon the brain and can help after the use of antidepressants.

You can find that NPR program by going down to section #1 on our website at http://www.drugawareness.org/alternatives/ and then click on the NPR logo which looks like this:

nprlogo

Dr. Mark Moss, lead researcher from the University of Northumbria in the UK, commented: “What is interesting is the possibility of using rosemary over a long period to maintain cognitive performance. It could be that a bit more rosemary with lunch maintains a healthy mind throughout life.”

A later study by Dr. Moss tested volunteers’ ability to do mental arithmetic. Those subjected to the aroma of rosemary saw enhanced aspects of cognition, with greater speed and accuracy. Performance outcomes improved for each task tested.

The most recent Moss study tested prospective memory – remembering events that are expected to occur in the near future and remembering to complete tasks at a certain time. Those exposed to the essential oil performed at a 60 – 75% higher level compared to those not exposed. They were better able to remember events, complete tasks and had greater speed of recall.

More Effective Than Dementia Drugs

Rosemary is able to improve brain function by several mechanisms. It contains a chemical important for memory called 1,8-cineole. Blood levels of this substance rise when a person is exposed to the rosemary scent. 1,8-cineole also has the ability to inhibit acetyl-cholinesterase, an enzyme that reduces brain function. It is among the key enzymes that promote Alzheimer’s disease. Most dementia drugs target this enzyme.

Not only does rosemary contain 1,8-cineole, it also contains rosmarinic acid and ursolic acid. These compounds are also able to inhibit acetylcholinesterase. So altogether, rosemary boasts three factors that work to reduce a dangerous mind-destroying enzyme.

Rosemary also contains carnosic acid, a natural chemical that protects against the ravaging effects of free radicals in the brain that contribute to neurodegeneration.

Dr. Takumi Satoh of Iwate University offered this thought about carnosic acid: “It means that we can do even better in protecting the brain from terrible disorders such as Alzheimer’s, perhaps even slowing down the effects of normal aging.”

Makes You Feel Good Too

Experiments with human volunteers suggest another benefit I find very attractive: The aroma of rosemary elevates a person’s mood. People reported feeling fresher and more active, with greater alertness and less drowsiness. Those who had a massage with rosemary oil said they felt more vigorous and cheerful.

Let me make it clear that the only oil I recommend using is Young Living because there are too many oil companies that extract their oils by using chemicals. I would NEVER recommend using oils processed like that for inhalation. Inhaling something is a direct hit to the brain and you want to make sure what you are inhaling is in its purist form. Young Living Oils are processed via low temperatures (which preserves the enzymes in the oils) steam distillation giving you the purist form you can find to use. If you would like to try it for yourself you can order a bottle by clicking the link below:

Order Rosemary Oil Here and help support us in this battle for truth about antidepressant dangers: https://www.youngliving.org/adrianneb

Rosemary oil

 

Original Article on Rosemary with additional links to more information:http://naturalhealthinsiders.com/?p=414

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,

International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

WITHDRAWAL HELP: You can find the hour and a half long CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/  And if you need additional consultations with Ann Blake-Tracy, you can book one at www.drugawareness.org or sign up for one of the memberships for the International Coalition for Drug Awareness which includes free consultations as one of the benefits of that particular membership plan.

WITHDRAWAL WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

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Memory Loss on Zyban (Wellbutrin)

“I just wanted to share this, so sister/fellow sufferers won’t have to settle for these drugs.”

 

I actually have been on Zyban (Wellbutrin) just recently and in trying to get off of it, am having that same dang “EBP” that I did with Effexor!! Dizzy, running into things, moody/crying, and this weird thing like you’d expect to find with someone who’s had a stroke. I KNOW what I want to say, but I can’t bring the picture into my mind, so I can’t bring up the name. If that makes sense. I don’t mean words that I can’t think of because they’re stuck in my long-term memory, but words like “Popsicle” and “scone”. Even worse are words that are abstract, such as “audible” and “trepidation” (of which I am having quite a bit of, I must say!). Have you heard of anything like this with others on Buproprion? And if so, when does it pass?? DOES it pass???

I have always been very articulate, having started reading at age 3, and have a love of language and words. I can go look up a word in the dictionary, and 20 minutes later finds me still at the book, actually reading it! I am very concerned about this side effect/withdrawal, this “dead zone” created in my brain.

I know Effexor effects epinephrine, norepinephrine and serotonin…..which is the same thing the cocaine effects! I do know that PTSD sufferers seem to have damage to the endocrine system, and the epinephrine and norepinephrine are involved. Effexor, initially, worked miracles for me (I had tried EVERY kind of therapy known to help). I found a therapy called EMDR, which worked miracles……..LASTING miracles. I just wanted to share this and pass it along, so sister/fellow sufferers won’t have to settle for these drugs when they just might have a much better avenue! A lasting one, WITHOUT SIDE EFFECTS.

Years 2000 and Prior

This is Survivor Story number 63.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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Power Naps Boost Brainpower

For those of you who have read my book Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare with the extensive information on the great importance of sleep this report will be no surprise at all. It is always nice to have a confirmation of the information though. I thought it quite interesting to note that these researchers found that a nap can dramatically boost and restore your brainpower, refresh the mind, improve one’s capacity to learn, and make you smarter while to the contrary staying up late to cram for a test can decrease ability to learn by almost 40%! The more hours we stay awake the more sluggish our minds become. This makes it easy to understand why antidepressants, which produce so much insomnia and other sleep disorders, prevent you from learning and produce so much memory loss! Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director, International Coalition for Drug Awareness www.drugawareness.org & www.ssristories.drugawareness.orgAuthor: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant! http://psychcentral.com/news/2010/02/22/power-naps-boost-brainpower/11615.html Power Naps Boost Brainpower By RICK NAUERT PHD Senior News Editor Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on February 22, 2010 New research suggests an hour’s nap can dramatically boost and restore your brainpower. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley discovered a nap can not only refresh the mind, but make you smarter. Conversely, the more hours we spend awake, the more sluggish our minds become, according to the findings. The results support previous data from the same research team that pulling an all-nighter – a common practice at college during midterms and finals –- decreases the ability to cram in new facts by nearly 40 percent, due to a shutdown of brain regions during sleep deprivation. “Sleep not only rights the wrong of prolonged wakefulness but, at a neurocognitive level, it moves you beyond where you were before you took a nap,” said Matthew Walker, an assistant professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and the lead investigator of these studies. In the recent UC Berkeley sleep study, 39 healthy young adults were divided into two groups – nap and no-nap. At noon, all the participants were subjected to a rigorous learning task intended to tax the hippocampus, a region of the brain that helps store fact-based memories. Both groups performed at comparable levels. At 2 p.m., the nap group took a 90-minute siesta while the no-nap group stayed awake. Later that day, at 6 p.m., participants performed a new round of learning exercises. Those who remained awake throughout the day became worse at learning. In contrast, those who napped did markedly better and actually improved in their capacity to learn. These findings reinforce the researchers’ hypothesis that sleep is needed to clear the brain’s short-term memory storage and make room for new information, said Walker, who presented his findings at the annual meeting of the American Association of the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in San Diego, Calif. Since 2007, Walker and other sleep researchers have established that fact-based memories are temporarily stored in the hippocampus before being sent to the brain’s prefrontal cortex, which may have more storage space. “It’s as though the e-mail inbox in your hippocampus is full and, until you sleep and clear out those fact e-mails, you’re not going to receive any more mail. It’s just going to bounce until you sleep and move it into another folder,” Walker said. In the latest study, Walker and his team have broken new ground in discovering that this memory-refreshing process occurs when nappers are engaged in a specific stage of sleep. Electroencephalogram tests, which measure electrical activity in the brain, indicated that this refreshing of memory capacity is related to Stage 2 non-REM sleep, which takes place between deep sleep (non-REM) and the dream state known as Rapid Eye Movement (REM). Previously, the purpose of this stage was unclear, but the new results offer evidence as to why humans spend at least half their sleeping hours in Stage 2, non-REM, Walker said. “I can’t imagine Mother Nature would have us spend 50 percent of the night going from one sleep stage to another for no reason,” Walker said. “Sleep is sophisticated. It acts locally to give us what we need.” Walker and his team will go on to investigate whether the reduction of sleep experienced by people as they get older is related to the documented decrease in our ability to learn as we age. Finding that link may be helpful in understanding such neurodegenerative conditions as Alzheimer’s disease, Walker said. Source: University of California, Berkeley

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Amnesia & Murder: Man Stabs Wife to Death: Nebraska

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side
effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect
for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.  It is no uncommon to be
unaware of what one has done on these drugs.
Also paranoia is listed as an “Infrequent” side-effect
[but not listed as Rare] in the Physicians Desk Reference for medications for
depression.  A person with paranoia should almost never be given an
antidepressant.
_____________________________
Paragraphs 12 through 16 read:  “The report says
Hollister began experiencing  ‘depressive symptoms,’ including
severe insomnia, in the summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a
relative’s purported involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the
report says.”

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom
he believed were ‘plotting’ against him
,” the report says.  ‘He also
experienced suicidal ideation during that time period’.”

“Hollister
sought help from several medical professionals and was
prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.”

“On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was
dead and a knife was beside her.”


http://www.omaha.com/article/20091031/NEWS01/710319900/-1/FRONTPAGE

Published Saturday October 31,
2009

Man competent for trial in wife’s death

By Todd Cooper
WORLD-HERALD STAFF WRITER

His mental
state now stabilized through medication, Robert T. Hollister has been ruled
competent to stand trial in the stabbing death of his wife, Jeanie “Ellie”
Hollister.

What doctors haven’t determined is whether the Omaha man was
sane at the time of his wife’s death on Nov. 3, 2008.

In a recent court
document, Lincoln Regional Center doctors said they needed more time to make
that determination. Hollister has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to

first-degree murder.

“Mr. Hollister is competent to stand trial,” the
regional center report says. “Further evaluation is necessary before an opinion
can be offered regarding Mr. Hollister’s mental status at the time of the
offense.”

Douglas County Attorney Don Kleine acknowledged the rarity of
regional center doctors requesting more time for evaluation because they haven’t
reached a consensus regarding a defendant’s mental state at the time of a
crime.

He said a defendant isn’t necessarily insane just because he has
been battling mental illness. However, he said, attorneys will have to wait for
the further evaluation before deciding how to proceed.

With insanity
defenses, the burden shifts to defense attorneys to prove that their client was
insane at the time of the killing. It will be up to Douglas County District
Judge Marlon Polk to weigh any testimony about Hollister’s mental
state.

If the judge concludes that Hollister was insane, he most likely
would be committed indefinitely to the regional center. If the judge determines
that Hollister was sane, he would proceed to trial and, if convicted, face life
in prison.

The initial regional center report by psychiatrist Klaus
Hartmann and psychologist Mario Scalora shows that Hollister, 59, had been
battling depression for several months before the death of his

wife.

Hollister, who has no criminal record, has a master’s degree in
human resources and was employed at Omaha Bedding Co. from 1994 to
2007.

He then worked at his wife’s vintage clothing store, “Weird Wild
Stuff,” from 2007 until the time of her death.

The report says Hollister
began experiencing “depressive symptoms,” including severe insomnia, in the
summer of 2008. Financial stress, health problems and a relative’s purported
involvement with a cult contributed to his depression, the report
says.

“Hollister reportedly became paranoid about others, whom he
believed were ‘plotting’ against him,” the report says. “He also experienced
suicidal ideation during that time period.”

Hollister sought help from
several medical professionals and was prescribed medicine for depression and
insomnia.

On Nov. 3, Hollister called 911, saying his wife was dead and a
knife was beside her.

Police found Ellie Hollister dead in the couple’s
home at 4705 N. 111th Circle.

Detectives found evidence that Ellie
Hollister, 52, tried to fight off her husband, including scratch marks on Robert
Hollister’s face. Hollister told regional center doctors he had “memory lapses
related to the alleged offense.”

“Hollister demonstrated a desire for
justice,” the report says, “rather than undeserved punishment.”

Contact
the writer:

444-1275,

todd.cooper@owh.com

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PROZAC: Alcohol Cravings & Assault with Amnesia: Massachusetts

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Serious memory loss is a common complaint as far as side effects to antidepressants go. Even Amnesia is listed as a Frequent side effect for Prozac in the Physicians Desk Reference.

Also applicable to this case and so many others is the fact that the Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and alcohol abuse. The liver cannot metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously, which leads to elevated levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human body resulting in toxic reactions.
________________________________

Sentences three through five read: “Flavell’s court-appointed attorney Neil Madden said Flavell takes Prozac and was drinking Captain Morgan rum Thursday. Madden said his client “doesn’t remember entering Massachusetts General Hospital. He remembers being with a friend and he remembers ending up in jail.’’

http://bostonist.com/2009/10/23/boston_blotter_sex_offender_homicid.php

Boston Blotter: Sex offender, homicide, robberies
Blotter siren
— A Level Three sex offender allegedly assaulted a woman in a Massachusetts General Hospital bathroom on Thursday. David C. Flavell was charged with assault with intent to rape and assault and battery by means of a dangerous weapon and held without bail until a psychiatric evaluation next Tuesday. Flavell’s court-appointed attorney Neil Madden said Flavell takes Prozac and was drinking Captain Morgan rum Thursday. Madden said his client “doesn’t remember entering Massachusetts General Hospital. He remembers being with a friend and he remembers ending up in jail.’’ The victim is a Mass. General employee. Suffolk Assistant District Attorney David Deakin said Flavell has prior sex crimes convictions. [ Globe, Herald]

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Unexpected Suicide Attempt: Permanent Brain Damage: NY

Paragraph 3 reads:  “Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain
damage
and severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead
Park Nursing Home and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his
daughter said.”

Paragraph 14 reads:  “According to Ms. Schortemeyer,
her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic car
aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his
children, and would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on
monthly visits when they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However,
Mr. Schortemeyer suffered from loneliness and was on medication for

depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=232464&town=Sag%20Harbor&n=Sag%20Harbor%20woman%20advocates%20for%20suicide%20prevention%20awareness

Sag Harbor woman advocates for suicide prevention awareness

By Bryan Finlayson
Sep 7, 09 10:32 AM

Two years ago in June, Ann Marie Schortemeyer, 25, was
driving home from work when Karen Mayer, her aunt, phoned with
news.

After an attempted suicide, Edwin Schortemeyer, Ann Marie’s father,
a veteran union plumber from Manorville, was in critical condition at John T.
Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.

Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain damage and
severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead Park Nursing Home
and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his daughter
said.

Now, Ms. Schortemeyer, who lives in Sag Harbor, is on a quiet
mission to spread awareness about suicide prevention on Long Island. She and her
fund-raising group, Eddie’s Angels, which has five members, collect donations
for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention [AFSP], a nationwide
organization that advocates research into the causes of suicide. To date, they
have collected $2,208 for the foundation.

Ms. Schortemeyer is also
participating in a suicide awareness walk at the Old Westbury Gardens in Old
Westbury on October 4, about a month after September 10, which is World Suicide

Prevention Day.

“I don’t think people realize how big a problem
depression and mental illness can be,” Ms. Schortemeyer said last week. “It can
affect anyone. I thought my dad was a happy man, and it turns out he had his own
battle with depression.”

The suicide or attempted suicide of a loved one
touches the lives of thousands of Americans each year, AFSC Executive Director
Bob Gebbia said. More than 33,000 people in the United States commit suicide a
year and close to a million attempt suicide, he said.

“If you take the
suicides and the attempted suicides and put them together, you can see that this
is a serious problem,” Mr. Gebbia said.

The Old Westbury Gardens walk is
expected to raise $125,000 for the AFSP to help fund education and research
grants for suicide prevention, Mr. Gebbia said. The money goes toward research
grants for institutions such as Columbia University, and will help fund
investigations into brain chemistry, psychosocial behavior and other symptoms
that can lead to suicide.

The walk in Old Westbury Gardens is one of 190
walks that will occur throughout the country this fall to raise awareness about

suicide prevention. Mr. Gebbia said more than 50,000 people are expected to
participate overall.

One of the foundation’s goals is to break the social
stigma that keeps people from discussing suicide and mental illness with
others.

Suicide is something that is not talked about, it is kept in the
shadows,” said Mr. Gebbia, noting that symptoms relating to suicide can be
treated with medication and therapy. “Suicide is the result of illness, not the
result of character flaws or a personal weakness.”

In Ms. Schortemeyer’s
experience, her father attempted suicide without giving any clear forewarning to
his family and friends. Neither Ms. Schortemeyer or her sister, Sharon, 23, of
Lindenhurst saw any warning signs leading up to the tragedy, Ms. Schortemeyer
said. But in retrospect, Ms. Schortemeyer said, there were “1,000 warning signs”
that her father was battling depression, yet “me and my sister didn’t even
notice it. It just seemed like a funny phase.”

According to Ms.
Schortemeyer, her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic
car aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his children, and
would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on monthly visits when
they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However, Mr. Schortemeyer
suffered from loneliness and was on medication for depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

His second marriage­he married about two weeks before he
attempted suicide­was tumultuous, by Ms. Schortemeyer’s account. “He married
a woman he didn’t know too well,” Ms. Schortemeyer said.

In
conversations, Mr. Schortemeyer often complained of money problems and of his
daughters being so far away from home. In 2007, Sharon was attending college in
Florida and Ann Marie was working as an administrative assistant for a
construction company in Wisconsin.

“He just seemed to be complaining a
lot about credit card bills and the cost of maintaining a home,” Ms.
Schortemeyer said. “I thought it wasn’t anything that big.”

The night
before Mr. Schortemeyer hung himself, he called Ms. Schortemeyer in Wisconsin
and left a voice message to thank her for a Father’s Day card. “He said he
misses me and to please call him soon,” said Ms. Schortemeyer, who reached the
message the following day.

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DEPRESSION MED: Suicide Attempt: Unexpected: Permanent Brain Damage: Ne…

Paragraph 3 reads:  “Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain
damage
and severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead
Park Nursing Home and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his
daughter said.”

Paragraph 14 reads:  “According to Ms. Schortemeyer,
her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic car
aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his
children, and would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on
monthly visits when they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However,
Mr. Schortemeyer suffered from loneliness and was on medication for

depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=232464&town=Sag%20Harbor&n=Sag%20Harbor%20woman%20advocates%20for%20suicide%20prevention%20awareness

Sag Harbor woman advocates for suicide prevention awareness

By Bryan Finlayson
Sep 7, 09 10:32 AM

Two years ago in June, Ann Marie Schortemeyer, 25, was
driving home from work when Karen Mayer, her aunt, phoned with
news.

After an attempted suicide, Edwin Schortemeyer, Ann Marie’s father,
a veteran union plumber from Manorville, was in critical condition at John T.
Mather Memorial Hospital in Port Jefferson.

Confused and distraught, Ms.
Schortemeyer, who was living in Wisconsin at the time, booked a plane ticket to
New York and spent the next 10 days waiting for her 50-year-old father to wake
from a coma. But Mr. Schortemeyer, who attempted suicide by hanging himself in a
backyard garage at his home in Rocky Point, suffered lasting brain damage and
severe memory loss. He is now under supervision at Hempstead Park Nursing Home
and does not remember ever trying to commit suicide, his daughter
said.

Now, Ms. Schortemeyer, who lives in Sag Harbor, is on a quiet
mission to spread awareness about suicide prevention on Long Island. She and her
fund-raising group, Eddie’s Angels, which has five members, collect donations
for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention [AFSP], a nationwide
organization that advocates research into the causes of suicide. To date, they
have collected $2,208 for the foundation.

Ms. Schortemeyer is also
participating in a suicide awareness walk at the Old Westbury Gardens in Old
Westbury on October 4, about a month after September 10, which is World Suicide

Prevention Day.

“I don’t think people realize how big a problem
depression and mental illness can be,” Ms. Schortemeyer said last week. “It can
affect anyone. I thought my dad was a happy man, and it turns out he had his own
battle with depression.”

The suicide or attempted suicide of a loved one
touches the lives of thousands of Americans each year, AFSC Executive Director
Bob Gebbia said. More than 33,000 people in the United States commit suicide a
year and close to a million attempt suicide, he said.

“If you take the
suicides and the attempted suicides and put them together, you can see that this
is a serious problem,” Mr. Gebbia said.

The Old Westbury Gardens walk is
expected to raise $125,000 for the AFSP to help fund education and research
grants for suicide prevention, Mr. Gebbia said. The money goes toward research
grants for institutions such as Columbia University, and will help fund
investigations into brain chemistry, psychosocial behavior and other symptoms
that can lead to suicide.

The walk in Old Westbury Gardens is one of 190
walks that will occur throughout the country this fall to raise awareness about

suicide prevention. Mr. Gebbia said more than 50,000 people are expected to
participate overall.

One of the foundation’s goals is to break the social
stigma that keeps people from discussing suicide and mental illness with
others.

Suicide is something that is not talked about, it is kept in the
shadows,” said Mr. Gebbia, noting that symptoms relating to suicide can be
treated with medication and therapy. “Suicide is the result of illness, not the
result of character flaws or a personal weakness.”

In Ms. Schortemeyer’s
experience, her father attempted suicide without giving any clear forewarning to
his family and friends. Neither Ms. Schortemeyer or her sister, Sharon, 23, of
Lindenhurst saw any warning signs leading up to the tragedy, Ms. Schortemeyer
said. But in retrospect, Ms. Schortemeyer said, there were “1,000 warning signs”
that her father was battling depression, yet “me and my sister didn’t even
notice it. It just seemed like a funny phase.”

According to Ms.
Schortemeyer, her father, a former Manorville volunteer firefighter and classic
car aficionado, was good humored and a hard worker. He loved his children, and
would bring his two daughters boxes with gifts from home on monthly visits when
they were in college, Ms. Schortemeyer said.

However, Mr. Schortemeyer
suffered from loneliness and was on medication for depression, Ms. Schortemeyer
said.

His second marriage­he married about two weeks before he
attempted suicide­was tumultuous, by Ms. Schortemeyer’s account. “He married
a woman he didn’t know too well,” Ms. Schortemeyer said.

In
conversations, Mr. Schortemeyer often complained of money problems and of his
daughters being so far away from home. In 2007, Sharon was attending college in
Florida and Ann Marie was working as an administrative assistant for a
construction company in Wisconsin.

“He just seemed to be complaining a
lot about credit card bills and the cost of maintaining a home,” Ms.
Schortemeyer said. “I thought it wasn’t anything that big.”

The night
before Mr. Schortemeyer hung himself, he called Ms. Schortemeyer in Wisconsin
and left a voice message to thank her for a Father’s Day card. “He said he
misses me and to please call him soon,” said Ms. Schortemeyer, who reached the
message the following day.

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3/30/2001 – LSD to Prozac and back to LSD?!

In the last half century we have witnessed Eli Lilly bring America LSD and
then Prozac. Now that the public has been brainwashed about the “benefits” of
Prozac and its clones, it is time to once again attempt to sell us on LSD.
After admitting in this article the truth of the argument I have made for ten
years against the SSRI antidepressants – they work like LSD in the brain (”
Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.”) they now work to sell us on the
“benefits” of LSD. After all, if we can as a society have given similar drugs
– the SSRIs – such a warm welcome, we must now be ready to accept LSD, the
CIA’s drug of choice for a mind control experimentation, with welcome arms as
well.

Has the world gone completely mad?! Obviously! We now have the National
Institute on Drug Abuse encouraging us to use a drug, already declared
dangerous and of no medical use, when they are suppose to educate us on the
dangers of it. Perhaps the name of the institute should be changed to the
National Institute for Production of Drug Abuse. At this point it would
certainly be more appropriate. Clearly they are counting on their lack of
educating the public about drugs to have produced enough public ignorance of
drugs and their effects so as to allow them to get away with this one. As I
have said repeatedly, the drug companies count on our memory loss. They
expect us to forget within a generation our experience with a drug and then
pull the same drug on us again. They generally give it a new name, or a new
twist, but the more you learn about drugs, the more you realize that the
drugs remain the same.

Obviously on this one they are counting on mass stupidity among the general
population for its acceptance. I would hope that everyone of you is working
as hard as you can to educate all around you to the dangers of these drugs.
Time is of the essence! If you have not yet figured out that we are in a
battle for our lives, you have missed something. Our society as we have known
it and our future is at stake. The Brave New World is here. And with them
feeling so confident as to take such a bold and blatant step as this all that
can be said at this point is, “God help us all!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/hallucinogen010322.html

A computer-generated model of the LSD molecule. (Heffter Institute)

MedicalHallucinogens?

Researchers Studying Possible Medical Use of LSD, Peyote, Psilocybin

By Robin Eisner

N E W Y O R K, March 22 Could shrooms or LSD help the mentally ill?

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs
Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed
Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

At Harvard, a psychiatrist is studying whether the hallucinogenic cactus
peyote creates any long-term memory or attention problems in the American
Indians who take the drug as part of religious rituals.

A University of Arizona psychiatrist is poised to begin researching whether
taking the hallucinogen psilocybin under controlled circumstances may help
people suffering with obsessive compulsive disorder.

And another Harvard psychiatrist is in the beginning phases of designing a
protocol that may employ LSD or another hallucinogen to see if it helps
terminally ill people suffering from depression and pain.

With some support from the private New Mexico-based Heffter Institute, these
researchers, along with others in the United States and abroad, represent a
small movement of scientists looking at the possible medical benefits of
hallucinogens for some psychiatric conditions.

Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs

Hallucinogens are among the oldest known group of drugs that have been used
for their ability to alter human perception and mood, according to the Drug
Enforcement Agency. They have been used for medical, social and religious
practices.

More recently, synthetic hallucinogens have been used recreationally, with
hippies from the ’60s, such as the now deceased ex-Harvard psychology
professor Timothy Leary, first promoting their use with the famous slogan,
Turn on, Tune in, Drop Out.

Today, hallucinogens are deemed drugs of abuse by the DEA, with no known
medical benefit. Approximately 8 percent to 10 percent of high school
seniors tried a hallucinogen in the past year according to a University of
Michigan study of drug use.

It remains unclear how these drugs exert their action in the brain, but
anecdotal evidence and some earlier studies indicate they may help a variety
of psychiatric conditions, says David E. Nichols, founder of the Heffter
Institute, in Santa Fe, and professor of medical chemistry and molecular
pharmacology at Purdue School of Pharmacy in West Lafayette, Ind.

Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.

He founded the institute in 1993 to help give scientific credibility to
medical research on hallucinogens. After years of fund-raising, the
institute now has enough money to help scientists do serious research.

Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed

Since opinions are so strongly held about hallucinogens, it is essential
that any studies in this area be performed with the most rigorous modern
methods and great care to have an impartial approach, says Dr. Harrison
Pope, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who is leading the
four-year peyote study in American Indians.

Funded largely by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and Heffter, Popes
group will be comparing three populations of American Indians peyote users
in religious ceremonies, alcoholics, and local tribespeople to see if
peyote use is associated with cognitive problems.

Pope is also developing a trial to follow up on studies from the ’60s and
’70s suggesting that hallucinogens helped ease anxiety and depression in the
terminally ill and also reduced their need for pain medication.

The challenge is to design the study in such a way that if the drug shows
benefits, skeptics are convinced, and if it doesnt help, proponents of
hallucinogenic use dont challenge the research as inadequate, Pope says.

Psilocybin mushroom

These studies take time to develop to get that scientific imprimatur. They
also need to get review, by local medical institutions and governmental
regulatory authorities. The DEA and the FDA is still reviewing a protocol by
Dr. Francisco Moreno, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University
of Arizona in Tucson, hoping to study a chemically synthesized psilocybin
for obsessive-compulsives. His hospital gave him permission to start the
study.

A protocol of psilocybin and depression in Switzerland also is undergoing
revision before it is submitted to the government authorities there, Nichols
says.

Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

Some scientists, however, question the potential risks of these studies.

The problem with this kind of research is that when average people hear or
read about them in this preliminary stage they might think these drugs could
be good for them now, says Una McCann, associate professor of psychiatry at
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. But it remains unknown until the studies
are finished, McCann says.

Dr. Gregory Collins the director of the Alcohol and Drug Recovery program at
the Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio, believes the risks outweigh any
benefits.

Some of these drugs have been shown to have long-term consequences in
healthy people, Collins says. I would be reluctant to try them in the
mentally ill.

Nichols, however, defends the research. I think we will find some medical
benefit of these drugs, Nichols says. There is no other drug class that
doesnt have some medical utility.

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