ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Two Dead: Oregon

Paragraph seven reads: “The family had known Phillips for years. They
said he took numerous medications, including antidepressants and pain
medications while he waited for hip-replacement surgery.”

http://www.mailtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100422/NEWS/4220320/
-1/NEWSMAP

April 22, 2010

By Anita Burke
Mail Tribune

MEDFORD ­ Family, friends and a west Medford neighborhood mourn a
murder-suicide that left a man and woman dead on Monday.

Gregory Alan Phillips, 57, shot his former girlfriend, Evalina Maria
Lattoure, 39, three times in the head and neck with a .22-caliber revolver
before fatally shooting himself, Medford police said. The shootings happened at
about 2:20 p.m. Monday in the driveway of a duplex at 725 Beekman Ave.,
where the two, along with other roommates including Lattoure’s 9-year-old
daughter and the girl’s father, were moving.

The group had lived just down the street in a house that was foreclosed in
January and they had just been evicted, Jackson County Circuit Court
records show.

“They were very nice people,” said Dustin Wilhelmi, who lives in the
adjoining unit of the duplex and saw Phillips shoot himself. “I don’t know why
he would do that to her.”

Lattoure’s 17-year-old son, who lives with other relatives in Jackson
County and asked that his name not be published, said Phillips “took the life
of a great and wonderful woman.”

He said his mother also has a 22-year-old son who lives in California, as
well as a sister and other relatives who were gathering to plan a funeral.

The family had known Phillips for years. They said he took numerous
medications, including antidepressants and pain medications while he waited for
hip-replacement surgery.

“Maybe he wasn’t in his right mind when he did this,” Lattoure’s teenage
son said, wondering compassionately what the loss must be like for Phillips’
aging mother in California, who must now deal with the knowledge that her
son is a murderer.

Medford police Lt. Bob Hansen said that Lattoure and Phillips had argued
earlier in the day, but each had left, apparently to cool down separately.
Investigators didn’t release details about that conflict.

Phillips’ car was in the driveway of the duplex Monday afternoon when
Lattoure pulled up, police said. She approached his car, then was shot.

An autopsy showed that a fatal shot hit Lattoure’s spine, her son said.

As neighbors heard shots Monday afternoon and called 9-1-1, Medford police
quickly notified Washington Elementary and South Medford High schools,
which went into precautionary lockdown, as did the Medford School District’s
central office.

School officials praised prompt and clear communication from police, who
evaluated the potential threat to schools. As soon as investigators
determined that everyone involved in the shooting was dead, the lockdown was lifted.

Washington Principal Joe Frazier said police and schools train to work
well together in emergencies and that training paid off.

Teachers had information about the shooting right away so they could
grieve after school, Frazier said. Then, on Tuesday morning, the school gathered
students to acknowledge the tragedy that had happened in the neighborhood
and reassure them that they were safe in school, he said.

Teachers provided some time for students to deal with grief, then helped
them return their focus to learning, he said. The district provided
additional counseling for a few students who needed more help.

The Children’s Advocacy Center is also assisting Lattoure’s family,
officials said.

Reach reporter Anita Burke at 541-776-4485, or e-mail
aburke@mailtribune.com.

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CELEXA: Murder-Suicide: Two Doctors Say Celexa Caused Tragedy: Ireland

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):
Always keep in mind that 7% – 10% of the population lack the liver enzyme system necessary to metabolize the SSRI & SNRI antidepressants. Because of this 7% – 10% of the population will reach toxic levels quickly due to this inability to break the medications down. Although there is a simple test that would reveal who those 7% – 10% are BEFORE they are prescribed one of these drugs it is never given to patients. Anyway in 20 years of working with thousands, I have yet to find one who reports ever having one of these P450 2D6 liver enzyme tests run before a prescription is written for an antidepressant.
___________________________________
Paragraphs four through seven read:  “The jury refused to bring in a verdict of suicide on account of the evidence given both by Professor of Psychiatry David Healy of the University of Cardiff and assistant state pathologist Dr Declan Gilsenan, who underlined the dangers of suicidal and homicidal acts arising from the use of SSRIs.”

“Professor Healy stated clearly that in a small but significant minority of patients using SSRIs can give rise to violent behavior including self-harm, suicide and violence to others, even up to killing them. He said that this was independent of any condition the patient might have, as the same symptomatology had been observed in healthy volunteers.”

“Dr Healy criticized the existing warnings for patients, as they give the impression that such feelings and behaviours are part of the patient’s complaint, and because they are not strong enough. ”The risk arises entirely from the treatment,” he said.

“The jury was obviously strongly influenced by his evidence and that of Dr Gilsenan, who testified to “toxic” levels of citalopram [Celexa] in Clancy’s blood, the active ingredient in the antidepressant Cipramil [Celexa] which he had been taking in the period leading up to the night of horrific violence in Bray in which he and Seb Creane died and Seb Creane’s brother, Dylan, and the latter’s girlfriend were lucky to escape with their lives.

http://psychiatricnews.wordpress.com/2010/04/16/irish-jury-implicates-ssri-antidepressants-in-deaths/

The Wellbeing Foundation

NEWSLETTER­ 15 April 2010

Foundation demands action from Minister after verdict of ‘not suicide’ by jury in Shane Clancy inquest

THE WELLBEING FOUNDATION has demanded that Mental Health Minister John Moloney act immediately to put in place proper protections for patients, their families, relatives and friends following the ‘not suicide’ verdict in the Shane Clancy SSRI-inspired double death case. The Irish Medicines Board is still funded by the drug companies, still remains one body despite the recommendations of an Oireachtas committee, and still issues weak and ineffective patient information leaflets with inadequate warnings of the dangers of the SSRI antidepressants which drove Shane Clancy to kill a college friend and then stab himself to death.

Please help our campaign to get effective protection for patients: write or email Mr Moloney supporting the three demands we set out in the press release.

Mr John Moloney, TD | Minister of State  Department of Health and Children, Hawkins House, Dublin 2 email

minister_moloney@health.gov.ie

**************************

Verdict in Shane Clancy inquest is a call to action by Minister John Moloney

THE OPEN VERDICT returned by the jury at the inquest into the death of Shane Clancy is| a call to action on the part of Government, and particularly the Minister for Mental Health, John Moloney, to strengthen both the patient and doctor warnings relating to SSRI anti-depressants.

The jury refused to bring in a verdict of suicide on account of the evidence given both by Professor of Psychiatry David Healy of the University of Cardiff and assistant state pathologist Dr Declan Gilsenan, who underlined the dangers of suicidal and homicidal acts arising from the use of SSRIs.

Professor Healy stated clearly that in a small but significant minority of patients using SSRIs can give rise to violent behaviour including self-harm, suicide and violence to others, even up to killing them. He said that this was independent of any condition the patient might have, as the same symptomatology had been observed in healthy volunteers.

Dr Healy criticised the existing warnings for patients, as they give the impression that such feelings and behaviours are part of the patient’s complaint, and because they are not strong enough. ”The risk arises entirely from the treatment,” he said.

The jury was obviously strongly influenced by his evidence and that of Dr Gilsenan, who testified to “toxic” levels of citalopram in Clancy’s blood, the active ingredient in the antidepressant Cipramil which he had been taking in the period leading up to the night of horrific violence in Bray in which he and Seb Creane died and Seb Creane’s brother, Dylan, and the latter’s girlfriend were lucky to escape with their lives.

Both doctors also stressed that the high levels of the drug were not necessarily due to an overdose, but could have resulted from a build-up of citalopram resulting from it being slower to metabolise in Shane Clancy. Prof Healy recommended that the warnings in respect of this class of drugs be strengthened to emphasise that the drug can cause the problem, and that feelings such as suicidal ideation, agitation, restlessness, hostility and others are caused by the drug rather than by  the patient’s diagnosed condition. He stated that there should be compulsory monitoring of patients prescribed SSRIs at the starting period of their treatment, as the danger period is generally within the first two weeks and usually within the first days of taking the drug.

The Wellbeing Foundation supports Prof Healy’s recommendations. We wish to point out, yet again, that while in the USA and other countries the warning about possible suicidal and violent bahaviour is compulsorily displayed at the top of the patient information leaflet, in large, bold type and enclosed in a black box with a heavy bold rule all round, in Ireland the Irish medicines Board allows a mild warning of suicidal ideation to be included far down the text of the patient information leaflet and without any form of emphasis.

Dr Michael Corry, our founder, was hounded by the psychiatric establishment for stating last October that if Shane Clancy had not been taking SSRIs, this appalling tragedy, which has deeply affected two families and wide circles of friends and relations, would not have happened. A jury has now accepted that these drugs were implicated in these deaths and injuries which occurred during an outburst of insane violence.

We call on Minister John Moloney to move instantly on this matter in order to protect other young people and their families, and indeed anyone who may be prescribed SSRIs, from the possible consequences of taking these drugs. We call on Minister Moloney to do the following right away:

1. Instruct the Irish Medicines Board immediately to introduce a strong Black Box warning, similar to those in the USA and Canada, on the patient information leaflets for all SSRIs, SNRIs, and similar antidepressants; and also to strengthen the prescribing information for doctors to include a similar warning and to stress the need for close monitoring.

2. Make it obligatory for all prescribing doctors to carefully monitor all patients prescribed these same classes of drugs, including setting at least one return appointment on the date of prescription, so that the doctor can check the patient for any tell-tale signs and take corrective action.

3. We also ask the Minister to implement the relevant recommendations of the Oireachtas Committee on Health and Children in 2007, which he himself chaired at the time. The findings of this inquiry into the use of pharmaceuticals in Ireland included a finding that the structure and funding of the Irish Medicines Board were seriously flawed, and recommended that the IMB be broken up into two bodies, one to deal with licencing and one with pharmacovigilance or post-licencing safety monitoring. The committee also recommended that the present funding of the IMB, by the drug companies, should end and that this body should receive its funding from central government sources.

If further tragedies of this type are not to occur in future, with all the pain and suffering that they visit on parents, uncles, aunts, wives, husbands, or partners, other relations and friends of the victims, the Minister must act promptly to ensure that the public receives strong and adequate information on the real dangers posed by taking these drugs, and that anyone who is prescribed them is protected by a compulsory monitoring system.

Dr Aine Tubridy, Clinical Director of the Wellbeing Foundation, and Mr Basil Miller, the Foundation’s Director of Communications, are both available for further comment or interview.

To contact Dr Tubridy, call 01 2800084.

To contact Basil Miller, call 086 8182082

April 16, 2010 – Posted by Philip Barton | Blogroll | | No Comments Yet

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Four Dead: Oregon

Paragraph three reads:  “The reports also indicates that Clackamas
County Sheriff’s Sgt. Jeffrey A. Grahn was taking antidepressants that
can trigger suicidal thoughts. Grahn also told witnesses he had a
couple of drinks before heading out on what would become a horrific
shooting rampage.”

Last three paragraphs read:  “He then grabbed Charlotte and hustled
her out a door near the bandstand. Once out in the alley, he pulled a
.40-caliber Glock 27 semiautomatic pistol from his sweatshirt pocket,
placed it against her head and fired.”

“Grahn then went back into the club and shot Schulmerich in the back
of the head, execution-style. He shot Hoffmeister in the face.”

“In the ensuing chaos, Grahn went back out in the alley, put the
pistol in his mouth and fired his fourth fatal shot.”

http://www.oregonlive.com/gresham/index.ssf/2010/02/post.html

Reports detail jealousy, suspicion behind Clackamas sergeant’s murder-suicide

By Rick Bella, The Oregonian

February 26, 2010, 6:15PM

GRESHAM — In the end, age-old jealousy and suspicion fueled an
off-duty sheriff’s sergeant’s blinding rage, culminating in a Feb. 12
triple murder-suicide at a Gresham lounge.

Complete report online
Gresham police released the complete report Friday into the Feb. 12
shooting rampage at the M&M Lounge.
That’s the conclusion that emerges from hundreds of pages of
investigative reports released Friday by Gresham police.

The reports also indicates that Clackamas County Sheriff’s Sgt.
Jeffrey A. Grahn was taking antidepressants that can trigger suicidal
thoughts. Grahn also told witnesses he had a couple of drinks before
heading out on what would become a horrific shooting rampage.

The reports, forming a two-inch-thick stack, detail interviews with 53
witnesses, seven members of victims’ families and eight other people.
In all, 40 police officers from Gresham, Troutdale, Fairview, Oregon
State Police and the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office worked on the
reports.

 Also Friday, the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office released a
separate report on a 2009 investigation of domestic abuse allegations
against the same sergeant.

The reports provide new information about the Grahns’ relationship and
Jeffrey Grahn’s actions.

According to interviews, Grahn and his wife, Charlotte M. Grahn, were
trying to repair what had been a volatile marriage. Grahn had moved
back to their Boring-area home after ending an affair with a Clackamas
County Courthouse employee.

Meanwhile, Grahn had tried to befriend other women through Facebook,
at one time carrying on sexually tinged conversations with a married
woman, all while telling friends he suspected his wife was cheating.

On Feb. 12, Charlotte Grahn and four friends went on a “ladies night
out” to Gresham’s Fourth Street Brewing Co. for dinner. Two friends
then went home, and Charlotte Grahn continued on to the M&M Lounge &
Restaurant with Kathleen Hoffmeister and Victoria Schulmerich to hear
some music.

Around 9:45 p.m., Jeffrey Grahn drove up to the M&M in a white pickup
and bulled his way into the crowded lounge and confronted his wife,
who was sitting at a table with Hoffmeister and Schulmerich. Grahn
then picked up a glass of beer and threw it in Schulmerich’s face,
yelling “What are you doing, bringing my wife into a place like
this?!”

He then grabbed Charlotte and hustled her out a door near the
bandstand. Once out in the alley, he pulled a .40-caliber Glock 27
semiautomatic pistol from his sweatshirt pocket, placed it against her
head and fired.

Grahn then went back into the club and shot Schulmerich in the back of
the head, execution-style. He shot Hoffmeister in the face.

In the ensuing chaos, Grahn went back out in the alley, put the pistol
in his mouth and fired his fourth fatal shot.

— Rick Bella


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DEPRESSION MED: Murder-Suicide: Man Shoots three Deputies: Kills One

Paragraph five reads:  “Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer
said Friday that Liles
had been taking medication
for depression and probably took his own life with a gunshot to the
head.”

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-minkler27-2010feb27,0,2450243,full.story

A slow burn suddenly turns deadly in Minkler, Calif.

First there was a series of fires in the small town east of Fresno. Then
came the shootings. On Thursday, a shootout left a sheriff’s deputy dead and two
other law enforcement officers injured.

(Paul Sakuma /
Associated Press / February 26, 2010)

By Diana Marcum

February
27, 2010

Reporting from Minkler ­ Trouble had been brewing in tiny
Minkler, a Sierra foothills community about 20 miles east of Fresno, for months.
But residents never envisioned that it would end with two people — one a
sheriff’s deputy — dead and two other law enforcement officers
wounded.

Joel Wahlenmaier, 49, a veteran with the Fresno County Sheriff’s
Department who investigated homicides and other violent crimes, was killed in
Thursday’s gunfire. Deputy Mark Harris, 48, was injured.

Javier Bejar, a
Reedley police officer who responded to the call for backup in the minutes after
Wahlenmaier was shot, is on life support at Community Regional Medical Center in
Fresno and is not expected to survive.

The suspect, Ricky Ray Liles, 51,
died during the gun battle that erupted when authorities attempted to serve him
with a search warrant.

Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said Friday that
Liles had been taking medication for depression and probably took his own life
with a gunshot to the head.

Liles had told his wife “that he would not go
to prison,” Dyer said at a news conference. “He would take the lives of several
officers before taking his own life.”

On Friday, what there is of Minkler
was cordoned off as a crime scene, helicopters buzzing overhead.

But
Minkler’s worries began about five months ago with small fires. A bunch of
leaves here, a patch of grass there.

“You’d come out and say, ‘How did
that tractor seat catch on fire?’ ” said rancher Jeff Rodenbeck,
51.

Eventually, a shed and a trailer burned. Then the shootings started.
Someone shot up the Minkler Cash Store six times since January. On Monday,
someone fired four bullets into Sally Minkler’s mobile home.

“Sally said
she bent over to get her cellphone and the bullet went right where her torso had
been,” said Mary Novack, who runs the Minkler Cash Store, the nerve-center and
commercial entirety of Minkler, a town so small it once was listed for sale on
EBay.

Residents were convinced the culprit was Liles, a former security
guard renting a mobile home on Minkler family property across from the
store.

“He was just your average pasty white guy with a bad back,” said
Jeff Butts, who grows grapes and plums along the Kings River.

“But when
you know all your neighbors, you look around and say, ‘Well, I know it’s not
Mary, and it’s not Charlie and it’s not Sally’ . . . and pretty soon everyone
came up with Liles,” Butts said. “He wasn’t friends with anyone. But no one ever
actually saw anything they could prove. Things were getting tense out
here.”

On Thursday morning, Novack was relieved when she saw law
enforcement vehicles pull up to Liles’ place. She called Butts and told him cops
were about to knock on Liles’ door.

“Hey, this guy is finally going down,
let’s go to the store and watch,” Butts said he told one of his
workers.

A small crowd gathered on the front porch of the general store,
which has held court in Minkler since 1920. They watched as a deputy kicked in
the door, shots were fired, an officer slumped, more law enforcement came and a
prolonged gun battle raged.

“I was stunned. I didn’t even get down,”
Butts said. “I kept thinking, ‘What are they doing? Those can’t be real
bullets.’ The cops are saying hundreds of rounds were fired, but it had to be
thousands.”

He was incredulous when a woman, later identified as Liles’
wife, Diane, and a dog emerged from the trailer. “I don’t see how anyone came
out of that alive,” Butts said.

Half a mile down the road, Rodenbeck
heard the first volley of shots. He loaded a pistol and rifle, and got his wife
and teenage daughter away from the house in case gunmen emerged from the woods
behind their home. Then he went to see what was going on.

When the bigger
gun battle began, he crouched inside his truck’s tire well.

“Look, this
is the country, gunfire is not a big deal, you hear it all the time. Someone’s
shooting at coyotes. Or skeet,” he said. “But this was a war zone. It sounded
like the cops had automatic rifles and they kept shooting. If you’d been here,
you would have hit the ground. It rocked this place. He killed a cop right in
front of them, and they don’t take lightly to that and I can’t say I blame
them.”

Rodenbeck moved to Minkler from Huntington Beach to raise his
family away from the city. He likes the beauty — “this is river bottom, green
all the time” — the quiet, and the fact that men such as Charles Minkler, the
great-grandson of Orzo Minkler, who founded the town in 1892, can still load
1,000 bales of hay. Minkler is in his 70s.

“Out here, men don’t get old.
They get beat up and wrinkled, but they don’t use canes,” Rodenbeck said. “They
have chores to do.”

But he was never under any illusion that violence
couldn’t touch this place.

“They say they used to hang people from that
tree over there,” he said. “Charlie can tell you about the bandits that used to
hide out in these hills. Different people have different reasons for wanting to
be out somewhere quiet.”

Novack, 54, recalls drug-dealing motorcycle
gangs in the 1970s. As a teenager, she glimpsed white-robed Ku Klux Klan members
burning crosses at the river’s edge.

“That’s a sight you never forget,”
Novack said. “It’s chilling.”

She looked around at the orchards in bloom,
snow-dusted peaks and sheepdogs trying to make friends with the
police.

“People are saying, ‘In Minkler? It’s so beautiful and quiet
there.’ But good and evil are everywhere,” she said. “Right in front of you.
Right next to each other all the time.”

metrodesk@latimes.com

Marcum is a
special correspondent for The Times.

The Associated Press contributed to
this report.

Copyright © 2010, The Los Angeles
Times

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Two Children & Self: Ohio

Paragraph 12 reads:  ” ‘Daniel is in counseling and
on antidepressants,
the detective
wrote.”

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/12/05/murder-suicide_westerville_f.ART_ART_12-05-09_A1_3TFT8G8.html?sid=101

Were their deaths preventable?
As details of the Westerville

murdersuicide emerge, there are questions about what was known of the family,
when and by whom
Saturday,  December 5, 2009 3:10 AM
By
Theodore Decker, John Futty and Rita Price
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

CHRIS RUSSELL | Dispatch

A memorial for Nicole and Sarah
Dobson sits outside the home where they were killed by their father. The girls
met with a child-welfare worker, who asked if their dad had hurt them, three
weeks before they died.

Three weeks before their father killed them,
Nicole and Sarah Dobson met with a child-welfare worker who asked whether he had
hurt them.

“The girls denied that they were abused or maltreated,” said
Eric Fenner, executive director of Franklin County Children

Services.

With no physical evidence or statements supporting the
allegations that had been made in a referral, the caseworker saw no grounds to
remove the children from Daniel J. Dobson’s Westerville home, Fenner said
yesterday.

Police say Dobson, divorced this year from the children‘s
mother, Joyce, shot the girls and then himself Thursday in an upstairs bedroom
of the house at 813 Westray Dr., just west of Sunbury Road.

Now the
agency is left to wonder: Were the girls so scared that they lied? And if so,
did investigators, who had been called about the Dobsons twice before, do
everything they could to find the truth?

“A child who is afraid may not
say everything,” said Fenner, who had tears in his eyes as he talked about the
shooting deaths of Nicole, 15, and Sarah, 11. “What worries me is, ‘Did they
reach out to someone? Did they try?’  ”

In early 2008, both girls
reportedly said that, on a scale of 1 to 10, their fear of their father “was
close to 10,” according to the complaint Children Services supplied to
Westerville police.

The report indicated that Mr. Dobson sometimes hurt
the girls by tickling them and bruised them by squeezing them too hard, usually
while he was intoxicated. Sarah reportedly said she “wished she could hurt her

father so he doesn’t kill us.”

But Fenner said those comments came not
from a caseworker but from the person who referred the case to the agency, whose
identity is protected by law. He said those were the type of claims that the
agency was unable to confirm.

Police closed their investigation of the
2008 case as “unfounded” after the mother told them “this whole thing was blown
out of proportion and has been resolved,” a detective’s report
shows.

“Daniel is in counseling and on antidepressants,” the detective
wrote.

Fenner said the agency will investigate and review all its work in
the case. In addition to the recent allegation, he said caseworkers had received
referrals about the treatment of the children in October 2007 and February
2008.

In each case, no abuse was substantiated, although it was clear
that the mother and father had a volatile relationship, Fenner said. “Dad was
drinking; there was some domestic violence.” Franklin County records, however,
show that Dobson had never been charged criminally.

Fenner said the
most-recent complaint, that Dobson had slapped his older daughter on the leg,
came in to the agency on Nov. 2. The caseworker went to the house several times
before finally finding Mr. Dobson at home on Nov. 13.

The caseworker
notified Westerville police about the case, standard practice when a
physical-abuse allegation is made, officials said.

Lt. John Petrozzi said
a detective left a voice mail for Dobson Monday night. Dobson didn’t return the
call.

Petrozzi said information supplied by Children Services indicated
that a therapist alerted the agency about Nicole’s claim that her father slapped
her on the leg “because she wasn’t getting ready for school fast
enough.”

Handwritten notes that Dobson left before killing himself make
no mention of child-abuse allegations. He wrote various notes to his family, his
ex-wife, even his doctor, all on the same notepad. He thanked his family for
their love and support through the years and said there was nothing more they
could have done.

The letters expressed no anger toward his ex-wife, or
anyone else, and said that he had entertained suicidal thoughts for decades and
wanted to spare his daughters pain.

“There will be no more worries for
us,” he wrote.

“I could not stand to see Nicole and Sarah suffering and
could not leave them behind.”

He also left a note at the bottom of the
stairs.

“Joyce, do not come upstairs. Call the police.”

The
Dispatch
reviewed the notes at the Franklin County coroner’s office through
a public-records request.

According to a 911 call from the younger girl’s
principal, which led to the discovery of the bodies, school administrators were
aware of domestic problems.

Kathleen Norris, the principal of St. Paul
Elementary School in Westerville, called 911 Thursday after Sarah failed to show
up for school and her father didn’t report her absence.

In her call,
Norris was asked by a 911 operator whether Daniel Dobson might harm
Sarah.

“Mother feels that, yes, but I have, I have no proof,” Norris
said. “She was worried.”

She described the parents’ relationship as
“adversarial.”

After 10 years of marriage, Mr. Dobson filed for the
divorce in August 2008 and it was granted in May. He kept the house and agreed
to a shared-parenting plan with his ex-wife. Nicole was to live primarily with
her father, and Sarah would move between their homes on a week-to-week basis,
court records show.

Although the girls were not in school on Wednesday,
Petrozzi said detectives think they weren’t killed until sometime Thursday
morning, possibly before dawn.

What the three did during the day on
Wednesday is unclear, though he said he thought the girl’s mother spoke to one
or both girls Wednesday morning, and a neighbor reported seeing Mr. Dobson in
his garage about 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Franklin County Coroner Jan Gorniak
could not pinpoint a time of death but said the girls and their father likely
died Wednesday night or Thursday morning. She said all died of single shotgun
wounds to the head.

Fenner said cases involving domestic violence can be
difficult for child-welfare agencies, partly because fear and threats are more
difficult to substantiate — and to read on children‘s faces — than physical
abuse and neglect.

He said the agency is developing a special unit that
will have more training.

“This is an area we want to strengthen,” he
said. “We want to find out how we can, within the confines of the law, delve
deeper.”

tdecker@dispatch.com

jfutty@dispatch.com

rprice@dispatch.com

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder-Suicide: Mother Strangles her 2 Children: Kills Self

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Lo Wai-fan, a psychiatrist at East
Kowloon General Out-patient Clinic, said she met Lau in late October last
year
and prescribed her two-week’s worth of sleeping and
anti-depression drugs.
However, Lau turned up at the clinic on
November 6 – a week before her scheduled follow-up session – saying she was
suffering from insomnia and worrying about her son.”

Paragraphs three
through five read:  “But divorcee Lau Hoi-chu, 43, was released from Kwai
Chung Hospital on November 25 last year – two days before her mainland
friend Chen Shaozhen found Lau hanging in a bedroom
next to the body of

her son, Law Chung-yan, 16.

Her daughter, Law Yu-ching, 13, was
unconscious in another room in a flat in Lok On House, Tsz Lok Estate, Tsz Wan
Shan.

All three were certified dead by paramedics. The children were
apparently strangled.

http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?pp_cat=11&art_id=90995&sid=26191271&con_type=3

Tormented mom told carers `she was ready
to kill’ –

Diana Lee

Tuesday,
November 24, 2009

A mentally-disturbed mother who was found hanged in

her flat near the strangled bodies of her two children told a psychiatrist she
“wanted to take her son’s life and then her own” three weeks before they died, a
coroner’s inquest was told yesterday.

Concerned she might injure herself
and others, she was sent to hospital for compulsory observation.

But
divorcee Lau Hoi-chu, 43, was released from Kwai Chung Hospital on November 25
last year – two days before her mainland friend Chen Shaozhen found Lau hanging
in a bedroom next to the body of her son, Law Chung-yan, 16.

Her

daughter, Law Yu-ching, 13, was unconscious in another room in a flat in Lok On
House, Tsz Lok Estate, Tsz Wan Shan.

All three were certified dead by
paramedics. The children were apparently strangled.

Testifying before a
jury of five, Chen said she took care of the children when Lau was in hospital.

She had a meal with the family shortly before their deaths and Lau
appeared to be at peace with her children.

Among the exhibits presented
in court was a calendar on which was scribbled “afraid to be admitted to
hospital again.”

In a written statement, Lau’s sister-in-law, Chen
Jianqing, said she moved into the flat on November 23 to help look after the
children together with Chen Shaozhen but on November 26 Lau told her not to
spend the night in the flat.

Lo Wai-fan, a psychiatrist at East Kowloon
General Out-patient Clinic, said she met Lau in late October last year and
prescribed her two-week’s worth of sleeping and anti-depression drugs. However,
Lau turned up at the clinic on November 6 – a week before her scheduled
follow-up session – saying she was suffering from insomnia and worrying about

her son.

Lau’s son, a Secondary Four student, had just been put on
probation for shoplifting.

“Lau was emotional and believed there was no
hope for the future. She said she wanted to end her son’s life before she ended
hers,” Lo said.

Fearing she might hurt herself and others, Lo had her
admitted to Kwai Chung Hospital under the Mental Health Ordinance for compulsory
psychiatric observation of at least seven days.

Kwong Lap-kuen, a
medical social worker, observed Lau and agreed with Lo’s diagnosis.

Chan
Wai-ping, an assistant social worker in the Social Welfare Department, said she
talked with Lau for more than an hour on November 19, during which she was calm
though she did express concern about finding a secondary school for her
daughter.

“She said it was just out of impulse when she said she wanted
to hurt herself and her son. She regretted what she had said, as she couldn’t
take care of her children while she was in hospital,” Chan said.

Lau
also wrote notes to remind herself of a “better tomorrow” and that “issues
concerning the growing up of the children do not equate to failure on my part.”

Lau’s ex-husband, Law Chi-pun, said he had not contacted her since 2006,
nor given her alimony.

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Murder-Suicide: Father Kills Son (22) & Self: California

Last paragraph reads:  “The victims are reportedly Ardo
Novarro, 55, and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had
been taking antidepressants a
nd appeared grief-stricken over the
death of his wife earlier in the year.”

http://www.760kfmb.com/Global/story.asp?S=11121686

Police investigating possible murdersuicide in Paradise
Hills

Posted: Sep 13, 2009 11:37 AM CDT Updated: Sep 13,
2009 12:01 PM CDT
[]

Autopsies are scheduled Saturday for a father and son believed to
have been killed in a murdersuicide in Paradise Hills.

A friend who
went to check on the men in a house on Sylvy Way near Omega Drive looked in a
window, saw what appeared to be two bodies and called 911 about 2 p.m. Saturday,
according to the Medical Examiner’s Office.

Neighbors said they heard
several shots coming from the home Wednesday night. Authorities said a handgun
was found near the bodies.

The victims are reportedly Ardo Novarro, 55,
and his 22-year-old son, Noel. Neighbors said the father had been taking

antidepressants and appeared grief-stricken over the death of his wife earlier
in the year.

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Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion So Far to Settle Various Paxil Lawsuits

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Excellent article! Many would still be alive and many more
would have avoided being damaged had they been able to see this coming as
clearly as I did years ago when I began warning about these drugs. But it is not
over! There will tragically be many more losses due to the ability of drug
manufacturers to buy the silence this doctor from Tufts says below should
not happen. These settlements need to be made public!

The one glaring omission in this article is a case I am very
familiar with Tobin vs Glaxo. This Paxil-induced murder/suicide
case was allowed to go to court, rather than being settled by Glaxo.
And after hearing all the evidence the jury ruled
that it was clear that Paxil was the main cause of this tragic
murder/suicide that cost 4 lives in one WY family. They ordered Glaxo to pay
$6.3 Million – in my opinion a very small amount for four lives!

But it will not be the end of these types of cases being filed.
The authors did not figure the losses Glaxo will face from those cases
of murder/suicide so their losses could be far greater than detailed
below.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
Author: Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin
Nightmare & Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepresant!

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings
the number of suicide, birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because
it raises the red flag for both doctors and patients that there might be a
problem,” said Dan Carlat, a psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine
in Boston who writes and edits a
blog and a monthly

Psychiatry
Report
. “It would motivate
doctors to dig into the literature even more before prescribing these
drugs.”

  • About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
    haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
    600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.
  • A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million
    to the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after
    his mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst
    estimated the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect
    cases waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.
  • 600 More Cases
  • “A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
    Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
    Kilker verdict.
  • In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
    combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
    200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to
    pay $4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn
    painkiller.
  • Harris Pogust, an
    attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
    are confidential.
  • The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old
    boy who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham,
    of Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged
    Glaxo suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide
    attempts by adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court
    papers.
  • The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
    attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
    confidential.
  • About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average
    of about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an
    average of $300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits
    were filed, according to the people familiar with the matter.
  • Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a
    Houston-based lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in
    court Dec. 2. The settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar
    with the cases said.
  • Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200
    claims linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases
    said.
  • In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
    “conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who
    alleged they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case,
    filed in Los Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in
    February.
Glaxo Said to Have Paid $1 Billion to Settle Paxil

Lawsuits

By Jef Feeley and Margaret Cronin Fisk

Dec. 14 (Bloomberg) — GlaxoSmithKline Plc has
paid almost $1 billion to resolve lawsuits over Paxil since it introduced the
antidepressant in 1993, including about $390 million for suicides or attempted
suicides said to be linked to the drug, according to court records and people
familiar with the cases.

As part of the total, Glaxo, the U.K.’s largest drugmaker, so far has paid
$200 million to settle Paxil addiction and birth-defect cases and $400 million

to end antitrust, fraud and design claims, according to the people and court
records.

The $1 billion “would be worse than many people are expecting,” said Navid Malik, an analyst
at Matrix Corporate Capital in London. “I don’t think this is within the
boundaries of current assumptions for analysts.”

The London-based company hasn’t disclosed the settlement total in company
filings. It has made public some accords. Glaxo’s provision for legal and other
non-tax disputes as of the end of 2008 was 1.9 billion pounds ($3.09 billion),
according to its latest annual report. This included all legal matters, not just
Paxil. The company said 112 million pounds of this sum would be “reimbursed by
third-party issuers.”

The drugmaker has reduced its insurance coverage to contain costs, “accepting
a greater degree of uninsured exposure,” the annual report states. “Recent
insurance loss experience, including pharmaceutical product-liability exposures,
has increased the cost of, and narrowed the coverage afforded by, insurance for
pharmaceutical companies generally,” Glaxo said.

Glaxo Comment

Glaxo declined to confirm the $1 billion figure. “Paxil has been on the
market in the U.S. since 1993. Like many other pharmaceutical products, it has
been the subject of different kinds of litigation over the years,” said Sarah Alspach, a
spokeswoman for Glaxo, in an e-mailed statement. “It would be inappropriate and
potentially misleading to aggregate payments in these various types of
litigation.”

Chief Executive Officer Andrew Witty has moved
to replace revenue lost to generic versions of drugs such as Paxil. Worldwide,
Paxil generated about 514 million pounds in sales last year, or 2.1 percent of
the total. Glaxo closed up 5 pence to 1,303 pence in London trading Dec. 11,
down 8.8 percent from a year ago.

About 450 suicide-related Paxil cases were settled. Only about a dozen
haven’t been, the people said. The $1 billion total doesn’t include more than
600 claims that Paxil caused birth defects.

A Philadelphia jury on Oct. 13 found the drugmaker should pay $2.5 million to

the family of Lyam Kilker, a 3-year-old boy born with a heart defect after his
mother took Paxil while pregnant. Based on that outcome, an analyst estimated
the company may potentially face additional verdicts in birth-defect cases
waiting to be tried in Pennsylvania.

600 More Cases

“A liability totaling $1.5 billion is possible,” wrote Savvas Neophytou, a
Panmure Gordon analyst in London, in a note to investors the day after the
Kilker verdict. He still recommended buying Glaxo shares because a likely appeal
may reduce the amount paid by the company.

In comparison, Pfizer Inc., parent of Wyeth, the maker of diet-drug
combination fen-phen, has had to set aside about $21 billion to resolve about
200,000 personal-injury claims over that medicine. Merck & Co. agreed to pay
$4.85 billion to resolve more than 48,000 claims over the withdrawn painkiller.

Harris Pogust, an
attorney for Paxil plaintiffs, couldn’t confirm the total. He said the amounts
are confidential.

Paxil Is Different

Paxil’s been different from most drugs,” said Pogust, a lawyer from
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, who is handling suicide and withdrawal cases.
“You’ve had three major personal injury litigations over one drug — the
suicide, the birth defect and the withdrawal cases. To have three significant
problems with one drug is really unusual.”

The company had $11.7 billion in U.S. Paxil sales for nine years starting in
1997, according to documents made public this year in a Pennsylvania trial. In
2002, the year before Paxil faced generic competition in the U.S., sales of the
drug there were $2.12 billion. Last year, U.S. sales had fallen to $129 million.
Through September of this year, sales were $52 million, down 52 percent from the
same period in 2008.

Since at least 2003, Glaxo has faced claims in U.S. courts that some Paxil
users were subjected to an undisclosed, higher risk for suicide and birth
defects.

A Suicide Settlement

The suicide settlements included a suit over the death of a 14-year-old boy
who had been taking Paxil for two months. The parents of Scott Cunningham, of
Valparaiso, Indiana, sued after the boy hung himself in 2001. They alleged Glaxo

suppressed evidence that Paxil use was linked to the risk of suicide attempts by
adolescents. Glaxo denied the allegations, according to court papers.

The family settled its suit in May, according to court filings. Family
attorney Bijan Esfandiari confirmed the settlement, saying the amount was
confidential.

About 150 cases over suicides by Paxil users were settled for an average of
about $2 million, and about 300 over suicide attempts settled for an average of
$300,000, they said. Some of the claims were resolved before suits were filed,
according to the people familiar with the matter.

Glaxo has settled about 10 birth-defect cases, Sean Tracey, a Houston-based
lawyer who represented the family of a child victim, said in court Dec. 2. The
settlements averaged about $4 million, the people familiar with the cases said.

Hasn’t Specified

The company hasn’t specified in regulatory filings the number of suicide,
birth-defect and addiction cases settled.

“It’s important to disclose such settlements because it raises the red flag
for both doctors and patients that there might be a problem,” said Dan Carlat, a
psychiatrist at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston who writes and
edits a blog and a monthly Psychiatry Report. “It would motivate doctors to dig into the
literature even more before prescribing these drugs.”

Glaxo paid an average of about $50,000 per case to resolve about 3,200 claims
linking Paxil to addiction problems, the people familiar with the cases said.

In its 2008 annual report, company officials noted they had reached a
“conditional settlement agreement” in January 2006 with Paxil users who alleged
they suffered withdrawal symptoms after taking the drug. The case, filed in Los
Angeles federal court, was marked closed in court records in February.

Glaxo did not admit liability” in the addiction settlements, the company’s
officials said in a March 2009 filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange
Commission.

The Other $400 Million

In one of eight accords unrelated to individual suicide, addiction or
birth-defect claims, Glaxo agreed in 2003 to pay $87.6 million to the U.S. and
49 states over claims it repackaged and privately labeled Paxil and another
drug, Flonase, to a health maintenance organization at discounted prices.

Glaxo, denying liability, agreed in 2004 to pay $165 million to settle two
antitrust suits over allegations it engaged in sham patent infringement
litigation to stall approval of generic versions of the drug, court records
show. Of that total, $100 million was for direct purchasers of Paxil, such as
drug wholesalers, and $65 million was for indirect buyers, the records show.

In the same year, Glaxo agreed to pay $2.5 million to New York to resolve
accusations the company withheld safety data about the antidepressant. The
company, calling the claims unfounded, agreed to release safety studies on the
medicine’s effect on children.

In 2005, the company added a black-box warning to its Paxil label that the
drug increased the risk of suicidal thoughts among adolescents, following a
request by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to do so.

The Philadelphia case is Kilker v. SmithKline Beecham Corp. dba
GlaxoSmithKline, 07-001813, Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia County,
Pennsylvania (Philadelphia).

To contact the reporters on this story: Jef Feeley in
Wilmington, Delaware, at jfeeley@bloomberg.net and; Margaret Cronin Fisk in
Southfield, Michigan, at mcfisk@bloomberg.net.

Last Updated:
December 14, 2009 00:01 EST

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