DEPRESSION MED: Mother Kills her 7 Month Old Twins: Attempts Suicide: …

First four paragraphs read: “Police are investigating reports the mother of twins found dead inside a Perth home was suffering depression.”

“Detective Senior Sergeant Mark Fyfe said prescription drugs for the woman were found alongside the unconscious mother and her seven-month-old twins, who media reports have named as Sophie and Lachlan.”

“Police believe the woman may have killed her son and daughter before attempting to take her own life.”

“Det Sen Sgt Fyfe said family members had told police the mother had been suffering postnatal depression and been prescribed drugs for treatment.”

http://news.theage.com.au/breaking-news-national/dead-twins-mother-was-depressed-report-20090707-dakd.html

Dead twins’ mother was depressed: report

Aleisha Preedy
July 7, 2009 – 1:49PM

Police are investigating reports the mother of twins found dead inside a Perth home was suffering depression.

Detective Senior Sergeant Mark Fyfe said prescription drugs for the woman were found alongside the unconscious mother and her seven-month-old twins, who media reports have named as Sophie and Lachlan.

Police believe the woman may have killed her son and daughter before attempting to take her own life.

Det Sen Sgt Fyfe said family members had told police the mother had been suffering postnatal depression and been prescribed drugs for treatment.

He said police had ruled that no one had forced entry into the house and the incident was being investigated as an apparent murder suicide.

“We are investigating reports the mother was suffering postnatal depression,” Det Sen Sgt Fyfe told reporters on Tuesday.

“We have been unable to confirm that at the moment.

“It appears she may have taken an overdose of prescription drugs but until later today when the toxicology reports are out, I can’t confirm that.”

He said the distraught father had been sedated and police hoped to speak to him later in the day.

The mother remained in a critical but stable condition in Royal Perth Hospital.

Major crime squad detectives were called to the home at the end of a cul-de-sac in Flintlock Street, Cloverdale about 3.30pm (WST) on Monday.

The twins were the couple’s only children.

© 2009 AAP

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Murder-Suicide on Zyban

“But after going on Zyban something went terribly wrong.”

 

We have a close friend who went on Zyban nearly 2 years ago to quit smoking. He was the nicest guy you could ever know. He was unselfish – often taking in homeless people into his own home and helping them out until they were on their feet again. If a neighbor needed help – he was the first one to lend a hand.

He was also a single dad who was raising his 8-yr. old son on his own. He also had a 3-yr. old daughter by a following relationship that failed. The little girl lived with her mom.

But after going on Zyban something went terribly wrong. He felt so much anxiety about his little girl, because her mommy was a drug addict. The next thing we knew, he was all over the news on TV and in the papers.

He had taken his 2 kids camping out of town and attempted a murder suicide, which resulted in suffocating the girl and slitting the boys throat and slitting his own wrists. The boy lived but the girl died. He suddenly came to himself and realized what he had done and quickly drove to the nearest town to a hospital to try and save his son. All he was wearing when he arrived at the hospital was his undershorts.

He underwent psychiatric assessment before the trial and they said he was totally sane. Yet they failed to admit that the Zyban had anything to do with it. Now he is serving 15 years in Jail for the death of his little girl and the trauma that his son had to face.

I feel so awful – I don’t think he should be in jail. And the worst of it is – the jail will not even allow him any psychological counseling to help him deal with this tragedy.

And he is still smoking!

Heartbroken in Canada

 

7/23/2001

This is Survivor Story number 14.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

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3/17/2001 – Doctor Links Viagra to Five Cases of Blindness

I have made the statement before that Viagra is a very dangerous drug and the
only good thing about it is that it will give Pfizer the funds they need to
pay off all of their Zoloft wrongful death suits while it remains to be seen
which new Pfizer drug will bring in the funds to pay off all of the Viagra
damage suits.

It appears the serious physical effects have begun to surface in spite of
most major drug company’s ability to suppress this type of information.

A Washington State man claimed Viagra drove him to attack a woman with a
hammer soon after the drug was released. And I just investigated the case of
a police officer who committed a murder/suicide while on Viagra. It will be
interesting to see how many more reports begin to come in as the public
becomes more aware of the serious effects of this new wonder drug.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/htx/nm/20010312/hl/viagra_blind_1.html

Monday March 12 12:07 PM ET

Doctor Links Viagra to Five Cases of Blindness

By Edward Tobin

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A US ophthalmologist says there
appears to be a very small risk that men taking the
impotence drug Viagra could suffer permanent vision
loss, but the firm that makes the drug on Friday
played down the reported threat.

Howard Pomeranz, director of neuro-ophthalmology at
the University of Maryland Medical Center, said he
knows of five men across the United States who were
diagnosed with permanent vision loss by doctors after
taking the impotence drug. More than 10 million people
have taken the drug since it was approved in 1998.

The condition, called ischemic optic neuropathy, is
caused after blood flow is cut off to the optic nerve
in the eyeball. It usually occurs in people with
diabetes, hypertension and other vascular disorders.

A spokesman for Pfizer Inc., which makes Viagra,
dismissed Pomeranz’s observations, which were first
presented at the American Academy of Ophthalmology
Conference in Dallas in November. The company
spokesman told Reuters that the three-year old product
is not a threat to its users.

“From all clinical experience with Viagra, there have
been no cases of treatment-related blindness reported,
and reports of serious visual problems have been
extremely rare,” said Geoff Cook, the Pfizer
spokesman.

Viagra, which is available in 100 countries, is known
to cause some temporary vision problems such as
blue/green color distortions in some patients.

Blood Flow To Optic Nerve Constricted

Pomeranz said the five men diagnosed with the
condition after taking Viagra had a low cup-to-disk
ratio, which is a way doctors measure the small
circular indentation where the optic nerve connects to
the eyeball.

The low cup-to-disk ratio means that the blood vessels
and nerves are tightly bundled together into the small
space in the back of the eye, according to a
University of Maryland release about the issue.

“We know that Viagra regulates a chemical in the body
to constrict the arteries. The constriction may cut
off the blood flow to the optic nerve, especially in
people with a low cup-to-disk ratio, where the blood
vessels and nerves are tightly bundled,” Pomeranz
said in the release.

Pfizer’s Cook associated potential permanent visual
damage with the known risk factors for men taking the
drug, such as diabetes, and not the drug itself.

“In the population of men who take Viagra, many men
with diabetes and other conditions have significant
associations with long term visual problems,” he
said.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which
reviews reports of drug side effects, said it had not
received any complaints of sudden blindness in
patients taking Viagra.

“We do not have any reports of people losing their
sight like that,” FDA spokeswoman Susan Cruzan said.

“We would take any such reports seriously, and we
encourage health professionals to submit any such
information to us,” she added.

Leonard Yaffe, analyst with Banc of America
Securities, said more information was needed before
evaluating what effect the report would have on
Pfizer. “I’d want to know how often the men were
taking the drug, for how long a period of time?” he
said. “You need to know a lot more than these five
guys had this problem.”

Pomeranz, who is also assistant professor of
ophthalmology and neurology at the University of
Maryland School of Medicine, called for more research
into the matter.

“People who take Viagra who have this particular
configuration of their optic nerve at least need to be
aware that this is a potential problem that may occur
if they use this medication,” he said. “Whether this
is a significant increased risk, I don’t have the
statistics to back that up.”

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07/19/1999 – My antidepressant made me do it! – Hartman estate says

The following article makes its first appearance today (7/19/99) on
salon.com:

My antidepressant made me do it!
The Hartman estate says Zoloft was to blame for a murder-suicide.
By Rob Waters

(http://www.salon.com/health/feature/1999/07/19/zoloft/index.html)

My antidepressant made me do it!

The Hartman estate says Zoloft was
to blame for a murder-suicide.

– – – – – – – – – – – –
By Rob Waters

July 19, 1999 | It was May 1998, and comedian Phil Hartman and his wife, Brynn, were planning a party. Their son, Sean, was soon turning 10 and they wanted to make it special with a bash at Planet Hollywood. Brynn was inviting her son’s friends, including some of his classmates from his school in Encino.

In mid-May she called Kathryn Alice, the mother of one of Sean’s friends, to get her address. Sean and Calvin, Kathryn’s son, played together and had visited each other’s homes. Through their sons, the moms had gotten to know each other, too. They chatted on the phone, and Brynn confided that things were tough. “She said she was barely hanging on by a thread,” Alice recalls. “I told her things will get better, but she said ‘I don’t know.'”

The invitation soon arrived in the mail, but the birthday party never happened. On May 28, at about 2:30 a.m., Brynn Hartman returned home from a night out with a female friend. As Sean and his sister, Birgen, slept in their rooms, Brynn entered the master bedroom and shot her sleeping husband three times. Four hours later, with police in the house and friends listening outside, Brynn lay down on the bed next to Phil’s body and pulled the trigger once more, killing herself.

How could this happen? Why did a woman who was, by all accounts, a devoted and protective mother, deprive her children of their parents? In the days after the killings, the tabloids and mainstream press ruminated over the problems in the couple’s often stormy relationship, speculating that Phil was preparing to leave her, or that she had relapsed into an old cocaine addiction. People magazine reported that she had recently started drinking again after 10 years of near-sobriety and had checked into an Arizona rehab clinic earlier in the year. Indeed, toxicology reports cited in press accounts indicate that at the time she died, Brynn Hartman had both cocaine and alcohol in her system.

But the couple’s family and their lawyers have another answer: Zoloft made her do it.

In late May 1999, one year after the deaths, attorneys for the Hartmans’ estate and children filed a lawsuit against Pfizer, the pharmaceutical giant that makes Zoloft, a new-generation antidepressant similar to Prozac. The suit contends that Brynn Hartman’s violent outburst was caused by a rare but previously documented side effect of the medication that left her agitated, jittery and “out of touch with reality.” It is one of more than 170 wrongful death lawsuits filed against the makers of these new antidepressants since Prozac first hit the market 12 years ago.

The Hartman suit also charges that Arthur Sorosky, the psychiatrist that supplied Brynn Hartman with Zoloft, was not really her doctor and never conducted an evaluation. Sorosky, the complaint alleges, was actually her son Sean’s doctor and gave Brynn medication samples — the kind doled out to physicians by drug company salesmen — “without the benefit of a history and physical examination [or] diagnosis.”

Sorosky’s attorney, Joel Douglas, told Salon Health that his client and Brynn Hartman had “a doctor-patient relationship” and that Sorosky had prescribed the Zoloft in a proper and appropriate way. “From what I understand,” he added, “with cocaine and alcohol in her system, you don’t need to look for Zoloft to understand what happened.”

Original report on murder/suicide: http://www.cnn.com/SHOWBIZ/TV/9805/28/hartman/

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