ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL: Suicide: Recent Withdrawal: Michigan

Often there is the terrible withdrawal associated with the SSRIs. Unless patients are warned to come very slowly off these drugs by shaving minuscule amounts off their pills each day, as opposed to cutting them in half or taking a pill every other day, they can go into terrible withdrawal which is generally delayed several months. This withdrawal includes bouts of overwhelming depression, terrible insomnia and fatigue, and can include life-threatening physical effects, psychosis, or violent outbursts.

Paragraph 7 reads: “Fessenden disputes reports that his son was taking multiple prescription drugs. He said his son recently went off anti-depressants.”

Relatives remember Oceana man as generous person

by Chad D. Lerch | The Muskegon Chronicle
Friday July 03, 2009, 6:41 AM

Roger Fessenden

OCEANA COUNTY — Dale Fessenden says his son, who was found dead June 25 in an Oceana County pond, will be remembered as a caring person who always put others first.

His son, Roger Dale Fessenden, 40, of Rothbury suffered a back injury at work earlier this year when he fell 20 feet while cleaning a storage tank. He underwent back surgery in February, family members said.

Roger Fessenden was reported missing June 23 and was found dead two days later in a pond known by locals as Oceana Lake in Grant Township.

Dale Fessenden said his son often had a difficult time sleeping because of back pain. He said Roger would take prescription sleeping pills and then go for drives in his car. He suspects the sleeping pills affected his son’s judgment.

On the night he went missing, Roger Fessenden likely took sleeping pills before venturing out, his father said.

“He didn’t know what he was doing and just took off,” he said. “I’m convinced that’s what happened to him.”

Fessenden disputes reports that his son was taking multiple prescription drugs. He said his son recently went off anti-depressants.

Family members said they want Roger Fessenden to be remembered as someone with a generous heart.

Dale Fessenden said his son once went shopping for a stranger in the hospital — just because he wanted to help.

“That’s the kind of person my son was,” he said. “He was the most polite person in my life.”

Oceana County Sheriff Bob Farber said a toxicology report is pending in the investigation into Roger Fessenden’s death. The report could return from the lab in the next two weeks.

But in the meantime, the county coroner has ruled the cause of death as drowning. It remains unclear how Fessenden ended up in the pond.

Fessenden, a longtime resident of Ferry, is survived by his wife, Blanco Suarez, two stepchildren and his parents.

E-mail Chad D. Lerch at clerch@muskegonchronicle.com

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PROZAC: Man Kills Girlfriend: Stabs her Over 200 Times: New Zealand

Second paragraph from the end reads: “She knew he could be mean and nasty when he was under stress and that he had been seeing a psychotherapist for years. She also knew he was on the antidepressant drug known as prozac.”

SRI Stories note: A second article follows and states that the girl was stabbed over 200 times.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10582076

Tutor had ‘nasty, mean side’ ex-girlfriend tells court
11:31AM Thursday Jul 02, 2009

Sophie Elliott was stabbed to death. Photo / Supplied
Living with Clayton Weatherston could be “a bit like walking on eggshells”, a former girlfriend of the 33-year-old former University economics tutor told the Christchurch High Court this morning.

The trial was later adjourned until tomorrow after a juror collapsed.It will reconvene at 10am tomorrow.

The young woman whose identity is suppressed was in a relationship with Weatherston for two to three years until 2007 when he became involved with Sophie Elliott, a 22-year-old Honours student.

Weatherston stabbed Miss Elliott to death at her Ravensbourne home on January 9 last year and is on trial for murder.

He has admitted manslaughter but denies the killing was murder. The defense says he was provoked by the pain of the tumultuous relationship with Miss Elliott and because she attacked him with a pair of scissors.

The young woman was giving evidence on the seventh day of Weatherston’s trial.

To defense counsel Judith Ablett-Kerr QC, she said she learned she had to be “quite careful” with Weatherston. If she said something that set him off he would “really go off”.

But she agreed their relationship was generally loving and kind although she found it really stressful when he came under stress “He had two sides, a loving and generous side and a nasty, mean side which he seldom showed in public,” the woman said.

During their time together, she had never challenged Weatherston nor questioned his sexual performance. And she would not have compared his sexual organs to anyone else’s although she did once “reluctantly” when he asked her directly.

She never implied he was “a retard” but Weatherston told her Sophie Elliott had called him that.

” I thought she was probably saying it in jest and I suggested that to him. I said I didn’t think it was directed to his intelligence or meant that way.

“But he took it differently, and referred to it several times,” the young woman said.

She knew he could be mean and nasty when he was under stress and that he had been seeing a psychotherapist for years. She also knew he was on the antidepressant drug known as prozac.

“You knew he was psychologically fragile?” Mrs Ablett-Kerr asked, and the witness agreed there was “an element of fragility” to his personality.

– OTAGO DAILY TIMES
——————————————————————————————————-
Second paragraph reads: “The university tutor is accused of killing Sophie Elliott by stabbing her more than 200 times.”

http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/tears-flow-weatherston-trial-2824693

Tears flow at Weatherston trial
Published: 12:29PM Thursday July 02, 2009

Source: NZPA/ONE News

Emotions spilled over in the murder trial of Clayton Weatherston in Christchurch on Thursday as letters he wrote after his arrest were read to the court.

The university tutor is accused of killing Sophie Elliott by stabbing her more than 200 times.

A former girlfriend of the accused, who has name suppression, read a letter she sent him while he was in jail.

“This will be a rough ride, you’ll be ok,” she read.

As Weatherston’s ex-girlfriend began to cry, there were tears from Clayton Weatherston too. His lawyer had to take over reading a letter he had written back.

“I’m nervous about court on Thursday and I’m annoyed my side will not be made public,” the letter, from just days after he stabbed Elliott to death, read.

The woman, who had been Weatherston’s girlfriend for three years, said she had written to him before she knew the extent of Elliott’s injuries.

“When I found out what had gone on…I couldn’t believe it and I wouldn’t have written a letter,” she said.

She also told the defense about the night Weatherston attacked her and kicked her across a room.

“Just before he kicked me he said ‘you ungrateful bitch’.” t

She agreed he was stressed and on anti-depressants at the time.

Just after the court adjourned, one of the jurors collapsed in the jury room.

A doctor in the court’s public gallery gave the juror medical assistance before he was taken away by an ambulance.

“We will get a report from the hospital after they have been able to assess his condition,” Justice Potter said.

If he is too unwell to continue, the court will reconvene at 10am on Friday with a jury of just 11.

Here is the complete list of adverse reactions attributable to SSRI medications:

1. Insomnia

2. Vivid and violent dreams

3. Inability to detect dreams from reality (The world takes on an other-worldly aspect)

4. No emotions

5. Inability to feel guilt or cry

6. Nausea

7. Loss of appetite

8. Rash; Breathing or lung problems

9. Heart fluttering

10. Shaking – jitteriness

11. Unusual energy surges at times producing super human strength (adrenalin rushes)

12. Memory impairment

13. Hair loss

14. Blurred vision or pressure behind the eyes

15. Inability to discontinue use of drug and increasing own dose

16. Cravings for alcohol, sweets, and other substances or drinking large sums of alcohol, coffee or other caffeinated drinks, diet pop with NutraSweet, etc.

17. Headaches

18. Swelling and/or pain in joints

19. Burning or tingling in extremities

20. Muscle twitching or contractions

21. Tongue numbness and slurred speech

22. Sweating

23. Dizziness

24. Confusion

25. Chills or cold sweats

26. Muscle weakness

27. Extreme fatigue

28. Diabetes or hypoglycemia

29. Lowered immune system

30. Seizures or convulsions

31. Weight gain or weight loss

32. Mood swings

33. Altered personality

34. Symptoms of mania, ie., inability to sit still or restlessness, racing thoughts, acting silly or giddy (like a teenager again)

35. Sexual promiscuity leading to unwanted pregnancy or divorce

36. Irresponsibility, wild spending sprees, gambling, criminal behavior, shoplifting, embezzling, stealing, hostility, etc.

37. Deceitfulness

38. Blank staring

39. Inability to see any alternatives in situations

40. Hyperactivity

41. Aggressive or violent behavior

42. Wanting to ram other cars or driving irrationally

43. Impulsive behavior with no concern about consequences

44. Numbness in various body parts – legs go numb and right out from under patient

45. Sexual organs go numb making orgasm impossible

46. Pulling away from loved ones and others (isolating oneself)

47. Divorce

48. No desire to be touched

49. Paranoia

50. Falsely accusing others of abuse – family members or acquaintances

51. Loss of spirituality

52. Feeling “possessed” or that something evil is inside

53. Self destructive behavior and suicidal ideation

54. Suicide attempts

55. Muscle tremors

56. Loss of co-ordination

57. Mania

58. Psychosis

[SOURCE: PROZAC: PANACEA OR PANDORA?, BY ANN BLAKE TRACY, PH.D.]

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Soldier’s Condition Worsens: U.S.A.

Cravings for both alcohol and cigarettes in those who never used them before are reported regularly by those taking antidepressants.

Paragraphs 14 through 18 read: “Marcus, whose name has been changed for fear of reprisal from his former military leaders, sat in a worn easy chair in his Salem studio apartment sucking on his third Marlboro in less than 20 minutes and nervously twirling an ink pen from Salem Hospital. A tall bottle of a generic prescription antidepressant sat on the end table he crafted out of leftover two-by-fours from a fencing project he worked last year. The shades were pulled and the glimmer from his lamp highlighted beads of perspiration on his forehead in the warm room.”

“’Before I left, I never smoked, not once,’ he said, as he took another long drag, letting the smoke linger in his mouth before letting it loose with a slow exhale. ‘There were a lot of things I didn’t do, ‘ he said. ‘That tour f***ed me up. When I got back, they expected me to return to life like it was before. No s***, like nothing had ever changed’.”

“Things had changed for Marcus, who said he couldn’t manage to keep his job as a welder because he would get sudden flashbacks to that one day in the Afghan village.”

“Change had also occurred for his 26-year-old wife, whom he said left him shortly after he returned, adding additional stress for the veteran to overcome.”

“’I’m the one who drove her away,’ Marcus admitted, wiping away several tears. ‘I would yell at her constantly. I hit her. I was never, never like this before I went to Afghanistan, never’.”

http://willamettelive.com/story/Soldiers_return_from_the_frontlines_to_face_war_with_VA121.html

Soldiers return from the frontlines to face war with VA
By Sheldon Traver
from WillametteLive, Section News

Posted on Tue Jun 30, 2009 at 08:45:07 PM PDT

This year marks a milestone for the Oregon Army National Guard.

More than 3,000 soldiers have already left or are preparing for deployment to Iraq in 2009. It will be the largest deployment for the Oregon Army National Guard since World War II.

However, questions have recently been raised about the care veterans receive upon their return from war. Some Oregon weekend warriors are finding a Department of Veterans Affairs that is unwilling or unable to care for the long-term physical and mental disabilities they are now facing.

With little outside help, some have given up the fight and others continue to struggle for the benefits they say they deserve.

The Veterans Affairs office in Portland disputes these claims, saying it is doing more for veterans now than any time in the past, and points to increased services and a new processing facility in Hillsboro that has prepared the federal agency to aid all returning veterans.

Todd Marcus

In November 2006, then-23-year-old Army specialist Todd Marcus was on patrol in a small Afghan village outside of Kabul.

He carried his M-16 barrel down with his finger just inside the trigger housing. He sweltered under more than 50 pounds of combat gear, including body armor and a Kevlar helmet. Beads of perspiration trickled down to the palms of his gloved hands. Even with the fingertips cut off, the salty runoff made the cuts in his hands sting and itch.

Approximately 100 meters to his left, Marcus saw an Afghan police officer walking a few meters behind another police officer in patrol formation. The officer looked nervous as he scanned the rooftops, looking for those who might intend to kill him. Each little boy, each expectant mother could have been a suicide bomber, paid or extorted by insurgents to end their lives in a desperate bid to feed their families.

Suddenly, a bright flash of light filled Marcus’ peripheral vision, followed by a percussion of hot wind that knocked him aside. His sunglasses flew off and the smell of cordite wafted through the air with a cloud of concrete and dust. He looked toward the ground where the blast originated. The Afghan police officer that was walking just yards from him lay in a pool of blood along with two other officers. An improvised explosive device planted inside the corner of a bullet-riddled concrete home had taken their lives.

Once the carnage and chaos was over, all Marcus could do was cry.

Although it was the only combat action he saw, Marcus said he was severely wounded, not medically, but mentally. However, the same government that agreed to send hundreds of thousands to war is failing to provide veterans like Marcus with proper care upon their return.

Lack of funding, personnel, and an overtaxed veterans administrative system has left many without the care they were promised, according to a 2006 report by the General Accounting Office.

“(The) VA does not know the number of veterans it now treats for PTSD,” and more significantly, the “VA will be unable to estimate its capacity for treating additional veterans… and therefore, unable to plan for an increase in demand for these services,” it said in the report. Additionally, outdated procedures and processes have slowed ability to process veterans’ benefits significantly, said Troy Spurlock, a veteran who has dealt with the Veterans Benefits Administration for himself and others.

Marcus, whose name has been changed for fear of reprisal from his former military leaders, sat in a worn easy chair in his Salem studio apartment sucking on his third Marlboro in less than 20 minutes and nervously twirling an ink pen from Salem Hospital. A tall bottle of a generic prescription antidepressant sat on the end table he crafted out of leftover two-by-fours from a fencing project he worked last year. The shades were pulled and the glimmer from his lamp highlighted beads of perspiration on his forehead in the warm room.

“Before I left, I never smoked, not once,” he said, as he took another long drag, letting the smoke linger in his mouth before letting it loose with a slow exhale. “There were a lot of things I didn’t do,” he said. “That tour f***ed me up. When I got back, they expected me to return to life like it was before. No s***, like nothing had ever changed.”

Things had changed for Marcus, who said he couldn’t manage to keep his job as a welder because he would get sudden flashbacks to that one day in the Afghan village.

Change had also occurred for his 26-year-old wife, whom he said left him shortly after he returned, adding additional stress for the veteran to overcome.

“I’m the one who drove her away,” Marcus admitted, wiping away several tears. “I would yell at her constantly. I hit her. I was never, never like this before I went to Afghanistan, never.”

In 2008, Marcus called and made his first appointment with a Veterans Affairs specialist. It took months to get the initial appointment with the compensation and pension specialists and months more for the VBA to make a decision on his claim. His claim for benefits and treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder was denied.

“They said I was faking it,” he said. “Wel,l f*** them. If they can’t look me in the eye and see that I’m f***ed up, I don’t know what to do.”

Troy Spurlock

Spurlock, a Newberg resident and employee with the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office knows the struggles veterans face as they attempt to get the care to which they believe they are entitled. As a military police officer and a private during the first Gulf War, he was exposed to unidentified chemicals that caused fibromyalgia.

He also has a host of other ailments, injuries and post-traumatic stress requiring ongoing care. Additionally, he was systematically harassed and threatened by soldiers in his own unit.

However, unlike Marcus, he fought the system and has seen some, though not total, success serving as his own advocate.

“As soon as I got out I started the process,” Spurlock said. “I immediately realized that it’s a typical government bureaucratic process that acts much like an insurance company does. When you do finally get to see someone, you get a quick five-minute ‘Hi, how are you, what’s your claim and thank you I’ll read your file.’ You really have to jump through hoops to substantiate your claim.

“It’s not an adequate medical exam and doesn’t even touch the complexities of issues soldiers go through,” he added.

Veterans Affairs

The Department of Veterans Affairs is divided into three unique parts: the National Cemetery Division, the Veterans Hospital Administration (VHA) and the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA).

Portland VHA spokesman Mike McAleer works with Oregon’s returning soldiers who return from deployments overseas. He said more is being done now to help soldiers reintegrate and get the benefits they need than any time in the past.

“We send folks to where the soldiers are,” McAleer said. “We provide them with information for enrollment and try to get them into the medical system. We also try to get them information about the services we provide. We want them to be successful when they enter the civilian-warrior portion of their lives.”

There are currently more than 330,000 vets eligible for medical benefits in Oregon, although McAleer said only one-third are taking advantage of them. Oregon Guard men and women returning from active duty are entitled to full medical coverage for five years, including mental health services.

Returning veterans need to sign up, even if they aren’t ready to file a claim,” McAleer said. “They can even do it online. It will streamline the process when they are ready to file a claim.”

To file a claim, there are many hands in the process. Veterans can file medical disability claims themselves or with the help of a specialist. The claim is filed through the VBA. If accepted, a new compensation and pension processing center in Hillsboro conducts medical and psychiatric exams. More than 1,000 requests for examination from the VBA are processed at the Hillsboro facility.

“This is where we compile information and send it to the VBA for processing,” McAleer said. “I think we’re doing a good job of reaching out to veterans and want to do more to help them.”

Once exams are complete, the files return to the Veterans Benefits Administration for further processing.

“Our organization has established a strategic goal of completing a claim in 125 days,” said Lisa Pozzebon, Assistant Director of the VA Regional Office in Portland. “Currently we have an average of 146 days.”

Claims that require a highly specialized exam or ones in the appeals process take longer, she said.

Tim Wehr

Spurlock spends part of his off time trying to reach veterans and help them navigate the stormy VA paperwork waters. His MySpace web site, www.myspace.com/support4veterans, has links to nonprofits working to help vets. Additionally, he has made it his mission to help his colleague, Tim Wehr of Sheridan, receive benefits he initially applied for in 1970 after returning from Vietnam with a purple heart, bronze star and many other decorations and awards.

Wehr currently receives a small amount of money as disability payments for an injury to his ear and PTSD. The Yamhill County Sheriff’s deputy said he still has flashbacks, especially when he hears a helicopter. He said he used to compulsively drop and roll any time he heard a helicopter, but recently was able to overcome this behavior.

Most of his military and medical records were lost in a 1972 fire that destroyed a federal records building and left many vets unable to prove their service and disabilities. He reapplied for benefits in the early 1980s, this time for skin conditions, which later included skin cancer related to exposure to Agent Orange, an herbicide used extensively during the Vietnam War. While his claim for PTSD and hearing problems was accepted, it was denied for his chloracne (Agent Orange-related skin condition) and a knee injury. He gave up trying – until he met Spurlock through a mutual friend.

In 2007, Spurlock was given the power of attorney for Wehr’s VA claims. Spurlock has managed to pull together many of Wehr’s old records to justify claims; however, both men feel the VBA is impeding their efforts. Several of the letters to and from the VBA regarding Wehr’s claims are available at www.WillametteLive.com.

Veterans Service Center manager Kevin Kalama said claims for conditions related to Agent Orange exposure don’t require the same level of documentation as other service-related disabilities.

“We will presume he was exposed to Agent Orange because of where he was in Vietnam during that time,” he said. “If we can find a record that he stepped foot in Vietnam during that time period, it is presumed he had exposure.” Wehr said this has not been true with his case.

The most recent denial came when the VA claimed that Spurlock’s power of attorney privileges had ended, despite no paperwork showing a POA is appointed for a limited time.

“The VA is continuing to stonewall my claims any and every chance it gets without clear and legal justification,” Wehr said in a letter to the Veterans Affairs office in Portland dated June 15, 2009. “Meanwhile, I will be preparing to submit my entire file to Senator Wyden’s office and request a congressional investigation into this utter lack of professionalism and lack of attention to detail in this matter.”

Protecting Yourself

With the current deployments, Spurlock said troops need to take steps while in Iraq to reduce problems later.

“Keep a copy of all of your medical records,” he advised. “Any time you see a doctor for anything, you need to keep that. Don’t wait too long… and don’t be dismayed by any instant denial. That is just routine.”

Veterans should also research their own medical conditions and have the information on hand when talking to the VA.

“The biggest thing is not to give up,” Spurlock emphasized. “They will try to wear you down, but don’t let them.”

Making sure all medical records are available is crucial to avoid delays, McAleer acknowledged. Currently the VA is working with the Department of Defense for access to medical and personnel records. He said this will help veterans and the VBA to process claims more efficiently.

Although he couldn’t speak about any individual cases, he said Marcus must make every effort to go to a clinic and get screened for PTSD and any other ailments.

“We have a clinic in Salem,” he said. “We are trying to make it as easy as possible for our veterans to get the help and services they need.”

One of the biggest pieces of advice that was offered by McAleer is to file all the known claims at one time.

“The process can be really frustrating if you are doing it in bits and pieces,” he said.

He added that veterans should keep a call list of people they served with to verify claims if needed.

Despite efforts to treat returning troops, one thing is certain: many of these complexities are leading to tragic endings.

In 2008, the Army reported nearly 150 suicides within its ranks. Every military branch except the Coast Guard has seen an increase in suicide rates. However, steps are being taken to curb the rise.

Both the Joshua Omvig Suicide Prevention Act, increasing mental-health assessments, and the Wounded Warriors Act, designed to help soldiers transitioning from active-duty to veteran status, are intended to aid active duty and returning soldiers. Studies are under way at the Madigan Army Medical Center near Fort Lewis, Wash., to assist in this effort.

This is little consolation for veterans who don’t have a desire to kill themselves, but simply want care for physical and mental injuries and benefits they were promised upon enlistment.

Marcus said his experience with the VA has left him soured and he doesn’t have any immediate plans to return. He admits he occasionally daydreams about refilling his antidepressants and taking them in a one-night alcohol-induced party for one.

He said he won’t do it, because “God doesn’t accept cowards who take the easy way out.”

In the back of his mind, he believes he’ll get help one day, or simply be cured by a miracle.

“I don’t know what may change, tomorrow or next year,” he said. “F*** the VA. I don’t need ’em. One of these days I’ll get my head straight and have a family. It’ll all be good.”

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Michael Moore – Reveals the real cause of Columbine.


Michael Moore obtained a copy of Ann Blake-Tracy’s book, “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare” at the premier of “Bowling for Columbine” in Denver, CO. After learning more about these drugs, see his statement from the movie he recently appeared in with Ann Blake-Tracy, Mark Taylor, Neal Bush, and others in the Gary Null production “The Drugging of our Children” Full Video http://video.google.com/videoplay?doc… OTHER SCHOOL SHOOTINGS go to. http://www.ssristories.org/index.php AntidepressantsKill.com

Michael Moore obtained a copy of Ann Blake-Tracy’s book,

“Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightamre”

at the premier of “bowling for Columbine” in Denver, CO.

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Columbine Anniversary Brings Columbine & Red Lake Together

Monday, 20 April 2009

PRESS RELEASE:
Columbine Anniversary Brings Columbine & Red
Lake Together
DATE: APRIL 20, 2009
TIME: 5:00 – 6:00 PM
Place: Clement Park, Littleton,
Colorado
INFORMATION CONTACT:
Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
INFORMATION INCLUDED:
– Joint statement from the family of a Columbine victim & the family of
the Red Lake, MN school shooter – total dead 25, total wounded 31
– FDA testimony of Columbine shooting victim Mark Allen Taylor
– Statement by Michael Moore about the cause of Columbine after making
the movie, “Bowling for Columbine”
– New Medical Article Linking Antidepressants to Murder/Suicide in
the Spring Issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons
COLUMBINE & RED LAKE COME TOGETHER AT COLUMBINE
ANNIVERSARY
Donna Taylor: Mother of Mark Taylor, the first boy shot at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999 as Eric and Dylan, on their way into the school, shot at those gathered to discuss scriptures outside. Eric Harris shot Mark 6 – 13 times with 9mil bullets. Mark survived earning himself the title of “The Columbine Miracle Boy.”
Tammy Lussier: Daughter of Officer Daryl (Dash) Lussier of the Red Lake Police Department and aunt to Jeff Weise who shot and killed Tammy’s father, his own grandfather, and eight others before taking his own life with his grandfather’s police firearm.
Our Message: Here we are together at the 10th Anniversary of the tragedy at Columbine High School. So, why would a family member of a school shooting victim and a family member of a school shooter come together? We want the world to know that antidepressants cause violence with the most popular antidepressant on the market today listing “homicidal ideation” as a potential side effect.
Many shot at Columbine have learned to do is to forgive Eric Harris and Dylan Kleebold for doing what they did to them. We have just celebrated the glorious Easter season filled with the reassurance that through the mission of Jesus Christ we can overcome death and live again. As we remember Columbine we feel it is crucial to recall
that as Christ hung on the cross He plead with His Father in Heaven for those who were in the process of taking His life from Him “Father forgive them for they know not what they do.” In forgiving Eric and Dylan we believe that we are forgiving them for the same reason Christ asked for those taking his own life to be forgiven – they did not
know what they were doing April 20, 1999 when they took 15 lives, including their own, and injured 24 more.
Although USA Today attempted to rewrite history this past week and erroneously reported that the Columbine shooters were not on antidepressants we are here to remind the world that Eric Harris was on the antidepressant Luvox. Whether Eric was sharing his meds with Dylan, which is far too common with kids, or was on his own prescription we will never know as his records were sealed. In the Red Lake school shooting Jeff Weise was taking
the antidepressant Prozac. Our statement today is that minus antidepressantswe feel sure that the shootings at Columbine High School and Red Lake, MN High School would never have happened and neither would the
majority of the other school shootings and workplace violence shootings (see www.ssristories.drugawareness.org for a long list of documented cases).
Antidepressants push the user into a dream state leaving one to act out nightmares. Columbine was a nightmare acted out by Eric Harris and Dylan Kleebold, just as Red Lake was a nightmare acted out by Jeff Weise which took another 10 lives and injured 7 more. We do not believe they were conscious and coherent enough to fully understand what they were doing because of the adverse effects of antidepressants.
Over the past two years Donna has watched her son Mark go from a normal boy to someone she does no longer recognize because he was given two short bouts of similar drugs given to Eric Harris. Now Mark is living and
experiencing firsthand similar adverse reactions to what Eric was when he shot Mark. How ironic and tragic!
See Mark’s powerful statement below given before the FDA about these drugs that have now robbed him of who he is or was. [UPDATE: Please see the following video to see what has happened to Mark since this press release: http://www.drugawareness.org/mark-taylors-fight4columbine/ ]
If we want the shootings of Columbine and Red Lake to end we MUST learn the truth about the potential dangers of antidepressant medications.
____________________________________

Mark Taylor’s testimony before the FDA
9/13/2004

I am Mark Allen Taylor and I am a victim of the SSRI antidepressant era. I took six to thirteen bullets in the heart area in the Columbine High School shooting when Eric Harris on Luvox opened fire that now infamous day.

They almost had to amputate my leg and my arm. My heart missed by only one millimeter. I had three surgeries. Five years later I am still recuperating.

I went through all this to realize that SSRI antidepressants are dangerous for those who take them and for all those who associate with those who take them.

I hope that my testimony today shows you that you need to take action immediately before more innocent people like me, and you, do not get hurt or die horrible deaths as a result.

As Americans we should have the right to feel safe and if you were doing your job we would be safe. Why are we worrying about terrorists in other countries when the pharmaceutical companies have proven to
be our biggest terrorists by releasing these drugs on an unsuspecting public?

How are we suppose to feel safe at school, at home, on the street, at church or anywhere else if we cannot trust the FDA to do what we are paying you to do? Where were you when I and all of my classmates got shot at Columbine?

You say that antidepressants are effective. So why did they not help Eric Harris before he shot me?

According to Eric they “helped” him to feel homicidal and suicidal after only six weeks on Zoloft. And then he said that dropping off Luvox cold turkey would help him “fuel the rage” he needed to shoot everyone. But he continued on Luvox and shot us all anyway.

So, why did these so called antidepressants not make him better? I will tell you why. It is because they do not work!

We should consider antidepressants to be accomplices to murder.

_____________________________

To listen to Michael Moore’s statement about the cause of the Columbine tragedy after making the movie “Bowling for Columbine” – go to http://www.drugawareness.org/michael-moore-cause-of-columbine/

______________________________________

“Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibior [SSRI]
Drugs: More Risks Than Benefits?”

Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons: Volume 14: number 1: Spring 2009, there is an article by Joel M. Kauffman, Ph.D., [Professor of chemistry emeritus at the University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, Pa.]
In regard to the International Coalition for Drug Awareness, the study reads on page 10: “The International Coalition for Drug Awareness in cooperation with the Prozac Survivors Support Group has produced a website on which about 1,600 [now 3,000] violent incidents associated with SSRI use are described (www.ssristories.drugawareness.org/index.php).”
In regard to SSRI Stories www.SSRIstories.net documenting the link between thousands of cases of multiple murder/suicides and antidepressants, Dr. Kaufmann made the following statement on page 10: “Since no clinical trial involving multiple homicides is ever likely to be run, no firmer evidence is likely to be found. Healy noted that much of the evidence for suicide and murder came from the efforts of journalists and lawyers”.To read the full article and see the data go to the journal’s websitehttp://www.jpands.org/jpands1401.htm or http://www.jpands.org/vol14no1/kauffman.pdf

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PAXIL: 85 Year Old Man Kills Wife: No History of Violence

PAXIL: 85 Year Old Man Kills Wife: No History of Violence

Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:26 pm

“Paul Deyoub, a forensic psychologist with the Arkansas State Hospital in Little Rock, testified for the state that he didn’t believe Basham was delirious when he killed his wife.

“He said he didn’t believe Basham’s contention that he didn’t remember anything about the killing, and that his first memory that day was waking up in the hospital. He said nearly all defendants charged with domestic homicide that he has evaluated claim to have no memory or some loss of memory of thecrime.”

Well Mr. Forensic Psychologist just for your information (which I am sure drug companies have paid enough to your institution of higher learning to assure you never learn), the reason that ” . . . nearly all defendants charged with domestic homicide [that you have] evaluated claim to have no memory or some loss of memory of the crime” is because the large majority of those
defendants charged with domestic homicide are on SSRI or SNRI antidepressants which affect memory so adversely that “amnesia” is listed as a frequent side effect. WAKE UP!!! If they cannot even remember who they are, how can they remember what happened?!!!

And if this case was prosecuted by the same prosecutor I went up against in Fayetteville a few years ago, who could not make one statement without first reading it from the SSRI Prosecutor’s How to Manual, it is no wonder the courts’ time is still being wasted prosecuting such cases when they should be immediately dismissed and apologis and settlements issued directly from the
drug manufacturers to these families! How very tragic for this poor old man and his family!!!

[The SSRI Prosecutor’s manual is distributed by the drug manufacturers in criminal cases to make sure that anyone who commits a crime, while under the influence of their drugs, goes immediately to jail . Why? So that their drugs remain “innocent” and therefore lucrative because who would want to use a drug that a court has just said produced a suicide or murder or other violent crime? Is providing such a manual illegal? No, but probably should be. Is it unethical? Without a doubt!!!!

But it was obvious to me when testifying in these cases that this manualexisted due to prosecutors asking the same questions of me, almost word for word in every case, no matter which SSRI was involved or where in the country the case was tried. So, while working as the defense attorney on Christopher Pittman’s case, Andy Vickery asked for the manual as evidence and got a copy
for us. If anyone would like to waste their time reading it let me know and I will gladly send you a copy.]

Now back to this elderly man’s case:

As you read through the next two paragraphs understand why I gasp when I hear that this man was given an SSRI while suffering from anxiety, pneumoniaand sleep apnea. You see, anything that increases serotonin – as the SSRI antidepressants are designed to do and all antidepressants do – shuts down the lungs thereby cutting off oxygen to the brain. This is how these drugs produce brain damage, the cutting off of the oxygen supply.

[If you would like to test out this idea on your own, do what I do. Every time you see someone who is not elderly, but generally is overweight and is
carrying around an oxygen tank, ask them which antidepressant they have been on and how long. Then explain to them that the main function of serotonin is the
constriction of smooth muscle tissue which includes the lungs and bronchial tubes [and all major organs] which is why they now need oxygen. And then give
them our website because they are going to want to know what else these drugs have done to their health. But always stress that abrupt or rapid
discontinuation of the drug/drugs is very dangerous.]

Paragraph 4 reads: “Ross testified that in an attempt to explain how Basham, who never had a reputation for violence and always got along with his
wife, could have committed such a bizarre act, she concluded that Basham suffered from delirium.”

Paragraph 7 reads: “Ross pointed out that Autry Basham had pneumonia, took the drug Paxil for anxiety

and suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. All those factors, which were present on the day of Marie Basham’s death, inhibited his ability to get
oxygen to his brain. A lack of oxygen can trigger delirium, she said, especially in the elderly.”

Congratulations are in order for Dr. Ross for being able to understand the real reason for Autry Basham’s delirium was lack of oxygen!!! I wish more
doctors would work a little harder to see what is actually happening in these cases to produce such out of character behavior rather than following the old
school where the drugs involved were very different. Perhaps lack of oxygen leading to delirium is an easier conclusion to arrive at in an elderly patient,
but it does happen in all age groups and is a huge contributing factor in these tragic cases. It is also another reason why hyperbaric oxygen treatment
is so very helpful after using these drugs and subsequently suffering from elevated serotonin levels.

There should be grave concern in our country about such tragic cases as this one where a couple has had a long and loving marriage relationship and in an
instant it is ended in such horror because of what we call “medication”! For those of you who are younger and sadly may not be aware, things like this
DID NOT HAPPEN in the world we grew up in!!!! Cases like this (which I now see far too often) were basically non-existent before the widespread use of
serotonergic drugs.

As it states on the front cover of my book, these drugs have literally turned our world upside down! For this we owe the younger generation and those
generations to come our deepest apologies for the extensive damage we have allowed to occur. I fear we have left you a terrible, terrible legacy that at
this point I do not know if we can make restitution for it.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org(http://www.drugawareness.org/) &
www.ssristories.org (http://www.ssristories.org/)
Author of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our
Serotonin Nightmare & the audio, Help! I Can’t
Get Off My Antidepressant!!! ()

http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/241972/
(http://www.nwanews.com/adg/News/241972/)

SEBASTIAN COUNTY : Sides dispute delirium led to husband’s killing of wife
BY DAVE HUGHES

Posted on Thursday, October 30, 2008

GREENWOOD ­ A Fayetteville psychiatrist said Wednesday that 85-year-old Autry Basham suffered from delirium brought on by pneumonia and a sleep
disorder when he slashed the throat of his 83-year-old wife last year.

The testimony of Dr. Robin Ross in Sebastian County Circuit Court in Basham’s first degree murder trial bolstered the defense’s contention that Basham of
Mansfield is innocent of murder because of a mental disease or defect at the time he killed his wife of 64 years, Lola Marie Basham, on Aug. 27, 2007.

The jury trial before Circuit Judge James Cox began Monday and is expected to wrap up today.

Ross testified that in an attempt to explain how Basham, who never had areputation for violence and always got along with his wife, could have
committed such a bizarre act, she concluded that Basham suffered from delirium.

She said tension and anxiety Basham may have been feeling over the falling out between his wife and son Jerry Basham didn’t play a role in triggering
the delirium.

Prosecutors have told jurors they believe Basham killed his wife after they argued the weekend before about her failing memory and her belief that their
son didn’t pay as much attention to them as he should, given the financial and other help they gave him over the years.

Ross pointed out that Autry Basham had pneumonia, took the drug Paxil for anxiety and suffered from obstructive sleep apnea. All those factors, which
were present on the day of Marie Basham’s death, inhibited his ability to get oxygen to his brain. A lack of oxygen can trigger delirium, she said,
especially in the elderly.

Delirium was defined as a disruption of consciousness and a change in perception that can come on rapidly and can come and go over time. It would
have been possible for Basham, she said, to be delirious and still carry out a sequence of events in killing his wife.

In rebuttal, the prosecution called Little Rock forensic psychiatrist Raymond Molden who testified there was no direct evidence that Basham suffered
from delirium.

He said the fact that Basham called his son and daughter-in-law before killing his wife and then carried out the series of actions in killing his wife
showed that he took steps in a logical sequence to bring about a result.

Following a logical sequence of steps, he said, was inconsistent with aperson suffering from delirium.

Paul Deyoub, a forensic psychologist with the Arkansas State Hospital in Little Rock, testified for the state that he didn’t believe Basham was
deliriouswhen he killed his wife.

He said he didn’t believe Basham’s contention that he didn’t remember anything about the killing, and that his first memory that day was waking up in
the hospital. He said nearly all defendants charged with domestic homicide that he has evaluated claim to have no memory or some loss of memory of the
crime.

As you read through the next two paragraphs understand why I gasp when I hear that this man was given an SSRI while suffering from anxiety, pneumoniaand sleep apnea. You see, anything that increases serotonin – as the SSRI antidepressants are designed to do and all antidepressants do – shuts down the lungs thereby cutting off oxygen to the brain. This is how these drugs produce brain damage, the cutting off of the oxygen supply.

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Now in Jail for Murder after Prozac

“I was charged with murder and also death penalty.”

 

My trouble started several years ago when I had to have a complete hysterectomy at the age of twenty-eight. My doctor put me on hormone replacement medication. Through the upcoming years after my hysterectomy my body fought off one sickness after another. I would go through nights of not getting any sleep, fighting insomnia. Through lack of sleep I was exhausted.

A friend of mine suggested for me to go to her physician. She felt he could help me. She made the appointment, drove me to the doctors office. After seeing the doctor he prescribed a sleeping aid, which was the root of my problem, and PROZAC.I found out my friend was on it too. She expressed to me that Prozac made her feel like a brand new person.

No one took the time to explain the danger of this drug or monitored me on the drug. I had one follow up visit to see how I was doing. At the time, I really was not sure how I felt, there was not a lot of change. The only difference was that I was sleeping a little better than before.

My emotions were numb, nothing bothered me, even my daily chores, I just let them go, I did not care. Eventually my insomnia came back even worse than before. In March of 2000, being three months on Prozac, I started my way to Hell. One just does not know mentally what is going on or happening within. Your whole mental capability is blurred. I started crying Hysterically.

It crossed my mind this is ridiculous crying all the time and spending the ungodly amount of money monthly on Prozac. I threw the bottle of pills in the trash. Each day that went by I steadily was hitting bottom. Everything that crossed my mind had to do with religion. The people that I seen at this time all knew that something was wrong with me. This went on for about nine to ten days. Each day getting worse and worse. Toward the eighth day my emotion/thoughts flipped speedily from one thought to another.

Aubrey, my eleven year old daughter, and myself went to McDonalds for lunch. I became extremely paranoid of everyone in the building. I thought someone was going to come in start shooting. I was so frightened all I could think of was protecting my Aubrey.

I thought my yard was the Garden of Eden. Everything was meant to be free. So I let our big dog, Sam, loose and freed our two ducks that were caged. Our dog, Sam, caught one of the ducks in his mouth, immediately it crossed my mind that he was a monster and he was going to kill the ducks. I became extremely scared of him. In the process of trying to catch Sam to get the duck out of his mouth, he finally let the duck go, he jumped on Aubrey and knocked her down.

She was screaming, he was on top of her and she could not get up. That’s when I hysterically went to pieces. I had to save her. I went to get this gun that was in my closet on the top shelf. I shot the dog to save Aubrey. The next thing I remember is I am in my bathroom to put the gun up and all of a sudden my thinking pattern shifts again.

Crying hysterically, I put the gun to my head to pull the trigger when Aubrey walks into the bathroom to witnesses what is fixing to happen. She screams “No Moma,” and jumps on me and grabs my hand with the gun and the gun goes off. The bullet that was meant for me hit her.

The next thing that I remember is waking up in ICU being told I had been shot. I lost a lung and part of my liver. I lost Aubrey. I went through hell for days, no one had enough of time to reach a caring hand out to save me. My daughter of eleven years was the bravest of all. She reached out her hand and saved my life.

What once was a normal family is now grieving torn apart family that has lost so much. I had to under go hypnosis to remember all of this for my memory was blank.

I was charged with murder and also death penalty. Today, I have been on a long journey. It has been one year and a half since my world came crashing down. Everyday I see my scars on my body to remind me of this horrible tragedy that I lived through and Aubrey did not.

When I was in the hospital, I had guards over me 24hrs a day. After I was discharged, I was sent to the psychiatric ward which I remained there for a couple of weeks. After that I was sent to parish jail in which I stayed three months. I was sent to a mental hospital for therapy/hypnosis to regain my memory. I stayed there six months. My two psychiatrists, who was with me daily basis testified on my behalf to rebuild my life. The judge ordered me to go to another hospital forensic center to be reevaluated again.

Due to a long waiting list for this particular hospital, I was sent to jail again. Today this is where I am writing my story. I have been here for eight months waiting to be reevaluated have been DRUG FREE. I am not even taking hormone replacement medication am wanting to go home, back to my husband who has been faithfully stood by me along the way and my oldest daughter. I will never be the same without my young daughter.

Paula

 

9/26/2001

This is Survivor Story number 29.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

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Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

Judge Denies Rehearing in Drug Case

Associated Press

A federal judge denied a request by the maker of Paxil for a new trial in the case of a man who killed himself and three family members after taking the anti-depressant drug.
Donald Schell vs. SmithKline Beecham

8/11/2001

Judge Denies Rehearing in Drug Case

http://wire.ap.org/?FRONTID=HOME&SITE=CALOS&enter=Go

Associated Press

GlaxoSmithKline asked that they be granted a new trial in the case of the murder/suicide where the family was awarded $8 million for the deaths of four members of the Donald Schell family and the Tim Tobin family. They tried to say that Dr. David Healy who testified as an expert for the Schell and Tobin families contradicted himself in the trial. (Wow! I wonder if he looked at someone cross-eyed too?! Talk about grasping for straws!)

On Thursday Federal Judge William Beaman turned down their request stating that “the verdict was supported by reliable scientific data and that jury instructions were proper.”

Obviously GlaxoSmithKline has not been as successful at buying the verdict they desired as Lilly was in the Wesbecker murder/suicide case in Kentucky. But they assure us that they will not give up as yet. They will now head for Denver to see what they can accomplish there.

You see, as long as they can put up a strong front, they can postpone the inevitable landslide of future lawsuits against their “golden goose.” The stalling pays off in another way as well with every day bringing in another $7 million or so in profits on Paxil. It all comes back to $$$$$. Clearly loss of human life is not what matters to GlaxoSmithKline or Lilly, or Pfizer, or Solvay, etc., etc., etc.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive DirectorInternational Coalition For Drug AwarenessAuthor of Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare July 2001 Edition – (1-)

A federal judge denied a request by the maker of Paxil for a new trial in the case of a man who killed himself and three family members after taking the anti-depressant drug.

In June, a jury determined that taking Paxil prompted Donald Schell to kill his wife, daughter, granddaughter and himself in 1998. It awarded $8 million in damages to Schell’s relatives.

Jurors returned the verdict in a civil wrongful death suit against SmithKline Beecham, the manufacturer of Paxil, the country’s second-largest selling anti-depressant. The company is now called GlaxoSmithKline PLC.

Attorneys for the company had asked U.S. Magistrate Judge William C. Beaman to overturn the jury award or allow a retrial.

The company must pay $6.4 million of the $8 million total, because the jury ruled that it was 80 percent responsible for the deaths, while Schell was 20 percent liable.

The company’s request was based in part on what it called the unreliability of the plaintiffs’ expert witness, Dr. David Healy, saying his testimony contradicted what he wrote in professional articles.

Beaman turned down the request Thursday, saying the verdict was supported by reliable scientific data and that jury instructions were proper.

GlaxoSmithKline will appeal to the U.S. 10th Circuit Court in Denver, attorney Tom Gorman said.

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