PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

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PROZAC: Personality Change: Later He Died: England

Paragraph 14 reads:  “In January 2008,
he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical
Practice in Plympton, Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks.
He was prescribed anti-depressant
drugs.”

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the
anti-depressant fluoextine  [Prozac]  as the original
prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to ease his
anxiety.”

Paragraphs 21 through 24 read:  “Mr Swan, of Tern
Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change

in Mathew’s behaviour from early in 2008.

He became
more distant, was fidgety and restless and would
fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew suffer a panic
attack in a bank queue.”

He said Mathew also became disillusioned
with his work that he had previously loved,
and had various run-ins with colleagues.”

This, said Mr Swan, was

totally out of character.

http://www.thisisplymouth.co.uk/news/Plymouth-man-died-inhaling-aerosol-gases/article-1320479-detail/article.html

Plymouth man died after inhaling aerosol gases

Tuesday, September 08, 2009, 11:45

5 readers have commented on
this story.
Click
here to read their views.

A TWENTY-TWO-year-old apprentice
electrician who died from inhaling a deodrant aerosol was suffering from
undiagnosed medical condition which meant he was more at risk from the gases in
the can, an inquest heard.

Mathew Burrows was found dead in bed by his
father in Churchdown, Glos, just weeks after he had moved from Plymouth to start
a new life with his dad.

After the tragedy, a pathologist found Mathew
was suffering from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, a condition which meant the butane
and propane in the spray were more likely to kill him, the Cheltenham inquest
was told.

Mathew, of Farrant Avenue, Churchdown, Glos, who had a history
of anxiety and panic attacks, was found dead by his father on Sept 14 last
year.

Recording a verdict of accidental death, Gloucestershire coroner
Alan Crickmore said there were a limited number of explanations as to how Mathew
came to inhale the gases.

He said he was sadly drawn to the conclusion
that Mathew inhaled deliberately although he was ‘absolutely satisfied’ this was
not intended to cause harm to himself.

The inquest heard that the day
before he was found dead Mathew had enjoyed a family day out at the Newent Onion
Fayre.

His father, Andrew Burrows, said he found his son’s body under a
duvet when he took him a cup of tea at around 9am.

Later, when a scene of
crime officer and a policeman moved Mathew, an aerosol can of deodorant was
found in the bed.

The inquest heard that Mathew had moved to Gloucester
area from Plymouth to be closer to his girlfriend, Charlotte
Morton.

Described by his mother, Tracy Brown, from Plymouth, as a ‘happy
lad, bright and popular,’ the inquest heard that Mathew had seen his doctor in
November 2007 after suffering palpitations.

Blood tests and an
electro-cardiograph were carried out and found to be normal.

In January
2008, he saw Dr Francis Roberson, of the Ridgeway Medical Practice in Plympton,
Plymouth, complaining of anxiety and panic attacks. He was prescribed
anti-depressant drugs.

Later, Mathew saw Dr Stephen Robinson at the same
medical practice, and was prescribed the anti-depressant fluoextine as the
original prescription was causing unpleasant side-effects and had done little to
ease his anxiety.

Over the next six months, Dr Robinson increased
Mathew’s dosage to 60mg and his condition was improving. Dr Robinson also
referred Mathew to a confidential counselling service for young people, called
The Zone.

After Mathew’s move to the Gloucester area, he was seen by Dr
Tim Macmorland of the Churchdown Surgery on September 4 and they discussed his
anxiety and panic attacks.

Dr Macmorland arranged for Mathew to see the
community psychiatric nurse with a view to future appointments with a
psychiatrist and a psychologist and for a full range of blood tests to be
carried out.

When asked by the coroner whether he had any concerns about
Mathew’s behaviour, Dr Macmorland said: ‘No, I did not. He was looking forward
to his new life in Gloucester. He looked relaxed and talked freely and
openly.’

In a statement read to the inquest, Mrs Brown said her son had
passed the first year of an electrical apprenticeship with distinction. When she
saw him over the August Bank Holiday weekend, he ‘seemed really
settled.’

Witness Michael Swan said he had known Mathew since he was 15
and became very close describing him as his family’s ‘surrogate son.’

Mr
Swan, of Tern Gardens, Plympton, Plymouth, said he noticed a change in Mathew’s
behaviour from early in 2008.

He became more distant, was fidgety and
restless and would fall asleep suddenly. Mr Swan said he also witnessed Mathew
suffer a panic attack in a bank queue.

He said Mathew also became
disillusioned with his work that he had previously loved, and had various
run-ins with colleagues.

This, said Mr Swan, was totally out of
character.

His father, Andrew, told the inquest he left Mathew watching
television at around 10.30pm on Saturday, September 13. They had enjoyed a
family trip to the onion fayre and later they had shared a bottle of wine over
dinner.

The next morning Mr Burrows found his son lying face down on his
bed under the duvet.

He was cold and when he tried to rouse him, there
was no movement or reaction. Mathew was later pronounced dead by
paramedics.

He was such a happy-go-lucky guy. He never demonstrated any
behaviour that would lead him to anything like that,” said Mr
Burrows.

Consultant forensic toxicologist Dr Simon Elliott told the
inquest that analysis of lung, brain and blood tissue revealed the presence of
butane and propane gases used as propellants in aerosol cans and cigarette
lighters.

Dr Elliott said investigation of blood and urine samples
revealed levels of alcohol above the legal drink-drive limit but way below any
fatal concentrations, and the presence of anti-depressant drug fluoextine that
fell within the range that could lead to fatal consequences in some
circumstances.

Dr John McCarthy, a consultant pathologist, said post
mortem examinations revealed that Mr Burrows had been suffering with Hashimoto’s
Thyroiditis, a condition that might simulate the symptoms of a depressive
illness.

Earlier, the inquest had heard from thyroid disease expert Dr
Edward Coombes who said such a condition could make a sufferer at risk of heart
failure.

Dr McCarthy said after studying the toxicology reports it was
more likely than not that the inhalation of butane and propane caused a sudden
cardiac arrest.

The coroner, giving his verdict, said the primary care
Mathew had received in Plymouth and Gloucester was of a high standard and there
had been no diagnostic reason for his thyroid problem to have been
spotted.

Mr Crickmore said the amount of relatively safe anti-depressants
at the lower end of the toxicity scale were not the direct cause of death nor
was the alcohol in his system.

He said that on the balance of
probabilities, it was likely that Mathew inhaled sufficient amounts of butane
and propane to get into his system and he accepted Dr Coombes point that his
heart, sensitised by the thyroiditis, put him at more risk.

Verdict:
Accidental.

416 total views, no views today

ANTIDEPRESSANT: Murder: Man Kills Mother & His Own Daughter – Michigan

Third paragraph from the end reads:  “Donna Vanniekerk told Defense Attorney Lesley Kranenberg that her husband  ‘used to be kind and loving but he turned mean and vindictive’  after his father died in 2004. She said he had been seeing a therapist and taking medication for depression.

Paragraph five reads:  “Vanniekerk was found in a bed in the motel and arrested and now is charged with two counts of open murder. He listened Thursday as the first witnesses testified in his preliminary examination before Calhoun County District Court Judge John Holmes. Testimony will continue in September when a pathologist is expected to testify that Brenda Vanniekerk and her granddaughter Laura Vanniekerk died from an overdose of medication.”

http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com/article/20090807/NEWS01/908070314/1002/NEWS01/Wife-testifies-against-man-in-slayings

Wife testifies against man in slayings

Trace Christenson • The Enquirer • August 7, 2009

As Johan Vanniekerk straddled his wife, hitting and choking her, she told him she couldn’t breathe.Advertisement

“I know,” Donna Vanniekerk remembers him saying, “because I am going to kill you tonight.”

“I started screaming and he started strangling me harder. He said, ‘Don’t worry about the girls. When I am done killing you, I am going to kill them, too.”

Johan Vanniekerk didn’t kill anyone that night, April 30, but the 41-year-old Fort Wayne, Ind., man is charged with the May 1 death of his mother, 72, and his daughter, 3, in a Marshall motel. Investigators have alleged that Vanniekerk assaulted his wife in their Fort Wayne apartment and then the next day drove his mother and daughter to Marshall, where they were killed in a motel room.

Vanniekerk was found in a bed in the motel and arrested and now is charged with two counts of open murder. He listened Thursday as the first witnesses testified in his preliminary examination before Calhoun County District Court Judge John Holmes. Testimony will continue in September when a pathologist is expected to testify that Brenda Vanniekerk and her granddaughter Laura Vanniekerk died from an overdose of medication.

Donna Vanniekerk said she and her husband had been married 12 years but the relationship had soured and the couple separated because of his depression.

On the night of April 30, she said her husband entered their apartment a few minutes after a male co-worker, who was repairing some computers, had left.

“He took me down the hall and he put me on the bed,” Donna Vanniekerk told Prosecutor Susan Mladenoff. “He climbed on top of me and started hitting me and strangling me.”

A few minutes later the assault stopped and she said her husband made her promise he could move back with her and their three daughters and they would be together. She said she decided to act normally “because I thought I was dead and he was going to kill me and the girls.”

The next morning she prepared to go to work, took Laura to the apartment of her mother-in-law Brenda Vanniekerk, who provided child care, and then took the two older girls to school. There, an administrator called police and later Johan Vanniekerk realized the authorities were involved.
(2 of 2)

The couple exchanged some phone calls and text messages but when Donna Vanniekerk and the police went to Brenda Vanniekerk’s apartment, they found she and her granddaughter were gone.

At 4:15 p.m. that Friday, Donna Vanniekerk received a text message from her husband which said “we have reached the point of no return,” and then another which said “this is all your fault, you have no one to blame but yourself.”

She continued to call her husband and, when he finally answered, she asked about her mother-in-law.

“She is already dead,” she said her husband replied.

And when Donna Vanniekerk asked about Laura, her daughter, he said, “she is dead, too.”

“I started screaming and said she is my baby. He said, ‘not anymore,’ and hung up.”

Donna Vanniekerk told Defense Attorney Lesley Kranenberg that her husband “used to be kind and loving but he turned mean and vindictive” after his father died in 2004. She said he had been seeing a therapist and taking medication for depression.

Marshall Patrol Officer Andrew Groeneveld testified he was one of several officers to enter two rooms rented by Vanniekerk at the Comfort Inn in Marshall.

Groeneveld said in the room he entered shortly after 5:30 p.m., they found Vanniekerk on one bed, with labored breathing, and the child already dead on another bed.

Trace Christenson can be reached at 966-0685 or tchrist@battlecr.gannett .

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