Baum, Hedlund, Aristei, Guilford & Schiavo vs. Glaxo Smithkline Corporation

Baum, Hedlund, Aristei, Guilford & Schiavo vs. Glaxo Smithkline Corporation

Suit: Antidepressant is Addictive

A lawsuit contends the manufacturer of the popular anti-depressant Paxil concealed evidence that the drug can be addictive

Baum, Hedlund, Aristei, Guilford & Schiavo vs. Glaxo Smithkline Corporation

8/25/2001

Suit: Antidepressant is Addictive

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/htx/ap/20010825/us/paxil_suit_1.html

To learn more, go to http://www.baumhedlundlaw.com

A lawsuit contends the manufacturer of the popular anti-depressant Paxil concealed evidence that the drug can be addictive.

The lawsuit was filed Friday on behalf of 35 people from around the country who say they suffered symptoms ranging from electric-like shocks to suicidal thoughts after discontinuing use of the drug.

The lawsuit, which seeks class-action status and unspecified damages, says GlaxoSmithkline PLC concealed the possibility of physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms from the drug. It alleges fraud, deceit, negligence, liability, and breach of warranty.

There was no immediate comment from the British-based company. Calls to its U.S. offices after business hours Friday were not returned.

Introduced on the U.S. market in 1992, Paxil is the country’s second-largest selling anti-depressant.

Paul Domb, 42, of Miami, said that after he stopped taking Paxil last year, he suffered from convulsions, night sweats, and suicidal thoughts for about six weeks.

He said he thought the problems had to do with recent heart surgery, but after researching his symptoms he concluded they were caused by his withdrawal from Paxil.

“I stopped taking this drug … and it destroyed me. It almost killed me,” he said.

In June, a Wyoming jury awarded $8 million in damages to the family of a man after determining that Paxil caused him to kill his wife, daughter and granddaughter before committing suicide.

644 total views, 1 views today

Paxil Prescribed for Fatigue

“I can remember it being hard to feel a smile.”

Hello,

My name is Barton Mahoney. Thank you for this forum. It represents an opportunity to know that others understand what I experienced with the drug Paxil.

Bad, bad, bad for Bart! It has been a lonely experience in explaining the affects this intrusive drug has had in my life. I am one of those people that this drug was not designed for, doing it only by a doctor’s order. If I only knew what was in store for me, assuredly it would never have happened. It was prescribed not so much for depression as to help with an extreme case of fatigue. Depression and fatigue can appear hand-in-hand when working 80+ hour workweeks in construction. As an energetic and conscientious building contractor this is now my previous occupation.

Paxil, smaxil, serotonin, shmerotonin. I had no idea of what these were or what they would mean, before it was too late. They prescribed it with Xanax, another wonder drug. Within the first week I was complaining to my doctor about the effect it was having on me. I was told my condition was consistent with the early affects of the drug. It was recommended to continue the medication for the 4-6 week incubation period when the Paxil would then become balanced with my system.

This never happened. I stopped the Xanax within months. My personality and character changed so dramatically that I left the construction trades, lost the respect of my family, along with every ounce of self-esteem that I had within a very short time. I can remember it being hard to feel a smile. It was the major contributing factor to the demise of a life once enjoyed, leading to the perils of a drug user. I wish this on no person. The scary part is that this was considered a legal practice.

I was hospitalized on several occasions during the first year. Each time was the result of collapsing on the floor or when lying down and not being able to get up. I would just lay there not able to move or with a feeling of not wanting to move. It is difficult to explain. If helped by a person and moved very slowly they could get me to my feet, only to immediately collapse again. Three times at home, Twice while at hotels, once on an airplane. That time they had to hold the flight I was on from taking off. It took better than a half an hour to retrieve me from the bathroom. Two very helpful Texas police officers saw our way to a hospital. I was treated in the emergency room but they wanted to take blood. With a phobia about shots plus being through this experience before I felt to have a better answer for my treatment. They did not understand that I just wanted to lie there and that I would be fine in a little while. I tried explaining my condition at the hospital and asked if they would please call my doctor. They did not make the call and released me because I refused treatment by not letting them stick needles in me. I took a later flight home and told myself that this was it. I had to get off this drug.

I was in the care of my doctor this entire period from September 1997 until November 1999. What is interesting was how the medical clinic provided me with prescriptions of Paxil even after I had lost my insurance (I lost everything but that’s not the point). My thinking was that they are giving me the medication because they know something may go wrong if I stopped taking it. Something was adrift for them to give me the medication for free. It appears I am discovering that they did know once this drug had taken its place in my system that it was a very long process to wean a person off the drug. Plus there was a possibility that I may not be stable enough for those around me. There was nothing about this on the drug description at the time, only to say do not stop medication without consulting your doctor. I did and was told to very slowly reduce the dosage until I could handle life without it. It took over a year to free myself from this consummate condition.

It has been a year and a half since my final battle with the drug. The final no-more-Paxil period lasted for about three weeks. No different than any other episode during this treatment, if I stopped or slowed down the medication I would lose my motor skills or would lose my will to use them. Slowly perking-up I am happy to say that now without this drug in my system and because of a very supporting family; I am back to my old self and am finding life enjoyable once again. The further life distances itself from the history of this period the better off I will be. Occasionally, I still have strange twinges at the base of my neck and I now shake when doing something tedious with my hands. I had always prided myself in the steadiness of intricate tasks, but this is no more.

My memories of this period are also quite bothersome. I have spoken with three attorneys, one said his legal counsel doctor said I should have been able to stop cold-turkey with out having any problems. Right! A second said it appeared to be a class-action suit after a 20-20 television show about the anti-affects of anti-depressant medication. A third attorney said it would cost more than his firm could afford just in getting the case to trial.

I left it at that knowing that I was greatly improved and able by nature to fight my way back to a life. My wife and I were married at age 15 & 16 respectively. We have three wonderful adult children. For 31 years we have been through many tough times and this is now just another experience. I don’t want to think of where my life would be if I hadn’t fought through and separated myself from the clutches of Paxil. Even thinking through this letter helps with the healing process. I was compelled to write because it appears the truth is coming out. Previously, I actually thought I was going crazy and that nobody was listening, nor would they believe me. It was the loneliest feeling in the world.

I am saddened by the actions of those people under the influence of this
drug. To have done the things that they have hurts all of us. To an extent I can understand how they felt when performing these horrific acts. My prayers and thoughts go out to all that are affected. These are all very disturbing conditions that to some extent fall on the shoulders of those that offer these treatments and to those who manufacturer the drugs that they prescribe. It is a dangerous business. These drugs which are administered do have an affect. I can claim adverse reactions if the person is not designed for treatment in such a manner. We all deserve more information, especially when it comes to a drug that effects our central nervous system.

For those who have had or are having similar experiences, you are not alone nor are you crazy. If you are thinking about taking an anti-depressant, discuss all possibilities with your doctor. If the medication is helping you, then you are lucky. I might still be enjoying a life once stable. Hopefully I will continue to overcome and in time will be fully restored. As I get older it will be interesting to see whether I will ever chance taking any medication. Never again do I want to go through this experience no matter what my condition may be. I would rather go natural.

Thank you for hearing my voice. Now that I have written this brief letter about my experience, I hope it will help others understand the dangers of drugs not meant for the masses. Still it hurts to the center of my soul when considering these possibilities. I have experienced Paxil. Communication is our strength and it should be critically applied with matters of health. Manufacturers, doctors and patients must have all possible information before making life-altering decisions. I signed no waivers in regards to potential side-affects which excuses my ignorance. Luckily I was strong enough to help myself. Woe to those who are not so lucky, you are at the mercy of questionable practices by those we should be able to trust.

Barton Mahoney

 

8/17/2001

This is Survivor Story number 25.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

298 total views, 1 views today

Coming Off Paxil—the Hard Way

“…I told him I was going to just end it all and kill myself.”

 

I was prescribed Paxil by a walk in clinic doctor. During the first week nothing seemed real, and I wasn’t able to express my emotions. Everything was calm and ethereal.

I was going through a very hard time with my boyfriend and breaking up. By the 3rd week, I was in a level fog, unable to get too upset or too happy. All I wanted to do was sit down and read or sleep. I didn’t want to take a shower or get out of bed. I’m normally a very motivated person but I just didn’t care anymore. I couldn’t follow conversations and didn’t really want people to talk around me; I just wanted to sit quietly.

It’s now been one month and I am trying to wean myself off Paxil. I was on 50 mg a day, which I am now understanding is a high dose. I was also taking Klonopin at night. I started skipping my Paxil every other day, and then chopped a few in half. I have terrible headaches, where I literally have to hold my head in hands; it feels like it will rip open. Every time I cough or move my head it hurts and spins. I have had diarrhea for 2 days now. I sweat constantly and my body hurts like when you have the flu. My fingers and toes have tingles and dead spots. I went to my boyfriend’s the other night and told him I was going to just end it all and kill myself.

I honestly felt like it was the right logical answer. I have all these feelings of despair. I can’t seem to think straight. I finally began writing in my diary trying to tell myself it was just the Paxil. I found several websites addressing these problems with Paxil and I feel better. I am 27 years old, and I don’t want to end up a cliche…I am going to keep weaning myself off this drug and begin exercising and eating healthy, to get it out of my system. Now that I know all these weird thoughts aren’t me…just the Paxil. I am going to be brave and make it thru.

NOTE FROM ANN BLAKE-TRACY: This is why this is the wrong way to come off these drugs! The roller coaster effect in one’s mood swings of taking the drug every other day is horrendous! It is so important to know to wean VERY gradually off these medications and once again I would recommend my hour and a half long tape detailing how to do this without these horrible reactions.

(800-280-0730)

 

8/9/2001

This is Survivor Story number 20.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

561 total views, 2 views today

A Nurse's Nightmare on Xanax and Paxil

“In just 3 days I began going crazy.”

 

I’m a 31 year old female (and a registered nurse) I have 2 young children, recently I went through a lot of loss in my life. My mother in law battling her second brain tumor, and I cared for my grand father in his home until his death. During this time I became very anxious and started having some neurological symptoms of twitching and fatigue. My physician suggested I get to see a neurologist to rule out MS. That was the day I had my first panic attack (seems mild to me now.)

I then realized I could not see a neurologist for over 2 months. The anxiety intensified, my MD prescribed Xanax and Paxil. The first day I only required a 1/2 of a .25mg of Xanax. but by day 3 on Paxil I was taking 2 whole tabs of Xanax with no relief. In just 3 days I began going crazy. I had my husband take me to the hospital. I was not sleeping, eating, I was very dizzy. I had tingling, burning, numbness all over my body, headaches, and strange tremors and electrical sensations. Many of these symptoms mimic the symptoms of MS.

I went through the whole battery of tests, all negative. It was not until day 7 of Paxil that I realized that the majority of my symptoms were directly related to the Paxil. I weaned myself over 3 days, (only on it for 7 days before) It has only been 8 days now, I am feeling about 50% better. Every morning I wake up and go for my morning walk (3 miles) It takes so much out of me, but I know it is important. When I come home I have to prepare myself for the long day of taking care of my children. I am trying to stay busy and surround myself with a lot of very supportive people. At this point my three biggest complaints are dizziness, extreme fatigue, and inability to sleep. I just wanted to know if my story sounds familiar, (I had no mental health history before 3 weeks ago!) I just have to keep thinking that I will be better someday. Thanks for your support. My love and prayers to all of you suffering.

Jenny
nikdelicious@hotmail.com

8/6/2001

This is Survivor Story number 27.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

532 total views, 1 views today

Xanax and Paxil—a Life-Altering Combination

“The scary part is that this was considered a legal practice.”

 

Hello,

My name is Barton Mahoney. Thank you for this forum. It represents an opportunity to know that others understand what I experienced with the drug Paxil.

Bad, bad, bad for Bart! It has been a lonely experience in explaining the affects this intrusive drug has had in my life. I am one of those people that this drug was not designed for, doing it only by a doctor’s order. If I only knew what was in store for me, assuredly it would never have happened. It was prescribed not so much for depression as to help with an extreme case of fatigue. Depression and fatigue can appear hand-in-hand when working 80+ hour workweeks in construction. As an energetic and conscientious building contractor this is now my previous occupation.

Paxil, smaxil, serotonin, shmeritonin. I had no idea of what these were or what they would mean, before it was too late. They prescribed it with Xanax, another wonder drug. Within the first week I was complaining to my doctor about the effect it was having on me. I was told my condition was consistent with the early affects of the drug. It was recommended to continue the medication for the 4-6 week incubation period when the Paxil would then become balanced with my system.

This never happened. I stopped the Xanax within months. My personality and character changed so dramatically that I left the construction trades, lost the respect of my family, along with every ounce of self-esteem that I had within a very short time. I can remember it being hard to feel a smile. It was the major contributing factor to the demise of a life once enjoyed, leading to the perils of a drug user. I wish this on no person. The scary part is that this was considered a legal practice.

I was hospitalized on several occasions during the first year. Each time was the result of collapsing on the floor or when lying down and not being able to get up. I would just lay there not able to move or with a feeling of not wanting to move. It is difficult to explain. If helped by a person and moved very slowly they could get me to my feet, only to immediately collapse again. Three times at home, Twice while at hotels, once on an airplane. That time they had to hold the flight I was on from taking off. It took better than a half an hour to retrieve me from the bathroom. Two very helpful Texas police officers saw our way to a hospital. I was treated in the emergency room but they wanted to take blood. With a phobia about shots plus being through this experience before I felt to have a better answer for my treatment. They did not understand that I just wanted to lie there and that I would be fine in a little while. I tried explaining my condition at the hospital and asked if they would please call my doctor. They did not make the call and released me because I refused treatment by not letting them stick needles in me. I took a later flight home and told myself that this was it. I had to get off this drug.

I was in the care of my doctor this entire period from September 1997 until November 1999. What is interesting was how the medical clinic provided me with prescriptions of Paxil even after I had lost my insurance (I lost everything but that’s not the point). My thinking was that they are giving me the medication because they know something may go wrong if I stopped taking it. Something was adrift for them to give me the medication for free. It appears I am discovering that they did know once this drug had taken its place in my system that it was a very long process to wean a person off the drug. Plus there was a possibility that I may not be stable enough for those around me. There was nothing about this on the drug description at the time, only to say do not stop medication without consulting your doctor. I did and was told to very slowly reduce the dosage until I could handle life without it.

It took over a year to free myself from this consummate condition. It has been a year and a half since my final battle with the drug. The final no-more-Paxil period lasted for about three weeks. No different than any other episode during this treatment, if I stopped or slowed down the medication I would lose my motor skills or would lose my will to use them. Slowly perking-up I am happy to say that now without this drug in my system and because of a very supporting family; I am back to my old self and am finding life enjoyable once again. The further life distances itself from the history of this period the better off I will be. Occasionally, I still have strange twinges at the base of my neck and I now shake when doing something tedious with my hands. I had always prided myself in the steadiness of intricate tasks, but this is no more.

My memories of this period are also quite bothersome. I have spoken with three attorneys, one said his legal counsel doctor said I should have been able to stop cold turkey with out having any problems. Right! A second said it appeared to be a class-action suit after a 20-20 television show about the anti-affects of anti-depressant medication. A third attorney said it would cost more than his firm could afford just in getting the case to trial. I left it at that knowing that I was greatly improved and able by nature to fight my way back to a life.

My wife and I were married at age 15 & 16 respectively. We have three wonderful adult children. For 31 years we have been through many tough times and this is now just another experience. I don’t want to think of where my life would be if I hadn’t fought through and separated myself from the clutches of Paxil. Even thinking through this letter helps with the healing process. I was compelled to write because it appears the truth is coming out. Previously, I actually thought I was going crazy and that nobody was listening, nor would they believe me. It was the loneliest feeling in the world.

I am saddened by the actions of those people under the influence of this drug. To have done the things that they have hurts all of us. To an extent I can understand how they felt when performing these horrific acts.

My prayers and thoughts go out to all that are affected. These are all very disturbing conditions that to some extent fall on the shoulders of those that offer these treatments and to those who manufacturer the drugs that they prescribe. It is a dangerous business. These drugs which are administered do have an affect. I can claim adverse reactions if the person is not designed for treatment in such a manner. We all deserve more information, especially when it comes to a drug that effects our central nervous system. For those who have had or are having similar experiences, you are not alone nor are you crazy.

If you are thinking about taking an anti-depressant, discuss all possibilities with your doctor. If the medication is helping you, then you are lucky. I might still be enjoying a life once stable. Hopefully I will continue to overcome and in time will be fully restored. As I get older it will be interesting to see whether I will ever chance taking any medication. Never again do I want to go through this experience no matter what my condition may be. I would rather go natural.

Thank you for hearing my voice. Now that I have written this brief letter about my experience, I hope it will help others understand the dangers of drugs not meant for the masses. Still it hurts to the center of my soul when considering these possibilities. I have experienced Paxil. Communication is our strength and it should be critically applied with matters of health. Manufacturers, doctors and patients must have all possible information before making life-altering decisions.

I signed no waivers in regards to potential side-affects, which excuses my ignorance. Luckily I was strong enough to help myself. Woe to those who are not so lucky, you are at the mercy of questionable practices by those we should be able to trust.

On the Mend

 

8/6/2001

This is Survivor Story number 19.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

422 total views, 1 views today

Paxil-A Dangerous Prescription for PMS

“It shocked me that she would prescribe a medication with such severe withdrawal symptoms to be taken every two weeks on rotation.”

 

I am a registered nurse who has always been very leery of doctors since I work with them every day. I recently moved to a new state and needed to find a gynecologist. I always like to “test” my doctors on the first visit to see how quickly they will try to write me a prescription for something. This new doctor failed my “test” miserably. I have severe pms- heavy bleeding, cramps, and bad mood swings. Of course, I informed the doctor of this when she asked me about my periods. She immediately informed me that I had PMDD and needed to be on Paxil for it. She wanted me to take Paxil starting on day 14 of my cycle and then stop taking it on the first day of my period. She also told me that I needed to be on birth control pills despite the fact that I am overweight and smoke a pack of cigarettes a day. (Smoking is known to significantly increase the risk of blood clots, strokes and heart attacks while on the pill.)

Anyway…. I immediately got on the web when I got home to look up Paxil. I am an ICU nurse, and most of our patient’s are unconscious so they don’t usually get antidepressant meds, and I knew nothing about them. I was outraged at what I found out in less than one hour!!! It shocked me that she would prescribe a medication with such severe withdrawal symptoms to be taken every two weeks on rotation. Imagine the state I would have been in had I attempted that!!! I probably would have lost my nursing license for acting crazy or something.

The point I am trying to make here is that these doctors are either handing out these meds without knowing the side effects, or they do know the side effects and just do not care. (Kickbacks from drug reps perhaps?)

I have not yet had the chance to confront this doctor. I may not be able to confront her for fear of losing my job. (The town I live in has two main employers– a huge university medical center where I work, and a drug manufacturing plant.)

Not everyone is as lucky as I am to be wary of medications. Please people; let’s get out of the 1950’s. Doctors are not Gods, and they certainly do not always care about their patients. We do not have to do their bidding just because they supposedly know the secrets workings of our bodies. Trust me when I say this, I work with doctors fresh out of medical school. They are spoon fed by the nurses.

Please save yourselves the horror of overmedication. Never ever fill a prescription until you first research it on your own. And, do not do not do not use pharmacists or other doctors for your research. Who do you think pays pharmacy school and med school scholarship programs????— Drug companies, and other big medical businesses with a vested interest in new drugs being handed out to the blind masses like candy.

Sorry this was so long, but I had to get the word out to people.

A Registered Nurse

 

7/24/2001 2001

This is Survivor Story number 15.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

427 total views, 1 views today

The Wrong Way to Withdraw from Paxil

“Now that I know all these weird thoughts aren’t me…just the Paxil.”

 

I was prescribed Paxil by a walk in clinic Dr. During the first week nothing seemed real and I wasn’t able to express my emotions. Everything was calm and ethereal. I was going through a very hard time with my boyfriend and breaking up. By the 3rd week, I was in a level fog, unable to get too upset or too happy. All I wanted to do was sit down and read or sleep. I didn’t want to take a shower or get out of bed. I’m normally a very motivated person but I just didn’t care anymore. I couldn’t follow conversations and didn’t really want people to talk around me, I just wanted to sit quietly.

It’s now been one month and I am trying to wean myself off Paxil. I was on 50 mg a day, which I am now understanding is a high dose. I was also taking Klonopin at night. I started skipping my Paxil every other day, and then chopped a few in half. I have terrible headaches, where I literally have to hold my head in hands, it feels like it will rip open. Every time I cough or move my head it hurts and spins. I have had diarrhea for 2 days now. I sweat constantly and my body hurts like when you have the flu. My fingers and toes have tingles and dead spots. I went to my boyfriends the other night and told him I was going to just end it all and kill myself. I honestly felt like it was the right logical answer. I have all these feelings of despair.

I cant seem to think straight. I finally began writing in my diary trying to tell myself it was just the Paxil. I found several websites addressing these problems with Paxil and I feel better. I am 27 years old, and I don’t want to end up a cliche. I am going to keep weaning myself off this drug and begin exercising and eating healthy, to get it out of my system. Now that I know all these weird thoughts aren’t me…just the Paxil. I am going to be brave and make it through.

NOTE FROM DR. TRACY: This is why this is the wrong way to come off these drugs! The roller coaster effect in one’s mood swings of taking the drug every other day is horrendous! It is so important to know to wean VERY gradually off these medications and once again I would recommend my hour and a half long tape detailing how to do this without these horrible reactions. (800-280-0730)

7/16/2001

This is Survivor Story number 26.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

290 total views, 1 views today

5/01/2001 – World Health Organization – SSRI Addiction

“A league table of withdrawal and dependency side-effects, published by the
WHO, shows that drugs including Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil] have produced far
more complaints from patients than old-fashioned tranquillisers . . . SSRIs
(selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), including Prozac, are more
addictive than tranquillisers such as Valium.”

Yesterday, in several major newspapers Lilly placed full page ads offering a
coupon for a month of free Prozac. Do you think they warned the consumer in
those ads that these free pills were addictive? Because so few doctors are
aware of this withdrawal and do not know how to withdraw patients from SSRIs,
after the month on the “free” pills the patient would have to continue to
purchase the drug until they could find my tape on how to get off Prozac
safely.

If you had told me ten years ago, shortly after I began researching the SSRIs
and dealing with patients going through horrific withdrawal from Prozac, that
it would take TEN years for the World Health Organization to finally see what
I was seeing, I would not have believed it. It was so obvious! But I have
waited and waited and waited as I have warned and warned and warned of this
addiction and withdrawal and finally today we see the WHO admit it.

At least the WHO have warned the public now, but where is the FDA? Will they
finally at least admit this much about SSRIs? All of these organizations that
society thinks are there to protect them – where were they as millions
suffered needlessly? How many times do we need to see this repeated with one
drug after another before we realize that there is no protection to the
consumer via these agencies? Obviously “buyer beware” most definitely applies
in this arena of prescription drug use. This is why I feel it is so important
to educate the public about these drugs.

You can mark my words when I say that this is only one of MANY more
admissions that will continue to come confirming all the warnings that I gave
in my book about the SSRI antidepressants, Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org and author of
Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? ()

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health/story.jsp?story=69366

01 May 2001
Home > News > UK > Health

World health watchdog warns of addiction risk for Prozac users

By Robert Mendick

29 April 2001

Prozac, billed for years as a harmless wonder drug, often creates more
problems than the depression it is supposed to be treating, warns the head of
the World Health Organisation’s unit monitoring drug side-effects.

Professor Ralph Edwards says Prozac and drugs similar to it are
overprescribed. A league table of withdrawal and dependency side-effects,
published by the WHO, shows that drugs including Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil]
have produced far more complaints from patients than old-fashioned
tranquillisers prescribed by doctors in the 1970s. Campaigners say this
proves that the drugs called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors),
including Prozac, are more addictive than tranquillisers such as Valium.

“SSRIs are probably over-used,” says Professor Edwards. “They are used for
relatively minor psychiatric problems, and the issue of dependence and
withdrawal has become much more serious. You risk creating a greater problem.
For serious psychiatric problems, it is worth the risk. But if you are just
tired or going through a bad patch, well, people get over that without
medication.”

A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, makers of Prozac, accepted there are potential
side-effects including head-aches, dizziness, sleeplessness and nausea but
added: “The benefits of Prozac far outweigh the downsides. Extensive
scientific and medical experience has demonstrated that Prozac is a safe,
effective antidepressant that is well-tolerated by most patients.”

Prozac has been taken by an estimated 35 million people worldwide since its
launch a decade ago. But the reputation of SSRIs as wonder drugs is being
questioned. Research by Dr David Healy, at the University of Wales, appeared
to show that two people in a trial group of 20 became violent after taking an
SSRI.

Dr Healy’s research may be presented as evidence in a High Court case being
brought by the family of Reginald Payne, a retired teacher who was taking
Prozac when he killed his wife then jumped off a cliff. The family is suing
Eli Lilly, claiming negligence and saying the pharmaceutical firm failed to
warn Mr Payne of side-effects, which they say include suicidal and violent
behaviour.

The experiences of Ramo Kabbani on Prozac prompted her to set up the Prozac
Survivors Support Group. In two years, it has taken 2,000 calls. Ms Kabbani
claims SSRI withdrawal causes side-effects ranging from flu-like symptoms
such as dizziness and aching muscles to suicidal tendencies. She began taking
Prozac to combat depression after the death of her 27-year-old fiance from a
heart attack.

“The medication stopped me working through the feelings of grief which had
caused the depression.” she says. “When I came off Prozac I became
super-sensitive and very emotional. I found it worse going through withdrawal
than going through the depression.”

Council for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction 0151 949 0102; Prozac
Survivors Support Group 0161 682 3296.

829 total views, 1 views today

4/18/2001 – Paxil Is Approved for Anxiety Disorder?!

Incredible! The FDA continues to undermine the health and safety of America
with this latest approval – as if doctors had ever noticed that Paxil was NOT
approved for anxiety before this. They have been handing it out like candy
for any and everything they can think of for years.

What is so disconcerting about this is that anxiety can be caused by two
disorders in particular – low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or seizure activity.
Paxil can trigger both hypoglycemia and seizures. So, if a doctor does not
check to see if the patient is suffering from either of those disorders (and
that is hard to do in the three minutes it has been reported that it usually
takes for a doctor to recommend one of these SSRIs), the Paxil could throw
the patient into serious blood sugar problems or seizures.

Did the FDA consider any of that information before this approval?
Considering the number of drugs pulled from the market in the last few years,
chances are slim that they did.

So now many more ethical doctors who were not handing out Paxil for anxiety
before will feel that with the FDA’s approval they can do so without worry.
No one has warned them that the patient will be lucky to live through the
horrific withdrawal though. As Dr. Nancy Snyderman pointed out in the 20/20
special last August, it may take patients up to a year to get off this drug
safely. (Something I have been saying for years.)

Once again we have the FDA to thank. Isn’t it long past time for them to be
sued for the lives being lost to their incompetence? I guess I just see too
many families wiped out in murder/suicides and too many mothers killing their
children and too many school shootings and workplace violence incidences
induced by Paxil to be patient any longer about this.

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/17/business/17GLAX.html?searchpv=nytToday

April 17, 2001

Paxil Is Approved for Anxiety Disorder

By BLOOMBERG NEWS

WASHINGTON, April 16 (Bloomberg News) — Glaxo- SmithKline P.L.C. has won the
Food and Drug Administration’s approval to market its antidepressant Paxil
for treating general anxiety disorder, a new use for the drug.

That makes Paxil the first drug in its class to be approved for the
condition, which affects about 10 million Americans and involves excessive,
often debilitating worrying, the company said today.

“Generalized anxiety disorder can paralyze sufferers with uncontrollable
worry, devastating people’s lives,” said Jack Gorman, a professor in the
department of psychiatry at Columbia University. “Paxil provides a new
alternative to help sufferers regain control over their lives.”

Paxil is already approved for treating depression, obsessive- compulsive
disorder, social phobia and panic disorder. With sales of $2.4 billion, Paxil
was the world’s seventh top-selling drug in 2000, according to figures
compiled by the prescription drug tracker IMS Health Inc.

New indications are important to the company’s efforts to defend Paxil, which
belongs to same class as Eli Lilly’s Prozac, against generic competitors.

In a different class of medicines, two antidepressants, Effexor from American
Home Products and Buspar from Bristol-Myers Squibb, are also approved to
treat general anxiety disorder.

537 total views, 1 views today

3/30/2001 – LSD to Prozac and back to LSD?!

In the last half century we have witnessed Eli Lilly bring America LSD and
then Prozac. Now that the public has been brainwashed about the “benefits” of
Prozac and its clones, it is time to once again attempt to sell us on LSD.
After admitting in this article the truth of the argument I have made for ten
years against the SSRI antidepressants – they work like LSD in the brain (”
Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.”) they now work to sell us on the
“benefits” of LSD. After all, if we can as a society have given similar drugs
– the SSRIs – such a warm welcome, we must now be ready to accept LSD, the
CIA’s drug of choice for a mind control experimentation, with welcome arms as
well.

Has the world gone completely mad?! Obviously! We now have the National
Institute on Drug Abuse encouraging us to use a drug, already declared
dangerous and of no medical use, when they are suppose to educate us on the
dangers of it. Perhaps the name of the institute should be changed to the
National Institute for Production of Drug Abuse. At this point it would
certainly be more appropriate. Clearly they are counting on their lack of
educating the public about drugs to have produced enough public ignorance of
drugs and their effects so as to allow them to get away with this one. As I
have said repeatedly, the drug companies count on our memory loss. They
expect us to forget within a generation our experience with a drug and then
pull the same drug on us again. They generally give it a new name, or a new
twist, but the more you learn about drugs, the more you realize that the
drugs remain the same.

Obviously on this one they are counting on mass stupidity among the general
population for its acceptance. I would hope that everyone of you is working
as hard as you can to educate all around you to the dangers of these drugs.
Time is of the essence! If you have not yet figured out that we are in a
battle for our lives, you have missed something. Our society as we have known
it and our future is at stake. The Brave New World is here. And with them
feeling so confident as to take such a bold and blatant step as this all that
can be said at this point is, “God help us all!”

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org

http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/hallucinogen010322.html

A computer-generated model of the LSD molecule. (Heffter Institute)

MedicalHallucinogens?

Researchers Studying Possible Medical Use of LSD, Peyote, Psilocybin

By Robin Eisner

N E W Y O R K, March 22 Could shrooms or LSD help the mentally ill?

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs
Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed
Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

At Harvard, a psychiatrist is studying whether the hallucinogenic cactus
peyote creates any long-term memory or attention problems in the American
Indians who take the drug as part of religious rituals.

A University of Arizona psychiatrist is poised to begin researching whether
taking the hallucinogen psilocybin under controlled circumstances may help
people suffering with obsessive compulsive disorder.

And another Harvard psychiatrist is in the beginning phases of designing a
protocol that may employ LSD or another hallucinogen to see if it helps
terminally ill people suffering from depression and pain.

With some support from the private New Mexico-based Heffter Institute, these
researchers, along with others in the United States and abroad, represent a
small movement of scientists looking at the possible medical benefits of
hallucinogens for some psychiatric conditions.

Hallucinogens Among Oldest Drugs

Hallucinogens are among the oldest known group of drugs that have been used
for their ability to alter human perception and mood, according to the Drug
Enforcement Agency. They have been used for medical, social and religious
practices.

More recently, synthetic hallucinogens have been used recreationally, with
hippies from the ’60s, such as the now deceased ex-Harvard psychology
professor Timothy Leary, first promoting their use with the famous slogan,
Turn on, Tune in, Drop Out.

Today, hallucinogens are deemed drugs of abuse by the DEA, with no known
medical benefit. Approximately 8 percent to 10 percent of high school
seniors tried a hallucinogen in the past year according to a University of
Michigan study of drug use.

It remains unclear how these drugs exert their action in the brain, but
anecdotal evidence and some earlier studies indicate they may help a variety
of psychiatric conditions, says David E. Nichols, founder of the Heffter
Institute, in Santa Fe, and professor of medical chemistry and molecular
pharmacology at Purdue School of Pharmacy in West Lafayette, Ind.

Nichols says there is some indication these drugs work on the serotonin
pathway in the brain, the same target of the selective serotonin reuptake
inhibitor drugs Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft, used to treat depression, anxiety
and obsessive compulsive disorder.

He founded the institute in 1993 to help give scientific credibility to
medical research on hallucinogens. After years of fund-raising, the
institute now has enough money to help scientists do serious research.

Trials Must Be Rigorously Designed

Since opinions are so strongly held about hallucinogens, it is essential
that any studies in this area be performed with the most rigorous modern
methods and great care to have an impartial approach, says Dr. Harrison
Pope, professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, who is leading the
four-year peyote study in American Indians.

Funded largely by the National Institute of Drug Abuse and Heffter, Popes
group will be comparing three populations of American Indians peyote users
in religious ceremonies, alcoholics, and local tribespeople to see if
peyote use is associated with cognitive problems.

Pope is also developing a trial to follow up on studies from the ’60s and
’70s suggesting that hallucinogens helped ease anxiety and depression in the
terminally ill and also reduced their need for pain medication.

The challenge is to design the study in such a way that if the drug shows
benefits, skeptics are convinced, and if it doesnt help, proponents of
hallucinogenic use dont challenge the research as inadequate, Pope says.

Psilocybin mushroom

These studies take time to develop to get that scientific imprimatur. They
also need to get review, by local medical institutions and governmental
regulatory authorities. The DEA and the FDA is still reviewing a protocol by
Dr. Francisco Moreno, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University
of Arizona in Tucson, hoping to study a chemically synthesized psilocybin
for obsessive-compulsives. His hospital gave him permission to start the
study.

A protocol of psilocybin and depression in Switzerland also is undergoing
revision before it is submitted to the government authorities there, Nichols
says.

Critics: Risks Outweigh Benefits

Some scientists, however, question the potential risks of these studies.

The problem with this kind of research is that when average people hear or
read about them in this preliminary stage they might think these drugs could
be good for them now, says Una McCann, associate professor of psychiatry at
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. But it remains unknown until the studies
are finished, McCann says.

Dr. Gregory Collins the director of the Alcohol and Drug Recovery program at
the Cleveland Clinic, in Cleveland, Ohio, believes the risks outweigh any
benefits.

Some of these drugs have been shown to have long-term consequences in
healthy people, Collins says. I would be reluctant to try them in the
mentally ill.

Nichols, however, defends the research. I think we will find some medical
benefit of these drugs, Nichols says. There is no other drug class that
doesnt have some medical utility.

616 total views, 2 views today