Effexor Prescribed for PMS

“PMS compared to this would be heavenly!”

I am 45 yr old mother of 4, working full time. I was prescribed Prozac 12 yrs ago , then was changed to Effexor 7 yrs ago and have not been able to stop. The withdrawal’s are too overwhelming and debilitating. Even the slightest reduction 1/8th, starts the withdrawal symptoms. I experience extreme crying spells, horrifying panic attacks, which has sent me to the emergency room, sweating and burning followed by shivering cold spells. I can’t sleep, work or even function . I was prescribed this drug to help with PMS. PMS compared to this would be heavenly! The drug companies need to be held responsible for their actions. I believe their greed became more important than the reason these drugs were developed, to help people. I am a Christian and firmly believe God’s Word, we shall reap what we sow. I would ask other believer’s to join me and pray that these drug companies would reap what they have sown. Destruction. I have not yet gone through ‘the eye of the needle’ withdrawal and freedom but I am believing god to go thru and I will follow. Our country messed up big time. Hopefully god will be merciful and get up through this!

Liz powers
swamee14@yahoo.com
Lpowers@hmacloan.com

 

368 total views, no views today

Paxil-A Dangerous Prescription for PMS

“It shocked me that she would prescribe a medication with such severe withdrawal symptoms to be taken every two weeks on rotation.”

 

I am a registered nurse who has always been very leery of doctors since I work with them every day. I recently moved to a new state and needed to find a gynecologist. I always like to “test” my doctors on the first visit to see how quickly they will try to write me a prescription for something. This new doctor failed my “test” miserably. I have severe pms- heavy bleeding, cramps, and bad mood swings. Of course, I informed the doctor of this when she asked me about my periods. She immediately informed me that I had PMDD and needed to be on Paxil for it. She wanted me to take Paxil starting on day 14 of my cycle and then stop taking it on the first day of my period. She also told me that I needed to be on birth control pills despite the fact that I am overweight and smoke a pack of cigarettes a day. (Smoking is known to significantly increase the risk of blood clots, strokes and heart attacks while on the pill.)

Anyway…. I immediately got on the web when I got home to look up Paxil. I am an ICU nurse, and most of our patient’s are unconscious so they don’t usually get antidepressant meds, and I knew nothing about them. I was outraged at what I found out in less than one hour!!! It shocked me that she would prescribe a medication with such severe withdrawal symptoms to be taken every two weeks on rotation. Imagine the state I would have been in had I attempted that!!! I probably would have lost my nursing license for acting crazy or something.

The point I am trying to make here is that these doctors are either handing out these meds without knowing the side effects, or they do know the side effects and just do not care. (Kickbacks from drug reps perhaps?)

I have not yet had the chance to confront this doctor. I may not be able to confront her for fear of losing my job. (The town I live in has two main employers– a huge university medical center where I work, and a drug manufacturing plant.)

Not everyone is as lucky as I am to be wary of medications. Please people; let’s get out of the 1950’s. Doctors are not Gods, and they certainly do not always care about their patients. We do not have to do their bidding just because they supposedly know the secrets workings of our bodies. Trust me when I say this, I work with doctors fresh out of medical school. They are spoon fed by the nurses.

Please save yourselves the horror of overmedication. Never ever fill a prescription until you first research it on your own. And, do not do not do not use pharmacists or other doctors for your research. Who do you think pays pharmacy school and med school scholarship programs????— Drug companies, and other big medical businesses with a vested interest in new drugs being handed out to the blind masses like candy.

Sorry this was so long, but I had to get the word out to people.

A Registered Nurse

 

7/24/2001 2001

This is Survivor Story number 15.
Total number of stories in current database is 34

465 total views, no views today

7/24/2000 – Prozac [Sarafem] and PMS – What’s in a name?

Once again we thank Vera Hassner Sharav, President, CIRCARE: Citizens for
Responsible Care & Research, a Human Rights organization, for passing on this
interesting commentary on Prozac’s name being changed to Sarafem for PMS. The
dangers of interaction leading to serotonin syndrome – a life threatening
complication of serotonergic medications – is most obvious in all of these
name changes.

Ann Blake-Tracy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://mentalhealth.about.com/health/mentalhealth/library/weekly/aa071700a.htm

Prozac and PMS – What’s in a name?
Leonard Holmes, Ph.D.

Drug companies are doing some interesting things to the names of their
products. The FDA recently approved the chemical fluoxetine for the treatment
of symptoms related to PMS – Premenstrual Syndrome (officially known as PMDD
– pre-menstrual dysphoric disorder). Fluoxetine is sold by Eli Lilly and
Company under the name Prozac. Will women with PMS be taking prescriptions
for Prozac to their pharmacist? Not likely. Lilly has decided to rename the
drug Sarafem when it is prescribed for this problem. Why the new name?
Lilly’s official position follows:

The additional trademark will help with educational efforts for this largely
underrecognized disorder while reducing confusion about the differences
between depression and PMDD. (Lilly Newsroom 7/00)

What about the confusion that is added by two different names for the same
chemical? What happens when a patient gets Prozac from one doctor and
Sarafem from another?

Prozac has a mixed reputation. While some have hailed it as the first in a
class of wonder drugs others have implicated it it in some cases of suicidal
behavior. There have never been any substantiated cases of suicidal behavior
traced to Prozac or any other antidepressant. Lilly has a response to these
rumors too:

Concerning media allegations of Prozac and suicide there is no credible
evidence that establishes a causal link between Prozac and violent or
suicidal behavior. In fact, in September 1991, a panel of experts appointed
by the FDA found no credible evidence of a causal link between the use of
antidepressant drugs, including Prozac, and suicidal or violent behavior.
(Lilly Newsroom quoted 7/00)

This is not the first time that a drug company has given a new name to the
same medication. In 1997 bupropion was approved for smoking cessation. This
medication, better known by the trade name Wellbutrin was re-christened Zyban
when used for smoking cessation. That’s why the Zyban ads warn you not to
take it if you are taking Wellbutrin. Not much fuss was made about this at
the time, but it seems to have started a trend.

Steve Cartun, M.D. did write to protest the renaming back in 1997. His logic
still rings true, and there is a great deal of irony in the example that he
used at the time. An excerpt:

New indications for old medications have become a staple of
psychopharmocology. Prozac, for example, originally introduced as an
antidepressant, has since garnered FDA approval for the treatment of
obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eli-Lilly, the company that manufactures and
holds the patent for Prozac, did not rename it’s product simply because it
had earned a new indication. Even though Prozac had been subjected to false
and damaging statements, Eli-Lilly chose not to fashion it in newer clothes.
The renaming of Wellbutrin by the same company that manufactures it, simply
because research studies show that it has a new and valuable use, gravely
concerns me….

The renaming of medications is a dangerous semantic. While a pharmaceutical
company can argue that a new name that gains wider use will ultimately help
the patient, I believe that such a measure treats physicians like naive
consumers who care more about a logo than the gritty science that logo
represents. Perhaps this is an alarming symptom of how trivialized the
importance of reality, at the expense of marketing, is becoming. Physicians
have already been renamed health care providers. Wellbutrin is now being
named Zyban for a new use. An industry insider once told me that the letter
“Z” is particularly useful for gaining audience attention. I hope that Zyban
gains all the attention it can to prevent this naming process from becoming a
trend. Enough misrepresentation. Convolution must be resisted. If it
continues, the meaning of health care will become even more lost than it is
now. (Cartun, 1997)

I’m afraid that Dr. Cartun’s hopes have not been realized. Lilly has renamed
Prozac to appeal to women with PMS who might otherwise shy away from the
medication. It’s hard enough to keep track of all of the different
medications out there. We shouldn’t have to keep track of multiple trade
names for the same medication from the same company.

Excerpt from a 1997 letter by Dr. Steve Cartun:

New indications for old medications have become a staple of
psychopharmocology. Prozac, for example, originally introduced as an
antidepressant, has since garnered FDA approval for the treatment of
obsessive-compulsive disorder. Eli-Lilly, the company that manufactures and
holds the patent for Prozac, did not rename it’s product simply because it
had earned a new indication. Even though Prozac had been subjected to false
and damaging statements, Eli-Lilly chose not to fashion it in newer clothes.
The renaming of Wellbutrin by the same company that manufactures it, simply
because research studies show that it has a new and valuable use, gravely
concerns me….

The renaming of medications is a dangerous semantic. While a pharmaceutical
company can argue that a new name that gains wider use will ultimately help
the patient, I believe that such a measure treats physicians like naive
consumers who care more about a logo than the gritty science that logo
represents. Perhaps this is an alarming symptom of how trivialized the
importance of reality, at the expense of marketing, is becoming. Physicians
have already been renamed health care providers. Wellbutrin is now being
named Zyban for a new use. An industry insider once told me that the letter
“Z” is particularly useful for gaining audience attention. I hope that Zyban
gains all the attention it can to prevent this naming process from becoming a
trend. Enough misrepresentation. Convolution must be resisted. If it
continues, the meaning of health care will become even more lost than it is
now. (Cartun, 1997)

641 total views, 0 views today