TRAZADONE: Update: 13 Dead in Washington DC Naval Yard Shooting

Aaron Alexis

Aaron Alexis

TRAZADONE: 13 Dead in Washington DC Naval Yard Shooting

This morning the New York Times released the fact that over the past month Aaron Alexis has been on the antidepressant, Trazadone (Desyrel), given to treat insomnia. (See quotes below.) Of course I am not finished asking questions. I want to know what he was on before this that may have induced his serious problems with insomnia. Was that yet another antidepressant? Was he in withdrawal from an antidepressant before the Trazadone which withdrawal can cause terrible insomnia and then magnify the reactions with another antidepressant added to that? How many times had he been on and off an antidepressant? Considering the way the military hands them out like candy and stops them abruptly … the options are endless. Considering also that he had quite a supply of the drug he could have attempted to overdose the night before in an impulsive suicide attempt. That can also be the case when it turns into a shooting like this because the brain toxicity seems to hit before the toxicity that would bring death.

“On Aug. 23, Mr. Alexis went to Veterans Affairs hospitals in Providence, where he had been working as a contractor, complaining of insomnia but did not say that he was hearing voices, according to a senior federal official. Mr. Alexis said he could not sleep for more than a few hours. Doctors there prescribed him an antidepressant pill commonly prescribed for insomnia, Trazodone, the official said.

“Five days later, Mr. Alexis went to a Veterans Affairs hospital in Washington, where he had traveled to work on a job at the navy yard. Mr. Alexis, who had not been given many Trazodone pills in Providence, said to the medical personnel in Washington that he was still having trouble sleeping and the doctors prescribed him more Trazodone, said the official.

“In that meeting, Mr. Alexis told the medical personnel that he was not using drugs, did not have suicidal thoughts, was not depressed or particularly anxious, and was not having nightmares, the official said.”

Keep in mind that Trazadone, also known as Desyrel, is the same antidepressant the Unibomber , Ted Kaczynski, was taking at the time of the bombings that killed three and seriously injured others. Considering the reports of Ted being in LSD experiments when he was younger, an antidepressant would have been an extremely poor choice for him since antidepressants are known to produce LSD flashbacks.

Original article: http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/18/us/washington-navy-yard-shootings.html?h=9AQEJbFie&s=1&pagewanted=all&_r=1&

The following is my original post that came out the day after the shooting:

NAVY YARD SHOOTING2

ANTIDEPRESSANT EVIDENCE: 13 Dead in Washington DC Naval Yard Shooting

Shots rang out this morning only blocks from the White House in Washington, DC. When they stopped 13 people were dead including the shooter, 34 year old Aaron Alexis. And first thing this morning I posted on our Facebook page along with the story the question “Antidepressants?”

We now as much as have that answer from Aaron’s father in an interview with police over a 2004 incident Aaron had where he blacked out and shot out the tires of some construction workers parked next to his home. He had suffered false accusations toward these workers which is common with antidepressants and then blacked out when he became violent – also common with antidepressants:

“Detectives later spoke with Alexis’ father, who lived in New York at the time, who told police Alexis had anger management problems associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and that Alexis had been an active participant in rescue attempts on September 11th, 2001.”

“Following his arrest, Alexis told detectives he perceived he had been “mocked” by construction workers the morning of the incident and said they had “disrespected him.” Alexis also claimed he had an anger-fueled “blackout,” and could not remember firing his gun at the victims’ vehicle until an hour after the incident.

“Alexis also told police he was present during “the tragic events of September 11, 2001 and described “how those events had disturbed him.”

As I have said so many times before “Anger Management” is a given for a prescription for antidepressants. If you are not already on them to produce the anger management problem you will soon have a prescription for an antidepressant which they seem to always hand out along with the diagnosis.

The prescribing of antidepressants doubled with 9/11 and with this young man actively working to rescue people during the 9/11 tragedy I would place my bets on him being first medicated at that point with an antidepressant. That likely led to the black out he suffered triggered by anger. (Most all of you who have been on an antidepressant can relate to the adrenalin kicking in with no way to stop it – the brakes are gone under the influence of these drugs.) The blackouts are common.

I really have little question about what triggered this attack. About the only question I would have is how often had he gone off and back on the antidepressants over the years. Each time the reactions become worse.

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: ”Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

Original article: http://spdblotter.seattle.gov/2013/09/16/suspect-in-navy-yard-attack-previously-arrested-in-seattle-for-anger-fueled-shooting/

Star-Telegram reporters discuss shooter who they knew personally.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxTp8Oh7wVs&feature=youtu.be

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MEDS for PTSD: Antidepressants, Antipsychotics, Etc. Soldiers Overmedicated

Paragraphs 8 through 10 read:  “”The troops are
overmedicated
. We see it all the time. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder has been more
serious, especially since the
November 5
shooting
,” she said.”

“Thomas said

counselors sometimes have to drive GI’s to their appointments and to the base
because they are so heavily medicated that they cannot drive themselves.

Many have chronic migraines that keep them from driving, she said.”

” ‘On
average, most of the soldiers I have talked to take 20 to 25 medications
per day
and some look as though they are in the advanced stages of
Parkinson’s disease; some actually stumble from their meds
,’ Under the
Hood
counselor Matti Litaker said.”

http://www.truthout.org/over-meds-and-under-hood56822

Over the Meds and
Under the Hood

Thursday 11 February 2010

by: Candice Bernd, t r u t h o u t
|
Op-Ed

Army psychiatrist Maj.
Nidal Malik Hasan’s
alleged brutal shooting of 13 GI’s stationed at the
largest US military base, located just outside Killeen, Texas, drew sympathy
from the national, state and military political establishments and reinforced a
prejudice in the hearts and minds of many Americans.

The sure-fire
coverage from the corporate media easily painted a picture of the story that
would reinforce the War on Terror while leaving unanswered the deeper and more
challenging questions about the state of US military establishments and the
mental and emotional state of our young soldiers serving in those institutions.
The Fort Hood shooting commanded an investigation into Hasan’s alleged
connections to Islamic radicals, but was unable to probe the everyday standards
and practices of the military base itself to find the hidden causes of GI
strife.

Introspection is needed to objectively analyze the effects of
the current political climate on our troops and see the hidden costs of war on
our country in order to reconcile tendencies towards racism in public perception
and to move on after this national trauma.

When President Obama
visited Fort
Hood
to offer his condolences to victims of the November 5, 2009,
shooting
, the GI’s were told by their chain of command to line up for their
chance to shake the president’s hand. One GI, Pfc. Michael Kern, member of the
Fort Hood chapter of

Iraq Veterans Against the War, knew the president was coming. Kern attempted
to hand the president a letter written on behalf of the veterans’ organization
demanding that the military radically overhaul its mental health care system and
halt the practice of repeated deployment of the same troops. Although he
couldn’t hand the letter directly to the president due to security reasons, the
letter did arrive to him through the proper channels.

On January 15,
2010, Kern organized a protest outside the east gate entrance to the base that
focused on overmedicating of the soldiers stationed there and the lack of mental
health resources and counseling. The protest, which lasted from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., maintained approximately 30 people throughout the day as protesters
rotated to avoid the cold and the rain. The event was co-organized by Under the Hood Café, a local coffee
house and outreach center that counsels soldiers coming back from war and offers
basic services to GI’s in need, including referrals for counseling, legal advice
and information on GI rights.

“If it wasn’t for Under
the Hood, I’d be dead,” Kern said after the protest.

Under the Hood Café
manager Cynthia Thomas said the coffee house concept originated in the 1960’s
during the GI movement against the Vietnam War. When the US invaded Iraq and
Afghanistan, Thomas began working with Iraq Veterans Against the War to have a house
near Fort
Hood
because it is the largest US military base in the world. The Fort Hood
Support Network helped Thomas to get a 501(c)(3) nonprofit status for the
center, she said.

“The troops are overmedicated. We see it all the time.

Post-Traumatic
Stress Disorder
has been more serious, especially since the November 5
shooting
,” she said.

Thomas said counselors sometimes have to drive
GI’s to their appointments and to the base because they are so heavily medicated
that they cannot drive themselves. Many have chronic migraines that keep them
from driving, she said.

“On average, most of the soldiers I have talked
to take 20 to 25 medications per day and some look as though they are in the
advanced stages of Parkinson’s disease; some actually stumble from their meds,”
Under the Hood counselor Matti
Litaker said.

One active-duty soldier came back to the café after meeting
the protesters outside Fort Hood . The 20-year-old GI, Mick, would
only give his first name due to his active-duty status. Mick had suffered three
concussions after coming too close to an Improvised
Explosive Device
in Iraq, and now has a Traumatic Brain
Injury
.

“They expect you to be the perfect soldier and the perfect
civilian,” he said. “The government expects us to be bipolar, to separate work
life from home life.”

After Mick had received his TBI, he tried to
“chapter out,” or leave the Army. He had a court date for an unrelated crime,
and was expecting to get a discharge when his superior told him that he would
make sure that Mick didn’t go to his court date so that he could stay in the
Army. He said that he was hopeful because he could get “med-boarded” for his TBI
and get a discharge.

Mick said he knew that another GI had been illegally
deployed when he was 17 and that while he was in Iraq during the 2008 election,
the absentee ballots for the soldiers vote did not come in until three weeks
after they were supposed to be due back in the states.

“I don’t think we
got to vote in that election,” he said. Kern backed up his account, saying that
he too did not get his absentee ballot in time to vote in the 2008
election.

Kern said that he had joined the military with “hopes of doing
right for all of humanity.” Kern said that he didn’t join the Army for the
money, but because he believed in the mission of the Army and that when he
joined he supported the war. All of that changed when he killed a child in Iraq.
After he returned to the States he was transferred to the Warrior Transition Brigade,
where he saw many soldiers who were missing limbs and who were “messed up in the
head.”

He then found Under the Hood Café and joined the

Iraq Veterans Against
the War
. Kern said that after he knew Obama had received the letter from the
IVAW, he wrote an email to the president outlining many GI concerns. He told the
president that he was planning on paying him a visit to talk about the issues on
behalf of the IVAW, but after Obama escalated the war in Afghanistan he
“realized [Obama] was the same as Bush.”

Kern is on many meds himself. He
pulled out his current medications prescription list. There were a total of 47
different medications that had been prescribed to Kern within the last 180 days
before January 15, 2010.

“If the Army asks, yeah I take it all, but I
don’t really take it all,” he said.

Kern said he believes that the
government and pharmaceutical companies are testing drugs on the soldiers in
war. He said that the soldiers were given an H1N1 vaccine that had not been FDA approved and that
later on after the GI’s had taken it, it was recalled.
He also said that the Army is giving the soldiers Botox injections for their
brain nerves, for pain, but that the procedure is not yet FDA
approved.

Kern is currently working on a piece called “Creating an
Activist,” which details his struggles overseas and as well as back home, both
inside and outside the Army.

Could there be something more to the Fort
Hood shooting than Islamist extremism? Hasan himself was a psychiatrist,
prescribing meds to soldiers in order to make them “deployable,” and was about
to be deployed to Afghanistan before the shooting. What happened on November 5,
2009, was truly devastating, but the event can serve as an eye opener for the
state of the country, for the state of our soldiers, and for the state of the
wars.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Robbery: Spits on Policeman: England

Paragraph 12 reads:  “It is thought he has since been
suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder,
depression, panic attacks and some psychotic behaviour.”

Paragraph 10 reads:  “Sam Lamsdale, defending, said Hussain had
no recollection of the assault
because the alcohol had reacted with
his medication.”

SSRI Stories
Note:  The Physicians Desk Reference states that antidepressants can cause a craving for alcohol and
alcohol abuse. Also, the liver cannot
metabolize the antidepressant and the alcohol simultaneously,  thus leading
to higher levels of both alcohol and the antidepressant in the human
body.

http://www.berrowsjournal.co.uk/news/4698691.Jailed__councillor_s_son_who_stole_TV_and_spat_at_policeman/

Jailed: councillor’s son who stole TV and spat at policeman

8:10am Friday 23rd October 2009

By Lauren Rogers »

THE son of a Worcester councillor has been jailed for spitting at a
police officer and stealing.

Azad Hussain – whose father is former mayor
of Worcester Coun Allah
Ditta
– stole £499 of electrical goods from a woman who was renting a house
from his family.

Hussain, aged 25, claimed she owed him council tax and
said that he was seizing her belongings, including a high-definition television
and computer screen, until she paid up.

However, Worcester
Magistrates Court
was told that the claim was in fact a lie. The stolen
goods have never been recovered.

Hussain, of Richmond Road, off Wyld’s
Lane, Worcester, was found guilty of the theft at a trial he failed to attend
last month. He was also found guilty of assaulting a police officer by spitting
in his face.

The attack happened in May after Hussain was found by
police lying in a front garden.

Matt Dodson, prosecuting, said he was
intoxicated. He said: “His speech was at times incomprehensible and he was
struggling to stand. He refused to leave the area.

“He was arrested
after he lunged at a passing member of the public.”

Hussain spat in the
officer’s face while on the way to the station.

Sam Lamsdale, defending,
said Hussain had no recollection of the assault because the alcohol had reacted
with his medication.

“Mr Hussain was the victim of an attack four years
ago in which he was attacked with a hammer,” she said.

“It is thought he
has since been suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, panic
attacks and some psychotic behaviour.”

She said Hussain worked as an
assistant at a residential care home and was responsible for taking his sister’s
children to and from school.

Sentencing Hussain to six months in prison,
district judge Bruce Morgan said: “Community punishments have been imposed in
the past, but obviously do not work because you carry on offending.

“You
steal, you breach court orders by failing to come to court, then there is the
despicable act of spitting at a police officer.”

l Your Worcester
News
was the only member of the media to attend the hearing


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ANTIDEPRESSANTS & PAIN MEDS: Death: Former Woman Soldier: England

Paragraphs two and three read:  “Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers andantidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.”

“Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.”

http://www.eveningnews24.co.uk/content/news/story.aspx?brand=ENOnline&category=News&tBrand=ENOnline&tCategory=news&itemid=NOED27%20Aug%202009%2007%3A35%3A01%3A210

Uncertainty over overdose death

Chanice Ward.
REBECCA GOUGH
27 August 2009 07:35

A coroner has ruled that a young woman who was discharged from the army against her will and who died of an overdose earlier this year may not have deliberately taken her own life.

Chanice Ward, 29, died in April after taking a cocktail of painkillers and antidepressants in her Barford caravan, but yesterday greater Norfolk coroner William Armstrong said he could not be certain she committed suicide.

Her father maintains a belief that Miss Ward took her own life because she was suffering from post traumatic stress disorder bought on by her years in the army, and has now vowed to continue with the fight for recognition she began before she died.

The inquest heard how Miss Ward, who was pursuing a case for compensation with the Service Personnel and Veterans Agency, had a history of depression and died as a result of a “self-administered overdose”.

Mr Ward, 57, who served 22 years in the army, said: “I know this inquest could not appoint blame but I’m certainly of the opinion that her time in the military and in active service worsened her state of mind. We have a case going on with the MoD and will be continuing her cause.”

For the last five years Miss Ward, of Barford, near Hethersett, had been working at Norwich Union in Surrey Street, Norwich and was a PA in the pensions department.

Since the age of 18 she had served six years in the Royal Medical Corps as a combat medic and ambulance technician, from 1997 to 2003, and won award medals from Bosnia and Kosovo.

She was found dead in the caravan she rented in Barford on April 3, but speaking at her inquest, her family and friends said they were shocked she had taken an overdose.

Her mother, Donna Holder, said her daughter was diagnosed with depression when she was a teenager but had appeared much happier in recent months.

Ms Holder said: “It was a very great shock because she was so well and had so many future plans and so much to look forward to.”

Mr Ward added that he had taken a phone call from his daughter a few weeks before she died, and said: “She said to me ‘I don’t think I’ve got long left to live’, and I said she was being silly but I knew deep down that she knew it.

“In the last six months she appeared tremendously upbeat but there was something underlying. She always appeared on the surface to be putting on a front but you never knew underneath what was going on.”

Her close friend Stanley Woodhouse was with her the weekend before she died and said: “I think I probably spent more time with her in the last few months of her life than anybody did.

“She thought the medication she was on had solved a lot of her problems but, as her father has said, we didn’t really know what was going on deep down. The feeling she gave to me was that she was upbeat about life.”

In an interview with our sister paper the Evening News earlier this year Ms Ward claimed she twice tried to kill herself but that her bosses would not accept she was suffering from an illness.

A MoD spokesman said: “Our thoughts are with the family of Chanice Ward at this difficult time.

“We take the welfare of all our service personnel and veterans seriously.

“We have made great progress both in the treatment of mental health problems and in reducing the stigma associated with seeking help.

“Treatment for mental health disorders, including post-traumatic stress, is also available for veterans through six community-based mental health pilot schemes the MoD has created with the NHS.”

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MED for DEPRESSION: 5 Dead at Baghdad Psychiatric Center: May 11th: Ir…

Paragraphs 8 through 10 read: “Russell went to the combat stress center at Camp Liberty where mental-health workers evaluate soldiers for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Russell was close to the end of his deployment. He was given medication and his sidearm was taken away, a routine precaution for soldiers receiving counseling.”

“On May 11, after a dispute at the center, Russell was ordered to leave. Outside, he allegedly grabbed a gun from his escort, burst into the center and started firing. He submitted to arrest minutes later.”

Dead were Navy Cmdr. Charles Springle, 52, of Wilmington, N.C.; Maj. Matthew Philip Houseal, 54, of Amarillo; Staff Sgt. Christian Enrique Bueno-Galdos, 25, of Paterson, N.J.; Spc. Jacob David Barton, 20, of Lenox, Mo., and Pfc. Michael Edward Yates Jr., 19, of Federalsburg, Md.

http://www.amarillo.com/stories/072809/new_news8.shtml

Web-posted Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Soldiers’ families await hearing
Los Angeles Times

SHERMAN – Tears come to Elizabeth Russell’s eyes when she thinks of the five American soldiers her son is accused of gunning down in a moment of rage in Iraq.

She prays for them: the Navy officer, the Army psychiatrist, and three enlisted men, and their widows, parents and children.

She also prays for her son, Army Sgt. John Russell, who faces five counts of premeditated murder for what happened May 11 at a combat stress center near Baghdad.

Russell, 44, is in custody in Kuwait, awaiting an Article 32 hearing, the military equivalent of a preliminary hearing. Under military law, a conviction can carry a death sentence; the minimum is life in prison.

In more than seven years of war in Afghanistan and Iraq, there have been cases of alleged attacks among U.S. troops, but never one in which a soldier stands accused of killing five colleagues.

The Russell case also brings up issues of how the Army evaluates the mental health of troops in combat zones, many of whom, like Russell, have endured repeated deployments. The Army is now studying the psychological services available to soldiers in Iraq.

Russell had been a competent communications technician but hardly a stellar performer. After 16 years, he was still a sergeant. He had lost a stripe earlier for unauthorized absence.

Russell went to the combat stress center at Camp Liberty where mental-health workers evaluate soldiers for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Russell was close to the end of his deployment. He was given medication and his sidearm was taken away, a routine precaution for soldiers receiving counseling.

On May 11, after a dispute at the center, Russell was ordered to leave. Outside, he allegedly grabbed a gun from his escort, burst into the center and started firing. He submitted to arrest minutes later.

Dead were Navy Cmdr. Charles Springle, 52, of Wilmington, N.C.; Maj. Matthew Philip Houseal, 54, of Amarillo; Staff Sgt. Christian Enrique Bueno-Galdos, 25, of Paterson, N.J.; Spc. Jacob David Barton, 20, of Lenox, Mo., and Pfc. Michael Edward Yates Jr., 19, of Federalsburg, Md.

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