AMITRIPTYLINE: Several Students Hospitalized After Taking Prescription Drug – OK

“Stupid decision, Dr. Glisson,” the students told her before heading to the
hospital down the street. The drug? Amitriptyline. What’s that? The principal
didn’t know either, so she Googled it.

“Sluggishness, lethargy,
red eyes,” said Glisson. It’s an antidepressant, whose unbeknownst side effects
include the swift response of concerned adults.

posted: Wednesday December 9 @ 7:36 pm ET
I attend Sapulpa High School. The administrators are
making this seem like its no big deal. The kids were foaming at the
mouth,shakeing uncontolably,and passing out. The kids that were though to be on
the medication were taking out of class and sent back in after questioing.
Everybody in the school is worriered about our friends we asked for updates on
the students and got none. They wont tell us if they lived or not. All we have
to go on is rumors.
rescription for Danger
12/08/09 9:48 pm   |   reporter: Burt Mummolo
producer: Burt Mummolo
Sapulpa – The lesson plan at Sapulpa High School on
Monday contained an impromptu demonstration of grace under pressure.

“Lunchtime was approaching pretty fast, we had about
10 minutes to make a decision,” said principal Dr. Jenyfer Glisson, recalling
the moments just after being made aware that an unknown number of students had
taken some prescription pills that weren’t prescribed to
them.

“It was one student who had brought something from the
family medicine cabinet,” said superintendent Dr. Mary Webb.

Her administrators were faced
with the decision of keeping the info under wraps or going public.

“What’s more important? People knowing about the situation or
kids safety?” she asked.

“This is the right thing to do,”
said Glisson, “and the announcement was made to the
students.”

“Ms. Glisson said, ‘If you took any prescription
pills this morning, I need you to come to the office because a lot of people
are getting sick’,” said one student.

It paid off. Five
students came to the office.

“Stupid decision, Dr. Glisson,”
the students told her before heading to the hospital down the street. The
drug? Amitriptyline. What’s that? The principal didn’t know either, so she
Googled it.

“Sluggishness, lethargy, red eyes,” said Glisson.
It’s an antidepressant, whose unbeknownst side effects include the swift
response of concerned adults.

“We take our drug policy and
drug use very seriously in Sapulpa,” said
Webb.

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ANTIDEPRESSANT: Overdose ruled as cause of Reading High student’s death

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

This case reminds me of a neighbor boy who attempted suicide after taking
Zoloft for about a month that he had gotten from his cousin without his parents
having any idea of what he was doing. When he ran out of the drug and found
himself in cold turkey withdrawal he made a suicide attempt. Because of his
suicide attempt they started him on Paxil with no idea how large a part
antidepressants had played in his suicide attempt. Of course with Paxil added to
the mix the reactions only began to worsen.
Anyway I mention his case to let you know that these drugs are so
widespread in use now that this young woman could have gotten these lethal drugs
anywhere and who knows how long she had been taking them?!
____________________________________________
Noelle-Cian Rodriguez, a senior, took a lethal dose of an antidepressant
medication and the death was ruled a suicide, Deputy Coroner Jonn M. Hollenbach
said.
Hollenbach ruled after receiving the final autopsy report Friday. He said
officials do not know how Rodriguez got the antidepressant pills.
Originally Published:
11/28/2009

Area digest: Overdose ruled
as cause of Reading High student’s death


Reading Eagle

An overdose of a
prescription drug caused the death last month of a 17-year-old Reading
High School student, the Berks County coroner’s office said
Friday.

Noelle-Cian Rodriguez, a senior, took a lethal dose of an
antidepressant medication and the death was ruled a suicide, Deputy
Coroner Jonn M. Hollenbach said.

Rodriguez was pronounced
dead Oct. 8 in Reading Hospital after she experienced seizurelike symptoms
in her home.

Hollenbach ruled after receiving the final autopsy
report Friday. He said officials do not know how Rodriguez got the
antidepressant
pills.

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ZOLOFT & SEROQUEL: Multiple Drug Toxicity-Marine’s Autopsy Report Released

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

Yet another soldier’s sudden death is confirmed as being caused by
prescription drug toxicity. How many do we need to see before we stop this
madness of killing more of our troops with prescription drugs than we are seeing
die at the hands of our “enemies”?
This makes you wonder if we are really aware of who our real
enemies are when the fact is that we lose as many lives EVERY WEEK in this
country to “properly prescribed prescription drugs” as we lost in the 9/11
tragedy. We are in Iraq over a small handful of American deaths while
the mass prescription drug genocide continues on a weekly basis with the death
toll now approaching the 2 million mark just since 9/11 [without counting
the millions of deaths before that time and to add controversy to the issue –
with the jury still out on WHO was really behind that attack].
What was left out of this article are several critical points that
would help one to better understand how prescription drugs killed Cpl. Chad
Oligschlaeger –
#1 Antidepressants CAUSE as a side effect – flashbacks.
# 2 Antidepressants CAUSE as a side effect – horrifyingly violent and
very vivid nightmares.
#3 Antidepressants CAUSE as a side effect – all the symptoms
of Post Traumatic Stress.
#4 Antidepressants CAUSE as a side effect – mania and one form of
mania is known as Dipsomania which is described as an overwhelming craving for
alcohol.
#5 Antidepressants CAUSE as a side effect – suicide.
#6 Antidepressants often show up in autopsy as amphetamine.
#7 Zoloft, Seroquel and amphetamine/methamphetamine all increase serotonin
levels thus leading to the very strong possibility of producing Serotonin
Syndrome which causes death via multiple organ failure.
These facts will better help you to understand not only that the
prescription drugs killed Chad, but that they may have produced side
effects for which he was subsequently medicated with such a deadly combination
of drugs.
_______________________________________________
“The prescription drugs killed him.”

Chad Oligschlaeger had
returned from Iraq in early 2006, unsettled by flashbacks and nightmares.

His parents have said that he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress
disorder, and they have said that he was given prescription drugs to treat it.

“The biggest thing was he wasn’t drinking that night,” Eric
Oligschlaeger said. “And we got affirmation that he didn’t commit suicide.”

http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/2009/10/01/1001autopsy.html

Autopsy report released in Round Rock Marine’s death

Chad Oligschlaeger is found to have died from multiple drug
toxicity.

By Joshunda Sanders
AMERICAN-STATESMAN
STAFF
Thursday, October 01, 2009

The U.S. Marine Corps has released

the autopsy report for Cpl. Chad Oligschlaeger of Round Rock, who was found dead
in his room at the Twentynine Palms Marine base in California on May 20, 2008.

The report found that Oligschlaeger died from multiple drug toxicity.
His death was ruled accidental, according to the report.

The report

shows that methamphetamine and the antidepressants sertraline [Zoloft] and
benzodiazepine were found in Oligschlaeger’s system. Propranolol, a hypertension
drug used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder, and Quetiapine [Seroquel], an
antipsychotic medication, were also found.

“There were no surprises
there,” Eric Oligschlaeger, Chad Oligschlaeger’s father, said of the autopsy
results. “The prescription drugs killed him.”

Chad Oligschlaeger had
returned from Iraq in early 2006, unsettled by flashbacks and nightmares.

His parents have said that he was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress
disorder, and they have said that he was given prescription drugs to treat it.
But his family said Oligschlaeger was left unsupervised in military housing for
long periods after his second tour of duty in Iraq.

Military officials
have said that Marine policies prohibit commanders from discouraging mental
health treatment or leaving troops physically or mentally wounded troops uncared
for.

The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology would not comment on the
findings, citing confidentiality laws related to patient information.

“The biggest thing was he wasn’t drinking that night,” Eric
Oligschlaeger said. “And we got affirmation that he didn’t commit suicide.”

jsanders@statesman.com; 445-3630

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Senate Orders Study on Military Suicides

Paragraphs 7 & 8 read: “By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.”

“That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.”

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2009/07/military_suicides_antidepressants_072309w/

Senator: Study prescriptions-suicide link
By Rick Maze – Staff writer
Posted : Thursday Jul 23, 2009 11:32:42 EDT

The Senate on Wednesday ordered an independent study to determine whether an increase in military suicides could be the result of sending troops into combat while they are taking antidepressants or sleeping pills.

Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., who pushed for the study, said he does not know whether there is a link, but he believes prescription drug use, especially when it is not closely supervised by medical personnel, needs a closer look.

“One thing we should all be concerned about is that there are more and more of our soldiers who are using prescription antidepressant drugs … and we are not clear as to whether they are under appropriate medical supervision,” Cardin said.

The problem, he said, is that some antidepressants “take several weeks before they reach their full potential,” and during that time there is a risk of increased suicidal thoughts among 18- to 24-year-olds ­ an age group that includes many service members.

When people taking antidepressants are deployed, they may not be under close medical supervision, especially if they are in a unit that is on the move in combat, Cardin said.

“Surveys … have shown that as many as 12 percent of those who are serving in Iraq and 17 percent of those who are serving in Afghanistan are using some form of prescribed antidepressant or sleeping pills,” Cardin said. “That would equal 20,000 of our service members.”

By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.

That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.

The reports would not include names or any specifics that would identify the service members, Cardin said. “We protect their individual privacy,” he said. “There is no stigma attached at all to this survey.”

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Follow up message

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: Atracyphd1@aol.com
To: post@drugawareness.org, DCKCCPAS@aol.com, Atracyphd2@aol.com
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2009 03:08:48 EDT
Subject: ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Senate Orders Study on Military Suicides
Paragraphs 7 & 8 read: “By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.”

“That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.”

http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2009/07/military_suicides_antidepressants_072309w/

Senator: Study prescriptions-suicide link
By Rick Maze – Staff writer
Posted : Thursday Jul 23, 2009 11:32:42 EDT

The Senate on Wednesday ordered an independent study to determine whether an increase in military suicides could be the result of sending troops into combat while they are taking antidepressants or sleeping pills.

Sen. Benjamin Cardin, D-Md., who pushed for the study, said he does not know whether there is a link, but he believes prescription drug use, especially when it is not closely supervised by medical personnel, needs a closer look.

“One thing we should all be concerned about is that there are more and more of our soldiers who are using prescription antidepressant drugs … and we are not clear as to whether they are under appropriate medical supervision,” Cardin said.

The problem, he said, is that some antidepressants “take several weeks before they reach their full potential,” and during that time there is a risk of increased suicidal thoughts among 18- to 24-year-olds ­ an age group that includes many service members.

When people taking antidepressants are deployed, they may not be under close medical supervision, especially if they are in a unit that is on the move in combat, Cardin said.

“Surveys … have shown that as many as 12 percent of those who are serving in Iraq and 17 percent of those who are serving in Afghanistan are using some form of prescribed antidepressant or sleeping pills,” Cardin said. “That would equal 20,000 of our service members.”

By voice vote, the Senate approved a Cardin-sponsored amendment to the 2010 defense authorization bill that would order an independent study by the National Institute of Mental Health on the potential relationship between suicide or suicide attempts and the use of antidepressants, anti-anxiety and other behavior-modifying prescription drugs.

That study is expected to take two years. In the meantime, Cardin’s amendment also would require a report every June from 2010 through 2015 giving the number and percentages of troops who are serving or have served in Iraq or Afghanistan who had prescriptions for antidepressants or similar drugs.

The reports would not include names or any specifics that would identify the service members, Cardin said. “We protect their individual privacy,” he said. “There is no stigma attached at all to this survey.”

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5/01/2001 – World Health Organization – SSRI Addiction

“A league table of withdrawal and dependency side-effects, published by the
WHO, shows that drugs including Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil] have produced far
more complaints from patients than old-fashioned tranquillisers . . . SSRIs
(selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors), including Prozac, are more
addictive than tranquillisers such as Valium.”

Yesterday, in several major newspapers Lilly placed full page ads offering a
coupon for a month of free Prozac. Do you think they warned the consumer in
those ads that these free pills were addictive? Because so few doctors are
aware of this withdrawal and do not know how to withdraw patients from SSRIs,
after the month on the “free” pills the patient would have to continue to
purchase the drug until they could find my tape on how to get off Prozac
safely.

If you had told me ten years ago, shortly after I began researching the SSRIs
and dealing with patients going through horrific withdrawal from Prozac, that
it would take TEN years for the World Health Organization to finally see what
I was seeing, I would not have believed it. It was so obvious! But I have
waited and waited and waited as I have warned and warned and warned of this
addiction and withdrawal and finally today we see the WHO admit it.

At least the WHO have warned the public now, but where is the FDA? Will they
finally at least admit this much about SSRIs? All of these organizations that
society thinks are there to protect them – where were they as millions
suffered needlessly? How many times do we need to see this repeated with one
drug after another before we realize that there is no protection to the
consumer via these agencies? Obviously “buyer beware” most definitely applies
in this arena of prescription drug use. This is why I feel it is so important
to educate the public about these drugs.

You can mark my words when I say that this is only one of MANY more
admissions that will continue to come confirming all the warnings that I gave
in my book about the SSRI antidepressants, Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?

Ann Blake-Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition For Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org and author of
Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? ()

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/health/story.jsp?story=69366

01 May 2001
Home > News > UK > Health

World health watchdog warns of addiction risk for Prozac users

By Robert Mendick

29 April 2001

Prozac, billed for years as a harmless wonder drug, often creates more
problems than the depression it is supposed to be treating, warns the head of
the World Health Organisation’s unit monitoring drug side-effects.

Professor Ralph Edwards says Prozac and drugs similar to it are
overprescribed. A league table of withdrawal and dependency side-effects,
published by the WHO, shows that drugs including Prozac and Seroxat [Paxil]
have produced far more complaints from patients than old-fashioned
tranquillisers prescribed by doctors in the 1970s. Campaigners say this
proves that the drugs called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors),
including Prozac, are more addictive than tranquillisers such as Valium.

“SSRIs are probably over-used,” says Professor Edwards. “They are used for
relatively minor psychiatric problems, and the issue of dependence and
withdrawal has become much more serious. You risk creating a greater problem.
For serious psychiatric problems, it is worth the risk. But if you are just
tired or going through a bad patch, well, people get over that without
medication.”

A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, makers of Prozac, accepted there are potential
side-effects including head-aches, dizziness, sleeplessness and nausea but
added: “The benefits of Prozac far outweigh the downsides. Extensive
scientific and medical experience has demonstrated that Prozac is a safe,
effective antidepressant that is well-tolerated by most patients.”

Prozac has been taken by an estimated 35 million people worldwide since its
launch a decade ago. But the reputation of SSRIs as wonder drugs is being
questioned. Research by Dr David Healy, at the University of Wales, appeared
to show that two people in a trial group of 20 became violent after taking an
SSRI.

Dr Healy’s research may be presented as evidence in a High Court case being
brought by the family of Reginald Payne, a retired teacher who was taking
Prozac when he killed his wife then jumped off a cliff. The family is suing
Eli Lilly, claiming negligence and saying the pharmaceutical firm failed to
warn Mr Payne of side-effects, which they say include suicidal and violent
behaviour.

The experiences of Ramo Kabbani on Prozac prompted her to set up the Prozac
Survivors Support Group. In two years, it has taken 2,000 calls. Ms Kabbani
claims SSRI withdrawal causes side-effects ranging from flu-like symptoms
such as dizziness and aching muscles to suicidal tendencies. She began taking
Prozac to combat depression after the death of her 27-year-old fiance from a
heart attack.

“The medication stopped me working through the feelings of grief which had
caused the depression.” she says. “When I came off Prozac I became
super-sensitive and very emotional. I found it worse going through withdrawal
than going through the depression.”

Council for Involuntary Tranquilliser Addiction 0151 949 0102; Prozac
Survivors Support Group 0161 682 3296.

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09/02/1999 – New Ritalin Study

I think you’ll be interested in this study being published today. Mark
——–
Study Says Too Many Kids May Be Taking Prescription Drugs

The drug Ritalin is often prescribed for attention deficit disorder,
but a new study shows that the rate of kids taking the drug far exceeds
the expected number of actual ADD cases.

http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/adhdstudy990901.html

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