Are Antidepressants Causing a Worsening of Depression Symptoms?

Someone just shared this article with me and asked what my opinion of it was. The subject of the article is the possibility of antidepressants causing a worsening of depression and possible long term depression.

 

Now Antidepressant-Induced Chronic Depression Has a Name:

Tardive Dysphoria

robert whitaker

Robert Whitaker

June 30, 2011

Three recently published papers, along with a report by a Minnesota group on health outcomes in that state, provide new reason to mull over this question: Do antidepressants worsen the long-term course of depression? As I wrote in Anatomy of an Epidemic, I believe there is convincing evidence that the drugs do just that. These latest papers add to that evidence base.

Although this concern first surfaced in the late 1960s and early 1970s, when a handful of psychiatrists expressed concern that antidepressants were causing a “chronification” of the disorder, it was in 1994 that Italian psychiatrist Giovanni Fava, editor of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, urged the field to directly confront this possibility. He wrote: “Within the field of psychopharmacology, practitioners have been cautious, if not fearful, of opening a debate on whether the treatment is more damaging [than helpful] . . . I wonder if the time has come for debating and initiating research into the likelihood that psychotropic drugs actually worsen, at least in some cases, the progression of the illness which they are supposed to treat.”

******My Response******

Now before I give you what I shared with her, let me say I greatly admire Robert Whitaker for the attention he has been able to bring to the issue of the dangers of and damage caused by antidepressants through his work.

That being said the following is my response to her:

“Well I did not have to read very far before giving you this answer….

“Who was it who wrote the first book on SSRIs in 1991 called “The Prozac Pandora?” with the second edition in 1994 called “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora?” and the third edition in 2001 titled “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare”?

“Yep! That was me! And I refer to Giovanni Fava’s work extensively in my book.

prozac-bookcart-image

“And what was the main focus of my book from the very beginning? (I do believe you have a copy of the 2001 edition.) The main theme of the book is to show that the hypothesis behind antidepressants is completely backwards and that the existing research shows serotonin (5HT) itself is NOT low in depression, anxiety, etc., but instead is elevated. What is low is one’s ability to metabolize serototonin (5HIAA).

“Yet how do these drugs work? They increase serotonin by inhibiting the metabolism of serotonin even further than the initial problem the patient had with being able to metabolize the serotonin. They are, therefore, making the depression, anxiety, etc. worse, not better.

Has my opinion changed in the least? NO!!!!!! It has only grown stronger with research slowly backing up absolutely everything I said all along.

“Now do I think we need further research as suggested in this article?

“Absolutely not! The research was done decades ago. And all anyone has to do is READ IT! That is why I spent four years gathering it all to put it into one volume for anyone to read. It amazes me that so few in medicine read research! It makes you wonder why they ever even bother doing it!

To order Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare! click link below:

http://store.drugawareness.org/?wpsc-product=prozac-panacea-or-pandora

To order Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant! in either CD or MP3 click link below: 

http://store.drugawareness.org/?wpsc-product=help-i-cant-get-off-my-antidepressant

WARNING: In sharing this information about adverse reactions to antidepressants I always recommend that you also give reference to my CD on safe withdrawal, Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!, so that we do not have more people dropping off these drugs too quickly – a move which I have warned from the beginning can be even more dangerous than staying on the drugs!

The FDA also now warns that any abrupt change in dose of an antidepressant can produce suicide, hostility or psychosis. And these reactions can either come on very rapidly or even be delayed for months depending upon the adverse effects upon sleep patterns when the withdrawal is rapid! You can find the CD on safe and effective withdrawal helps here: http://store.drugawareness.org/

 

Ann Blake Tracy, Executive Director,
International Coalition for Drug Awareness
www.drugawareness.org & http://ssristories.drugawareness.org
Author: “Prozac: Panacea or Pandora? – Our Serotonin Nightmare – The Complete Truth of the Full Impact of Antidepressants Upon Us & Our World” & Withdrawal CD “Help! I Can’t Get Off My Antidepressant!”

Original article: http://www.madinamerica.com/2011/06/%EF%BB%BFnow-antidepressant-induced-chronic-depression-has-a-name-tardive-dysphoria/

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Patients Report 20 Times More Side Effects Than Doctors Report

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy (www.drugawareness.org):

In answer to the question asked in the title of this article,
“Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?,” I should remind you of the comment made by the psychiatric nurse who
attended one of my lectures a couple of years ago. After listening to me discuss
the potential side effects of SSRI antidepressants she stood and said, “Dr.
Tracy we never get to hear what you have shared with us here tonight, but I know
it is true because I am on Lexapro and have suffered nearly every one of the

side effects you mentioned. But you do not know what is going on out here. At
least 75% of the doctors and nurses I work with are on these drugs! The drug
reps are telling them they are in a stressful profession and will surely end up
suffering depression as a result so they need to get started on these drugs now
in order to help prevent that.”

Of course my first response was, “With these drugs affecting
the memory so strongly as to cause “amnesia” as a frequent side effect, if you
cannot even remember who you are, how do you remember what your patients
need?”
She admitted that they do not remember and have to constantly
remind one another and then they attribute it to old age setting
in.
So perhaps by the time these doctors get around to reporting
the patientsside effects they have forgotten what those side effects were that
they were to report. Of course these drugs also produce much more business
for the doctors by producing side effects and bringing patients back in for
follow up treatment so there is also a financial incentive to not report and
give the drugs a bad record. No matter the reason it is clear that the
situation is causing a very serious situation for patients and public safety in
general.
Paragraph three reads:  “The investigators followed 300
patients who were in ongoing outpatient treatment for depression
over six weeks. The authors compared what the patient reported on a
standardized scale of 31 different side effects (Toronto Side

Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating psychiatrist
on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect between
psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects
reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris.
When the investigators concentrated on
those side effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still

reported 2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.”

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/charting-the-depths/201004/why-dont-psychiatrists-notice-when-patients-experience-medication-si

Why don’t psychiatrists notice when patients experience medication side
effects?

If side effects fall in the forest, do they make a sound?

Published on April 20, 2010

A rich scientific study raises more

questions than it answers.

This point is exempified by new work conducted
at Rhode Island Hospital and published in the Journal of Clinical
Psychiatry
.

The investigators followed 300 patients who were in
ongoing outpatient treatment for depression over six weeks. The authors compared
what the patient reported on a standardized scale of 31 different side effects
(Toronto Side Effects Scale; TSES) with the information recorded by the treating
psychiatrist on each patient’s chart. The main finding: A stunning disconnect
between psychiatrists and their patients. The average number of side effects

reported by the patients on the TSES was 20 times (!) higher than the number
recorded by the psychiatris. When the investigators concentrated on those side
effects that were most troubling to the patient, patients still reported
2 to 3 times more side effects than were recorded by the treating
psychiatrist.

The authors summarize their provocative findings in mild
language, “The findings of the present study indicate that clinicians do not
record in their progress notes most side effects reported on a side effects

questionnaire by psychiatric
outpatients receiving ongoing pharmacological treatment for depression.”

Obviously
all is not well in the state of Demark. Although the findings concern the
treatment of depression, they raise broader questions about the doctor-patient
relationship.

Why is there such a massive disconnect between what
psychiatrists and patients report, on something so basic as whether prescribed
medications are having untoward effects? Do psychiatrists not ask enough
questions about side effects? Do psychiatrists not dig deep enough into

patients‘ responses? Are psychiatrists hearing what patients say, but not
documenting it in their notes? Or is the problem more on the patient side? Are
patients reluctant to speak candidly to their doctors about side effects (i.e.,
yes, I am having problems with sexual functioning)? Or do patients freeze up and
forget their experiences when asked in the heat of the moment (it is easier to
respond to a standardized list of side effects using pencil and paper)? Or is it
the situation that is to blame for this disconnect? Are patient-doctor
interactions in this day and age simply too rushed to insure efficient or
effective transfer of information?

Whatever the explanation,
psychiatrists appear to believe that patients are having fewer problems with
medications than they truly are. It is hard to see how psychiatrists can act in
the best interest of their patients if they do not know what their patients are
experiencing!!!!

The researchers recommend the use of a self-administered
patient questionnaire in clinical practice to improve the recognition of side

effects for patients in treatment. This study reveals a chasm of
misunderstanding between doctors and patients. This recommendation is a
sensible, but baby, step towards narrowing
it…

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ANTIDEPRESSANTS: Death: Taxi Driver Hangs Self: Another Open Verdict: …

NOTE FROM Ann Blake-Tracy:

There should be warnings that anyone who has had a problem
with alcohol or illegal drugs should NEVER take antidepressants! The drugs
should be contraindicated for this group of people. They suffer the worst side
effects. And the question should always be in the cases, “Which came first the
alcohol problems or the antidepressant that causes alcoholcravings?”

____________________________________
Paragraph one reads:  “A KIDDERMINSTER man found hanging
in his home suffered from anxiety and depression, an inquest into his death

heard.”

Paragraph four reads:  “The 46-year-old unemployed taxi
driver was seeing psychiatrists for his mental health problems and
was taking anti depressants.”

http://www.kidderminstershuttle.co.uk/news/4661282.Open_verdict_for_Kidderminster_man_found_hanging/

Open verdict for Kidderminster man found hanging

10:14am Friday 2nd October 2009

A KIDDERMINSTER man
found hanging in his home suffered from anxiety and depression, an inquest into
his death heard.

Dean Haigh, of Dunclent Crescent, who the inquest heard
had problems with alcohol, was found by his son Jason, at about 11am, on August
2.

The inquest at Stourport also heard that days before his death, Mr
Haigh seemed “very” upset and had a number of things on his mind but did not
mention that he wanted to take his own life.

The 46-year-old unemployed
taxi driver was seeing psychiatrists for his mental health problems and was
taking anti depressants.

Deputy Coroner, Margaret Barnard, said: “The
report provided by the consultant psychiatrist assessed that each time Mr Haigh
had contact with his mental health doctors, the risk assessment did not reveal
any active thoughts of suicide.”

She added that she was not satisfied
beyond reasonable doubt that Mr Haigh wanted to take his own life and recorded
an open verdict.

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Victim of Adderal Abuse

“My story just proves how ignorant psychiatrists are.”

I have been on a few different anti-depressants in the past two years. I started abusing drugs, mainly Adderal, exactly 2 years ago. This led to me getting “depression”. My mom took me to 3 different psychiatrists. The first one put me on Celexa. For a week all I could do was lay on the couch staring outside with tears in my eyes. We went back and they tried me on Effexor XR. It seemed to work, so they continually increased the dose. The doctor was even convinced I had ADHD and gave me a prescription to Adderal, my drug of choice. Eventually we changed psychiatrists. The Effexor was not working anymore, and he decided to try me on Paxil. I was on a high dose of Effexor which he told me to immediately stop taking, and to start taking Paxil the next day.

This naturally sounds like a bad idea, but I listened to him. I experienced what seemed to be an electric storm going on throughout my body. Every time I moved my eyes I would get this shocking pulse from my head down and everything would go blurry for a fraction of a second. Eventually these all went away. It took approximately a month. A year went by where the only thing that seemed to help me was my addiction to abusing drugs.

Hid this well from my parents, and they AND the doctor believed the Paxil was helping. Well a few months ago I was caught by the police abusing Adderal and my parents were obviously informed. I then went to the psychiatrist so we could all talk. At this point, I was high off of 40 mg’s of OxyContin. The psychiatrist had no idea I was on anything, and proceeded to prescribe me the drug I was addicted to for “my ADHD”. I have been clean from all drugs for 8 days now, and feel much happier. I stopped taking the Paxil a few days ago,25 mg’s a day I was on, and am once again experiencing these shocks. I feel sick and am having trouble keeping food down. But I know I have to sit and wait it out. My story just proves how ignorant psychiatrists are and seem to have no clue what their medications or themselves are doing to have not even had a clue what was going on.

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An Answer to Our Nightmare on Paxil

“I feel like I am on a crusade to help prevent another family and child from going through this experience.”

 

Finding this web sight was such a revelation to us. After reading through all of the experiences, we knew that we finally had the answer to the nightmare that we experienced. I immediately wrote the following letter to all of the doctors, psychiatrists, therapists, and special education teachers that had worked with my son. I feel like I am on a crusade to help prevent another family and child from going through this experience.

Our son began experiencing anxiety and panic attacks upon our move to a new home in the country. They became frequent enough for us to seek help. We found a therapist and upon his recommendation, we took him to our family doctor. The doctor prescribed 5 mg. of Paxil. Almost immediately, there was a change in his personality. He became much more anxious, angry, and aggressive. Our son had never exhibited this behavior before. A phone call to the doctor resulted in raising the level to 10 mg. At this time, he began having horrible rages and out of control behavior. He destroyed the interior of our vehicle, and kept threatening to jump out of the moving vehicle. At that point, in desperation, I called a psychiatrist. He raised the dosage of Paxil to 20 mg. and added 15 mg. of Buspar! This caused us to visit hell with our son. At therapy, I voiced my concern that his behavior and personality were so strange. The therapist approach was to discuss his behavior as though he were deliberately misbehaving. Following that session, our son become enraged and proceeded to rage at me, his father, destroyed his bedroom, verbally and physically abused us for approximately 3-4 hours that evening. We finally got through to the doctor who immediately told us to not give him any more of the drugs. We stopped the drugs cold turkey. He had been on the Paxil for less than a month.

This was the beginning of a least a 3-year journey into hell, which we now believe was generated by the Paxil, and later on the Serzone. He continued to have rages, severe “fight or flight’ responses where he would run away from anything he thought might threaten him . He was unable to function in school and we had to place him in special education as an emotionally disturbed child. A special “one on one” aide was given to him to help keep him from running away. He repeatedly abused us verbally and often physically. He would lie in bed at night sobbing at how he felt. At different times he would threaten to hurt himself as well as others. Any little thing would set him off and he would go into another “rage” that could last for hours.

At that time, we visited with another psychiatrist and began seeing another therapist. Our son was put on Serzone and we were told to increase his dosage until 350 mg. He continued to fall apart, and twice we ended up at the Crisis Center. The second time, we were told to raise his Serzone to 600 mg. and keep him at home. Our lives had been devastated. And still no one could give us a real reason for his bizarre, out of control, so totally out of character, behavior, other than to tell us he had Panic and Anxiety disorder. Bi-polar and other disorders were discussed. In therapy, Bi-Polar disorder was discussed, possible abuse was insinuated. We now believe that the real problem was personality changes brought on by the medication and yet no one addressed this possibility. Our psychiatrist left it to our discretion to raise and lower our sons medications as we saw the need. We knew that we wanted him off and once he seemed calmer, we took it upon ourselves to gradually, very slowly remove him from the meds completely. It took us over a year, and now our son has been drug free since March of 2002. His personality has come back. He is doing well in school. He has not had a rage in a year. He is a loving, happy kid and we are looking at a happy life again.

We are angry and disgusted. We are terrified when we think about all that has happened. All because of a lack of knowledge on the part of professionals who should have realized that the problems we were having were not because of family life, or mental illness or abuse or “being angry with your mother”. Drug companies are experimenting on our children and doctors are taking the word of these people and dispensing drugs without fully knowing or appreciating the consequences.

Please, when a desperate parent comes to you for help, before you write out that prescription, make sure that you inform the patient and parents about all the potential problems. Research the drug fully so that when you dispense it you can do so with good conscience. Think, before you attribute the problem to “family problems” that maybe a child is experiencing a reaction to one of these drugs and treat the problem immediately. Pharmaceutical drugs save lives, but also destroy lives.

Our lives will never be the same, but we are recovering. We were lucky. Our son is still alive and the future looks bright. My goal is to make sure that as many people know about what happened so that others may avoid the hell we went through.

Doris and Brian Petro
314 Co. Rd. F45
Penrose, CO 8124
petro@amigo.net

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16-Year Old Wanting to End it All on Zoloft

…first night I had taken Zoloft I experienced extreme anxiety and mania, I thought I was going crazy.“

 

I am 17, at the time I was prescribed Zoloft I had just turned 16. On the first night I had taken Zoloft I experienced extreme anxiety and mania, I thought I was going crazy. It didn’t occur to me that it could have been the medication and I thought the world was literally ending around me.
If it wasn’t for my sister being awake and in my company at the time I know I would have ended it all. I couldn’t sleep but I didn’t want to stay awake because of the nightmare that I was living, the only option it seemed for me was to end my life. My sister talked me through it and she pretended she knew what was going on and made me believe I would be alright.

The psychiatrists I have seen have all been the same “up the dosage, up the dosage by 50mg and you’ll feel better”……I feel they’re all out for the money, so I go on my own instincts now with the help of a councilor . Although I don’t feel 100% better I am helping myself , not letting a drug do it for me and slowly getting there.

Fortunately now I have discontinued use of the drug, I am taking a lighter medication but I still feel the effects of Zoloft come back at me….like a flashback.

Your Letter on the drug awareness page helped me understand what I went through and I’m very mad that I was so ill informed on the medication I was prescribed.

I’m sure this is old news to you but I thought I had to share this with you.

Morgan

 

12/12/2000

This is Survivor Story number 3.
Total number of stories in current database is 96

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